Education News Roundup: Aug. 12, 2015

"Kids going to school" by Spyros Papaspyropoulos/CC/flickr

“Kids going to school” by Spyros Papaspyropoulos/CC/flickr

Education News Roundup

Today’s Top Picks:

 

Washington School Board approves a tax increase.

http://go.uen.org/4mY (SGN)

 

And Washington School District discusses its instructional materials needs.

http://go.uen.org/4mF (KTVX)

 

Governor Herbert touts walking to school.

http://go.uen.org/4mC (OSE)

and http://go.uen.org/4mD (PDH)

and http://go.uen.org/4mE (KUTV)

and http://go.uen.org/4mJ (KSL)

and http://go.uen.org/4mM (MUR)

 

LA Times looks at the work involved in reconciling the House and Senate ESEA rewrites.

http://go.uen.org/4mA (LAT)

 

How much homework is too much homework?

http://go.uen.org/4mG (Time)

and http://go.uen.org/4mH (CNN)

or a copy of the study

http://go.uen.org/4mI (American Journal of Family Therapy)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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TODAY’S HEADLINES

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UTAH

 

School board approves 3 percent tax hike; 3rd bump in 3 years

 

Washington County School District needs more instructional materials

 

Utah governor says kids should ditch carpools and walk to school

 

Free charter school helps students holistically with mind, body and heart

 

Utah Virtual Academy Welcomes Students for New School Year August 19th

 

Iron County School District wins award for electricity efficiency

 

 


 

 

OPINION & COMMENTARY

 

Utah’s education system is in desperate need of an overhaul.

 

Education should be center stage in primaries The problems are complex and resistant to easy sound-bite solutions.

 

What to Know About the Next Generation Science Standards They are not a curriculum, but a series of goals and best practices that are intended to inform teachers’ science instruction

 

Can We Interest You In Teaching?

 

I’m the Mother of a Murdered Child. No One Else Has to Be.

We protect our kids in so many ways; why not from gun violence? What my 6-year-older’s death in Newtown taught me.

 

Obama plan leaves child migrants adrift

After all of the public furor over the border surge last summer, the children seem to have dropped off the political map.

 

Lessons from the trenches on making school choice work

 

When Knowledge Is Unforgettable

Adults remember more of what they learned in school than they think they do—thanks to an aspect of education that doesn’t get much attention in policy debates.

 

 


 

 

NATION

 

Fixing the No Child Left Behind law: How the House and Senate plans differ

 

Some District Battle Shortage of Teachers as School Begins

 

Want a job? Major in education, new state report says

 

Judge rules union’s teacher evaluation lawsuit can proceed

 

Kids Receive 3 Times the Recommended Homework Load, Study Says First graders are getting way too much homework

 

Should educational materials be set free for all to use? Some say, yes.

 

Education dept. portal stays off in Douglas suit

 

Coal downturn clouds school funding outlook

 

School to fight judge’s ruling to allow gun-toting dad

 

Covington school district: Officer complied with policy by handcuffing student

 

Arkansas plans to put panic buttons in school classrooms statewide

 

Trial of Chinese-style maths lessons in English schools to be expanded Schools minister Nick Gibb hails controversial experiment as one of the most successful things the Department for Education has done

 

Ann McGovern, Author, Is Dead at 85; She Made ‘Stone Soup’ a School Staple

 

 

 

 

 

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UTAH NEWS

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School board approves 3 percent tax hike; 3rd bump in 3 years

 

  1. GEORGE – The Board of Education for the Washington County School District approved a 3 percent tax increase during a public Truth-in-Taxation hearing Tuesday held at the school district offices, 121 West Tabernacle Street in St. George, despite opposition from the Utah Taxpayers Association and others. The tax will be included in the county’s 2015 property taxes.

The tax hike is the second increase in Washington County property taxes for school district purposes in two years, in addition to a voter-approved $185 million construction bond passed in 2013 which is repaid by the taxpayers funds are issued.

http://go.uen.org/4mY (SGN)

 

 


 

Washington County School District needs more instructional materials

 

ST GEORGE – Bonnie VanAusdal has been teaching for 33 years in southern Utah and says nowadays, technology is imperative for a child’s learning.

“Let’s just take the preschool 4-year old games. Letters, letter-sound relationships, sight-reading games, memory games, these all can improve their skills,” said VanAusdal.

