Education News Roundup: Aug. 13, 2015

"School Supplies" by Nick Amoscato/CC/flickr

“School Supplies” by Nick Amoscato/CC/flickr

Education News Roundup

Today’s Top Picks:

 

Provo, Ogden, and Salt Lake comprise three of the top five U.S. cities for fertility.

http://go.uen.org/4nz (Bloomberg)

 

Granite District reaches out to refugee families.

http://go.uen.org/4nf (DN)

 

UHSAA is working on a transgender athlete policy.

http://go.uen.org/4nD (DN)

 

WaPo looks at the lengthening list of supplies students are being asked to bring with them to school.

http://go.uen.org/4n3 (WaPo)

 

New York and Kentucky now have three years’ worth of Common Core testing data. What have we learned?

http://go.uen.org/4nu (Hechinger)

 

Coming up next on HBO, following Game of Thrones, it’s Bert and Ernie.

http://go.uen.org/4nn (USAT)

and http://go.uen.org/4np (AP)

 

 

 

 

 

 

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TODAY’S HEADLINES

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UTAH

 

Americans Are Having the Most Babies in These 20 Cities

More babies = more spending

 

Refugee families get a helpful start to school year

 

UHSAA committee adopts first policy governing participation of transgender athletes

 

Parents invited to learn about new charter school

 

Logan High ready to receive students after summer of construction

 

Ogden Community Soccer Complex invites lacrosse and possible new name to facility

 

School Board approves property tax increase

 

Education software firm Instructure prepares for IPO: sources

 

Bozeman schools buck trend of national teacher shortage

 

Rules governing prep spring football practices could be modified

 

Teaching isn’t as popular as it once was, and it’s getting less popular

 


 

 

OPINION & COMMENTARY

 

A Political Education

 

GCHS parents invited to join community council

 

How the Common Core Will Help the United States Bring Up Its Grade on Mathematics Education

 

Beyond the Pros and Cons of Redshirting

When it comes to delaying kindergarten entrance, there’s lots more at stake than a single child’s competitive edge.

 

 


 

 

NATION

 

Students: Bring your own copier paper, cleaning supplies, tissues …

 

Report recommends rating system to measure charter schools’ financial health

 

Lessons from New York: Don’t expect fast change under Common Core

 

About 20% of Eligible Students Opted Out of New York State Tests

The refusal rate marks a revolt against standardized tests

 

Ax Common Core name, governor says

Step urged to ‘avoid issues’ in education standards redo

 

Connecticut parents sue school district, town over bullied teen’s suicide

 

Federal Court Dismisses Transgender Student’s Title IX Claims in Restroom Lawsuit

 

Save the Children crusades to make preschool a top-tier campaign issue

 

American Academy to Launch National Study on Foreign Language Learning

 

News Corp. Planning to Sell Off Money-Losing Education Unit

 

5 Big Ideas That Don’t Work In Education

 

U.S. Education Department Awards 38 States, D.C., and the Virgin Islands $28.4 Million in Grants to Help Low-Income Students Take Advanced Placement Tests

 

‘Sesame Street’ is moving to HBO

 

 

 

 

 

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UTAH NEWS

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Americans Are Having the Most Babies in These 20 Cities

More babies = more spending

 

Where do American babies come from? Mostly west of the Mississippi, it turns out.

The map below shows U.S. cities whose populations had the highest share of babies in their buggies as of July 2014, based on Bloomberg calculations using Census Bureau data. Cities in Utah, Texas and California took the top eight spots, followed by Wichita, Kansas, and the metropolitan area that includes Omaha, Nebraska.

The common thread that unites many of these cities is that they have high numbers of young households, according to Mark Mather, associate vice president for domestic programs at the Population Reference Bureau in Washington. Young populations tend to have lots of babies because there are so many people of reproductive age, even if an area’s fertility rate isn’t particularly high, Mather said.

In Utah, “you have a young population combined with a high fertility rate,” he said.

That’s especially the case for Provo, home to Brigham Young University, where many of the students are married with children, said John Curtis, who has been the city’s mayor for more than five years.

Additionally, “there’s a high Mormon population,” said Curtis, who has six children himself. “Mormons like big families — we’re not bashful about that at all.”

http://go.uen.org/4nz (Bloomberg)

 


 

 

Refugee families get a helpful start to school year

 

SALT LAKE CITY — Saran Nahas marveled at how things had changed for refugees in Salt Lake City.

