Education News Roundup: Aug. 10, 2015

scienceEducation News Roundup

Today’s Top Picks:

Utah State Board of Education gives preliminary approval to a new rule on school turnaround in Utah.

http://go.uen.org/4l9 (DN)

and http://go.uen.org/4lo (KSL)

Proposed middle school science standards will have 30 more days of public review.

http://go.uen.org/4lb (SLT)

and http://go.uen.org/4lh (PDH)

and http://go.uen.org/4lk (CVD)

and http://go.uen.org/4ll (SGS)

and http://go.uen.org/4lp (KSL)

and http://go.uen.org/4lv (MUR)

and http://go.uen.org/4lJ (Ed Week)

New York Times gives a national perspective on the teacher shortage.

http://go.uen.org/4l6 (NYT)

 

Chicago ad company launches #SaidNoSchoolEver campaign, as in “I love spending my own money on supplies,” #SaidNoSchoolEver.

http://go.uen.org/4ly (Ad Week)

and http://go.uen.org/4lz (WaPo)

 

To capture his personality, ENR would probably have his senior portrait be one of him asleep on the couch in front of the TV … but that’s probably a different kind of senior portrait from this one.

http://go.uen.org/4lB (USAT)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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TODAY’S HEADLINES

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UTAH

 

State School Board to begin new turnaround program for underperforming schools

 

Public feedback on evolution, climate change to be considered in rewrite of Utah school science standards Education » State returns 6th-8th grade curriculum plan to USOE a second time.

 

Security features part of Highland Junior High remodel

 

Why are there so few female engineers?

 

Freedom Academy teaches students leadership while building patriotism

 

Preschool aimed at helping kids who are deaf or hard of hearing loses funding

 

$14 Million Awarded for 40 Special Education Parent Training and Information Centers

 

Principal’s cross-country ride ends early due to injury, but message of kindness travels onward

 

Tabitha’s Way draws families for miles to prep kids for school

 

Kindergartners party at Treehouse Museum

 

Back to school: Computer options that won’t break the bank

 

Diamondbacks head back to Snake Pit

 

AICPA Presents Outstanding Young CPA Award to Utah Accountant

 

Mesquite Rotary provides students school supplies

 

 


 

 

OPINION & COMMENTARY

 

Teacher tax incentives — Utah needs to create desirable environment for future educators

 

Thumbs up, thumbs down

 

Utah schools need 21st Century overhaul to truly “raise the bar”

 

New Logan school superintendent says hello

 

Oh Captain, My Captain! Lessons for Life

 

Start Now, to Start the School Year Right

 

School Choice for Special-Needs Students Other children like our son would benefit from having vouchers that increase their options.

 

After a parent screamed at her, this first-grade teacher called the police

 

 


 

 

NATION

 

Teacher Shortages Spur a Nationwide Hiring Scramble (Credentials Optional)

 

Chicago public schools to lay off 1,500 teachers and staff

 

Educators Work to Stave Off ‘Summer Melt’

 

Should high school students have to ‘defend’ their diploma like a Ph.D?

California’s new way of ranking school performance could open the door to portfolio assessments

 

After scrubbing names of religious holidays, school considers new policy

 

Chappelle-Nadal wants Justice Dept. investigation, urges support for school transfer bill

 

Catholics Wrestle with Teachings as Gay Employees Dismissed

 

Gifted students: State neglects its brightest learners Since the state eliminated a funding match in 1995, more than 100 school districts have eliminated their programs. Just 21 programs remain.

 

Teachers Say They Have Too Much Money for Supplies in This Sarcastic Hefty Campaign From Havas Worldwide Chicago

 

The 101 on back-to-school computer shopping

 

Missouri teen lives más with Taco Bell senior portraits

 

 

 

 

 

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UTAH NEWS

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State School Board to begin new turnaround program for underperforming schools

 

SALT LAKE CITY — Next week, Utah’s lowest-performing schools will begin a new process for improving their students’ academic performance thanks to a law passed by legislators this year and implemented in policy by the Utah State Board of Education on Friday.