However, funding is tight. Superintendent Larry Bergeson said teachers don’t have enough computers or materials.

“One of our challenges is always, what resources, what materials can we provide,” Bergeson said.

For example, there are only six iPads for 45 preschoolers to use in every school.

http://go.uen.org/4mF (KTVX)

 


 

 

Utah governor says kids should ditch carpools and walk to school

 

SALT LAKE CITY— Utah Gov. Gary Herbert wants kids to ditch carpools and start walking to school instead.

Herbert is set to walk with students and parents from Highland Park Elementary in Salt Lake City on Thursday.

He’s encouraging use of an app from the Utah Department of Transportation that lets parents coordinate walking groups to and from school and tells them when their kids have arrived safety.

http://go.uen.org/4mC (OSE)

 

http://go.uen.org/4mD (PDH)

 

http://go.uen.org/4mE (KUTV)

 

http://go.uen.org/4mJ (KSL)

 

http://go.uen.org/4mM (MUR)

 


 

 

Free charter school helps students holistically with mind, body and heart

 

HARRISVILLE — A new charter school is taking a unique approach on education by focusing on its students’ holistic health.

Opening for the school year Aug. 26, GreenWood Charter School has a mission to “help students holistically with mind, body and their heart,” according to school director Jessie Kidd.

Kidd said they have done research and recruited a pediatrician, a food nutrition doctor, local parents and community members to design a school that will focus on both health and wellness and environmental stewardship.

http://go.uen.org/4mK (KSL)

 

 


 

 

Utah Virtual Academy Welcomes Students for New School Year August 19th

 

MURRAY, Utah — Utah Virtual Academy (UTVA), a tuition-free, online public school, will open for the 2015-2016 school year on August 19. Through personalized instruction, an interactive curriculum and individual attention, UTVA helps students from across the state of Utah achieve academic success in ways that suit their learning style.

http://go.uen.org/4n0 PRNewswire

 


 

 

Iron County School District wins award for electricity efficiency

 

IRON COUNTY – During the Rocky Mountain Power Utah Update meeting on Aug. 5, the Iron County School District was awarded the Wattsmart Business Partner of the Year in Utah for its continuing efforts to use electricity more efficiently.

http://go.uen.org/4mZ (Iron County Today)

 

 

 

 

 

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OPINION & COMMENTARY

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Utah’s education system is in desperate need of an overhaul.

KNRS commentary by Rod Arquette

 

Lets face is…public education in this country is severely lacking. We all know it’s not delivering on what it promises, and especially on what students are in need of. Many of them fail to graduate within the level of what is needed to succeed in not just college, but life as well. There’s WAY too much focus on taking tests and making sure schools hit the bottom line of what’s expected, and no real classes that provide work experience that could benefit them post high school. It used to be there was wood shop, metal shop, home education for cooking and sewing, as well as many other classes that allowed kids an education to get hands on training and mentoring before being thrown out in to the real world.

I mean we don’t even have in depth computer classes on topics like programming and web coding. And in today’s world that’s something that is in EXTREMELY high demand that can bring in six figures right out of college, or even high school if they’re good enough. But nope…we have to focus on testing…

So what would be the best thing to do going forward? How would we really refine the educational system here in the state? What will it take to once again focus on skills and abilities relevant to real life, and not just become automated test takers?

http://go.uen.org/4mL

 

 


 

 

Education should be center stage in primaries The problems are complex and resistant to easy sound-bite solutions.

USA Today op-ed by Gene A. Budig, past president of three major state universities, and Alan Heaps, former vice president at the College Board

 

Early indications are that education will be a major issue in the upcoming presidential election. One candidate has staked out the college cost issue. Another is publicly touting charter schools and vouchers. A third, a current governor, recently dropped the Common Core in his state. We can expect the other candidates to quickly join the debate.

The focus on education should be welcomed by all of us. Despite having some of the world’s best schools and colleges, large parts of the system are in disarray and need fixing.

A few numbers bear this out: American 15-year-olds rank only 27th in math, 20 in science, and 17th in reading among the world’s most developed economies; only 26% of our high school seniors are proficient or better in math and 38% in reading; only 59% of those who enroll in four year colleges graduate within six years; and only 32% of Americans over the age of 25 have a bachelor’s degree.