Nahas, a mother of five from Sierra Leone, said her eldest child was four years old when they left their refugee camp and relocated to Salt Lake City in 2004. Without her husband, who was unable to come with them at the time, Nahas said she relied on friends for clothes and money.

“Back then there was not much awareness about refugees,” Nahas said. “But now, people are coming out to help.”

Her reflections came Wednesday during Granite School District’s first ever refugee outreach event, designed to help families like Nahas’ access medical and educational resources.

http://go.uen.org/4nf (DN)

 

 


 

 

UHSAA committee adopts first policy governing participation of transgender athletes

 

MIDVALE — The Utah High School Activities Association approved its first-ever policy regarding the participation of transgender student athletes in high school sports.

Utah is just one of eight states without a policy dealing with how — and if — transgender athletes can participate in high school sports.

“As we have come to understand today, there are no policies regarding transgender athletes, so we feel it’s important to present one,” said UHSAA attorney Mark Van Wagoner, who was asked to draft a proposed policy several months ago. “This is something with which we need to deal. …It’s better for us to have a policy about it than it is to have us make a decision based on arbitrary…factors.”

The new policy received only minimal discussion in Wednesday’s Executive Committee meeting, which voted unanimously to adopt the policy. The policy must be approved by the UHSAA’s Board of Trustees on Aug. 27 in order for it to become a reliable guideline or enforceable rule.

http://go.uen.org/4nD (DN)

 


 

 

Parents invited to learn about new charter school

 

HARRISVILLE — GreenWood Charter School isn’t open yet, but enrollment for the new elementary school is almost full.

“We’re chartered for 530 students. As of now, we have about 50 openings in grades 3 through 6,” said Director Jessie Kidd. Kindergarten, first and second grade classes have already been filled.

A parent information night, for those interested in learning more about the school, starts at 7 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 13 in the Harrisville Cabin at 725 W. Harrisville Road.

http://go.uen.org/4nj (OSE)

 


 

 

 

Logan High ready to receive students after summer of construction

 

After a long summer of construction and remodeling, Logan High School is ready to receive its students for the first day of school.

The school has gone through a major overhaul, adding new additions to the school and remodeling existing areas. While construction will continue on through the school year, workers say the building will be ready, safety-wise, for students.

http://go.uen.org/4nk (LHJ)

 


 

 

Ogden Community Soccer Complex invites lacrosse and possible new name to facility

 

The Ogden Community Soccer Complex may be getting a new name.

Ogden School District’s Board of Education is scheduled to vote on the name during its next meeting, which starts at 6 p.m. Aug. 20. The meeting will be held in the board room of the district’s administration building, 1950 Monroe Blvd., Ogden.

http://go.uen.org/4ni (OSE)

 

 


 

 

School Board approves property tax increase

 

The Washington County School Board approved a 3 percent tax increase during a public hearing Tuesday.

The increase was due to inflation adjustments and deficit spending, said Washington County School District Superintendent Larry Bergeson.

The board had previously approved a tax increase of 6 percent after the Truth-in-Taxation hearing in August 2014.

http://go.uen.org/4nl (SGS)

 

 


 

 

Education software firm Instructure prepares for IPO: sources

 

Instructure is planning an initial public offering later this year that could value the education software company at $500 million to $800 million, according to people familiar with the matter.

Instructure, based in Salt Lake City, has hired Morgan Stanley and Goldman Sachs to help prepare for the IPO, which has been filed confidentially, the people said. They requested anonymity because the news of the IPO was not public.

Under the Jumpstart Our Business Startups Act, new companies that generate less than $1 billion in revenue can file for IPOs with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission without immediately disclosing details publicly.

Instructure, Morgan Stanley and Goldman Sachs did not immediately respond to requests for comment.

Instructure was founded in 2008 and makes Canvas, a tech platform that helps colleges and school districts manage their classrooms.

http://go.uen.org/4no (Reuters)

 

 


 

 

Bozeman schools buck trend of national teacher shortage

 

School districts from California to Kentucky and North Carolina are having trouble hiring all the teachers they need, but not in Bozeman.

There is no teacher shortage here, said School Superintendent Rob Watson.

“Right now we’re in really good shape,” said Pat Strauss, the school district’s human resources director.

Strauss said all of a sudden last spring, recruiters from Washington state, Alaska, Utah and other regional states started showing up at teacher career fairs at the University of Montana and Montana State University. For several years it had been mostly Montana school districts recruiting at the fairs.

