Education News Roundup: June 30, 2015

Lincoln Elementary School Principal Ross Lunceford was named Utah’s 2015 National Distinguished Principal by the National Association of Elementary School Principals. Photo by Zac Williams.

Lincoln Elementary School Principal Ross Lunceford was named Utah’s 2015 National Distinguished Principal by the National Association of Elementary School Principals. Photo by Zac Williams.

Education News Roundup

Today’s Top Picks:

 

UVU looks to build an autism program.

http://go.uen.org/44U (DN)

and http://go.uen.org/45g (KSL)

 

UVU also establishes the C. Mark and Amy Openshaw Annual Scholarship honoring the late Utah State Board of Education Member.

http://go.uen.org/44X (DN)

 

Congratulations to Lincoln Elementary School Principal Ross Lunceford, who was named Utah’s 2015 National Distinguished Principal by the National Association of Elementary School Principals.

http://go.uen.org/450 (OSE)

 

Congratulations to USOE Agriculture Education Specialist Buddy Deimler who was named to the National FFA Board of Directors.

http://go.uen.org/45h (FFA)

 

Colorado Supreme Court overturns school vouchers on one of its state’s counties.

http://go.uen.org/44I (Denver Post)

and http://go.uen.org/44K (NYT)

and http://go.uen.org/44O (WaPo)

and http://go.uen.org/455 (AP)

or a copy of the ruling

http://go.uen.org/44J (Colorado Supreme Court)

 

California passes a mandatory vaccination bill.

http://go.uen.org/44L (LAT)

and http://go.uen.org/44M (WSJ)

and http://go.uen.org/454 (AP)

 

ENR feels bad that he has nothing about the Greek loan crisis [despite what it’s doing to everyone’s 401(k)], but at least he’s got something about Greek yogurt.

http://go.uen.org/44R (AP)

 

 

 

 

 

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TODAY’S HEADLINES

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UTAH

 

UVU hopes to become ‘national leader’ with autism facility, program

 

UVU scholarship to honor late State School Board member’s family

 

Ogden principal receives national award

 

Utah Educator Named to FFA National Board of Directors

 

Volunteers turn overgrown patch at middle school into vegetable garden

 

New font shines light on dyslexia difficulties

 

Canyons District to open online registration in August

 

UND ed dean focus of complaints, criticism from faculty

 

Minnesota licensing hurdles frustrate out-of-state teachers

 

 


 

 

 

OPINION & COMMENTARY

 

Keeping track of school funds is only part of the story

 

The arts can prevent a summer learning ‘slide’

 

Utah’s Focus on Economic Growth also Benefits Education

 

Utah Continues Streak of Business Ranking Excellence

 

Whole Child Snapshots

Measuring Whole Child Success Across the States

 

2015 Schooling in America Survey: Perspectives on School Choice, Common Core, and Standardized Testing

 

 


 

 

 

NATION

 

Colorado Supreme Court rejects Douglas County voucher program State’s top court rules that Choice Scholarship Program is unconstitutional; district wants to take case to U.S. Supreme Court

 

California Legislature passes mandatory vaccination bill

 

Colorado committee members set to study school safety, youth in crisis Gov. Hickenlooper names eight to new legislative committee

 

SoCal schools may see more interns, substitutes in classrooms as teacher shortage grows

 

States Wrestle With How to Get Good Teachers in All Schools

 

Supreme Court takes up major case on public sector union fees

 

Bobby Jindal signs Common Core compromise, touts local control

 

‘Homework Gap,’ Privacy, and Budget Cuts Top Agenda of Ed-Tech Advocates

 

Educators, advocates see increased importance in US STEM education

 

“It Was Kind of Like a Double Life”: Meet Ariel, Who Is Growing Up Trans

 

Chobani Selected as Greek Yogurt Provider for School Lunches

 

Patterson Announces First Round of Grants to Schools

 

Schools face new legal duties to tackle extremism

 

 

 

 

 

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UTAH NEWS

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UVU hopes to become ‘national leader’ with autism facility, program

 

OREM — Utah Valley University announced plans Monday to construct a privately funded facility dedicated to autism on its campus.

http://go.uen.org/44U (DN)

 

http://go.uen.org/45g (KSL)

 

 


 

 

 

UVU scholarship to honor late State School Board member’s family

 

OREM — A scholarship has been established at Utah Valley University in memory of a family recently killed in a plane crash.