The law presents new requirements and incentives for low-performing schools, as well as a quick turnaround for education leaders to begin administering the initiative by its Aug. 15 deadline.

Some board members were hesitant to rely solely on Utah’s controversial school grading system to identify low-performing schools, as the legislation suggests, but the board voted Friday to proceed with following the Legislature’s recommendation so the fast-approaching deadline could be met.

Board members left the door open to adjusting the rule next year to use other metrics, such as attendance data or the PACE report card, in calculating the lowest-performing schools.

http://go.uen.org/4l9 (DN)

 

http://go.uen.org/4lo (KSL)

 

 


 

 

Public feedback on evolution, climate change to be considered in rewrite of Utah school science standards Education » State returns 6th-8th grade curriculum plan to USOE a second time.

 

It’s been roughly 20 years since science classes in Utah were updated, but the state school board is willing to wait a little longer.

A set of proposed standards for middle school science was recently released for 90 days of public review, which included a series of town hall meetings that drew loud, capacity crowds.

But school board members ordered Utah Office of Education staff back to the drawing board on Friday to incorporate public feedback into a full rewrite, prior to an additional, 30-day review period.

“It seems appropriate to have an additional period of public review for a lot of different reasons,” state Superintendent Brad Smith said. “I believe we’re ending up with a substantially better product.”

http://go.uen.org/4lb (SLT)

 

http://go.uen.org/4lh (PDH)

 

http://go.uen.org/4lk (CVD)

 

http://go.uen.org/4ll (SGS)

 

http://go.uen.org/4lp (KSL)

 

http://go.uen.org/4lv (MUR)

 

http://go.uen.org/4lJ (Ed Week)

 


 

 

 

Security features part of Highland Junior High remodel

 

OGDEN — Highland Junior High School is getting a face lift, and being made safer in the process.

“We’re redoing the entire front,” said Ken Crawford, Ogden School District’s director of support services.

The construction project includes adding visitor parking in the front of the building, and a pull-through for dropping off and picking up students.

http://go.uen.org/4le (OSE)

 


 

 

Why are there so few female engineers?

 

OGDEN — For young women considering a career in engineering, Kathleen Kramer has some straight advice: “truthfully, just do it.”

As a professor of electrical engineering at the University of San Diego, she sees her field’s gender gap firsthand. Women make up less than 20 percent of undergraduates enrolled in engineering programs. That disparity has persisted since 2002.

Once women wrap up college and enter technical fields, the environment isn’t always welcoming. Nobel laureates make sexist claims about women in the lab. Female CEOs sue their former Silicon Valley firms for discrimination. Most recently, the #ILookLikeAnEngineer hashtag has surfaced to break stereotypes about who belongs in the tech field.

But Kramer is proof that women can rise to the top in technical industries and stand out for their achievements. She’s authored or co-authored over 100 papers. She researches mind-boggling things like drone sensors and aerospace electronics. She’s also director-elect of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) Region 6, which covers six Western states, including Utah.

At a recent sustainable technology conference at Weber State University, Kramer spoke to the Standard-Examiner about bringing more women into science and technology. The interview has been edited for length and clarity.

http://go.uen.org/4lc (OSE)

 

 


 

 

Freedom Academy teaches students leadership while building patriotism

 

Waking up at 0500 hours is pretty standard for the typical Army grunt starting their day with PT.

But for more than 100 Utah high school students, this was a whole new experience they were eager to embrace.

For the past week, Camp Williams and the Utah National Guard have hosted the 54th annual Freedom Academy. The Freedom Academy is a week-long leadership training camp, designed to be more like the military than other training camps.

http://go.uen.org/4li (PDH)

 

http://go.uen.org/4lq (KSTU)

 

 


 

 

Preschool aimed at helping kids who are deaf or hard of hearing loses funding

 

SALT LAKE CITY, Utah – A group of parents is upset they’ll have to look for another preschool for their children who are deaf or hearing impaired.

