Education News Roundup: Aug. 11, 2015

"back to school" by Emma_Brown/CC/flickr

“back to school” by Emma_Brown/CC/flickr

Education News Roundup

Today’s Top Picks:

 

Utah State Board of Education is no longer a part of the Utah Public Education Coalition.

http://go.uen.org/4lS (SLT)

 

Weber School Board looks to refinance its bonds.

http://go.uen.org/4m3 (OSE)

 

USOE Associate Superintendent Angie Stallings reaches out to Hispanic parents in Utah for a back-to-school piece on Univision.

http://go.uen.org/4mc (Univision 32 via Facebook) video in Spanish

 

Ohio Gov. Kasich wants to change the partly-elected, partly-appointed state school board there.

http://go.uen.org/4lV (Columbus Dispatch)

 

New book argues that it’s time to let your kids fail.

http://go.uen.org/4mg (AP)

 

 

 

 

 

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TODAY’S HEADLINES

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UTAH

 

State school board draws fire after dropping out of education coalition Schools » Coalition members say decision shows disconnect between the state board and educators.

 

Weber school board looks at tax hike, refunding bonds

 

Graduation requirements to change for next year’s freshmen

 

Utah Lowest State For FAFSA Completion

 

Utah towns rank in 25 worst-paying cities for high school teachers

 

Utah guv appoints rancher, school counselor Derrin Owens to legislature

 

Regreso A Clases (Back to School)

 

Back to school tips for parents

 

Utah Jazz player holds back-to-school party for Boys & Girls Clubs

 

Students, parents, motorists: Read, learn, practice crosswalk rules, safety

 

Nearly half of Americans at risk of an earthquake

 

Bills seek to turn U.S. land over to 11 states; group raises questions

 

CHMS registration open

 

2 more Philly teachers face charges in cheating scandal

 

 


 

 

OPINION & COMMENTARY

 

Slow down, pay attention

 

Unfair to have elderly be taxed for schools

 

Why do schools charge fees for public schools?

 

Smith is bringing his ineptitude to the state

 

Making Little Brains Kindergarten-Ready

 

New York experience shows Common Core tests can come at a cost for underprivileged students Low-income students, disabled students and English language learners show sharper declines than general population in Common Core high school algebra exam

 

5 Education Questions for the GOP Field

Voters should know where the candidates stand on these important issues.

 

 


 

 

NATION

 

Kasich wants to change structure, role of Ohio education board

 

30,000 comments on Louisiana Common Core; most OK the standards

 

Nevada OKs Common Core high school math standards

 

Principals decry loss of funding, local control under Scott Walker

 

Two teachers explain why they want to take down their union

 

Charlotte, N.C. Gave Principals Power Over Teacher Layoffs. What Happened?

 

‘Homework Gap’ for Hispanics Targeted in New Broadband-Awareness Initiative

 

New Book Urges Parents to Let Kids Fail

 

When it’s time for kindergarten, some preemies might not be ready

 

 

 

 

 

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UTAH NEWS

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State school board draws fire after dropping out of education coalition Schools » Coalition members say decision shows disconnect between the state board and educators.

 

For two decades, a coalition of parents, teachers, principals and district administrators has met to set goals, discuss education policy and research legislation.

But when the group huddles again later this month, one chair will be conspicuously empty.

In May, state school board representatives alerted the Utah Public Education Coalition that the board would be ending its longstanding participation in the group.

Board members will continue to attend as invited guests, school board Chairman David Crandall said, but will not take part in official business.

“We just want to make sure that our involvement is appropriate,” Crandall said. “To me, it doesn’t really feel like much of a change.”

The coalition’s remaining members disagree. The group was created to foster collaboration, they say, which is undercut by the board’s absence.

http://go.uen.org/4lS (SLT)

 


 

Weber school board looks at tax hike, refunding bonds

 

WASHINGTON TERRACE — Just as homeowners can save money by refinancing mortgages, the school district can save taxpayers money by refinancing at a lower interest rate.

The Weber School District Board of Education approved a resolution tentatively authorizing the sale of up to $17,200,000 of general obligation refunding bonds Aug. 5.

