Education News Roundup: June 24, 2015

Tami Pyfer, education advisor for Gov. Gary Herbert.

Tami Pyfer, education advisor for Gov. Gary Herbert.

Education News Roundup

Today’s Top Picks:

 

Gov. Gary Herbert’s education advisor, Tami Pyfer, takes to KVNU to discuss the governor’s cooperation on education issues.

http://go.uen.org/42d (CVD)

 

The Governor himself takes to CBNC to tout Utah’s investment in education.

http://go.uen.org/42t (CBNC)

 

Ed Week looks at the proposed education cuts in the Senate’s budget.

http://go.uen.org/420 (Ed Week)

 

Sen. Lamar Alexander talks U.S. education policy generally.

http://go.uen.org/42o (USN&WR)

 

Pennsylvania considers ending state retail liquor stores and leasing the state’s wholesale liquor business … oh, and turning over the funds that generates to education.

http://go.uen.org/42v (Pittsburgh Tribune Review)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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TODAY’S HEADLINES

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UTAH

 

Pyfer: Herbert is collaborative on education issues

 

Materials engineer talks about building rockets

 

Developers of biodiesel fuel refinery say it will mitigate toxic effects on school children

 

Garfield County declares state of emergency

 

Seeking sustainability, Park City School District passes budget Officials say next year’s budget shows the district is in good financial shape

 

PCSD to hold master planning meeting

 

Student of the Week: Emily Susan Westercamp

 

 


 

 

 

OPINION & COMMENTARY

 

Things are tough in all of rural America, not just Utah

 

Time for change?

 

Why Utah thinks it will soon eclipse Silicon Valley From 2013 to 2014, venture capital dollars in Utah grew by nearly double the national rate.

 

The inefficiency of education

 

Utah can best manage its public lands

 

Is Special Education Racist?

 

An education agenda for 2016: Conservative solutions for expanding opportunity Education, Higher Education, K-12 Schooling, Leadership and Innovation

 

Bobby Jindal On Education: 10 Things The Presidential Candidate Wants You To Know

 

The Hidden Connection in City-wide Reform How Charter Schools Can Bring Equity to Public Education

 

State funding for students with disabilities

 

 


 

 

 

NATION

 

Senate Appropriators Propose Cutting Education Department by $1.7 Billion

 

A Failing Grade

Sen. Lamar Alexander is hopeful that Congress can improve its grade on education policy

 

Parents suing NY argue for $1 billion for small city schools, including Utica

 

House leader: Phase-out of state stores being considered to generate education funds

 

Kate Brown signs bill making it easier for parents to opt students out of state tests — but says they shouldn’t

 

State Chiefs Group Offers Guidance on Reducing Testing

 

California school backtracks on Common Core opt-out punishment

 

Changes in the works for Indiana high school diplomas

 

Schools Fear Impact of Gay Marriage Ruling on Tax Status

 

Dispute Over Union Fees Could Return to Supreme Court

 

Apple’s environmental chief to now head all social policy programs In a sign that Apple is aiming to expand its voice on social issues, Lisa Jackson is promoted to the company’s first vice president of environment, policy and social initiatives.

 

Malala Visits Capitol Hill to Urge More Education Funding

 

Dallas ISD board president: Mike Miles decided to resign after disagreement over contract

 

Pope’s Green Crusade will Enlist Schoolchildren Catholic schools already are planning to incorporate the pope’s call to action into their curricula.

 

 

 

 

 

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UTAH NEWS

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Pyfer: Herbert is collaborative on education issues

 

The Utah State School Board is not joining with Governor Gary Herbert in calling for federal legislation that would give the governor a larger role in public education. On a 7-7 split vote last week the board turned down a request from the governor’s office to sign a letter supporting amendments to the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) which would require the governor’s signature on plans for spending federal education dollars in Utah.

Former Logan resident Tami Pyfer, who previously served on the State Education Board, is now the governor’s education advisor. On KVNU’s For the People program Monday, Pyfer said the National Governors Association would like to strengthen the collaboration between state leaders and public education.

She said Governor Gary Herbert is very, very collaborative.

http://go.uen.org/42d (CVD)

 

 


 

 

Materials engineer talks about building rockets

 

KAYSVILLE — Endeavor elementary fosters all things education-related, particularly science and space, as evidenced by their space-themed school and Explore New Worlds motto.