We can expect the candidates to have a heated debate about solutions but the last 30 years of school reform has taught us that the problems are complicated and entrenched, tied to a myriad of issues such as social class, race and the economy. This means that there are no easy fixes; no one strategy will be effective. To give all students the skills they need to succeed in life, this nation must commit itself to a broad range of long-term coordinated educational policies.

The education proposals ideas submitted by the candidates must reflect this complexity.

To jump start the discussion process, in addition to college costs, charter schools, vouchers, and the Common Core, here are seven questions the candidates should be answering.

http://go.uen.org/4mV

 


 

 

What to Know About the Next Generation Science Standards They are not a curriculum, but a series of goals and best practices that are intended to inform teachers’ science instruction Time commentary by Brian Witte, a professional SAT tutor with Varsity Tutors

 

Historians may one day look back on the 21st century as a scientific revolution of sorts. Like the Industrial Revolution that occurred in the 1700 and 1800s, a scientific revolution would transform many aspects of the world around us, including our own selves. The United States may one day play a central role in opening the door to a scientific revolution, but to do so would require a sophisticated method of educating our students about science.

The Next Generation Science Standards (or NGSS) represent one such attempt to bring K-12 science education into the 21st century. The Next Generation Science Standards come at a time of upheaval in education, when change is certainly necessary, but the structure and content of this change remains unclear.

The Next Generation Science Standards are young, and their precise use in American classrooms is not yet known. Despite this fact, now is an ideal time for students to familiarize themselves with one possible educational future. After all, preparation is key to a smooth transition and continuing success, and with that in mind, here are four things every student should know about the Next Generation Science Standards:

http://go.uen.org/4mz

 


 

 

Can We Interest You In Teaching?

New York Times commentary by columnist Frank Bruni

 

Teaching can’t compete.

When the economy improves and job prospects multiply, college students turn their attention elsewhere, to professions that promise more money, more independence, more respect.

That was one takeaway from a widely discussed story in The Times on Sunday by Motoko Rich, who charted teacher shortages so severe in certain areas of the country that teachers are being rushed into classrooms with dubious qualifications and before they’ve earned their teaching credentials.

It’s a sad, alarming state of affairs, and it proves that for all our lip service about improving the education of America’s children, we’ve failed to make teaching the draw that it should be, the honor that it must be. Nationally, enrollment in teacher preparation programs dropped by 30 percent between 2010 and 2014, as Rich reported.

To make matters worse, more than 40 percent of the people who do go into teaching exit the profession within five years.

How do we make teaching more rewarding, so that it beckons to not only enough college graduates but to a robust share of the very best of them?

http://go.uen.org/4mr

 

 


 

 

I’m the Mother of a Murdered Child. No One Else Has to Be.

We protect our kids in so many ways; why not from gun violence? What my 6-year-older’s death in Newtown taught me.

Politico Magazine commentary by NICOLE HOCKLEY, founder of Sandy Hook Promise, a national non-profit dedicated to protecting children from gun violence

 

As a Newtown mom, I remember the resolve President Barack Obama showed me when we met for the first time in December 2012. The honor of meeting a sitting president is numbed when the reason is that your 6-year-old child is dead, gunned down in his first-grade classroom. Yet even through my grief, I sensed that Obama was reacting first as a parent faced with the unimaginable. It is no surprise to me that in recent interviews, the president has since called the failure to enact gun policy reform a major “frustration” of his tenure in office.

Those early days following the Sandy Hook Elementary School massacre were as painful as they were surreal. But in the months after the tragedy, many mobilized to fight for change. My neighbors dragged me out of bed on a frozen winter evening to a friend’s living room where we would form Sandy Hook Promise, a nonprofit dedicated to ending gun violence.  Obama called on Congress to try to keep our children, our families, safer. Working across the aisle, Senators Pat Toomey (R-Pa.) and Joe Manchin (D-W.Va.) tried but failed to advance a bill that would bring background checks to all 50 states.

At the time, it felt like another kind of death. Somehow, we managed to survive this profound disappointment and realized that while our hearts were broken, our spirits were not. Compelled to find the path forward, I’ve crisscrossed the country and found that people want change. I’ve spent countless hours in school auditoriums and church basements with Americans of all stripes. I am asked the same questions: “How do you go on? What can we do? How many more? How will we stop this?”

