Education News Roundup: June 29, 2015

"Etruscan Tombs" by Beacon Heights Elementary students.

“Etruscan Tombs” by Beacon Heights Elementary students.

Education News Roundup

Today’s Top Picks:

Trib looks into the arguments surrounding the proposed update to Utah’s science standards.

http://go.uen.org/43X (SLT)

Standard looks at calls for better finance tracking at USOE.

http://go.uen.org/43Y (OSE)

D-News looks at Hunter High switching to the four-year model.

http://go.uen.org/44a (DN)

and http://go.uen.org/44y (KSL)

National Journal previews the ESEA rewrite debate.

http://go.uen.org/44w (National Journal)

Three high school girls wrote to convicted gangster Whitey Bulger for a National History Day project. They asked him advice about a life in crime. His answer: “Advice is a cheap commodity some seek it from me about crime — I know only one thing for sure — If you want to make crime pay — ‘Go to Law School.’ ”

http://go.uen.org/44p (Boston Globe)

 

 

————————————————————

TODAY’S HEADLINES

————————————————————

 

 

UTAH

 

Debate about science standards pits faithful Mormon against faithful Mormon BYU sees no conflict, but parents mix in religion to varying degrees when doing science with kids.

 

Education office wants more money to track finances

 

Educators, parents see four-year high school as ‘a better pedagogical model’

 

AG’s office files motion to dismiss first civil suit against Altice

 

School of Life aims to reduce hard knocks

 

Former students take one last walk through Hillcrest Jr. High before school is torn down

 

Pro basketball player with Utah ties who is legally deaf hosts camp for youth with hearing loss

 

It’s dirty work, but some goat’s gotta do it

 

21st century learning: How online videos enhance education at home and in the classroom

 

Top 5 things your child will learn by spending time on a farm for a school year

 

New Waterford Early Learning for iPad Provides Students in K-2 Personalized Mobile Curriculum

 

U.S. high school graduation rates are up, but there’s still progress to be made

 

Why teaching about the Civil War isn’t as easy as it sounds

 

 


 

 

 

OPINION & COMMENTARY

 

APUSH in the wrong direction? Looking at revised U.S. history curriculum for AP students

 

White House Fact Sheet: House Republican Budget Bill Would Harm Students, Workers, Health Care, and the Economy in Utah

 

Bad data inhibits Utah schools’ accountability

 

School mix and match

 

Early education program

 

What the Gay-Marriage Ruling Means for Education

 

Favorite GOP Primary Game: Bashing Jeb Bush on Common Core

 

ESEA falls short on dropout prevention

 

The Problem With Ds

Why the letter grade should be banned from schools

 

 


 

 

 

NATION

 

Education Fights to Take Center Stage

The House and Senate will take up new versions of the controversial No Child Left Behind law in July.

 

STEM Index

The annual index measures science, technology, engineering and mathematics activity in the U.S.

 

News Corp. Is Winding Down School Tablet Sales

 

State Relaxes an Order Preventing Teachers From Discussing Standardized Tests

 

Should a homeschooler be head of the Texas Board of Education?

Texas Gov. Greg Abbott appoints Donna Bahorich, who homeschooled her children for several years, as chair of the State Board of Education.

 

‘Punched in the Gut’: Uncovering the Horrors of Boarding Schools

 

Marva Collins, Educator Who Aimed High, Dies at 78

 

Wanted in a new Dallas ISD leader: Cooperation, openness, integrity

 

High Schoolers’  Experiment Lost Again on Launch Failure

 

Wyoming districts equipping school buses with cameras

 

Bulger’s advice to local teens: Don’t waste your life

 

HopSkipDrive, a Ride Start­Up for the After­School Set

 

 

 

 

 

————————————————————

UTAH NEWS

————————————————————

 

Debate about science standards pits faithful Mormon against faithful Mormon BYU sees no conflict, but parents mix in religion to varying degrees when doing science with kids.

 

Evolution is spoken at LDS Church-owned Brigham Young University, but not in lots of Mormon homes.

The disconnect has gone public as state education managers debate how to implement a new set of science standards.

As far as leaders of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints are concerned, scientific theory does not conflict with faith.