The C. Mark and Amy Openshaw Annual Scholarship will benefit a student enrolled in the UVU School of Education, with preference to those planning to serve as a K-12 teacher.

Friends and colleagues of Mark Openshaw, a former Utah State Board of Education member, requested that the UVU Foundation establish the scholarship to honor his work in education. Amy Openshaw also was committed to education, serving as a PTA president and volunteering in classrooms, according to a news release.

Mark and Amy Openshaw and three of their children, Max, 5, Ellie, 12. and Tanner, 15, were returning home to Utah on June 12 after visiting family in Missouri when their plane crashed on the runway. Max was the only survivor.

http://go.uen.org/44X (DN)

 

 


 

 

Ogden principal receives national award

 

When Ross Lunceford was made principal of Ogden’s Lincoln Elementary, he made it his habit to pick up garbage outside of the building every morning before school. It wasn’t long before students started joining him.

“He’d go out there, and they would all just kind of follow him around,” said Sandy Coroles, Ogden School District’s superintendent. “He was proud of his school, and sent that message.”

More than that, she said, he sent a message that he cared about the students.

“He was very visible with the kids. They knew who he was,” she said. “He was quick in learning their names, so he created those relationships with students.”

The National Association of Elementary School Principals named Lunceford Utah’s 2015 National Distinguished Principal. He’ll be formally recognized in Washington D.C, in October. The award is given for excellence in leadership skills, and attention to student needs, and Coroles says Lunceford fits the bill.

http://go.uen.org/450 (OSE)

 

 


 

 

Utah Educator Named to FFA National Board of Directors

 

INDIANAPOLIS – Buddy Deimler of Salt Lake City, Utah, has been named to the National FFA Board of Directors.

Deimler, who is currently serving as state specialist in agricultural education and welding education for the Utah State Office of Education, has spent more than 35 years in the agricultural education profession.

http://go.uen.org/45h (FFA)

 

 


 

 

Volunteers turn overgrown patch at middle school into vegetable garden

 

What used to be an overgrown space behind Mount Logan Middle School is on its way to becoming a vegetable garden, thanks to the help of volunteers.

On Saturday, community members volunteered all afternoon to help prepare the space for planting. Others have given their time and energy since the project began June 1.

The purpose of the garden, according to Mount Logan Middle School Principal Mike Monson, will be to give families who don’t have the means or space for a garden a chance to plant and eat fresh fruits and vegetables.

http://go.uen.org/451 (LHJ)

 

 


 

 

 

New font shines light on dyslexia difficulties

 

LAYTON – A graphic designer from London designed a new typeface that depicts what reading is like for people with dyslexia.

Natalie Pollard is a tutor for dyslexic children in Layton. She feels the font is “eye-opening” to the challenges people with dyslexia face. Pollard is not dyslexic herself, but believes the font accurately portrays dyslexic reading issues. However she acknowledges dyslexia does not manifest itself the same for every individual.

“Anything that can help others to know what people go through is great, but there is definitely so much more that dyslexia entails,” Pollard said.

Phoebe Beacham, the cofounder of Decoding Dyslexia in Utah, sees all types of dyslexia simulations as essential to increasing awareness.

http://go.uen.org/44Z (OSE)

 

 


 

 

Canyons District to open online registration in August

 

SANDY — Online registration for Canyons School District students begins Aug. 4 for the 2015-16 school year.

http://go.uen.org/44V (DN)

 

 


 

 

UND ed dean focus of complaints, criticism from faculty

 

Lynne Chalmers acknowledges she can be direct, assertive and even admits she raised her voice once with UND’s College of Education and Human Development Dean Robert Hill on one occasion, but when he tried to reprimand her in March after serving the college for 25 years, that was the last straw.

“As long as you agree with him you will have no problems with him,” she said.”If you disagree with him in any way he will go after you with a vengeance.”