So it only seemed fitting to have a materials engineer who works on building parts for the next rocket aimed for Mars come to speak to students about his experience.

James V. Ly, who works at Orbital ATK, happens to have a child studying at Endeavor elementary, and he has been excited to see the focus on science and space at the school.

http://go.uen.org/42c (OSE)

 

 


 

 

 

Developers of biodiesel fuel refinery say it will mitigate toxic effects on school children

 

  1. GEORGE — Biodiesel fuel could soon be supporting Southern Utah’s economy and would also help sustain cleaner air and a healthier environment.

Such is the goal of Anderwood Ventures, a company working toward economic growth in Southern Utah through alternative fuel development and clean energy projects.

Currently, the company is working on creating premium quality biodiesel fuel from 100 percent waste material. The refinery would be established on land in the Fort Pierce area of St. George. It will release no emissions, Anderwood Ventures Vice President Woody Woodbury said, and every bit of recycled material will be used. There is no waste, he said.

http://go.uen.org/42A (SGN)

 

 


 

 

Garfield County declares state of emergency

 

PANGUITCH – Following a public hearing at Monday’s Garfield County Commission meeting, all three commissioners voted unanimously to declare a state of emergency, hoping for help with economic development from congressmen and senators, citing their children as their No. 1 export.

While the issue is not exactly about whether they will be closing the doors of schools in the near future, Commissioner Leland F. Pollock said, it certainly goes hand in hand with the crux of it all – a lack of strong, year-round work options for community members.

Since the creation of the Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument in 1996, Pollock said, the job opportunities in the region have declined so severely that families have been moving out of the county at a rapid rate.

By declaring a state of emergency, the county commissioners said they believe they can call attention to the fact that area schools are losing students at an alarming rate because job sustainability is not feasible for their parents in the area.

http://go.uen.org/42g (SGN)

 

http://go.uen.org/42y (OSE)

 

http://go.uen.org/42h (KTVX)

 

http://go.uen.org/42i (KSTU)

 

 


 

 

 

Seeking sustainability, Park City School District passes budget Officials say next year’s budget shows the district is in good financial shape

 

The Park City Board of Education last week voted unanimously to adopt the preliminary budget for the 2015-2016 fiscal year.

New expenditures in the budget include money for roughly eight additional full-time teachers to keep up with rising enrollment and nearly $1.6 million in increased pay for the district’s staff as a result of salary negotiations.

Much of the cost will be offset by an increase in property tax revenues due to growth in the area and the Utah Legislature increasing the Weighted Pupil Unit (WPU) used to fund public education. However, the costs will put the district in a deficit of just more than $1 million, according to the documents released in public meetings. The deficit will be covered with the district’s excess rainy day funds, which Todd Hauber, the district’s business administrator, has stated in several public meetings is an intentional move to draw down those funds and is not a long-term hazard to the district.

http://go.uen.org/42z (PR)

 

 


 

 

PCSD to hold master planning meeting

 

The community is invited to attend three Park City School District master planning presentations over the next month. According to the district’s website, pcschools.us, the first meeting is scheduled for Monday at 3:30 p.m. at the district office. The next meeting is set for July 6 at Ecker Hill Middle School at 5:30 p.m., with the third scheduled for July 21 at 6 p.m. at Park City High School. The district will be discussing its master plan, which includes potentially adding a wing onto the high school, building a new school for fifth- and sixth-graders and tearing down Treasure Mountain Junior High, among other items.

http://go.uen.org/42w (PR)

 

 


 

 

Student of the Week: Emily Susan Westercamp

 

Emily Susan Westercamp was chosen as this week’s Student of the Week. She is a seventh grader at Mapleton Jr. High School.

http://go.uen.org/42u (PDH)

 

 

 

 

 

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OPINION & COMMENTARY

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Things are tough in all of rural America, not just Utah Salt Lake Tribune editorial

 

Only a spectacular case of narcissism would lead officials in Garfield County to think that their situation — bad as it is — is significantly worse that the plight of rural areas across the nation. Or that empty schools and high unemployment only occur in areas where the federal government owns most of the land.

The Garfield County Commission Monday declared a “state of emergency” for itself. It was a reaction to a rapid decline in enrollment in local schools and a way to shift blame for the situation onto the federal government in general and the designation of the Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument in particular.