During his dedication of BYU’s new Life Sciences Building in April, Mormon apostle Russell M. Nelson downplayed the divide between science and religion.

Nelson said the perceived schism arises out of an incomplete understanding of either science or religion, or both.

“All truth is part of the gospel of Jesus Christ,” he said. “Whether truth comes from a scientific laboratory or by revelation from the Lord, it is compatible.”

One day after Nelson’s remarks, the state school board tentatively approved updated science guidelines for Utah’s middle schools.

The board’s vote kicked off a 90-day review period and set the stage for a weeks-long debate over local control and the compatibility of scientific theory and conservative religious beliefs.

While the debate in other states may be between the faithful and nonbelievers, in Utah, home to the predominant LDS Church, public hearings have pitted Mormons against fellow Mormons.

http://go.uen.org/43X (SLT)

 

 


 

 

 

Education office wants more money to track finances

 

SALT LAKE CITY — The state Board of Education has approved using a combination of discretionary funds, building sale revenues, and an unused legislative appropriation from 2006 for audits and studies, to cover $958,000 in expenses.

The state Office of Education ”currently has nearly $1 million of expenses requiring offset. This is due to accounting misstatements that have happened during year-end closeouts over the years, as identified during a board internal audit this year,” said Jennifer Johnson, second vice chair of the state school board.

The internal auditor’s report identified serious risks with USOE’s Year End Close procedures, especially with the violation of the matching principle. The matching principle dictates that related expenses and revenues be recognized during the same accounting period, in this case the state fiscal year which runs from July 1 to June 30. When matching does not occur, it can give an unclear picture of the agency’s true financial position.

“You might think of it as knowing that you’ve reconciled your check register to your bank account, so that the money you think you have you really do have, and you haven’t overspent,” Johnson told the board in its June 19 meeting.

http://go.uen.org/43Y (OSE)

 

 


 

 

 

Educators, parents see four-year high school as ‘a better pedagogical model’

 

SALT LAKE CITY — Craig Stauffer has his work cut out for him.

While most schools quietly await the return of familiar faces and the start of another ordinary school year, Hunter High School, where Stauffer serves as principal, is anything but quiet.

This fall, ninth-graders will join the ranks in what has been a campus for 10th- through 12th-graders. The West Valley high school is expected to take on 700 new students, which will boost the school’s enrollment by 34 percent and make it the second-largest school in the Granite School District.

http://go.uen.org/44a (DN)

 

http://go.uen.org/44y (KSL)

 

 


 

 

 

AG’s office files motion to dismiss first civil suit against Altice

 

FARMINGTON — Two weeks after a judge agreed to toss one civil lawsuit that involved Brianne Altice, the Attorney General’s Office filed a motion to have another lawsuit filed against Davis School District dismissed.

The motion was filed on Thursday in 2nd District Court by the Attorney General’s Office, which represents Davis School District. Altice and Davis High School were not named in this lawsuit.

The lawsuit, which was filed in March in 2nd District Court by a former student and his parents, accused Davis School District of failing ”to take sufficient steps to either terminate (Altice) or supervise her,” after school officials saw “photographs of her having inappropriate contact with students.” They are seeking $674,000 in economic and non-economic damages from the school district.

http://go.uen.org/44h (OSE)

 

 


 

 

School of Life aims to reduce hard knocks

 

Life can be hard, but statistically it tends to be more so without a high school diploma.

It’s a lesson Adam Nilssen was about to learn the hard way, struggling through his senior year in high school and uninterested in staying on track when he wasn’t sure where that track would lead. That’s when he found the School of Life Foundation.

A program devoted to helping young people learn life skills and find success, School of Life offers students like Nilssen a chance to recover lost school credits and find a course in life. Over the course of a 30-day training course taught after regular school hours, students focus on life skills to supplement the academic focus of the school day.

http://go.uen.org/44i (SGS)

 

 


 

 

 

Former students take one last walk through Hillcrest Jr. High before school is torn down

 

MURRAY, Utah — A century-old school’s time is about up, as Hillcrest Junior High School in Murray will be torn down to make way for a new school.

This week, former students got to walk through their old stomping grounds one last time.