Chalmers is one of several voicing displeasure with Hill in a faculty survey and a 2014 complaint.

Hill has served as dean since July 1, 2013, after leaving the University of Utah.

http://go.uen.org/45e (Grand Forks [ND] Herald)

 

 


 

 

Minnesota licensing hurdles frustrate out-of-state teachers

 

It should soon be easier for Kirstin Rogers and educators like her to be licensed to teach in Minnesota.

Rogers was recognized as a top educator during her more than decade-long middle school teaching career in Utah, but when she tried to get a permanent license in Minnesota, she was told to go back to school.

“That was going to be too much for me,” said Rogers, who has a master’s degree in education.

Returning to college would complicate the Burnsville resident’s plans to start a family, so she left the classroom, started tutoring and began training to be a reading specialist. Eventually, Rogers hopes to return to teaching.

Expensive college courses constitute what is probably the most common hurdle out-of-state teaching candidates face in pursuing a Minnesota license, but it is not the only one. Candidates say state licensing requirements are inconsistent, the process is not transparent and credentials from other states are routinely rejected.

http://go.uen.org/45f (St. Paul [MN] Pioneer Press)

 

 

 

 

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OPINION & COMMENTARY

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Keeping track of school funds is only part of the story Deseret News op-ed by Neil Flinders, emerita faculty member of the David O. McKay School of Education, Brigham Young University

 

A recent article by a member of the Utah State Board of Education rightfully indicated budgetary concerns (“There is too little discussion of how the state manages education funds,” June 18). Long-overdue issues were raised concerning fundamentals of financial management. The writer correctly stressed the need for better double-entry bookkeeping to preserve monetary fidelity of millions of public tax dollars. Tools to help protect against waste, fraud, corruption and manipulation seem to be essential. Most citizens of this state would agree.

This timely observation, however, is not the only concern citizens have with public education and its integrity. Evidence suggests an even higher priority: Serious cultural erosion and the loss of vital traditional values now threaten both religious freedom and the family as an institution. Management practices of modern schooling reflect a dramatic decline by the growing absence of nonbudgetary line items on the agendas of local and state boards of education. In our society, money matters seem to dominate.

Current public turmoil regarding such matters as curricular content, testing theory, Common Core standards, disciplinary theory, teacher licensing, gender issues, technological addictions, etc., loom large in the media and parents’ minds. Topics such as these are not primarily budgetary line items. They are connected values and usually transcend financial and conventional measurement. Hence, they seldom dominate administrative agendas until public distress forces such discussions.

This should be legitimate cause for concern.

http://go.uen.org/44W

 

 


 

 

 

The arts can prevent a summer learning ‘slide’

Deseret News op-ed by Erik Albertine, a high school science teacher at Utah Connections Academy

 

Summer break is the ultimate holiday for children everywhere, and it seems to never come soon enough. A symbol of freedom, summer is a chance for young students to fulfill their daydreams of sleeping in, staying up late and playing outside all day.

For the next two months, there won’t be any homework, teachers or tests, but that doesn’t mean learning should stop over the summer. Keeping your child engaged in learning over the summer is crucial to reinforce concepts he or she learned during the school year and to help prevent the “summer slide” — when students slide backward academically.

http://go.uen.org/44Y

 

 


 

 

 

Utah’s Focus on Economic Growth also Benefits Education Utah PolitcoHub commentary by Stan Lockhart

 

In the doldrums of summer and while the rest of the political world is fixated on Obamacare subsidies and same-sex marriage, I thought I would bring the conversation back to Utah for something really important:

Can Trey Lyles help the Utah Jazz win the NBA Championship in 2016?

Just kidding.

Instead, let’s talk about Utah’s unique approach to government — specifically, economic development — that starts at the top.

For as long as I’ve lived in Utah, gubernatorial candidates have made their major campaign theme “Education”.  Over and over I have seen campaigns based on improving education. Some wanted tax increases for education. Some wanted school choice. Some wanted smaller class sizes. All advocated for increased teacher pay. Education, education, education. That was what candidates for Governor did. All this in Utah where constitutionally Governors have relatively little say about the education of our children.