“I think this is the beginning of a phase where we have to compete with other states,” Strauss said.

http://go.uen.org/4nA (Bozeman [MT] Daily Chronicle)

 


 

 

Rules governing prep spring football practices could be modified

 

MIDVALE — While college football coaches spend a lot of time looking at high school athletes each spring, the rules governing Utah teams makes it difficult for prep coaches to showcase their players.

At best, the rules were confusing. At worst, they were unenforceable.

So Matt Hammer, the president of the Utah Football Coaches Association and head coach at Weber High, presented a change that would simplify the rules governing spring football practices.

http://go.uen.org/4nh (DN)

 


 

 

Teaching isn’t as popular as it once was, and it’s getting less popular

 

Name one teacher who made a difference in your life.

For most people, at least one or two teachers sparked their interest in learning or helped them understand themselves better.

Yet many college graduates these days are steering clear of teaching, which is bad news for students.

http://go.uen.org/4ng (DN)

 

 

 

 

 

 

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OPINION & COMMENTARY

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A Political Education

Salt Lake City Weekly commentary by columnist Kartharine Biele

 

In a nation polarized by issues like abortion and immigration, is it any wonder that education is steeped in politics? The Utah Board of Education has become more and more a tool of the far right and is now led by a man with zero education experience. Superintendent Brad Smith has thus become the target of the Utah Democratic Education Caucus and Kim Irvine, an outspoken opponent of Smith. Irvine, in a recent blog, lists Smith’s failed initiatives as Ogden superintendent, and sees them coming to the state. Already, several veteran employees of the state board have left or been let go. Now as the state board considers new science standards, there is reason to worry. With global warming and evolution considered “theory” by many, Utah’s science curriculum could get fuzzy.

http://go.uen.org/4nC

 


 

 

GCHS parents invited to join community council

Moab Sun News letter from Dr. Stephen Hren, Grand County High School Principal

 

Dear Community Members,

The purpose of this correspondence is to invite you to become a member of the Grand County High School Community Council and inform you of the nature of this organization.

http://go.uen.org/4nB

 


 

 

How the Common Core Will Help the United States Bring Up Its Grade on Mathematics Education

Center for American Progress commentary by Policy Analyst Max Marchitello and Vice President of Education Policy Catherine Brown

 

The Washington state technology industry is booming. The state is home to giant tech corporations such as Microsoft and Amazon, and it has the highest concentration of software companies in the country. This prosperity is expected to continue and estimated to increase the state’s science, technology, engineering, and math, or STEM, economy 24 percent by 2018.

A similar trend is expected nationwide. Today, 20 percent of all jobs across the country require a high level of knowledge in a STEM field. Experts predict that these fields will be among the country’s highest-growth industries in the years to come.

Less well known is that knowledge of STEM fields is important not only for highly educated workers, but also for those without a college degree. According to the Brookings Institution, “Half of all STEM jobs are available to workers without a four-year college degree, and these jobs pay $53,000 on average—a wage 10 percent higher than jobs with similar educational requirements.” Even “blue-collar or technical jobs in fields such as construction and production … frequently demand STEM knowledge.” Moreover, employers report that “mathematical knowledge will be either very important or extremely important to success” in 70 percent of jobs. In other words, the demand and reward for workers who are skilled in critical thinking and problem-solving is rising, while the number of opportunities available to workers without these skills continues to decline.

http://go.uen.org/4nd

 


 

 

 

Beyond the Pros and Cons of Redshirting

When it comes to delaying kindergarten entrance, there’s lots more at stake than a single child’s competitive edge.

Atlantic commentary by columnist ALIA WONG

 

If you’ve read Malcolm Gladwell’s Outliers, you probably remember the argument he makes in the book’s first chapter: In competitive situations, a person who’s relatively older than the others will probably be the one who wins.

Gladwell centers on a real-world example in which almost all of the players who had been selected for a Canadian Hockey League team had birthdays in the first four months of the year. Why? In Canada, Gladwell reasons, the cut-off age for participating in the sport is almost always January 1. A child who, say, turns 11 on January 4 would still play alongside a child who turns 11 much later in the year—and at that stage in life, there are typically significant distinctions in physical characteristics and abilities between two such kids. Gladwell concludes that in Canada, the world’s hockey capital, this policy puts the two children on two very different paths from the get go; the older, more physically developed one gets selected for all-star teams, which means better coaching, resources, and practice opportunities, and, ultimately, a better shot at the pros.