“There are portions of this building that are actually some of the first buildings that we had in our school district,” said Steven Hirase, the superintendent for Murray School District.

The school was built in 1911. At that time, it was called Hillcrest School and served grades one through eight. Since then, the school has served students of all ages, and at one point it was a combined junior high and high school.

http://go.uen.org/44k (KSTU)

 

 


 

 

Pro basketball player with Utah ties who is legally deaf hosts camp for youth with hearing loss

 

SALT LAKE CITY — Professional basketball player Lance Allred hosted a second annual basketball clinic for kids with hearing loss in Salt Lake City recently.

Allred spoke to FOX 13 News about what he’s doing to reconnect with his Utah roots.

“There’s sometimes a disconnect, and I know people are afraid to communicate with each other–those who speak sign and those who don’t–and so I’m definitely trying to bridge the gap and get the people to come together,” he said.

Allred grew up in Salt Lake and played center for the University of Utah from 2000 to 2002. Six years later, he became the first legally deaf player in the NBA when he signed with the Cleveland Cavaliers.

Allred said the clinic is an opportunity to teach kids how to rise above the challenge of hearing loss.

http://go.uen.org/44j (KSTU)

 

 


 

 

It’s dirty work, but some goat’s gotta do it

 

A herd of roughly 100 goats is on landscaping duty this weekend, helping to curb weeds and overgrowth at Washington Elementary School.

The goats arrived at the school Friday afternoon and will be supervised by a herder until Monday morning, Salt Lake City School District spokesman Jason Olsen said.

Crews have struggled with upkeep of the school’s landscape, particularly on a steep hill on the east side of the school.

For $2,000, the goats will accomplish what typically requires a full week of work by the district’s ground staff, and will avoid the need for chemical herbicides, according to the district.

http://go.uen.org/448 (SLT)

 

http://go.uen.org/44c (DN)

 

http://go.uen.org/44m (KSL)

 

http://go.uen.org/44l (KSTU)

 

http://go.uen.org/44n (MUR)

 

 


 

 

 

21st century learning: How online videos enhance education at home and in the classroom

 

HIGHLAND, UTAH — Jaxson Goeckeritz was just 10 years old when he decided to be a computer programmer.

Neither of his parents had much knowledge on the topic, so they enrolled him in a computer programming class at a nearby university, but it was too boring. Turns out, he had already learned all of the course material from YouTube.

Jaxson’s parents had also let their son watch videos from The New Boston, teaching him different aspects and techniques in computer programming with everything from Java to iOS development.

http://go.uen.org/44A (DN)

 

 


 

 

 

Top 5 things your child will learn by spending time on a farm for a school year

 

  1. You reap what you sow

If you plant a sunflower seed and expect a watermelon to grow you will be disappointed. Seems logical right? The problem is that all of us, including our youth, make decisions and choices without understanding the law of the harvest.

http://go.uen.org/44B (SLT)

 

 


 

 

 

New Waterford Early Learning for iPad Provides Students in K-2 Personalized Mobile Curriculum Thousands of proven effective activities available this summer on iPad for back-to-school use

 

SALT LAKE CITY & PHILADELPHIA–Waterford Institute today announced another platform for Waterford Early Learning™, this time on iPad. Utilizing the widely accepted Apple iPad in schools across the U.S., the Waterford Early Learning (WEL) curriculum is optimized for touch and set to release this summer in time for back-to-school training.

http://go.uen.org/44C (Business Wire)

 

 


 

 

 

U.S. high school graduation rates are up, but there’s still progress to be made

 

This spring saw some rare good news on the U.S. education scene when the federal government announced high school graduation rates jumped to 81 percent in 2012, up from 73 percent in 2006.

http://go.uen.org/443 (DN)

 

 


 

 

 

Why teaching about the Civil War isn’t as easy as it sounds

 

Amidst the pain that surrounded the recent church shooting in Charleston, South Carolina, a heated discussion erupted over the nature of a symbol that has come to be synonymous with Southern culture: The battle flag of the Army of Northern Virginia.

http://go.uen.org/44b (DN)

 

 

 

 

————————————————————

OPINION & COMMENTARY

————————————————————

 

APUSH in the wrong direction? Looking at revised U.S. history curriculum for AP students Deseret News editorial