Sound Beginnings is funded by the Utah School for the Deaf and Blind, but this year the school is being forced to operate without their financial backing.

Parents drove from Logan to Salt Lake City with their little ones to weigh in on their future at the State School Board meeting. They packed the room carrying signs and wearing T-shirts showing their support for Sound Beginnings.

http://go.uen.org/4ls (KSTU)

 

http://go.uen.org/4lu (KUER)

 

 


 

 

$14 Million Awarded for 40 Special Education Parent Training and Information Centers

 

The U.S. Department of Education announced today nearly $14 million in five-year grants to operate 40 parent training and information centers to assist America’s families of children with disabilities.

The centers will provide parents with details and assistance on laws, policies and research-based education practices for children with disabilities. They will inform parents how data can be used to guide instruction; how to interpret results from evaluations and assessments; and ways to effectively engage in school reform activities.

Utah      Utah Parent Center        $200,000

http://go.uen.org/4lw (ED)

 

 


 

 

Principal’s cross-country ride ends early due to injury, but message of kindness travels onward

 

HURRICANE, UTAH – Hurricane High School principal Jody Rich is always looking for of ways to inspire his students. Late last month, a cross country bike ride ended early after he broke his collar-bone, but the message he intended to send carries on.

Rich started the 1,700-mile bike ride July 13 with the theme, “It’s not about you.”

Rich gave service cards to all of the high school students, with a goal of performing random acts of kindness toward another person, then passing the card along for them to perform service.

http://go.uen.org/4lr (KSTU)

 


 

 

Tabitha’s Way draws families for miles to prep kids for school

 

For the fifth year, Tabitha’s Way held its annual backpack giveaway in Spanish Fork, and more children and numbers came than expected to the event to prepare for school.

“We’ve had a great turnout,” said founder Wendy Osbourne. “It’s been a little bit bigger than we expected but we are so pleased that we’ve been able to have this many people. We are so honored, so it’s great.”

This year, the organizers tried something different. Instead of giving out clothing, they gave certificates for clothing at Savers.

http://go.uen.org/4lg (PDH)

 


 

 

Kindergartners party at Treehouse Museum

 

OGDEN — Hundreds of kindergartners thronged with their parents, siblings and grandparents to party at the Treehouse Museum on Saturday.

http://go.uen.org/4ld (OSE)

 

 


 

 

Back to school: Computer options that won’t break the bank

 

  1. GEORGE — School will be back in session soon and before anyone starts singing “It’s The Most Wonderful Time of the Year,” remember that there are expenses involved in sending a student back to school … or university. One of those expenses will probably be a computer.

http://go.uen.org/4lM (SGS)

 


 

 

Diamondbacks head back to Snake Pit

 

http://go.uen.org/4ln (SGS) photos

 

 


 

 

AICPA Presents Outstanding Young CPA Award to Utah Accountant

 

The American Institute of CPAs (AICPA) has named Dan Griffiths, CPA as the winner of the Outstanding Young CPA Award in Honor of Maximo Mukelabai. Griffiths is the director of strategic planning at Tanner LLC, and was was recognized for his leadership role with the Utah Association of CPAs (UACPA) and service to his local community.

The Outstanding Young CPA Award recognizes a young CPA who personifies an unwavering commitment as demonstrated through successful practices, involvement in and contributions for the interest of the accounting profession. The award was presented to Griffiths by Mark Rich, CPA, director of investments at the Kimbell Art Foundation, at the AICPA’s E.D.G.E. Conference for Young CPAs in San Antonio. Rich was the recipient of last year’s award.