This phenomenon, according to the 2008 book, extends far beyond Canada and hockey. Hence, Gladwell’s famous case for academic redshirting: the increasingly popular parental practice of delaying kids’ entrance into kindergarten. According to some research, between 4 percent and 9 percent of kindergartners are redshirted annually. And while some scholars have suggested that redshirting doesn’t do much of anything—at least in the long run—Gladwell contends that this assumption is false. Rather, this dynamic persists in insidious ways, locking “children into patterns of achievement and underachievement, encouragement and discouragement, that stretch on and on for years,” he writes, pointing to a widely cited 2006 study that found that cut-off dates can even have an impact on whether or not a child ends up going to college.

http://go.uen.org/4nv

 

 

 

 

 

 

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NATIONAL NEWS

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Students: Bring your own copier paper, cleaning supplies, tissues …

Washington Post

 

As millions of students head back to school in coming weeks, they’ll be toting more than just a few notebooks and a backpack. Increasingly, public schools are leaning on families to outfit entire classrooms, asking them to supply items as varied as cardstock, copier paper, hand sanitizer and Band-Aids.

“The supply list that used to be sent home was very short — you were asked to bring a notebook and pencils and pens and paper,” said Michael Griffith, a senior policy analyst at the Education Commission of the States, a non­partisan think tank. “We’ve seen that list creep up and up, and now you start seeing things like tissues and toilet paper and cleaning supplies. Things you weren’t normally asked to bring a decade ago. It’s a hidden type of fee.”

With school districts strapped for funds and looking to trim expenses, many have turned to parents for help with basic supplies that many people assume are part of a school district’s operating budget.

Tim Sullivan, a former teacher, founded Teacher­Lists.com, a Web site on which 800,000 teachers have posted their supply lists for the coming school year. Among the items on the lists: standard erasers and pencils, trash bags and disinfecting wipes.

http://go.uen.org/4n3

 


 

 

Report recommends rating system to measure charter schools’ financial health

Washington Post

 

Seven of the District’s 60 charter schools were deemed to be financially low-performing and 21 schools were financially high-performing during the 2013-2014 school year, according to the most recent charter school financial review.

But the annual Financial Audit Review does not directly say which schools are at the high and low end of the spectrum of financial health.

A D.C. Fiscal Policy Institute report released this month recommends that the D.C. Public Charter School Board remedy this by publicly rating schools according to their financial performance, similar to the way it rates schools for academic performance.

Such a rating system would improve transparency and help parents understand a key indicator of a school’s management and success, said Soumya Bhat, education finance and policy analyst for the D.C. Fiscal Policy Institute.

http://go.uen.org/4n1

 

A copy of the report

http://go.uen.org/4n2 (DC Fiscal Policy Institute)

 


 

 

 

Lessons from New York: Don’t expect fast change under Common Core

Hechinger Report

 

New York State released the results from the latest round of Common Core-aligned tests on Wednesday. Three years into the transition to harder tests, scores across the board have remained low and largely stagnant.

Thirty percent of all fifth-graders passed the English exam, for instance – while just 7 percent of special education students did. In math, 43 percent of all fifth-graders were proficient, but only a quarter of black students were.

“This work is not easy and success isn’t going to be instantaneous,” MaryEllen Elia, New York’s commissioner of education, said on a call to reporters Wednesday. “Changing standards is not going to happen overnight, it takes time. Teachers need to try different strategies and they need to have information about what has been successful.”

New York is the second state in the country to have three years of testing under the new, tougher standards. Kentucky will release results from its fourth year of exams this fall, but most of the 44 states that adopted Common Core only began the new exams this spring.

http://go.uen.org/4nu

 

 


 

About 20% of Eligible Students Opted Out of New York State Tests

The refusal rate marks a revolt against standardized tests

Wall Street Journal

 

New York state officials said Wednesday that about one in five of the students who were supposed to take statewide tests last spring opted out without a valid excuse.

That refusal rate reflected an unprecedented revolt against standardized tests that critics call flawed and too time-consuming. Supporters of the federally mandated exams say they give parents and educators important insights on students, schools and achievement gaps.

State officials said third through eighth-graders had made “incremental progress” in English language arts and math since New York switched to tests tied to higher standards three years ago. At the same time, the missing data muddies some of the conclusions that could be drawn from scores statewide and in pockets with many test refusals, such as Long Island.