In large part, candidates for Governor touted education because of Utah’s Education Paradox. For decades (maybe since statehood) Utah has been at the bottom of America for per pupil funding. The paradox is that there are more children per capita in Utah than anywhere else in the country and there is less ability to tax than most places. Almost one out of four Utah residents is a school age child and only 30% of Utah land is able to be taxed because of our public lands.

http://go.uen.org/452

 

 


 

 

 

Utah Continues Streak of Business Ranking Excellence Utah Policy commentary by Utah Governor’s Office of Economic Development

 

Utah has consistently been ranked among the nation’s top economies and the state’s consistency is highlighted in the just-announced CNBC 2015 Top States ranking, claiming the no. 3 spot, once again.

The state has ranked in the top five of CNBC’s ranking every year since 2012, and particularly noteworthy this year is that Utah’s overall economy was recognized as the best in the United States.

“Once again Utah has proven that we can compete against the largest states in the nation,” said Gov. Gary R. Herbert. “Our overall best economy recognition by CNBC shows that maintaining a business friendly environment pays off.”

In ranking Utah among the best, CNBC also cited strong job growth, low unemployment, and low tax rates—specifically noting a 38 percent improvement in educational ranking. The increase in the state’s education ranking echoes the collaboration between Utah’s educational institutions, private industry and government.

http://go.uen.org/45i

 

 


 

 

Whole Child Snapshots

Measuring Whole Child Success Across the States Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development analysis

 

To be fully prepared for their futures, the nation’s children need personalized support, safe environments, good health, and challenging learning opportunities. How well are we, as a nation, supporting the whole child?

ASCD’s 50-state whole child snapshots begin to answer that question by featuring data that provide a more comprehensive picture of child performance and well-being.

Each snapshot also has initial ideas for how families, educators, and communities can make targeted and innovative improvements to support the whole child and help students become productive adults and engaged citizens. ASCD is developing the snapshots annually to feature the most recently available data and to permit year-over-year comparisons.

http://go.uen.org/12e

 

Utah report

http://go.uen.org/44T

 

 


 

 

2015 Schooling in America Survey: Perspectives on School Choice, Common Core, and Standardized Testing Friedman Foundation for Educational Choice analysis

 

The Schooling in America Survey is an annual project, developed and reported by the Friedman Foundation for Educational Choice. Our partner, Braun Research, Inc., conducts the live phone call interviews, collects the survey data, and provides data quality control. The purpose of the survey is to measure public opinion on, and in some cases awareness or knowledge of, a range of K–12 education topics and reforms. We report response levels, differences (“margins”), and intensities for the country and a range of demographic groups. We also track response changes over time when possible.

Our annual snapshots consider the perceived direction of American K–12 education; the federal government’s performance in K–12 education; education spending; grades and preferences for different types of schools; and school choice topics, such as charter schools, vouchers, education savings accounts, and tax-credit scholarships. Like last year, we have also asked two sets of questions with a special focus on standardized testing and the Common Core State Standards.

http://go.uen.org/44S

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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NATIONAL NEWS

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Colorado Supreme Court rejects Douglas County voucher program State’s top court rules that Choice Scholarship Program is unconstitutional; district wants to take case to U.S. Supreme Court Denver Post

 

In a nationally significant case involving religion, taxpayer dollars and school choice, a divided Colorado Supreme Court on Monday rejected the Douglas County School District’s groundbreaking school voucher program as unconstitutional.

The wealthy suburban district’s Choice Scholarship Program, which aims to use taxpayer money to send children to private schools, has been at the center of a four-year legal battle.

School district officials strongly indicated they would likely ask the U.S. Supreme Court to take up the case and pledged to seek a legal way to proceed with the voucher program as early as this fall.

More than nine in 10 students in the program — put on hold in 2011 as the first 304 students were to enroll — chose religious schools.

In a split decision on the constitutionality question, the state’s highest court found the program conflicts with “broad, unequivocal language forbidding the State from using public money to fund religious schools.”

The court wrote: “… this stark constitutional provision makes one thing clear: A school district may not aid religious schools.”