It also approved a new rate for 2016 that means the owner of a house valued at $200,000 will pay about $23 more in taxes.

Refinancing the school district’s debt could save taxpayers as much as $1.4 million.

http://go.uen.org/4m3 (OSE)

 


 

 

Graduation requirements to change for next year’s freshmen

 

Mountain Crest and Ridgeline’s class of 2020 will have a new set of graduation requirements when they enter high school next year.

The freshman class, which will begin school in 2016 at both Mountain Crest and the new Ridgeline High School, will have more options when it comes to how they fulfill their time at high school. The changes were presented to the Cache County School District Board of Education during its Aug. 6 meeting.

The major change for the freshmen class that starts in 2016 will come from switching from a six-period trimester to a five-period trimester with a flex period.

http://go.uen.org/4m7 (LHJ)

 

 


 

Utah Lowest State For FAFSA Completion

 

Only thirty-four percent of high school students in the state fill out FAFSA forms, the lowest number in the nation.

“It’s estimated that we are leaving on the table about forty five million dollars a year that could be available to Utah college students to help pay for tuition,” said Dave Buhler, Utah commissioner of higher education.

http://go.uen.org/4mo (UPR)

 


 

 

Utah towns rank in 25 worst-paying cities for high school teachers

 

High school teachers spend their workdays imploring teenagers to retain the basics of linear inequalities, cell anatomies and balancing chemical equations — none of which exactly pique the interest of most pubescent adolescents.

Many Americans would shudder at the thought of conquering that task day in and day out. And yet, there are hundreds of U.S. cities where high school teachers make less than $47,464, the average salary for all teaching jobs in 2012-2013 (the latest year for which data were available), according to the National Center for Education Statistics.

According to the latest numbers, a couple of Utah towns rank very low on the list.

http://go.uen.org/4ma (KSTU)

 

 


 

 

Utah guv appoints rancher, school counselor Derrin Owens to legislature

 

Gov. Gary Herbert formally appointed Derrin Owens, a counselor at Juab High School and part-time rancher, to fill a vacancy created in House District 58 after Herbert hired Rep. Jon Cox to be the governor’s communication director.

“Derrin brings a unique perspective to the Legislature having spent his entire career in public education,” Herbert said in a statement. “His experience as a teacher, school counselor and rancher have prepared him to effectively serve the people of Sanpete and Juab counties. I am confident that in his new legislative role, he will continue to be a strong voice for Utah’s rural communities.”

Owens was chosen by Republican delegates in the central Utah House district, beating out four other candidates in a special election late last month.

When he is sworn in later this month, Owens will become the fourth person to hold the House 58 seat in less than three years.

http://go.uen.org/4lN (SLT)

 

http://go.uen.org/4lO (DN)

 

http://go.uen.org/4lP (UP)

 

http://go.uen.org/4lQ (KTVX)

 

http://go.uen.org/4lR (Governor’s Office)

 


 

 

Regreso A Clases (Back To School)

 

Comienza la cuenta atrás: quedan días para el inicio oficial de regreso a clases. Lester Rojas tiene algunas recomendaciones para que su hijo, tenga un exitoso año escolar. (The official back-to-school countdown has begun. Lester Rojas has some recommendations for your child to have a successful school year.) http://go.uen.org/4mc (Univision 32 via Facebook) video in Spanish

 

 


 

 

Back to school tips for parents

 

Principal Kim Baker of Copper Mountain Middle School shares a few simple things parents can do to make school a positive experience for their children.

http://go.uen.org/4md (KSTU)

 


 

 

Utah Jazz player holds back-to-school party for Boys & Girls Clubs

 

SALT LAKE CITY — Derrick Favors made the assist as he lifted a little girl closer to the basket so she could make a shot during a game of “speed.”

“All right, guys. I got you,” the Utah Jazz forward said Monday as he rebounded a rogue ball and made a basket for a boy during the game.