 

Last year, the College Board — the nonprofit organization that writes, administers and grades the Scholastic Aptitude Test as well as the 30-plus Advanced Placement courses for high school students taking college-level classes for college credit — replaced its five-page topical U.S. history course outline with a 134-page APUSH Framework. Rather than center on the detailed and expansive overhaul, the resulting buzz instead focused on the Framework’s overall tone that some label as a cynical, limited and negative view of United States history.

http://go.uen.org/44e

 

 

 


 

 

White House Fact Sheet: House Republican Budget Bill Would Harm Students, Workers, Health Care, and the Economy in Utah Utah Policy commentary from The White House

 

Congressional Republicans have started to show how they plan to budget at discretionary levels that are the lowest in a decade, adjusted for inflation.

K-12 students will be shortchanged. The House Republican bill provides $2 billion less than current year funding and $5 billion less than the 2016 President’s Budget for our nation’s schools. It would eliminate 19 programs that serve primarily PreK-12 students and underfund core programs, including Title I, which supports educational improvements for our most vulnerable students.  Compared to the President’s Budget, Utah would receive $6.4 million less in Title I funding for disadvantaged students, an amount that is enough to fund about 20 schools, 90 teacher and aide positions, and 9,400 students. These eliminations take away critical resources being used to turn around low-performing schools, enhance STEM education, promote the arts, create safe school environments, and support educators who are doing the important work of preparing America’s students for the future.

http://go.uen.org/44D

 

http://go.uen.org/44E (White House)

 

 


 

 

Bad data inhibits Utah schools’ accountability Salt Lake Tribune letter from Kelsey White, research analyst for the Utah Taxpayers Association

 

The financial transparency of publicly funded entities, required by state and federal laws, sets the U.S. apart from other countries and contributes to the high standards of governance that taxpayers deserve. But for data to be meaningful and useful, it must be accurate and timely.

As research analyst for a watchdog organization that monitors taxpayer dollars in Utah, I rely on the budgets and financial data mandated to be publicly available across all levels of taxpayer-funded entities.

In preparing an annual report on Utah’s education spending that the Utah Taxpayers Association publishes, I discovered that the financial data for Utah’s public schools, as reported to and by the Utah State Office of Education (USOE), are muddled and fragmented. I saw problematic data at every level in Utah’s education hierarchy.

Such disorganization is unacceptable, especially because public education receives all of the state income tax, more than half of the property tax and nearly half of the state’s entire discretionary budget.

http://go.uen.org/449

 


 

 

 

School mix and match

Deseret News letter from Robert Holland

 

Why should Nevada’s newly created universal Education Savings Accounts “devastate programs that are providing innovative programs for inner city schools and high-poverty schools,” as state teachers union president Ruben Murillo Jr. lamented (“Aggressive new Nevada law puts private schools in reach of all,” June 16)? If by innovative he means approaches in public school classes that are actually helping children, such programs will prosper because no arbitrary assignment plan will forbid families from flocking to them.

With ESAs, parents will have the power to use their share of public funding to mix and match the best options — public or private — for their children.

http://go.uen.org/44f

 

 


 

 

 

Early education program

Deseret News letter from Donald Thomas

 

Let’s get real. To demonstrate our value for all children, it is time to act. We can improve the academic achievement of our children, especially children who live under difficult conditions, by enacting a major early childhood education program.

The research is abundant. The need is evident. Early childhood education provides greater benefits to individuals and to the society than any other school improvement strategy devised by legislators, business personnel or educators.

http://go.uen.org/44g

 

 


 

 

 

What the Gay-Marriage Ruling Means for Education National Review op-ed by FREDERICK M. HESS, director of education-policy studies at the American Enterprise Institute

 

Like fascists, Communists, and boy-band producers, the American Left has always believed it could fine-tune human nature if it could only “get ’em while they’re young.” That’s why the Left works so hard to impose its will on schools and universities. As John Dewey, America’s high priest of educational progressivism, explained in 1897, the student must “emerge from his original narrowness” in order “to conceive of himself” as a cog in the larger social order.