That, the court held, is precisely what the voucher program does.

http://go.uen.org/44I

 

http://go.uen.org/44K (NYT)

 

http://go.uen.org/44O (WaPo)

 

http://go.uen.org/455 (AP)

 

A copy of the ruling

http://go.uen.org/44J (Colorado Supreme Court)

 

 


 

 

 

California Legislature passes mandatory vaccination bill Los Angeles Times

 

Gov. Jerry Brown must now decide whether to sign into law a bill that would require mandatory vaccinations for nearly all California schoolchildren.

The measure, spawned by an outbreak of measles at Disneyland that ultimately infected more than 150 people, cleared its final legislative hurdle Monday in the state Senate. Brown has not said publicly whether he would sign it.

The measure — one of the toughest vaccination bills in the nation — would require children enrolling in school or day care to be immunized against diseases including measles and whooping cough.

Parents would no longer be able to cite personal or religious beliefs to decline the vaccinations, although children with certain medical problems, such as immune system deficiencies, would be exempt.

Those who decline the vaccinations would have to enroll their children in a home-based private school or public independent study program based off campus.

http://go.uen.org/44L

 

http://go.uen.org/44M (WSJ)

 

http://go.uen.org/454 (AP)

 

 


 

 

 

Colorado committee members set to study school safety, youth in crisis Gov. Hickenloopers names eight to new legislative committee Denver Post

 

Members of a new committee that will review how Colorado school districts can best handle students’ mental health issues and keep schools safe were announced Monday by Gov. John Hickenlooper.

The legislative committee includes parents, a superintendent and officials who work with children with mental illness. It was created by Senate Bill 214 to study school safety and mental health issues in students.

Specifically, the committee will study and “evaluate programs and methods for identifying and monitoring students in crisis, developing standardized criteria for school personnel to use in assessing the potential threat posed by one or more students,” according to a news release from the governor’s office.

The group also will examine the implementation of Senate Bill 213 — the companion bill — that made school districts liable for school violence by raising a school’s responsibility for safety to a duty of “reasonable care” and allowing an exemption to governmental immunity. It means victims of school violence can sue school districts for negligence to get information and some financial damages.

http://go.uen.org/44N

 

 


 

 

 

SoCal schools may see more interns, substitutes in classrooms as teacher shortage grows Pasadena (CA) KPCC

 

School is out for the summer, but for some in education, the work is just beginning on a problem that is growing more acute: the teacher shortage.

School districts have long anticipated they would be scrambling to fill teacher jobs once boomer-age teachers began retiring. But combine that with declining enrollment in teacher credentialing programs and now increased state funding for new hires, and you’ve got “the perfect storm,” said Donna Glassman-Sommer, a Tulare County Office of Education administrator who handles teacher recruitment.

“We have heard that there is a teacher shortage coming and it started to hit last year, and it’s kind of snowballed right now,” she said. “What they have predicted has arrived.”

A recent state report found that candidates in teacher preparation programs declined for the 12th consecutive year. The number of new teachers is down 26 percent over the past five years.

Interest in teaching fell following recession-era budget cuts that also drove many experienced teachers from the field. Some university students who had sought degrees in education changed majors to pursue more secure careers.

http://go.uen.org/44P

 

 


 

 

 

States Wrestle With How to Get Good Teachers in All Schools Education Week

 

Last year, with much fanfare, the Obama administration declared that it would tackle the tricky issue of equitable teacher distribution, calling on states to revise their plans for making sure that high-poverty schools get their fair share of qualified educators.

Now most states have answered the call, rewriting plans that initially stemmed from requirements in the No Child Left Behind Act.

But it’s an open question whether the work that went into these updated plans­—some of which are more than 100 pages long and include an eye-glazing level of detail—will actually lead to any real progress.

While some states used the opportunity to come up with new ideas for improving teacher quality and distribution, others simply restated or repackaged strategies already underway.

And it’s still unclear how the U.S. Department of Education will hold states to their promises.

The good news is that, in general, the plans are “definitely richer this time around,” compared to the original batch of nearly a decade ago, said Sonja Brookins Santelises, the vice-president of the Education Trust, an advocacy organization in Washington that focuses on poor and minority students.