Sadly, we’re not yet stopping it. Gun violence goes on unabated.

http://go.uen.org/4mt

 


 

 

Obama plan leaves child migrants adrift

After all of the public furor over the border surge last summer, the children seem to have dropped off the political map.

Politico analysis by DAVID ROGERS

 

One year later, child migrants from Central America are still paying a heavy price for President Barack Obama’s decision last summer to rush them into deportation proceedings without first taking steps to provide legal counsel.

New government data this week offer a first, full-year tally for the immigration courts, and the numbers show that among the 13,451 cases completed since July 18, 2014, barely half the children had legal representation.

The picture has improved over time, but in 38 percent of the cases completed since last Christmas, the child was still without counsel. Even since mid-April, there have been an average of 100 case completions per week in which there is no record of a defense attorney.

At one level, this picture is skewed by the stubbornly high level of deportation orders issued by judges “in absentia,” when the child defendant does not appear in court. But migrant rights attorneys argue that this is a Catch-22 situation: Without access to counsel, more children stay away and have no realistic chance of appeal.

http://go.uen.org/4mu

 

 


 

 

Lessons from the trenches on making school choice work Brookings Institute commentary by Ashley Jochim, Research analyst at the University of Washington’s Center on Reinventing Public Education

 

In the United States, what school a child attends is determined in large part by where she lives. According to the National Center for Education Statistics, nearly three-quarters of American children attend schools assigned to them based on their residence.  When combined with deep and long-lasting patterns of residential segregation, particularly in cities, assigning students to their neighborhood schools results in educational opportunities that are extensively stratified by race and class. Low-income and minority children, who now make up the majority of public school students in the U.S., are less likely to attend high-performing schools than their non-minority and more affluent peers and more likely to attend schools that are under-resourced and staffed by the least experienced educators.

Many education reformers have turned to school choice as one answer to these challenges. Proponents of school choice argue that untethering school enrollment from residential location levels the playing field for less advantaged families, who often are unable to compete with more affluent families to buy a house near a good public school. Critics, however, worry that school choice may exacerbate existing inequities in public education, with the least advantaged children least likely to benefit.

Research conducted by the Center on Reinventing Public Education, where I work, lends some evidence to debates about whether offering school choice to families is an effective tool to promote educational equity.  We learned that many less advantaged families will take advantage of school choice when provided the option. But, without more attention to the barriers families face in the process of choosing a school, the effects of choice on access to educational opportunity will be limited.

http://go.uen.org/4mU

 

 


 

 

When Knowledge Is Unforgettable

Adults remember more of what they learned in school than they think they do—thanks to an aspect of education that doesn’t get much attention in policy debates.

Atlantic commentary by DANIEL WILLINGHAM , a professor of psychology at the University of Virginia

 

I recently found a box of papers from high school and was shocked to see what I once knew. There, in my handwriting, was a multi-step geometric proof, a creditable essay on the United States’ involvement in the Philippine revolution, and other work that today is as incomprehensible to me as a Swedish newscast.

Chances are this is a common experience among adults like me who haven’t stepped foot in the classroom for ages—which might suggest there wasn’t much point in learning the stuff in the first place. But then again, maybe there is.

Research shows that people can often retain certain information long after they learned it in school. For example, in one 1998 study, 1,168 adults took an exam in developmental psychology, similar to the final exam they had taken for a college course between three and 16 years earlier. Yes, much had been forgotten, especially within the first three years of taking the course—but not everything. The study found that even after 16 years, participants had retained some knowledge from the college course, particularly facts (versus the application of mental skills). Psychologists in another psychology study, this one published in 1991, examined memory for high-school math content and had similar results.

These findings, among others, indicate that students forget less than they may think they do. And there’s value in what they remember. These conclusions carry important implications for the subject matter students study in school.

http://go.uen.org/4mT

 

 

 

 

 

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NATIONAL NEWS

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Fixing the No Child Left Behind law: How the House and Senate plans differ Los Angeles Times

 

Both the House and Senate have passed fixes to the No Child Left Behind law, the signature educational achievement of the George W. Bush administration, which requires schools to meet strict testing requirements.

But as the chambers try to agree on a solution, lawmakers remain sharply divided over key issues.