Last week’s gay-marriage ruling will yield a new wave of liberal efforts to ensure that schools do their part to combat wrong-headed “narrowness.” Justice Anthony Kennedy’s sweeping 5–4 decision in Obergefell v. Hodges opened by declaring, “The Constitution promises liberty to all within its reach, a liberty that includes certain specific rights that allow persons, within a lawful realm, to define and express their identity.” Kennedy took pains to opine that marriage “draws meaning from related rights of childrearing, procreation, and education.” In finding that the Fourteenth Amendment secures the right to “define and express [one’s] identity,” the Obergefell majority has issued a radical marker. (If gay marriage had been established by democratic process, things might have played out in a more measured manner.)

Justice Samuel Alito predicted, “Today’s decision . . . will be used to vilify Americans who are unwilling to assent to the new orthodoxy,” and “they will risk being labeled as bigots and treated as such by governments, employers, and schools.” Alito is almost assuredly right, and that poses serious questions for schools and colleges.

http://go.uen.org/44v

 

 


 

 

Favorite GOP Primary Game: Bashing Jeb Bush on Common Core Education Week commentary by columnist Alyson Klein

 

The 2016 election season is just getting started, but there’s already a favorite sport among GOP contenders: Hitting Jeb Bush for his support of the Common Core standards.

It’s happened over and over. It’s been both subtle and obvious. And it’s come from at least one former supporter of the standards, and from folks who never really liked them in the first place.

http://go.uen.org/44q

 

 


 

 

 

ESEA falls short on dropout prevention

Brookings Institute commentary by Mark Dynarski, Nonresident Senior Fellow, Governance Studies, Brown Center on Education Policy

 

Efforts are moving ahead to reauthorize the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) and its broad parameters are becoming clearer. The bill is likely to keep an annual testing requirement, but change accountability structures created under No Child Left Behind (NCLB), allowing states to create their own. But, like NCLB, the new bill will shortchange older students and those at risk of dropping out of school. The Alliance for Excellent Education has called this phenomenon the “missing middle.” Federal education spending is U-shaped, with large amounts spent on programs for young students and large amounts spent on college students in the form of student financial aid. The middle is missing, especially for students in secondary schools.

Recently, the press has heralded increases in the rate of high school students graduating on time; it’s now above 80 percent. The on-time graduation rate going up is welcome news, and perhaps NCLB played a role. But 20 percent of students still do not graduate on time. Imagine if one in five new cell phones didn’t work. Policymakers would be deluged by complaints and critics would be decrying the cavalier way the industry treats its customers.

Some students who do not graduate on time may ultimately graduate, or receive a General Education Development certificate. But many never graduate.

http://go.uen.org/44t

 

 


 

 

 

The Problem With Ds

Why the letter grade should be banned from schools Atlantic commentary by ANDREW SIMMONS, a writer, teacher, and musician based in California

 

“They sit there and blink. They approach sub-mediocrity,” says a former coworker when I ask her to describe her “D students.” She’s only partially joking.

Getting an F typically requires some combination of compulsive truancy, a keen distaste for holding a pen, and problems outside of school. An F leads to summer school or an online course, and unrepentant F students tend to drop out or head to an alternative school before long. Fs are a serious problem in education.

D students, however, often stick around and cause another serious problem: They may pass, but they learn close to nothing along the way. Plus, they have little chance of attending a four-year college out of high school. A D student may flake on at least one major assignment a semester but breezily make up minor reading quizzes two months after they were originally administered. Maybe he shows up—but only after sauntering in 10 minutes late. Maybe he doesn’t ask for help and casually breaks appointments for tutoring. Rarely reading and occasionally despairing (with a smile) that he “can’t understand the book,” the D student probably falls behind early and catches up late. But not too late to prevent that bad grade from morphing into a worse one—and not wholeheartedly enough to get the C or B he’s likely capable of earning. This D student knows exactly what he needs to do to avoid an F before grades are due.

http://go.uen.org/44u

 

 

 

 

 

————————————————————-

NATIONAL NEWS

————————————————————-

 

Education Fights to Take Center Stage

The House and Senate will take up new versions of the controversial No Child Left Behind law in July.

National Journal

 

House Republicans are poised to revisit an elementary and secondary education bill, months after it was controversially pulled from House consideration amid conservative objections.