Twenty-five kids from the Boys & Girls Clubs of Greater Salt Lake and their chaperones attended a back-to-school party hosted by Favors at the Zions Bank Basketball Center.

http://go.uen.org/4m2 (DN)

 

http://go.uen.org/4me (KSTU)

 

 


 

 

Students, parents, motorists: Read, learn, practice crosswalk rules, safety

 

  1. GEORGE — With school only a week away, police are reminding motorists to slow down and take it easy near crosswalks and school bus stops and to be vigilant in keeping students safe as this school year begins.

The hectic back-to-school season, which begins Aug. 13, finds many drivers, including parents, driving unsafely around school zones. Some studies have indicated that as many as two-thirds of drivers speed in school zones.

http://go.uen.org/4m9 (SGS)

 

http://go.uen.org/4mb (KSTU)

 

 


 

 

Nearly half of Americans at risk of an earthquake

 

When it comes to earthquakes in the United States, most people assume the dangerous shaking is confined to California.

But a new study published in Earthquake Spectra Monday found that the numbers of people at risk of potentially dangerous temblors are much more widespread across the United States than previously thought.

When looking at the highest populations exposed to the strongest shaking California leads the way followed by Washington, Utah, Tennessee, Oregon, South Carolina, Nevada, Arkansas, Missouri and Illinois.

While the study found tens of thousands of schools and hospitals would be a risk, it cautioned that the chances of a damaging quake are still quite rare in many places. Overall, only 28 million people could experience violent shaking in their lifetime.

http://go.uen.org/4mm (CBS)

 

A copy of the study

http://go.uen.org/4mn (Earthquake Spectra)

 

 


 

 

Bills seek to turn U.S. land over to 11 states; group raises questions

 

So far this year, 36 bills have been introduced in 11 western states aimed at wresting control of public lands from the federal government and turning management over to state legislatures, according to recent tally by a conservation group.

But a report released Tuesday said states are not prepared to administer public lands within their boundaries, adding that the bills are largely supported by a handful of state lawmakers with anti-government ideologies and do not have widespread public support.

The report, “Going to Extremes: The Anti-Government Extremism Behind the Growing Movement to Seize America’s Public Lands,” was issued by the Center for Western Priorities, which identifies itself as a nonpartisan land conservation policy organization. The group characterized the recent spate of bills as “advocating a wholesale grab” of federal lands.

“Legislation proposed in these states would mean the most far-reaching change to public land management in recent memory,” said Jessica Goad, advocacy director of Center for Western Lands. “The public has a right to know who is behind this movement and the consequences of what would happen if their aims were ever achieved.”

According to the report, a bipartisan team representing Democratic and GOP polling groups found last year that 52% of voters in western states oppose state government taking control of managing public lands. The poll, conducted by Public Opinion Strategies, a GOP polling group, and FM3, a Democratic group, found that 71% of western voters believe that public lands belong to all Americans, not just residents of a particular state.

http://go.uen.org/4mp (LAT)

 

A copy of the report

http://go.uen.org/4mq (Center for Western Priorities)

 


 

 

CHMS registration open

 

Registration to enroll your child at Charles Hughes Middle School is underway and will end tomorrow at 7 p.m.

http://go.uen.org/4m8 (SGS)

 

 


 

 

2 more Philly teachers face charges in cheating scandal

 

As the Atlanta testing scandal earlier this year made clear, when schools and teachers are placed under heavy pressure to perform on standardized tests, some will crack and resort to cheating as a way out. In the Atlanta case, 11 educators earlier this year were convicted for cheating to systematically improve the test scores of their students.

Philadelphia now has a very similar case as two more educators have been disciplined in a cheating scandal there, bringing the total to 12 disciplined and eight facing criminal charges, as reported by The Notebook, a Philadelphia education blog.

http://go.uen.org/4lW (DN)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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OPINION & COMMENTARY

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Slow down, pay attention

(St. George) Spectrum editorial

 

Sometime in the next few days, depending on where you live in Southern Utah, you’ll begin to see the annual end-of-summer movement of children from the swimming pools to the bus stops.

It’s time to go back to school — whether our young ones are ready or not.