The House bill, which would curtail federal standards and permit states to impose their own curricula, did not garner a single Democratic vote, and President Obama has threatened to veto it.

Rep. John Kline (R-Minn.), chairman of the House Education and Workforce Committee, emphasized the need to end the current policy “where Washington’s priorities have outweighed what parents, teachers and local leaders know what is best for their children.” Kline labeled it a “one-size-fits-all approach, which landed many schools in the failing category.”

He will head a committee expected to convene in September to reconcile House and Senate bills. Here’s a look at questions and answers surrounding the legislation:

http://go.uen.org/4mA

 

 


 

 

Some District Battle Shortage of Teachers as School Begins Associated Press

 

OKLAHOMA CITY — As students return to their classrooms this year, some may find fewer teachers waiting to greet them.

Many schools – particularly in places with growing populations and difficult working conditions – are having an especially tough time getting enough teachers to fill all their jobs. Districts say they’re struggling the most in areas like math, science, special education and foreign languages.

Low pay, more mandatory tests, funding cuts and what some educators feel are more demands from policymakers are among the reasons cited by departing teachers, and by administrators trying to replace them.

While teacher shortages aren’t appearing everywhere, they do tend to pose challenges in faster-growing states and those with budget problems, education researchers say. Remote areas, and high-poverty districts like Detroit with uncertain budgets and difficult working conditions, also have trouble.

http://go.uen.org/4mN

 

 


 

 

Want a job? Major in education, new state report says Las Vegas (NV) Review-Journal

 

Looking for a secure job in Nevada once you graduate?

Then your best bet is to declare an education major, according to a report published Friday through the state’s new super-data system that links information from public schools, state colleges and universities and employers.

The Student Completion and Workforce Report shows education majors who graduated with a bachelor’s degree during the 2012-13 academic year posted the highest in-state employment rate — 74.1 percent — among all degree programs offered at the Nevada System of Higher Education.

But education majors who started working in Nevada directly after their graduation only earned $35,751 on average. That is among the 10 lowest salaries listed in the new report.

http://go.uen.org/4mQ

 


 

 

Judge rules union’s teacher evaluation lawsuit can proceed Albuquerque (NM) Journal

 

A Santa Fe district judge has rejected the state Public Education Department’s attempt to have a lawsuit challenging the agency’s teacher evaluation system dismissed.

Attorneys for PED argued today the lawsuit should be dismissed because it makes similar arguments to a previous suit filed by a different teachers union. That lawsuit was rejected by an Albuquerque district court judge and the Court of Appeals.

But the lawyer for the National Education Association-New Mexico said there are important differences between the two cases, including their fundamental legal claims.

After a nearly two-hour long hearing, First Judicial District Judge Francis Mathew appeared to largely agree, saying, “The appropriate course for this particular case would be for it to go forward.”

http://go.uen.org/4mw

 

http://go.uen.org/4mx (Santa Fe New Mexican)

 

 


 

 

Kids Receive 3 Times the Recommended Homework Load, Study Says First graders are getting way too much homework Time

 

Elementary school children often receive far more homework than recommended by a leading education group, according to new research. The study, published in the American Journal of Family Therapy, found that the average first and second grader had three times the recommended homework load.

The National Education Association recommends that elementary school students receive 10-20 minutes of homework per night in first grade. That figure should grow by 10 minutes per year, the NEA recommends. The study found that teachers regularly assign homework that exceeds that recommendation.

The survey, based on an analysis of survey results from more than 500 parents in Rhode Island, suggests that the average student spends nearly 30 minutes on homework in the first grade, a number that grows steadily over the years. Time spent on homework peaks in 10th grade at 54 minutes per night, according to the study.

Researchers also found a disparity in homework patterns based on parents’ education level as well as a family’s racial background. On average, parents of Hispanic students said their children spent significantly more time on homework than their non-Hispanic counterparts in second, third and 12th grades.

http://go.uen.org/4mG

 

http://go.uen.org/4mH (CNN)

 

A copy of the study

http://go.uen.org/4mI (American Journal of Family Therapy)

 

 


 

 

Should educational materials be set free for all to use? Some say, yes.

Hechinger Report

 

A letter signed by more than 100 educators, scientists, lawyers and techies arrived last week on the digital doorstep of the White House.