The No Child Left Behind rewrite is expected on the floor in July, several members said, and to appease conservatives and outside groups who targeted the bill, House leaders will allow the chamber to vote on several amendments that were dismissed when the measure was first brought up in February.

Among those is an amendment that would allow schools to keep federal money but opt out of the federal regulations that come with it. Rep. Mark Walker, the amendment’s sponsor, said he spoke with Education Committee Chairman John Kline last week and believes his plan will get a hearing.

“I believe that he is OK allowing the vote to come to the floor for the amendment as it’s written,” Walker said. “I don’t know that we would have the votes to pass. … But I’m grateful that they are allowing it. I think that sets a precedent if you’re allowing what I feel like is a conservative amendment to go forward.”

The measure, dubbed A-Plus, is of particular interest to Heritage Action and the Club for Growth, both of which key voted against the bill. The groups, and several members, objected to the bill because it reauthorizes a federal role in education.

But Jim DeMint, president of the Heritage Foundation, was a major proponent of A-Plus when he was a senator. And Walker said he believes allowing the vote would cause outside groups to rescind their key votes, even if it does not pass.

That is particularly important to leadership because the measure is unlikely to draw much Democratic support, and passing it with only Republicans could be a heavy lift because a sizeable chunk of members likely will refuse in principle to vote for a bill retaining the federal government’s role in the education system.

http://go.uen.org/44w

 

 


 

 

STEM Index

The annual index measures science, technology, engineering and mathematics activity in the U.S.

U.S. News & World Report

 

The slight upward trend in STEM activity measured by the first U.S. News/Raytheon STEM Index continued in 2014, according to new data analyzed by U.S. News & World Report.

While an increase in the STEM activity is certainly welcome news for science, technology, engineering and mathematics industries and for STEM companies clamoring for qualified employees, the picture isn’t all roses.

The 2015 U.S. News/Raytheon STEM Index also shows remarkably little progress toward decreasing racial and gender disparities for interest and aptitude in STEM. In spite of a range of research projects and education initiatives focused on studying and closing the gaps, certain cultural issues – early bias, discrimination and social expectations – still play a significant role, diverting students from the STEM pipeline, often even before they reach college.

The U.S. News/Raytheon STEM Index tracks movements in STEM-related employment and education in the United States.

http://go.uen.org/445

 

 


 

 

 

News Corp. Is Winding Down School Tablet Sales Bloomberg

 

News Corp. is winding down sales of custom-made tablet computers after few schools bought the devices, once central to the company’s goal of overhauling U.S. education, according to two people familiar with the matter.

The media company, whose executive chairman is billionaire Rupert Murdoch, is no longer ordering new tablets from its manufacturer in Asia, though it has stock on hand for existing school customers, according to the people, who declined to be identified because they weren’t authorized to speak publicly.

By the end of this month, New York-based News Corp. will have invested more than $1 billion in Amplify, its education division, which sells a digital curriculum and testing services in addition to the tablets. Few districts have bought the units, which can be used for classroom work, homework assignments and tracking student performance. The head of the tablet business left the company earlier this year.

http://go.uen.org/446

 

http://go.uen.org/44r (Ed Week)

 

 


 

 

State Relaxes an Order Preventing Teachers From Discussing Standardized Tests New York Times

 

Orders to remain silent are commonplace for grand juries, for those involved in sensitive negotiations and for anyone privy to trade secrets.

Lately, those orders have also been applied to many of New York’s teachers.

Teachers who score the third through eighth grade standardized state exams have been required in recent years to sign confidentiality agreements barring them from discussing test questions, answers or other materials. As part of a sprawling bill approved at the end of the legislative session last week, legislators took a step toward loosening the restriction. But as was the fashion in Albany this session, that step was quite small.

Under the new law, teachers and administrators will be free to discuss certain test questions, but only those that have been publicly released by the state.

http://go.uen.org/442

 

 


 

 

 

Should a homeschooler be head of the Texas Board of Education?

Texas Gov. Greg Abbott appoints Donna Bahorich, who homeschooled her children for several years, as chair of the State Board of Education.

Christian Science Monitor

 

Gov. Greg Abbott has stirred up controversy in Texas after appointing a homeschooling mom as chair of the State Board of Education.