While summer isn’t officially over until the early-morning hours of Sept. 23, August marks the end of a months-long vacation for children in Washington and Iron counties and the beginning of a new adventure in learning. Students at Tuacahn High School are already back in classes, with other schools in the St. George area set to resume Thursday. The Cedar City-area schools open next week.

http://go.uen.org/4ml

 


 

 

Unfair to have elderly be taxed for schools

(Ogden) Standard-Examiner letter from Terry Wixom

 

I am writing this letter on behalf of all the older retired people who have paid taxes for various things their whole life. The one in particular that bothers me the most is the taxes they charge me on my home for funding school. I have been a home owner for over 40 years and all my kids have been out of school for years. How long does this government think I should pay this tax?

With limited income on Social Security, this is a big hit to my finances. It is hard enough to live on Social Security without being hammered with numerous taxes on everything you own and everything you buy or do. Each and every year the property tax on my home goes up and my retirement income is not keeping up with it, which means I have to eat less or do less in order to pay this increase.

I think when a person reaches retirement age they deserve a break from some of these taxes so they are able to keep the homes they worked so hard for.

http://go.uen.org/4m4

 

 


 

 

Why do schools charge fees for public schools?

(Ogden) Standard-Examiner letter from Nancy K. Lewis

 

As a property owner in Weber County , working class parent and former School Land Trust Fund board member, I have questions regarding some of the fees our school district is charging parents for their children to attend Utah’s public schools.

Where can I find information​ ​where Legislature authorized the imposition of the following fees: Adv orchestra, $15; comp and tech fee, $18; FACS, $10; Gateway  A $10; Mailing costs, $6; Science 8, $7; student activity, $18; Textbook rental, $35; and Web fee, $5.56.

My understanding of funding our public schools is a portion of my property tax and 100 percent of the Utah State income tax along with the interest and dividends earned on School Land Trust fund are used to fund and maintain Utah Public Schools.

http://go.uen.org/4m5

 

 


 

 

Smith is bringing his ineptitude to the state

(Ogden) Standard-Examiner letter from Brian Nefcy

 

For three years, we tolerated the least-qualified, most divisive superintendent ever, Brad Smith. Under his tenure, his often-used excuse for low test scores was, “We have a diverse population in Ogden.” He modeled his reforms using the state of Virginia. He, and his cronies, went to Virginia, invested millions in curriculum designed for a non-diverse (white) population, and then blamed “diversity,” and teachers, for low test scores.

“Diversity” must be his code word for “not caucasian.” Now the state wants to make him a “Poster Boy” for education? Well, put this on his poster: “During his leadership, Ogden High earned a 3.6 percent passing rate on the Math I test, and a 4 percent passing rate on the Math II test.” What a disgrace, and a measurement of his failed leadership.

http://go.uen.org/4m6

 


 

 

Making Little Brains Kindergarten-Ready

BloombergView editorial

 

One of the most important skills for any kindergartner, besides recognizing the alphabet and opening juice boxes, is knowing how to keep still. At Children’s Hospital Los Angeles, hundreds of children have practiced doing just that — and not just for their own sake, but for the good of science.

They needed to lie still for an MRI exam of their brains, which can last 45 minutes or more. These healthy children were volunteers in a vast effort to map poverty’s impact on children’s brains. The hope is that parents, teachers and others can now map a more complete response to poverty in their communities.

Many studies over the past few decades have found that poverty and its stresses inflict lasting damage on young children’s brains. In the largest study of its kind so far, researchers at Children’s Hospital Los Angeles, Columbia University and other centers looked at more than 1,000 young brains and found a clear correlation between parental income and the surface area of regions important for school performance: the temporal lobes (a center for language use and reading) and the frontal lobes (planning and impulse control).

Why is this so? For the children in this study, the researchers can only speculate.

http://go.uen.org/4lZ

 


 

 

New York experience shows Common Core tests can come at a cost for underprivileged students Low-income students, disabled students and English language learners show sharper declines than general population in Common Core high school algebra exam Hechinger Report commentary by columnist JILL BARSHAY

 

There’s been a considerable debate in New York State about when to demand that high school students master the new Common Core standards as a requirement for graduation. The state began upgrading its traditional high school exams, known as the Regents, to the Common Core standards in 2014. But because teachers hadn’t been teaching the new Common Core material for very long, officials decided to give students a safety net:  they would continue to administer the old exam, along with the new Common Core exam, and the students could use whichever score was higher.