It can be comforting to have a big bogeyman to blame your problems on. But it is not clear what kind of “emergency” response might be mounted. There is no reason to believe that, even if the monument designation went away and land managers suddenly decided to issue a flood of permits for coal mines and oil wells, Garfield County would be in a different situation than rural areas from coast to coast.

http://go.uen.org/42b

 

 


 

 

 

Time for change?

(St. George) Spectrum editorial

 

Most developed countries, including the United States, have a population of bilingual people.

But, the U.S. is still one of the very few countries identified as an economic power that still has a mostly monolingual population.

Most developed countries use the metric system, too. Actually, most of the countries in the world do, regardless of their economic role in the world. And yet, the U.S. is still measuring in inches and feet.

Most of the U.S., at least. Several professional fields, including medicine, for example, use milliliters and centimeters to stay competitive and share its wealth of knowledge and research with the rest of the world.

We can’t help but wonder what our limitations with languages and our refusal to adjust to the metric system does to our country’s image around the world.

Most other countries are comprised of primarily bilingual people, yet the introduction of dual immersion programs in the U.S. are typically met with skepticism.

http://go.uen.org/42f

 

 


 

 

 

Why Utah thinks it will soon eclipse Silicon Valley From 2013 to 2014, venture capital dollars in Utah grew by nearly double the national rate.

CNBC commentary by Utah Gov. Gary Herbert

 

Utah is America’s best place for business because Utahns make it their business to succeed—and we have the track record to prove it.

In Utah one word sums up our business prowess: investment. Simply put, we know we can’t have long-term economic growth and maintain Utah’s enviable quality of life without making some critical investments.

First and foremost among these is an ongoing investment in education. In Utah we concur with Benjamin Franklin, who said, “An investment in knowledge pays the best interest.”

We understand how important an educated and skilled workforce is to economic success. That’s why I have worked with state lawmakers to invest more new money in education during my administration than any other in Utah’s history, including $1.3 billion over the past four years.

As important as funding education is, it’s even more important to make each and every dollar count by setting benchmarks for what we will achieve with that investment. So I’m working with stakeholders across a broad spectrum to develop a strategic plan to ensure every dollar we invest in education helps secure long-term economic growth and optimal educational opportunities for all Utahns.

http://go.uen.org/42t

 

 


 

 

The inefficiency of education

(St. George) Spectrum op-ed by David W. Smith of St. George

 

Students in the United States are often not nearly as prepared educationally as students in other countries. While the number of hours spent officially in the classroom does not appear to be a significant factor, (the U.S. averages just more than 1,010 secondary hours per year, where countries such as Mexico spend 1,167 hours and Japan spends 866 hours), the quality of time spent in U.S. schools seems to be less efficient.

Of the 180 school days in a given school year, I can’t tell you how many times my high school-aged daughter reported that they had “free time” or “free days” throughout the year. In addition, it seemed that at the start and the end of each quarter and even at each mid term, teachers gave kids free time if they had completed projects or assignments. While this might sound logical, I see it as an ineffective use of time.

With block classes, we often see additional loss of efficient time as teachers see their students losing focus over the course of the 90 minutes sitting in a classroom.

I taught school for more than 16 years, in which I taught in both traditional class settings as well as the block time periods where students attended classes on alternate days. The only advantage I found with block learning was for science classes that used the extra time to complete lab assignments and for physical education where the extra time was helpful in setting up competitive games and effective physical conditioning.

However, the downside was significant, because students lost the continuity of subject matter by only attending any given subject every other day.

http://go.uen.org/42e

 

 


 

 

 

Utah can best manage its public lands

(St. George) Spectrum op-ed by Alan D. Gardner, chairman of the Washington County Commission

 

A recent press release by a Washington, D.C.-based organization calling itself the Campaign for Accountability has accused the American Lands Council and its director of fraud for its advocacy of transferring federal land to the states.

The assertion being that a legal challenge compelling such a land transfer may be unconstitutional and, therefore, using CFA’s logic, any funds raised in support of said effort, whether they be used for educational purposes, advocacy or preparing for litigation, must be fraudulent.

The Washington County Board of Commissioners recognizes its right and responsibility to be involved in matters impacting public health, safety and welfare. This includes the right to leverage our efforts with those of other counties or organizations when such associations are joined in an open, transparent and lawful manner. Such freedom of association is appropriate and is a common lawful practice in all levels of governance.

http://go.uen.org/42s

 

 


 

 

Is Special Education Racist?