Donna Bahorich, who will succeed outgoing chair Barbara Cargill, is a Republican from Houston who homeschooled her three sons before sending them to religious private schools.

Her appointment by Abbott last week has drawn criticism from all ends of the political spectrum, including from her own conservative colleagues.

“Public school isn’t for everybody, but when 94 percent of our students in Texas attend public schools, I think it ought to be a baseline requirement that the chair of the State Board of Education have at least some experience in that realm, as a parent, teacher, something,” Thomas Ratliff, a Republican member of the State Board of Education, told Texas Public Radio.

Ms. Bahorich concedes that her background is unorthodox but argues that not having familial ties to the public school system doesn’t make her any less qualified for the job.

http://go.uen.org/447

 

 


 

 

 

‘Punched in the Gut’: Uncovering the Horrors of Boarding Schools Indian Country Today

 

“No one has ever asked me before,” the elder explained.

“She was answering my question about why she had never told anyone about the abuse she suffered at Indian boarding school,” recalls Denise Lajimodiere, professor of Education at North Dakota State University in Fargo.

Lajimodiere, who also serves as president of the Boarding School Healing Coalition, found that the other survivors she interviewed told her the same thing. “Most of them had never even told their families,’ she says of interviewees who often whispered when sharing details of the sexual abuse they experienced at the schools.

Lajimodiere, a member of the Turtle Mountain Chippewa tribe, is working on a book containing ten of the most powerful survivor stories she’s collected over the past few years. “I don’t want the book to be academic; I want it to be their voices telling their stories.”

http://go.uen.org/44x

 

 


 

 

Marva Collins, Educator Who Aimed High, Dies at 78 New York Times

 

Marva Collins, a former substitute teacher whose success at educating poor black students in a private school she founded made her a candidate for secretary of education and the subject of a television movie, died on Wednesday in a hospice near her home in South Carolina. She was 78.

Her death was confirmed by Hospice Care of the Lowcountry in Bluffton, S.C.

After working as a substitute teacher for 14 years in Chicago public schools, Ms. Collins cashed in her $5,000 in pension savings and opened Westside Preparatory School in 1975. The school originally operated in the basement of a local college and then, to be free of red tape (the same reason she said she had refused federal funds), in the second floor of her home.

She began with four students, including her daughter, charging $80 a month in tuition. Enrollment at the school, on Chicago’s South Side, grew to more than 200, in classes from prekindergarten through eighth grade. It remained in operation for more than 30 years.

Ms. Collins set high academic standards, emphasized discipline and promoted a nurturing environment. She taught phonics, the Socratic method and the classics and, she insisted, never expected her students to fail.

http://go.uen.org/43Z

 

http://go.uen.org/44z (Chicago Tribune)

 

 


 

 

 

Wanted in a new Dallas ISD leader: Cooperation, openness, integrity Dallas (TX) Morning News

 

Dallas ISD’s next leader needs to hear people out, make good hires, play well with others, act with integrity, and figure out which programs are helping kids and which aren’t.

Walking on water is optional.

The superintendent’s job is daunting — especially in a big urban district like the Dallas Independent School District, with 160,000 children, 22,000 employees and a $1.4 billion budget. Parents, trustees and educators aren’t shy about what they want in a successor to Mike Miles.

The next superintendent needs to continue the district’s academic vision — and be cooperative about it, trustee Lew Blackburn said.

Blackburn’s dream candidate? “Somebody who can work with the board, work with the staff, work with the community members and keep everyone involved.”

http://go.uen.org/441

 

 


 

 

 

High Schoolers’  Experiment Lost Again on Launch Failure Associated Press

 

Three high school students were going to get the science lesson of a lifetime by flying their experiment in space.

Instead they got a life lesson about loss, but more importantly about determination, as they watched their experiment get wiped out for the second straight time by a rocket failure on Sunday.

The students from North Charleston, South Carolina, had come up with an intricate electronics circuitry experiment. It was supposed to fly last October to the International Space Station on an Antares rocket out of Wallops Island, Virginia.

But it blew up as they watched from only 1.7 miles away. Joe Garvey was knocked over by the blast coming off the launch pad. Rachel Lindbergh felt the heat on her face.