Griffiths has continued to expand his outreach throughout his community, by serving as a board member of the Utah State Board of Education.

http://go.uen.org/4lK (CPA Practice Advisor)

 


 

 

Mesquite Rotary provides students school supplies

 

Through the generosity of Mesquite Rotary Club members, Reliance Connects and Wal-Mart, much needed and appreciated school supplies were purchased for students enrolled in the Beaver Dam Elementary School Backpack Program.

http://go.uen.org/4lm (SGS)

 

 

 

 

 

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OPINION & COMMENTARY

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Teacher tax incentives — Utah needs to create desirable environment for future educators Deseret News editorial

 

Utah has received prominent notice in recent years for creating an environment favorable for business, fueling a period of economic growth marked by the creation of thousands of new jobs in the technology sector. For that to continue, the state is going to have to put the same kind of policy emphasis on creating a positive environment for those who would consider a career as a public school teacher.

We are facing the real possibility of a critical shortage of qualified teachers in coming decades, which would bring untenable pressure to the public education system. The warning signs are on the horizon. More than 30 percent of Utah educators will retire in the next 10 years. As we reported on these pages last month, new research shows a huge drop off in interest among new college students in the teaching profession. In addition, research shows that 20 percent of teachers quit their jobs after the first year, and 50 percent quit within five years.

Add to that the fact that Utah’s population is growing at double the rate of the national average and you have a looming crisis of supply and demand in classroom staffing. Failure to ensure an adequate supply of well-qualified teachers will have a domino effect on the quality of instruction and eventually the ability of schools to feed the labor market with the kinds of graduates necessary to keep the cycle of business growth on an upward trajectory.

The situation demands serious attention in the halls of the Utah Legislature, which has recently demonstrated a willingness to take on the problem.

http://go.uen.org/4l8

 

 


 

 

Thumbs up, thumbs down

(Ogden) Standard-Examiner editorial

 

THUMBS DOWN: To districts that do such a poor job of funding Utah schools that teachers are forced to buy their own classroom supplies.

A study by the National School Supply and Equipment Association estimated out-of-pocket teacher purchases during the 2012-13 school year at $945 per instructor. They spent about $268 on school supplies, $491 on instructional materials and $186 on other classroom needs.

Jay Blain, director of policy and research for the Utah Education Association, said that sounds about right.

“I think Utah teachers fall pretty much in line with those numbers,” Blain told the Standard-Examiner’s Becky Wright. “Considering we get little less funding, they might spend a little more to supplement.”

It’s a school district’s responsibility to fully equip classrooms; the responsibility shouldn’t fall on teachers.

http://go.uen.org/4lf

 


 

 

Utah schools need 21st Century overhaul to truly “raise the bar”

Salt Lake Tribune op-ed by Sharon May, a high school and college concurrent enrollment educator in Washington County

 

An op-ed by Sen. Jim Dabakis published in the Salt Lake Tribune (July 5) called for the Governor’s Commission on Education to “change the paradigm” for Utah public education. Dabakis is right in calling for a major change in K-12 public education, but he doesn’t go far enough. Our model needs a 21st-century makeover.

The first change needed is the expectation that every student should attend college, holding young adults hostage to unnecessary and ever-increasing debt that can take half a career or more to repay. Most career knowledge can and should be gained by less-costly skills certification during high school and paid with regular state education funds — similar to college concurrent enrollment programs offered in high schools now.

A significant percentage of students in “the Greatest Generation” did not attend college yet achieved middle-class lifestyles in a multitude of blue-collar and white-collar jobs. They learned career skills while progressing up the ladder of promotion in their chosen fields. There is no reason today’s skills cannot be gained in the same way.

“Raising the bar” of academic rigor for all students in all subject areas is as unnatural as expecting every student to be a highly achieving musician, athlete, dramatist, artist, or auto mechanic, puts an untenable stress on students and produces such an abundance of grade-inflated 4.0 GPA transcripts that colleges are not relying on them for admission decisions.