New York Times op-ed by PAUL L. MORGAN, associate professor of education at Pennsylvania State University, and GEORGE FARKAS,  a professor of education at the University of California, Irvine

 

MORE than six million children in the United States receive special­education services for their disabilities. Of those age 6 and older, nearly 20 percent are black.

Critics claim that this high number — blacks are 1.4 times more likely to be placed in special education than other races and ethnicities combined — shows that black children are put into special education because schools are racially biased.

But our new research suggests just the opposite. The real problem is that black children are underrepresented in special­education classes when compared with white children with similar levels of academic achievement, behavior and family economic resources.

The belief that black children are overrepresented in special education is driving some misguided attempts at policy changes.

http://go.uen.org/41Y

 

A copy of the study

http://go.uen.org/422 (Education Researcher via Politico)

 

 


 

 

 

An education agenda for 2016: Conservative solutions for expanding opportunity Education, Higher Education, K-12 Schooling, Leadership and Innovation American Enterprise Institute commentary edited by Frederick M. Hess, resident scholar and director of education policy studies at AEI, and Max Eden

 

Key Points:

* Under the Obama administration, the federal government has assumed an aggressive role in promoting education reform, often to mixed or poor results.

* While some presidential candidates might be tempted to react by doubling down on rhetoric about abolishing the US Department of Education and ending the federal role, that would be a major misstep.

* Forward-looking candidates should articulate a national education agenda that taps into the strengths of our federalist system of government to promote opportunity by cultivating a stronger early education, K-12, and higher education system.

http://go.uen.org/423

 

 


 

 

 

Bobby Jindal On Education: 10 Things The Presidential Candidate Wants You To Know Forbes commentary by columnist Maureen Sullivan

 

Louisiana Governor Bobby Jindal makes it official today with a leap into the crowd vying for the Republican presidential nomination. Jindal, a former congressman and president of the state’s public university system, will make his announcement this afternoon in New Orleans. With his support for vouchers, scholarships and charter schools, he has carved out a reputation as an education reformer. Last month, Jindal proposed legislation that would remove Common Core state curriculum standards from Louisiana. “We will not accept this one-sized-fits-all approach to our children’s education,” he says. Here are some of his views on education:

http://go.uen.org/42n

 

 


 

 

The Hidden Connection in City-wide Reform How Charter Schools Can Bring Equity to Public Education National Alliance for Public Charter Schools analysis

 

Over the past decade, New Orleans civic leaders reinvented the city’s public education system. Today, 93 percent of New Orleans public school children attend charter schools. No other urban school system in the nation has gone so far in rethinking how public education can be delivered to at-risk students.

This transition from government-operated to government-regulated schooling has produced significant gains in academic achievement. Rigorous research demonstrates that New Orleans charter schools outperform similarly situated schools across the state of Louisiana. High school graduation rates have increased by nearly 20 percentage points, ACT scores are up, and, on most metrics, New Orleans is rapidly approaching state averages.

Much of the national commentary on education in New Orleans has focused on the growth of the city’s charter school sector, and whether or not this growth has increased student learning.

But education reform is about more than academic achievement; it is also about equity. If we assign students to schools based on their zip codes, true opportunity will not be realized. If we expel our hardest to serve students in the efforts to serve the majority, the moral foundation of reform will be eroded. If we ignore the needs of students with severe disabilities, we will not be delivering on our public promise of education for all.

http://go.uen.org/427

 

 


 

 

State funding for students with disabilities Education Commission of the States analysis

 

About 13 percent of all public school students receive special educational services and state spending for these students is rising. In Michigan, for example, spending rose 60 percent from 2000 to 2010. While service costs have been increasing, the share of the costs covered by federal funding has been decreasing. Six years ago, the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) covered 33 percent of the cost of educating students with disabilities. In 2014, that number dropped to 16 percent. As a result, states and districts are scrambling to pick up a greater share of the tab leading them to rethink their state’s funding mechanisms.

While all states provide some funding for students with disabilities, the way funds are distributed to districts varies greatly from state to state. This 50-state review focuses on states’ primary funding mechanisms for students with disabilities. It clarifies strengths and weaknesses of these mechanisms and provides other funding considerations. Tables at the end of the brief offer a 50-state comparison.

http://go.uen.org/426

 

 

 

 

 

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NATIONAL NEWS

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Senate Appropriators Propose Cutting Education Department by $1.7 Billion Education Week

 

Washington – Senate appropriators unveiled their fiscal 2016 education spending plan Tuesday afternoon, proposing to fund the U.S. Department of Education and its federal education programs to the tune of $65.5 billion, a $1.7 billion cut from fiscal 2015.