The real test will be implementation, she added.

http://go.uen.org/457

 

 


 

 

Supreme Court takes up major case on public sector union fees Reuters

 

WASHINGTON | The U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday agreed to take up a case that could weaken public sector unions, a challenge by 10 nonunion public school teachers who say California’s requirement that they pay the equivalent of union dues violates their free speech rights.

The teachers have asked the court to upend a decades-old practice allowing public-sector unions to collect fees from workers who do not want union representation so long as the money is not spent on political activities.

The case comes as some Republican politicians, most notably Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker, have taken aim at public and private sector unions, which generally align themselves with Democrats. In 2011, Walker signed a law that limited collective bargaining rights for state workers. Walker, a likely 2016 presidential candidate, then prevailed in a union-backed 2012 recall election.

Unions, including the California Teachers Association, had urged the court not to hear the case, as did California Attorney General Kamala Harris, a Democrat.

http://go.uen.org/453

 

http://go.uen.org/458 (Ed Week)

 

http://go.uen.org/42k (AP)

 

 


 

 

Bobby Jindal signs Common Core compromise, touts local control New Orleans Times-Picayune

 

Gov. Bobby Jindal finalized Louisiana’s Common Core compromise Monday (June 29), signing three legislative bills authorizing changes to the national education standards in his state. As other Common Core opponents have, Jindal painted the bills as a victory for the anti-standards camp.

“Over the past year, we’ve worked closely with parents throughout the state and listened closely to teachers who have expressed deep concern and frustration with Common Core’s ‘one size fits all’ approach in our classrooms,” Jindal said. “This legislation ensures education standards and curriculum will be returned to local control.”

The measures are House Bill 373, House Bill 542 and Senate Bill 43. Under these new laws, the state Board of Elementary and Secondary Education must review Louisiana’s English and mathematics standards starting July 1. That board has until March to adopt new benchmarks. Four large committees, which comprise K-12 teachers and administrators, college professors, teachers union representatives and others, will advise the state board.

During the review, Louisiana will stop using the Common Core-aligned Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers exams in their entirety. No more than half of the questions on next year’s exams may be partnership-developed questions, the law states.

Finally, the governor and legislators who are elected this fall get considerable say in which standards are eventually used. The 2016 House and Senate education committees and the new governor each could reject the standards and ask the education board to rewrite them.

http://go.uen.org/44Q

 

 


 

 

 

‘Homework Gap,’ Privacy, and Budget Cuts Top Agenda of Ed-Tech Advocates Education Week

 

Fresh off a major victory in overhauling and expanding the federal E-rate program, proponents of educational technology are turning their attention to a trio of policy issues they say could threaten the spread of personalized digital learning.

Chief among them: expanding out-of-school access to high-speed broadband.

“The ‘homework gap’ is the cruelest part of our new digital divide,” said Democratic Federal Communications Commissioner Jessica Rosenworcel, speaking at the annual conference of the International Society for Technology in Education, being held here this week.Live_ISTE-slug.gif

Rosenworcel cited research suggesting that 70 percent of teachers assign homework requiring online access, even though one-third of households do not subscribe to broadband.

Other concerns include a slew of federal and state bills related to student-data privacy, as well as  a potentially significant reduction in ed-tech-related funding that could result from negotiations over the federal budget and reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act.

http://go.uen.org/459

 

 


 

 

 

Educators, advocates see increased importance in US STEM education Fox

 

When it comes to education reform in the United States, Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) is the term that is usually at the tip of the tongue of every policy maker, teacher, or school advocate. For its detractors, STEM is a buzzword for more standardized tests or a de-emphasis on humanities education. For its proponents, STEM signifies an increased dedication to making American schools globally competitive — preparing students for a job market that is becoming increasingly more reliant on science and technology skills.

According to 2012 statistics from the National Math + Science Initiative, there are 26 and 19 industrialized nations that perform better than U.S. students in math and science, respectively. The same report shows that, by 2018, it is estimated that 63 percent of all jobs in the U.S. will require some post-secondary education, while 92 percent of all STEM-related jobs will be for individuals with post-secondary training.