The academic bar for subject-area “proficiency” should be reset at a more realistic standard that all students can attain before focusing on their own areas of interest in which to reach higher achievement.

http://go.uen.org/4l7

 


 

 

New Logan school superintendent says hello

(Logan) Herald Journal op-ed by Frank Schofield Superintendent, Logan City School District

 

Dear Logan Community:

When my wife is in the mood to tease me about my age, she will occasionally make a comment about my affinity for listening to NPR, and particularly about my love for Garrison Keillor, the host of “A Prairie Home Companion.” Each week, Keillor tells stories from the fictional town of Lake Wobegon, “where all the women are strong, all the men are good-looking, and the children are all above average.”

As a parent, I know that we often perceive our children to be above average in some way, and we generally hope the experiences they have in life will build on their strengths as individuals. We especially expect our schools to provide safe, challenging environments that help each child reach his or her potential. My wife and share that goal for our children, and as superintendent, I share that goal for all of the students in the Logan City School District.

http://go.uen.org/4lj

 

 


 

 

Oh Captain, My Captain! Lessons for Life Education Week commentary by Ali Threet, Associate Director, Career Services, Dixie State University

 

Yesterday I had the wonderful opportunity to hear from a representative of the Utah Association of Public Charter Schools and two representatives from different charter schools in Utah. A group of fellow colleagues and I were able to clarify what charter schools really are and hear about the great things happening in charter schools right now.  During the course of this conversation there were two main points hit on time-and-time again.  They were:  1 – charter schools are public schools and therefore are required to have licensed and highly qualified teachers; they are also subject to the same testing as traditional schools. 2 – the individuals doing the hiring want to know what your philosophies and thoughts are on education and life.

Take a second and think about item two.

http://go.uen.org/4lL

 

 


 

Start Now, to Start the School Year Right U.S. Department of Education commentary by Secretary Arne Duncan

 

In communities and homes all across the country, change is in the air, and families are thinking about back-to-school season. There are lots of ways to gear up for a great school year.

Sometimes the whole neighborhood plays a part! For example, this past weekend, my hometown of Chicago hosted an 86-year tradition: the largest back-to-school parade in the country. Hundreds of students, parents, teachers and their neighbors took to the streets with marching bands, floats and special activities to celebrate the last few weeks of summer and get the word out about the new school year.

But even if there’s no parade or back-to-school block party in your area, now is still a great time for parents and kids to start getting set for success in the classroom. Here are some things you can do now, and in the weeks ahead:

http://go.uen.org/4lx

 


 

 

School Choice for Special-Needs Students Other children like our son would benefit from having vouchers that increase their options.

Wall Street Journal op-ed by THOMAS M. CHIAPELAS of St. Louis

 

My wife, Liz, and I have a 5-year-old son named Sam who, along with his little brother, Pete, is our pride and joy. Sam was diagnosed with autism-spectrum disorder at age 4. The symptoms of ASD vary but are characterized by social deficits and repetitive behavior. His doctor says he is high-functioning, which means that with the right schooling, therapies, teachers and family support Sam could be “mainstreamed” into a regular classroom with his peers in the future.

But getting from here to there is going to take enormous effort, and our local public school has already shown an unwillingness to help. Sam is old enough to attend kindergarten in the fall, but after reading his progress reports and listening to his therapists, Liz and I agreed he was not ready to tackle the added challenges of kindergarten. His language skills are still delayed and he has sensory and social issues that could use another year of work.

Our son was evaluated by the special-education personnel in our public-school district, and we were told he qualified to attend a general education pre-K class for part of the school day and receive therapy in the special-education classroom the other part of the time. We also got him into applied-behavior-analysis (ABA) therapy outside of the school system that was recommended to us by the pediatric neuropsychiatrist who diagnosed him.

So we asked for a meeting with local public-school officials to see if we could keep our son back a year. To our surprise, there were 11 school representatives at the 90-minute meeting, yet not one was qualified to render a decision. We wrote a follow-up letter expressing our disappointment and requested a second meeting.

http://go.uen.org/4l5

 

 


 

 

After a parent screamed at her, this first-grade teacher called the police Washington Post commentary by columnist Jay Mathews

 

What should educators do when they are unfairly penalized for something they said? This is what has happened to Rafe Esquith, a nationally celebrated Los Angeles fifth-grade teacher. He is still banned from his classroom because he told a joke in class that few people would consider the least bit offensive.