Unlike the House appropriations subcommittee, which proposed cutting $2.8 billion and eliminating 20 programs in its education spending bill, the Senate subcommittee’s strategy was not as severe.

Still, the proposal would slash funding for a slew of education programs and eliminate 10 others, including Investing in Innovation, Preschool Development Grants, and Striving Readers.

“The allocation itself requires significant cuts throughout the bill,” said Sen. Roy Blunt, R-Mo., chairman of the appropriations subcommittee. “Therefore we focused on preserving core programs.”

Among other funding decreases, School Improvement Grants would be cut by $56 million, Promise Neighborhoods would be cut by $20 million, and 21st Century Community Learning Centers would be cut by $117 million. Here’s a list of some additional cuts:

http://go.uen.org/420

 

 


 

 

 

A Failing Grade

Sen. Lamar Alexander is hopeful that Congress can improve its grade on education policy U.S. News & World Report

 

Since 2007, Congress has struggled to reauthorize No Child Left Behind, a George W. Bush-era education law that governs how dozens of federal education programs are funded and began an era of annual standardized testing in public schools. While lawmakers in the past have been unable to pass an update because of clashes over finances, school choice and federal oversight, Sen. Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn., has made updating this law and the Higher Education Act a priority.

While the House GOP pushed a partisan bill through its education committee, Alexander led a bipartisan effort, called the Every Child Achieves Act, that many believe has promise to replace the long outdated law. U.S. News recently spoke with Alexander about updating No Child Left Behind, college affordability and the future of education policy. Excerpts:

http://go.uen.org/42o

 

 


 

 

Parents suing NY argue for $1 billion for small city schools, including Utica Syracuse (NY) Post-Standard

 

SYRACUSE, N.Y. – A group of parents from New York’s small cities are trying to win back hundreds of millions of dollars they believe Albany owes their kids’ schools.

The lawsuit, officially Maisto v. State of New York, argues the government has underfunded school districts in eight small cities by as much as $1 billion in recent years.

http://go.uen.org/41Z

 

 


 

 

 

House leader: Phase-out of state stores being considered to generate education funds Pittsburgh (PA) Tribune Review

 

HARRISBURG – House and Senate negotiators are close to an agreement on legislation to phase out the state’s retail liquor stores and lease the state-controlled wholesale system to provide an estimated $200 million a year in education funds, House Majority Leader Dave Reed said Tuesday.

Reed, R-Indiana, didn’t provide details about the plan emerging from closed-door discussions. New liquor licenses would be part of the plan. Most people envision a privatized system as being able to buy a bottle of wine at the grocery store, he said. He mentioned “enhancing” restaurant licenses. Some grocery stores with eateries already sell beer.

Pennsylvania and Utah are the only states controlling wholesale and retail sales.

http://go.uen.org/42v

 

 


 

 

Kate Brown signs bill making it easier for parents to opt students out of state tests — but says they shouldn’t

(Portland) Oregonian

 

Gov. Kate Brown announced Tuesday that on Monday she signed a bill making it easier for parents to opt their children out of taking state standardized tests. But she said educators and state officials should convince parents not to do so.

Federal officials had warned that the bill, which also reduces the consequences for schools where many students skip tests, could lead the federal government to withhold millions in federal education funding.

House Bill 2655, which was strongly backed by the Oregon Education Association, prioritizes the rights of parents to exempt their children from that one aspect of public schooling over the desire of school accountability proponents to get complete reading and math test results for all students each year.

But Brown said she wants Oregon educators to make the case to parents that taking part in state tests is valuable so that they will opt for their children to keep taking the exams.

The new law means that, beginning next spring, schools will have to notify every family at least 30 days before state testing begins about what the tests will cover, how long they will take and when results will be delivered. Those notices will also tell parents they can exempt their child from the tests for any reason.

http://go.uen.org/424

 

http://go.uen.org/425 (Eugene [OR] Register-Guard)

 

 


 

 

 

State Chiefs Group Offers Guidance on Reducing Testing Education Week

 

San Diego, Calif. – Last year, the national group that represents state education chiefs called on states to figure out ways to reduce the burden of testing on their schools. Now it’s following up with a framework that states can use to evaluate their assessment regimens and cut back where they can, and it announced that 39 states are working to ways to do that.