The correspondence, which is written with constitutional flair, requests something that at first sounds simple: Make educational materials and professional development that are funded by the government free and widely available to the public.

“We, the undersigned organizations from the education, library, technology, public interest and legal communities are writing in response to the Office of Science and Technology Policy’s call for ideas to strengthen the U.S. Open Government National Action Plan,” the letter begins. “To ensure that the value of educational materials created with federal funds is maximized, we call upon the President to issue a strong Administration policy to ensure that they are made available to the public as Open Educational Resources to freely use, share, and build upon.”

Open Educational Resources are commonly referred as OER (pronounced O-E-R). And they might prove to be far more powerful in reshaping our schools than the banal acronym implies.

What is OER? In the simplest terms it can be summarized quite succinctly: free. Outside the education beltway of wonky, jargon-filled insider chatter, there is an example well known to just about everyone with an Internet connection: Wikipedia. It is a free, online encyclopedia that can be repurposed and rewritten by anyone, anywhere, without fear of violating copyright laws.

But the OER crusaders have loftier goals than putting door-to-door dictionary salesmen out of business. They see a future where educational materials (read: knowledge) aren’t locked behind a gate. And the movement didn’t start last week. After nearly a decade, it has a growing list of case studies to share.

http://go.uen.org/4mR

 

A copy of the letter

http://go.uen.org/4mS (Googledocs)

 


 

 

Education dept. portal stays off in Douglas suit Capitol Media Services via (Tucson) Arizona Daily Star

 

PHOENIX — State education officials are using a spat with the Board of Education in refusing to set up a website so schools can submit legally required plans to show how they plan to improve reading skills.

Michael Bradley, chief of staff to school superintendent Diane Douglas, said in an email to Greg Miller, president of the education board, that it isn’t the responsibility of the Arizona Department of Education to maintain a web portal for the Move On When Reading program, designed to boost reading proficiency of students in kindergarten through third grade.

The move came as a surprise to Miller. He said the education department has maintained the portal in prior years.

But Bradley said that was then — and this is now.

http://go.uen.org/4mv

 


 

 

Coal downturn clouds school funding outlook Casper (WY) Star-Tribune

 

For the past 13 years, Wyoming’s energy boom translated into a similar boom in school construction.

The state spent $3.2 billion, building 74 new schools and modernizing an additional 35.

Coal was largely to thank. When companies lease land to dig, they are charged fees called coal lease bonuses, a significant percent of which goes toward school facilities.

But times have changed. Now, as the coal industry reels, school facility funding appears headed for trouble.

There are now only seven leases from which the state draws money. Within the next year, that number will shrivel to two and then zero by fiscal year 2018.

Overnight on June 30, 2017, the state’s capital construction fund will go from receiving $120 million in coal lease bonus payments to exactly nothing.

This does not bode well for the Wyoming School Facilities Department, the agency responsible for overseeing school projects in the state, as the majority of the revenue it receives comes from coal lease bonuses.

http://go.uen.org/4my

 

 


 

 

School to fight judge’s ruling to allow gun-toting dad Detroit (MI) Free Press

 

CLIO, Mich. — A Genesee County school district voted to appeal a judge’s ruling that says a father can carry his pistol openly inside his daughter’s elementary school. And the district superintendent said the Legislature needs to take action to remove ambiguity in the law that allows some to carry guns openly in school.

“The Legislature needs to step up and get the focus on education, and not on some guy who wants to carry a gun in a school,” Fletcher Spears, the superintendent for the Clio Area School District, told the Free Press today.

The district’s board of education met Tuesday night, and the board voted 6-0 to appeal the case to the Michigan Court of Appeals. The Clio case is one of several in Michigan filed against school districts that assert their right to establish gun-free zones — including one in Ann Arbor.

Circuit Judge Archie Hayman on Monday ruled in favor of Kenneth Herman and the gun-rights advocacy group Michigan Open Carry. Herman filed a lawsuit in March against the Clio district, arguing he was denied access to Edgerton Elementary multiple times while trying to pick up his daughter because he was carrying his pistol openly.

http://go.uen.org/4mW

 


 

 

Covington school district: Officer complied with policy by handcuffing student Cincinnati (OH) Enquirer

 

The school resource officer accused of handcuffing an 8-year-old boy complied with the school district’s restraint policy, according to an independent investigator hired by the district.