Teachers are threatened with administrative punishments far more often than we know. They often react as we would if our bosses came after us. They are frightened, confused and ready to take the easiest way out.

What happens if they reject those instincts and instead get tough?

Linda Johnson, a retired California teacher who frequently contributes to the washingtonpost.com comments page for this column, told me what happened when she decided not to bow her head and take unfair criticism from her supervisors. Instead, she called the police, with surprising results.

http://go.uen.org/4lA

 

 

 

 

 

 

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NATIONAL NEWS

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Teacher Shortages Spur a Nationwide Hiring Scramble (Credentials Optional) New York Times

 

ROHNERT PARK, Calif. — In a stark about­face from just a few years ago, school districts have gone from handing out pink slips to scrambling to hire teachers.

Across the country, districts are struggling with shortages of teachers, particularly in math, science and special education — a result of the layoffs of the recession years combined with an improving economy in which fewer people are training to be teachers.

At the same time, a growing number of English­language learners are entering public schools, yet it is increasingly difficult to find bilingual teachers. So schools are looking for applicants everywhere they can — whether out of state or out of country — and wooing candidates earlier and quicker.

Some are even asking prospective teachers to train on the job, hiring novices still studying for their teaching credentials, with little, if any, classroom experience.

http://go.uen.org/4l6

 

 


 

 

Chicago public schools to lay off 1,500 teachers and staff Reuters

 

CHICAGO | Chicago Public Schools on Monday began notifying nearly 1,500 teachers and support staff who are being fired amid a previously announced, $200 million budget cut and a shift in student enrollment.

The announcement came as CPS released its $5.7 billion 2016 budget, which includes a historic $1.1 billion budget deficit driven by rapidly rising pension payments.

The layoff notices will affect 479 teachers and 1,012 other staff members out of more than 41,500 employees, according to the school system.

http://go.uen.org/4lC

 

http://go.uen.org/4lD (Chicago Tribune)

 

 


 

 

Educators Work to Stave Off ‘Summer Melt’

Education Week

 

Switching his college choice in late June has made the summer hectic for Christopher M. Triplett, a recent graduate of Lindblom Math and Science Academy on the South Side of Chicago.

On his own financially and the first in his family to go to college, Christopher has relied on his school counselor, Karen M. Fitzpatrick, to make sure everything gets done so he can attend Virginia State University in the fall. He had to submit his financial-aid documents three times and had trouble logging into the online housing system for the Petersburg, Va., college. But, with his counselor’s help, Christopher said he is “99 percent” sure he will report to VSU in August.

“I’m ready to go. I’m focused. I know what I need to do,” he said.

Low-income and first-generation college students, in particular, can lose momentum when they leave the support system of high school. They are at risk of a phenomenon that educators call the “summer melt”—when students who leave high school with college plans never make it to campus in the fall.

http://go.uen.org/4lF

 

 


 

 

Should high school students have to ‘defend’ their diploma like a Ph.D?

California’s new way of ranking school performance could open the door to portfolio assessments Hechinger Report

 

LOS ANGELES — Looking smart in a blue button-down shirt, Jorge Magana, 18, zipped through a PowerPoint presentation with the confidence of a Fortune 500 CEO.

Seated in front of Magana in a classroom at Los Angeles High School of the Arts was a panel of three judges: the school’s assistant principal, a school coordinator, and a former student. The occasion was his senior defense. Magana was trying to convince the panel that he was ready to graduate.

He had 45 minutes to present a portfolio of three “artifacts,” one academic, one artistic, and one of his own choosing. The panel grilled him: Can you describe your research process? Which obstacles did you face and how did you overcome them? How will the skills you learned help with your future plans?