The new framework was released Tuesday by the Council of Chief State School Officers at its annual conference on student assessment here. It aims to guide states as they try to cut back on testing, but still keep the assessments that produce meaningful information for students, parents, and teachers.

The 28-page document advises states, for instance, to be clear about why they are evaluating their assessment requirements, and to carefully gather information about what tests are required by the state, and by local districts. They should be sure to engage their communities in dialog about testing, and consider each test’s quality, purpose, and time demands before deciding what to cut out.

http://go.uen.org/42l

 

A copy of the report

http://go.uen.org/42m (CCSSO)

 

 


 

 

 

California school backtracks on Common Core opt-out punishment Fox

 

A California high school where a majority of juniors opted out of Common Core testing has backed off of plans to ban the students from using the school’s parking lot and from taking part in senior class activities after parents and education groups raised a fuss.

C.J. Foss, principal of Calabasas High School in Los Angeles County, last week sent an email to seniors-to-be announcing that certain privileges would be withheld from students who skipped the controversial test, which detractors say is an attempt to nationalize America’s public education system. Although the test, which critics say dictates curriculum, is widely known as Common Core, some states have different names for it. In the Golden State, the test is known as the California Assessment of Student Performance and Progress.

http://go.uen.org/42x

 

 


 

 

Changes in the works for Indiana high school diplomas Evansville (IN) Courier & Press

 

INDIANAPOLIS — Hoosier students may soon face new requirements to obtain a high school diploma, as state leaders mull changes to the system they say will increase rigor in the course loads taken by future graduates.

A top Evansville Vanderburgh School Corp. official said the district is still reviewing the proposals. But an initial reaction is that the increased expectations could lead to less flexibility and fewer opportunities for students to explore in high school, said Velinda Stubbs, chief academic officer for the district.

“It does ramp up the minimum expectations across the board, and so for some students who struggle that potentially could be a concern,” Stubbs said.

The proposed changes boost the number of credits required to obtain the equivalent of the current Core 40 Diploma, which most students follow if they intend to go to college. The new diploma requires the completion of 44 credits instead of the 40 credits needed to graduate under the current system. The proposals also require more math courses and rework the way electives are handled.

http://go.uen.org/421

 

 


 

 

 

Schools Fear Impact of Gay Marriage Ruling on Tax Status New York Times

 

Conservative religious schools all over the country forbid same­sex relationships, from dating to couples living in married­student housing, and they fear they will soon be forced to make a wrenching choice. If the Supreme Court this month finds a constitutional right to same­sex marriage, the schools say they will either have to abandon their policies that prohibit gay relationships or eventually risk losing their tax­exempt status.

The religious schools are concerned that if they continue to bar gay relationships, the Internal Revenue Service could take away their tax­exempt status as a violation of a “fundamental national public policy” under the reasoning of a 1983 Supreme Court decision that allowed the agency to revoke the tax­exempt status of schools that banned interracial relationships.

In a recent letter to congressional leaders, officials from more than 70 schools, from Catholic high schools to evangelical colleges, said that a Supreme Court ruling approving same­sex marriage would put at risk all schools “adhering to traditional religious and moral values.”

http://go.uen.org/42j

 

 


 

 

 

Dispute Over Union Fees Could Return to Supreme Court Associated Press

 

WASHINGTON — Powerful public-sector unions are facing another high-profile legal challenge that they say could wipe away millions from their bank accounts and make it tougher for them to survive.

A group of California schoolteachers, backed by a conservative group, has asked the Supreme Court to rule that unions representing government workers can’t collect fees from those who choose not to join.

Half the states currently require state workers represented by a union to pay “fair share” fees that cover bargaining costs, even if they are not members. The justices could decide as early as next week whether to take up the case.

http://go.uen.org/42k

 

 


 

 

Apple’s environmental chief to now head all social policy programs In a sign that Apple is aiming to expand its voice on social issues, Lisa Jackson is promoted to the company’s first vice president of environment, policy and social initiatives.

CNET

 

Apple has promoted its environmental chief to a more encompassing position. Lisa Jackson, who is the former head of the Environmental Protection Agency, is now Apple’s first vice president of environment, policy and social initiatives.

Company CEO Tim Cook sent a memo to employees saying that Apple has worked to be an industry leader on environmental issues and now he wants to expand that work to human rights, education and other social issues.