In the case of algebra, many students took both the old and new exams within a few weeks of each other during June 2014. And that created a wonderful laboratory experiment to see how these same students — most of them eighth and ninth graders —  did on these two different algebra tests. It also may have given us a troubling forecast for what tougher Common Core exams will reveal as they are administered in the rest of the country.

http://go.uen.org/4m0

 

 


 

 

5 Education Questions for the GOP Field

Voters should know where the candidates stand on these important issues.

U.S. News & World Report commentary by Nina Rees, president and chief executive officer of the National Alliance for Public Charter Schools

 

The first major televised debate of the 2016 election offered a glimpse into the Republican candidates’ views on a range of issues from the Iran nuclear deal to the economy to abortion. Unfortunately, education was largely off the radar. Few issues are as important to the future of our country as education is, and while Republicans are often hesitant to discuss the federal role in education – beyond curtailing it – they should remember that the most recent Republican president made education a central plank of his successful campaign.

Thursday night’s brief education discussion centered on Jeb Bush’s support for Common Core, the academic standards now being implemented in 43 states and Washington, D.C. The standards have been a hot-button issue for many Republican primary voters (and some Democrats). Common Core was created by the National Governors Association and the Council of Chief State School Officers. But the fact that the Obama administration required states to adopt Common Core in order to receive certain federal funds has made Common Core a de facto set of federal education standards in the eyes of many Republicans.

None of the GOP candidates supports federal education standards, but the question is something of a litmus test for conservatives, which means that it could continue to dominate the education discussion. That would be too bad, because many of the candidates on stage have played a direct role in shaping education policy in their states and getting to know their records would give voters a better sense of how they think about education and how they operate as decision-makers. What’s more, at no point in history has the value of education been more pronounced. The next president can use his or her bully pulpit to elevate the importance of education in today’s competitive global marketplace and make sure that today’s students are prepared to meet the dynamic economic and social challenges that lie ahead.

We’ll get to hear more about the candidates’ views on education at a panel hosted by former television journalist turned education reformer Campbell Brown on August 19. So far, six candidates have agreed to participate (Govs. Jeb Bush, Chris Christie, Bobby Jindal, John Kasich and Scott Walker, and former Hewlett-Packard CEO Carly Fiorina) and I hope more take up Brown’s invitation. Here are five questions I would ask the candidates on that day and in the months ahead:

http://go.uen.org/4mk

 

 

 

 

 

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NATIONAL NEWS

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Kasich wants to change structure, role of Ohio education board Columbus (OH) Dispatch

 

Like his predecessors, Gov. John Kasich is thinking about changing the makeup and duties of the Ohio Board of Education.

“The state Board of Education is extremely partisan. It’s very polarized and divided, and some people have seen that as a useful way to run through political agendas,” Kasich told The Dispatch.

“I frankly think the whole thing should be changed. I don’t like the structure of it. I don’t like the infighting … a governor should be able to pick their own head of the Department of Education.”

Under current law, the board — 11 elected members and eight appointed by the governor — hires, and fires, the state superintendent of public instruction.

“We have a system now, but I think it needs to be looked at and maybe changed,” said Kasich, a Republican.

His remarks followed calls last week by seven elected board members — six Democrats and one Republican — for an independent investigation into why data from poor-performing charter schools was omitted from evaluations by the husband of Kasich’s campaign manager. David Hansen, the state Education Department’s school-choice director, has since resigned.

The governor’s critics say an all-elected board is the best way to remove politics from the panel.

http://go.uen.org/4lV

 


 

 

30,000 comments on Louisiana Common Core; most OK the standards New Orleans (LA) Times-Picayune

 

As Louisiana education officials prepare to dive into a wholesale re-examination of the Common Core academic standards, they have a lot to consider. Almost 30,000 comments on Common Core have come in via an Education Department website, officials said Monday (Aug. 10), and all but about 2,500 comments OK’d the existing guidelines.