Portfolio assessments like this one, which look a lot like doctoral dissertation defenses, are on the rise in California. The practice, touted by educators nationwide as a proven path to college success, has largely been squeezed out by standardized tests, the quicker, less-costly measure of student performance. But the state’s reliance on test scores to rank school performance is about to change, and educators see an opportunity.

http://go.uen.org/4lI

 

 


 

 

After scrubbing names of religious holidays, school considers new policy Washington Post

 

Maryland’s largest school system is considering a policy to guide decisions about its annual school calendar, a move that comes nine months after officials set off a wave of public anger by scrubbing the calendar of religious holiday names, including Christmas.

The proposed policy does not revive the hot-button issue of identifying religious holidays on the document, but it touches on a related debate in Montgomery County: Under what circumstances should schools be closed on religious or other occasions?

Montgomery schools are closed by state law from Christmas Eve to Jan. 1 and from the Friday before Easter to the Monday afterward. Classes also are canceled on Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur, a result of county decisions that date to the 1970s.

Muslim community leaders have pressed the district to close schools on at least one of the faith’s two major holidays, arguing that the matter is an issue of fairness in a district that holds no classes on major Christian and Jewish holy days. But they have not succeeded in their efforts.

Montgomery school leaders say that they cannot, by law, decide to close on religious holidays. Instead, they must have operational reasons for not holding classes, such as an anticipation of high levels of student and staff absenteeism, they say.

http://go.uen.org/4la

 

 


 

 

Chappelle-Nadal wants Justice Dept. investigation, urges support for school transfer bill (Jefferson City) Missouri Times

 

  1. LOUIS – While many Republican legislators are gearing up their own challenges to vetoes made by Gov. Jay Nixon for this September, one Democrat wrote to her fellow lawmakers and the United State Attorney General Thursday, both on the topic of education, in an effort to override Nixon’s veto of HB 42.

In the first letter, one addressed to U.S. Attorney General Loretta Lynch, state Sen. Maria Chappelle-Nadal, D-University City, asked for an investigation of the administration of education of St. Louis by the Department of Justice. In the second, she urged her fellow lawmakers, specifically Republicans, to pass the House bill vetoed by Nixon that represents the second time lawmakers have clashed with Nixon’s veto pen over what to do with unaccredited school districts.

The senator, whose district encompasses the Ferguson-Florissant School District, said black, lower-income students disproportionately suffered from a lack of quality schools and education – amounting it to slavery in her appeal to Republicans.

http://go.uen.org/4lG

 


 

 

Catholics Wrestle with Teachings as Gay Employees Dismissed Associated Press

 

PHILADELPHIA — Pope Francis refined his vision for the church last week when he said long-spurned divorced and remarried Catholics should be welcomed with “open doors.” And he has famously parsed centuries of thought on homosexuality into a five-word quip: “Who am I to judge?”

Yet the Archdiocese of Philadelphia opened its door only briefly when married gay teacher Margie Winters, trailed by supporters, arrived Monday with 23,000 petitions seeking reinstatement to her job at a Catholic elementary school.

“The school and the Sisters of Mercy allowed me to work there for eight years. Once the diocese was notified, something changed,” said Winters, who was disappointed that a security guard, and not a church official, took her petitions at the chancery door.

Winters, 50, lost her job at Waldron Mercy Academy in June after a parent complained about her 2007 marriage to a woman. Her case highlights the shifting fault lines over gays in the church – and in church workplaces – just before the pope visits Philadelphia next month for the World Meeting of Families.

http://go.uen.org/3p1

 


 

Gifted students: State neglects its brightest learners Since the state eliminated a funding match in 1995, more than 100 school districts have eliminated their programs. Just 21 programs remain.

Sioux Falls (SD) Argus Leader

 

Eli Houdyshell wants to be a doctor, but he worries the classes he’s taking at Pierre Middle School won’t challenge him enough to achieve his dream.

The eighth-grader spent a week this summer at a camp for gifted children. It was a chance to be around kids who, like him, learn at a different pace.