For some advocates of STEM reform, progress has been gradual, but over the past few years there has been greater visibility and awareness of the need to inspire more and more students through science and mathematics.

http://go.uen.org/45c

 

 


 

 

“It Was Kind of Like a Double Life”: Meet Ariel, Who Is Growing Up Trans PBS Frontline

 

Like many young girls, 13-year-old Ariel loved Disney princesses when she was growing up.

She even asked her family to call her by a different Disney princess’s name every day: Cinderella. Belle. Snow White.

But for Ariel, her family’s willingness to call her by those names had special significance: she was born a boy. And at the time — around age nine — she was still presenting as a boy at school and in public, fearful of what the reaction of her peers might be if they knew she identified as a girl.

“It was kind of like a double life,” she tells FRONTLINE in Growing Up Trans, a new documentary premiering Tuesday, June 30, at 10 p.m. EST on PBS (check local listings). “I think a lot of people are completely just comfortable and fluid, but for me, I was really scared.”

Ariel is one of eight kids, ranging in age from nine to 19, who share their stories in Growing Up Trans.

http://go.uen.org/45a

 

http://go.uen.org/45b (KUED)

 

 


 

 

Chobani Selected as Greek Yogurt Provider for School Lunches Associated Press

 

BOISE, Idaho — Public schools across America will soon offer Greek yogurt as a meat substitute in school lunches beginning this fall.

Chobani, a manufacturer of Greek yogurt, officials announced Monday it had been selected by the U.S. Department of Agriculture to supply the yogurt as part of the federal school lunch program.

The USDA decided in April to include Greek yogurt as a permanent option in its school lunch program after classifying it as an approved meat substitute in 2013. Chobani was selected as the exclusive provider after it successfully led a Greek yogurt pilot program over the past year, expanding the program from four to 12 states.

http://go.uen.org/44R

 

 


 

 

 

Patterson Announces First Round of Grants to Schools Associated Press

 

NEW YORK — James Patterson is announcing the first round of school libraries to receive grants from an initiative he and Scholastic Reading Club launched in March, and he continues to raise the amount of money he will donate.

The best-selling and prolific author said Tuesday that $500,000 has been given to 127 schools, from Berryville Middle School in Arkansas to the Pierre Indian Learning Center in South Dakota. Individual grants range from $1,000 to $10,000, part of a program Patterson and Scholastic originally set at $1.25 million, but now stands at $1.75 million. On Tuesday, he committed an additional $250,000, the second time since March he raised funding by $250,000. An “overwhelming” volume of requests, more than 28,000, for books and other resources is behind the latest increase.

http://go.uen.org/456

 

 


 

 

 

Schools face new legal duties to tackle extremism

(London) BBC

 

“Extremism has no place in our schools,” said Education Secretary Nicky Morgan.

She was speaking the day before schools face new requirements to play a bigger part in counter-extremism.

The Counter-Terrorism and Security Act places a legal duty on schools to “prevent people from being drawn into terrorism”.

But NUT leader Christine Blower said: “Teachers cannot be turned into spies in the classroom.”

http://go.uen.org/45d

 

 

 

 

 

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CALENDAR

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USOE Calendar

http://www.schools.utah.gov/main/CALENDAR.aspx

 

 

UEN News

http://www.uen.org

 

 

July 2:

Utah State Board of Education Law and Licensing Committee hearing

6:30 p.m., 250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://www.utah.gov/pmn/sitemap/notice/278239.html

 

 

July 9:

Utah State Charter School Board meeting

250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://go.uen.org/1pn

 

 

July 14:

Charter School Funding Task Force

8 a.m., 445 State Capitol

http://le.utah.gov/Interim/2015/html/00003031.htm

 

Executive Appropriations Committee meeting

2 p.m., 445 State Capitol

http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?Year=2015&Com=APPEXE

 

 

July 15:

Education Interim Committee meeting

8:30 a.m., 30 House Building

http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2015&com=INTEDU

 

 

August 6-7:

Utah State Board of Education meeting

250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspx

 

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