Schools are entering their third year of using the mathematics and English benchmarks, which are shared with about 40 states. But opposition from some teachers and parents led lawmakers and Education Superintendent John White to start a comprehensive review.

The input mostly came from a dedicated corps: About 720 people contributed, which averages to 41 comments each. Sixty percent of the comments came from teachers, one quarter from parents. (Contributors were allowed to identify themselves in only one category.) Only a handful of comments came from people who said they did not live in Louisiana.

http://go.uen.org/4lT

 

 


 

 

Nevada OKs Common Core high school math standards Associated Press via Reno (NV) Gazette-Journal

 

CARSON CITY — Nevada lawmakers have given final approval to adopting Common Core math standards for high school students.

The 12-member Legislative Commission voted 11-1 on Monday to approve the regulations, which have already been through several levels of vetting. Republican Assemblyman Ira Hansen said he voted against the measure because his constituents don’t like Common Core.

The move was the last piece needed to fully implement Common Core-aligned standards in high school, and had been excluded from regulations in the past in a technical error.

http://go.uen.org/4m1

 


 

 

Principals decry loss of funding, local control under Scott Walker Milwaukee (WI) Journal Sentinel

 

In a letter addressed to Gov. Scott Walker and state legislators, 35 principals from southern Wisconsin have decried state budget measures they say underfund education and wrest local control from districts.

Some area superintendents had been outspoken about the need for adequate education funding during state budget negotiations this spring. But the joint letter from high school principals underscores concerns — at the school building level — about the reduced power of school boards to control issues such as curriculum and funding.

The principals from high schools such as Waukesha North, Waukesha West, Arrowhead, Oconomowoc, Pardeeville, Milton and Lake Mills said they’re concerned about how changes passed under Walker forcing schools to compete will result in more segregation. The model will result in an exclusionary system between the “haves and have nots,” they wrote.

And they point to how Walker has pledged to reduce big government, yet they feel power “of the people, by the people and for the people” is less in the people’s hands than it once was.

http://go.uen.org/4lU

 

 


 

 

Two teachers explain why they want to take down their union Washington Post

 

Ten California teachers and the Christian Educators Association have sued the California Teachers Association in a case that could eliminate public employee unions’ right to collect fees from all workers. Many observers believe that the case, to be argued before the Supreme Court this fall, could seriously undermine public sector unions nationwide.

So who are the teachers who want to take down their union?

One of them is Rebecca Friedrichs, the lead plaintiff in the case, Friedrichs v. California Teachers Association. She also is a 28-year veteran of elementary-school classrooms in Orange County. Another is Harlan Elrich, who teaches near Fresno and has been teaching for nearly 30 years.

Both of them say that they decided to become plaintiffs because they don’t want to support a politically powerful union with which they frequently disagree. Current law allows them to opt out of paying for the union’s political activities — about 30 percent to 40 percent of annual dues. But they must continue to pay “agency fees,” which support the union’s collective bargaining activities.

The plaintiffs are asking the Supreme Court to strike down public sector unions’ right in California (and 25 other states) to collect agency fees. Unions say that doing so would create a class of “free riders” who benefit from union representation but don’t pay for it.

http://go.uen.org/4mf

 

 


 

 

Charlotte, N.C. Gave Principals Power Over Teacher Layoffs. What Happened?

Education Week

 

Following the Great Recession, the wave of teacher layoffs gave birth to a seething debate: Should teacher layoffs be based on inverse seniority (as is usually the case in state law and/or contracts), or based more heavily on other factors, like teacher performance?

Now, a new research paper is the first to examine the topic using actual layoff data, in this case from the Charlotte-Mecklenburg district in North Carolina.

In 2009 and 2010, when faced with a budget shortfall, the Charlotte district gave principals a lot of discretion on how they reduced the teaching force. (North Carolina is one of just five states where public-sector collective bargaining is illegal, and so administrators generally have more flexibility with layoffs.) So how did they go about making those decisions?