But it was also a reminder of what he doesn’t have when he goes back home.

“I feel like I’m being left behind in my school,” Houdyshell said.

Pierre is among more than 100 South Dakota school districts that have phased out gifted education programs since 1995, the year state lawmakers eliminated dedicated funding for the programs.

http://go.uen.org/4lH

 


 

 

Teachers Say They Have Too Much Money for Supplies in This Sarcastic Hefty Campaign From Havas Worldwide Chicago Ad Week

 

Trash bag company Hefty and Havas Worldwide Chicago tackle a big issue—one that’s more powerful than smelly garbage or nondurable bags—for the brand’s new #SaidNoSchoolEver campaign.

The new work, which includes two 30-second online spots and a handful of playful memes, aims to raise awareness of the serious lack of funding many public schools and teachers face—but does so in a tongue-in-cheek manner.

The writing in the 30-second spots is both sarcastic and sharp, with teachers delivering lines like “We do not need any more art supplies” and “This map—from 1913. Almost all of the states are there.”

“At no point was this supposed to be polarizing for the brand,” Havas group creative director Ecole Weinstein told Adweek. “We wanted to touch the surface of the issue and still do it with a bit of a smile and make [the campaign] culturally relevant and sharable.”

http://go.uen.org/4ly

 

http://go.uen.org/4lz (WaPo)

 

 


 

 

The 101 on back-to-school computer shopping Reuters

 

NEW YORK | Looking to buy your kid a computer this back-to-school season?

Keep in mind that a teen getting a new computer today can expect it to be just one of 20 or so they can expect to go through in a lifetime. That means the price you pay now will affect your long-term budget: Choose unwisely and you could add thousands of dollars to your bottom line.

Most people upgrade their computers every three to five years, according to the Consumer Electronics Association (CEA), a trade group. The average replacement cycle for computers among younger people is roughly double the 18 to 24 months that they change phones, says Steve Koenig, senior director, industry analysis at CEA.

“Most people don’t want to trash a computer in three years, they want to get closer to five,” says Laurie Duncan, owner of MacSamurai Consulting in New York.

Over a lifetime of computer buying, an extra two years of use could shave off eight or more computer purchases – saving you anywhere from $3,000 for budget machines to more than $16,000, if you are partial to high-end Apple products.

http://go.uen.org/4lE

 


 

 

Missouri teen lives más with Taco Bell senior portraits USA Today

 

  1. LOUIS, Mo. — A high school student’s senior portraits are going viral because they’re hilarious, capture her personality and were taken at Taco Bell.

When Brittany Creech had her senior portraits taken, she got many of the usual shots– smiling, posing in front of pretty scenery with a couple different outfits. Then she headed to her favorite restaurant to get some photos taken.

The photos were uploaded to Facebook by Brendan Batchelor Photography last week and Brittany looks thrilled. This is a girl who knows what she loves.

And it seems that Taco Bell loves Brittany, too. The official Twitter account for Taco Bell tweeted out her senior pictures.

http://go.uen.org/4lB

 

 

 

 

 

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CALENDAR

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USOE Calendar

http://www.schools.utah.gov/main/CALENDAR.aspx

 

 

UEN News

http://www.uen.org

 

 

August 13:

Utah State Charter School Board meeting

250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://go.uen.org/1pn

 

 

August 18:

Executive Appropriations Committee meeting

2 p.m., 445 State Capitol

http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2015&com=APPEXE

 

 

August 19:

Education Interim Committee meeting

8:30 a.m., 30 House Building

http://le.utah.gov/Interim/2015/html/00003537.htm

 

Government Operations Interim Committee meeting

8:30 a.m., 20 House Building

http://le.utah.gov/Interim/2015/html/00003552.htm

 

 

September 17-18:

Utah State Board of Education meeting

250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspx

 

 

August 27:

Charter School Funding Task Force meeting

1 p.m., 210 Senate Building

http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2015&com=TSKCSF

 

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