Eight months passed. Every other student team got to fly their experiments again, but finally Sunday was the turn for Joe, Rachel and Gabe Voigt, and their teacher, Gabe’s mother, Kellye.

They drove down to Cape Canaveral, Florida, and joked about their luck. But Rachel, the eldest of the three students and a physics major headed to the University of Chicago, doesn’t talk about luck. She talks about independent events and variables.

http://go.uen.org/44o

 

 


 

 

Wyoming districts equipping school buses with cameras Associated Press via Casper (WY) Star Tribune

 

CHEYENNE, Wyo. — Nearly 60 percent of the school buses in Wyoming now have cameras to help catch motorists who illegally pass a stopped bus, and there are indications that the cameras might be dissuading the practice.

Of the 1,536 public school buses in Wyoming, 902 have been equipped with cameras, said David Koskelowski, education consultant for pupil transportation with the Wyoming Department of Education. “I believe at last check 23 of the 48 districts had at least a majority of their buses done,” Koskelowski said.

In 2014, the state Legislature approved $5 million to help school districts equip their buses with outside cameras to identify vehicles illegally passing a bus that is picking up or discharging students. Districts also can install cameras inside the bus to monitor student behavior.

http://go.uen.org/444

 

 


 

 

 

Bulger’s advice to local teens: Don’t waste your life Boston (MA) Globe

 

James “Whitey” Bulger showed no mercy to the people he tortured and killed. He refused to get on his knees when captured after more than a decade on the run because he didn’t want to get his pants dirty. And he swore at witnesses during his trial.

Now, as the imprisoned 85-year-old gangster faces the end of his life, his unwavering defiance has seemingly been replaced by regret, and even a little remorse. At least that’s what he told three local high school girls.

“My life was wasted and spent foolishly, brought shame + suffering on my parents and siblings and will end soon,” Bulger wrote in a Feb. 24 letter sent from a federal penitentiary in Sumterville, Fla.

“Advice is a cheap commodity some seek it from me about crime — I know only one thing for sure — If you want to make crime pay — ‘Go to Law School.’ ”

http://go.uen.org/44p

 

 


 

 

HopSkipDrive, a Ride Start­Up for the After­School Set New York Times

 

Recounting one’s driving route in painstaking detail is a well­known and beloved pastime among Los Angeles residents. But for parents who navigate the city’s traffic snarls multiple times a day, commuting to and from work and ferrying their children to school and various activities, the talk can take on a desperate tone.

Such was the case for Joanna McFarland, Carolyn Yashari Becher and Janelle McGlothlin, three working mothers with a total of eight children, who attend seven schools and are involved in karate, soccer, tennis, horseback riding, baseball, music, dance, gymnastics and skateboarding.

“You’re stressed,” Ms. McGlothlin said of her driving schedule. “You’re in traffic. You’re snapping at them because you’re worried.”

Their solution was to start a ride service called HopSkipDrive. It’s one of two such California companies catering to busy families. The other one, Shuddle, serves the San Francisco Bay Area.

HopSkipDrive’s passengers are children ages 7 to 17 whose parents request and pay for rides at least 24 hours in advance using a smartphone app or the company’s website. A ride costs $20; a package of 50 is $600. Trips longer than five miles or 30 minutes cost extra. Nearly 2,000 people have signed up for the service so far, according to the company.

http://go.uen.org/440

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

————————————————————

CALENDAR

————————————————————

 

USOE Calendar

http://www.schools.utah.gov/main/CALENDAR.aspx

 

 

UEN News

http://www.uen.org

 

 

July 9:

Utah State Charter School Board meeting

250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://go.uen.org/1pn

 

 

July 14:

Charter School Funding Task Force

8 a.m., 445 State Capitol

http://le.utah.gov/Interim/2015/html/00003031.htm

 

Executive Appropriations Committee meeting

2 p.m., 445 State Capitol

http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?Year=2015&Com=APPEXE

 

 

July 15:

Education Interim Committee meeting

8:30 a.m., 30 House Building

http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2015&com=INTEDU

 

 

August 6-7:

Utah State Board of Education meeting

250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspx

Related posts:

Comments are closed.