“We’ve dedicated ourselves to leaving the world better than we found it,” Cook wrote in the memo, which was confirmed by CNET. “Lisa will apply her passion and her unique skill set to integrate teams across Apple and make our impact even greater.”

Jackson was initially hired as Apple’s environmental and sustainability chief in May 2013. In this role she coordinated the company’s environmental practices. In her new role, Jackson will work with public schools and on public policy issues like clean energy and equality, Cook said in his memo. Jackson will also manage Apple’s international Government Affairs program.

http://go.uen.org/429

 

http://go.uen.org/42a (WaPo)

 

 


 

 

 

Malala Visits Capitol Hill to Urge More Education Funding ABC

 

Nobel Peace Prize Laureate Malala Yousafzai visited Capitol Hill today bringing her message of “books, not bullets” to members of Congress.

During a meeting with Senate Democratic Whip Dick Durbin, Yousafzai included the United States as a country that should invest more in education for young people.

“All the governments including the U.S. government should invest more in [education] so that children will not get deprived of an education,” she said.

Yousafzai was visiting the Capitol to encourage a bipartisan slate of lawmakers to increase spending on girls’ education globally, through initiatives such as the Global Partnership for Education, a group of 60 developing countries, donor governments, international organizations and non-governmental organizations, as well as First Lady Michelle Obama’s initiative Let Girls Learn.

http://go.uen.org/42p

 

http://go.uen.org/42q (UPI)

 

 


 

 

Dallas ISD board president: Mike Miles decided to resign after disagreement over contract Dallas Morning News

 

Dallas ISD board president Eric Cowan said that Superintendent Mike Miles’ three-year tenure in the district ended Monday during a disagreement over contract amendments Miles requested.

Miles wanted three changes to his contract, including that he would have immediate access to the $50,000 per year that the board has set aside and wouldn’t allow him to get until 2017. He also wanted his contact to note that the school board would be required to follow its Board Operating Procedures and that trustees would not look for a new superintendent while he was still there, Cowan said.

Miles wanted to discuss the possible changes with the nine trustees at Thursday’s school board meeting — the last before August, but Cowan told him it was not the right time. The conversation immediately shifted to Miles leaving, Cowan said.

http://go.uen.org/428

 


 

 

 

Pope’s Green Crusade will Enlist Schoolchildren Catholic schools already are planning to incorporate the pope’s call to action into their curricula.

National Journal

 

When the Archdiocese of Atlanta found out last month that Pope Francis would release an encyclical on the environment, Catholic educators knew that they’d want to include it in the new science curriculum at their schools.

Starting this fall, fifth-graders at 15 Catholic schools run by Atlanta’s archdiocese will study the encyclical as part of their science classes, said Diane Starkovich, superintendent of schools for the archdiocese, which educates nearly 12,000 students from pre-kindergarten through high school at 25 private Catholic schools.

“That doesn’t mean it’s only going to be referenced in fifth grade,” Starkovich said. “As teachers plan for the fall, particularly in high schools, I can see our theology faculty reading this and looking to make sure we are covering this in all our curricula.”

http://go.uen.org/42r

 

 

 

 

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CALENDAR

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USOE Calendar

http://www.schools.utah.gov/main/CALENDAR.aspx

 

 

UEN News

http://www.uen.org

 

 

June 24:

Charter School Funding Task Force

8 a.m., 445 State Capitol

http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?Year=2015&Com=TSKCSF

 

Retirement and Independent Entities Interim Committee meeting

1 p.m., 30 House Building

http://le.utah.gov/Interim/2015/html/00002692.htm

 

Public meeting on secondary math standards

6:30 p.m., 960 S Main St., Brigham City

http://www.schools.utah.gov/CURR/mathsec/Revision.aspx

 

 

July 9:

Utah State Charter School Board meeting

250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://go.uen.org/1pn

 

 

July 14:

Charter School Funding Task Force

8 a.m., 445 State Capitol

http://le.utah.gov/Interim/2015/html/00003031.htm

 

Executive Appropriations Committee meeting

2 p.m., 445 State Capitol

http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?Year=2015&Com=APPEXE

 

 

July 15:

Education Interim Committee meeting

8:30 a.m., 30 House Building

http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2015&com=INTEDU

 

 

August 6-7:

Utah State Board of Education meeting

250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspx

 

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