In a letter to parents, Covington Independent Public Schools Superintendent Alvin Garrison said the investigator found that Kenton County Deputy and School Resource Officer Kevin Sumner followed the district’s restraint policies.

“After a thorough review of this matter, including numerous interviews with witnesses and other research, the investigator concluded that Deputy Sumner and Covington school personnel complied with school district’s restraint policies, which are designed to ensure that students do not injure themselves or others,” Garrison said in the letter.

The American Civil Liberties Union filed a federal lawsuit against the Kenton County Sheriff’s Department after releasing a video that showed a sheriff’s deputy standing over a handcuffed boy who is kicking and crying.

http://go.uen.org/4mO

 

http://go.uen.org/4mP (Ed Week)

 


 

 

Arkansas plans to put panic buttons in school classrooms statewide Reuters

 

LITTLE ROCK, ARK. | Arkansas will put panic buttons in classrooms statewide this year, with officials saying on Tuesday the plan would be the most comprehensive public school emergency alert system in the nation.

The system would provide classroom teachers, principals and other school personnel with a console enabling them to alert first responders to crises including an active shooter, medical emergency, fire or on-site disruption.

The so-called panic button apparatus initially links to a community’s 911 system and can also guide designated emergency personnel to the precise location of the event.

“To our knowledge it is the first statewide deployment of our technology in the U.S.,” said Noah Reiter, director of industry solutions for Rave Mobile Safety, based in Framingham, Massachusetts, whose system will be used by the state.

http://go.uen.org/4mB

 

 


 

 

Trial of Chinese-style maths lessons in English schools to be expanded Schools minister Nick Gibb hails controversial experiment as one of the most successful things the Department for Education has done (Manchester, UK) Guardian

 

A controversial government experiment introducing Chinese-style maths lessons in English schools looks set to expand after being hailed by a minister as one of the most successful things the Department for Education has done.

Schools minister Nick Gibb, who is hoping to fly out to Shanghai in February to learn more about Chinese teaching methods, described the results of the pioneering experiment as incredible, with less-able children faring particularly well.

A group of secondary school teachers from a selection of English schools is preparing to travel to Shanghai next month, following an earlier visit by primary school teachers who watched Chinese teachers in action.

“When that’s brought to England and the approach has been tried in English schools, it’s been hugely successful,” said Gibb. “Teachers have been pleasantly surprised by how much some of the less-able children are achieving in maths as a consequence of this approach.”

Shanghai teachers use a whole-class, “mastery” approach, which involves teaching children of all ability every minute step of a calculation. Thirty Chinese teachers have also been flown to the UK to demonstrate their technique in English primary school classrooms.

http://go.uen.org/4mX

 


 

 

Ann McGovern, Author, Is Dead at 85; She Made ‘Stone Soup’ a School Staple New York Times

 

Ann McGovern, a prolific author for children whose work ranged over women’s history, adaptations of folk tales and her own exploits as a globetrotting adventurer, died on Saturday at her home in Manhattan. She was 85.

Her death, from cancer, was announced by her family.

The author of more than 50 titles that have collectively sold millions of copies, Ms. McGovern was known in particular for “Stone Soup,” her 1986 retelling of the traditional story, with illustrations by Winslow Pinney Pels.

http://go.uen.org/4ms

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

————————————————————

CALENDAR

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USOE Calendar

http://www.schools.utah.gov/main/CALENDAR.aspx

 

 

UEN News

http://www.uen.org

 

 

August 13:

Utah State Charter School Board meeting

9 a.m., 250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://go.uen.org/1pn

 

 

August 18:

Executive Appropriations Committee meeting

2 p.m., 445 State Capitol

http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2015&com=APPEXE

 

 

August 19:

Education Interim Committee meeting

8:30 a.m., 30 House Building

http://le.utah.gov/Interim/2015/html/00003537.htm

 

Government Operations Interim Committee meeting

8:30 a.m., 20 House Building

http://le.utah.gov/Interim/2015/html/00003552.htm

 

 

August 27:

Charter School Funding Task Force meeting

1 p.m., 210 Senate Building

http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2015&com=TSKCSF

 

 

September 17-18:

Utah State Board of Education meeting

250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspx

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