As it turns out, layoffs still tended to be concentrated among teachers with four or fewer years of seniority. Nevertheless, principals also targeted less-effective teachers across all levels of seniority. And when that happened, student achievement benefited, according to the study, to be published in the fall issue of Education Finance and Policy.

http://go.uen.org/4mh

 

A copy of the study

http://go.uen.org/4mi (Education Finance and Policy)

 

 


 

 

‘Homework Gap’ for Hispanics Targeted in New Broadband-Awareness Initiative Education Week

 

Media company Univision Communications and influential nonprofit Common Sense Media are teaming up to promote expanded broadband access and safe Internet usage among Hispanic-American families.

The move offers another sign that the so-called “homework gap,” between students who have affordable high-speed broadband at home and those who do not, is emerging as a significant ed-tech policy issue.

“This campaign will help to ensure that Hispanic students have the tools to succeed in school, on their way to becoming the workforce of tomorrow,” said a statement from Randy Falco, the president and CEO of Univision, home to the most-watched Spanish-language television broadcast network in the United States, as well as a host of other TV channels, radio stations, and websites.

The campaign’s goals are to provide parents with information and encouragement to get broadband access at home, help families find service and hardware at the best rates, and provide guidelines for responsible Internet usage.

Univision says it will run public-service announcements, conduct outreach and parent workshops, and conduct social media campaigns, among other strategies.

http://go.uen.org/4mj

 


 

 

New Book Urges Parents to Let Kids Fail

Associated Press

 

“The Gift of Failure: How the Best Parents Learn to Let Go So Their Children Can Succeed” (Harper), by Jessica Lahey

A new book written by a schoolteacher has a simple yet compelling message for parents: Back off.

In “The Gift of Failure: How the Best Parents Learn to Let Go So Their Children Can Succeed,” author Jessica Lahey pushes back against helicopter parenting, which she acknowledges having fallen victim to when raising her own children.

“(T)oday’s parents simply are not allowing their child to muck about in the unpleasant, messy experience of failure long enough to come to terms with the shortcoming of plan A and formulate plans B, C, D and E.” It’s the kids who have failed and regrouped, Lahey writes, “who will create true innovation and change the world” because they think creatively, aren’t afraid to try new strategies and show resolve when they hit bumps in the road.

http://go.uen.org/4mg

 


 

 

When it’s time for kindergarten, some preemies might not be ready Reuters

 

Some babies born just a week or two premature may later be developmentally unprepared for kindergarten, and screening these children at age two may not accurately predict whether they will be among the ones most at risk for falling behind in school, a new study suggests.

Researchers assessed kindergarten readiness at school age for 4,900 children born full-term and 950 late preterm infants, born up to about three weeks early. The late preterm kids were 52 percent more likely to be unprepared, the study found.

“At this point we cannot tell which babies will do the worst and may need increased interventions prior to school entry, although our study suggests that socioeconomic status plays a large role as well as gestational age,” said lead study author Dr. Melissa Woythaler of Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston.

http://go.uen.org/4lX

 

A copy of the study

http://go.uen.org/4lY (Pediatrics)

 

 

 

 

 

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CALENDAR

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USOE Calendar

http://www.schools.utah.gov/main/CALENDAR.aspx

 

 

UEN News

http://www.uen.org

 

 

August 13:

Utah State Charter School Board meeting

9 a.m., 250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://go.uen.org/1pn

 

 

August 18:

Executive Appropriations Committee meeting

2 p.m., 445 State Capitol

http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2015&com=APPEXE

 

 

August 19:

Education Interim Committee meeting

8:30 a.m., 30 House Building

http://le.utah.gov/Interim/2015/html/00003537.htm

 

Government Operations Interim Committee meeting

8:30 a.m., 20 House Building

http://le.utah.gov/Interim/2015/html/00003552.htm

 

 

September 17-18:

Utah State Board of Education meeting

250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspx

 

 

August 27:

Charter School Funding Task Force meeting

1 p.m., 210 Senate Building

http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2015&com=TSKCSF

 

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