State officials said 953,832 tested in language arts this year and 895,998 students tested in math. A spokesman for the state education department said he couldn’t say how many students were supposed to take the tests, but data showed that 1.135 million students took the language arts test last year. That number doesn’t include students who opted out of last year’s tests.

Students who refused were more likely to be white and from wealthy or average-need districts. They were also more likely to have struggled on state tests, having earned scores in 2014 that showed low or partial proficiency.

http://go.uen.org/4n6

 

http://go.uen.org/4n7 (NYT)

 

http://go.uen.org/4nq (AP)

 

http://go.uen.org/4nr (Ed Week)

 

 


 

 

Ax Common Core name, governor says

Step urged to ‘avoid issues’ in education standards redo

 

Gov. Asa Hutchinson on Wednesday urged that anticipated revisions to the state’s math and English/language arts standards include dropping the “Common Core State Standards” name.

The Common Core standards — the basis for classroom instruction in the state’s public schools — were adopted by Arkansas and a majority of other states in 2010 at the urging of the National Governors Association and the Council of Chief State School Officers.

Hutchinson’s proposal to consider a name change for revised standards in the state came in a letter dated Wednesday that he sent to Arkansas Board of Education Chairman Toyce Newton of Crossett and the other members of that board.

The letter’s purpose, Hutchinson wrote, was to formally submit to the Education Board the recommendations made last month by a governor’s council that was specifically created to review those education standards.

http://go.uen.org/4n8 ([Little Rock] Arkansas Democrat-Gazette)

 

http://go.uen.org/4n9 (Ed Week)

 

 


 

 

Connecticut parents sue school district, town over bullied teen’s suicide

Reuters

 

STAMFORD, CONN. | The parents of a 15-year-old Greenwich, Connecticut boy who committed suicide on the first day of school in 2013 after years of alleged bullying filed a wrongful death lawsuit on Wednesday against the school district and town for contributing to his death.

Anna Izabela Palosz and Franciszek Palosz maintain school staff failed to enforce mandatory anti-bullying policies that would have protected their son, Bartlomiej (Bart) Palosz.

The lawsuit filed in Superior Court in Stamford, Connecticut seeks unspecified damages. It claims the school system was “well-aware of the abuse,” and the bullying was a major factor contributing to his death.

Palosz shot himself after the first day of his sophomore year at Greenwich High School.

Despite “clear knowledge of the bullying Bart was facing, school personnel at both Western Middle School and Greenwich High School did not comply with the mandatory policies adopted by the Board of Education to protect students from ongoing bullying,” the lawsuit said.

“We feel this lawsuit is important so that other students in Greenwich don’t suffer the same kind of treatment that Bart did,” the Palosz family said in a statement released through their lawyer on Wednesday, adding that they hope it brings changes to the school system’s procedures.

The lawsuit cites public statements from both town and board of education officials made after the teen’s suicide who admitted to having knowledge of the bullying, and the school system’s failure to protect him.

http://go.uen.org/4nb

 

http://go.uen.org/4nc (Stamford [CT] Advocate)

 

 


 

 

Federal Court Dismisses Transgender Student’s Title IX Claims in Restroom Lawsuit

JD Supra

 

Last week, U.S. District Judge Robert G. Doumar ruled that a school board’s decision to prohibit a transgender student from using the male restroom does not constitute unlawful discrimination under Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, 20 U.S.C. §1681 et seq. (“Title IX”), a federal law that prohibits discrimination on the basis of sex in any federally funded education program or activity.

By way of brief background, Gavin Grimm (“Grimm”) is a 16-year old transgender student who was born female but identifies as a male. Beginning in October 2014, with the consent of school officials, Grimm began using the boys’ restroom at Gloucester High School, located in Virginia. Grimm was permitted to use the boys’ restroom for seven weeks without issue.

However, in December 2014, the Gloucester County School Board (the “School Board”) voted 6 to 1 to limit the use of girls’ and boys’ restrooms to students of “the corresponding biological genders…students with gender identity issues shall be provided an alternative appropriate private facility.” The passage of this policy left Grimm with two options: Grimm could either use the restroom associated with Grimm’s biological sex (the girls’ restroom) or Grimm could use the single-stall private restroom located in the nurse’s office.

http://go.uen.org/4ne

 


 

 

Save the Children crusades to make preschool a top-tier campaign issue

Washington Post

 

Save the Children, the century-old child-welfare organization, has spun off a new political arm that is crusading to make early-childhood education a top-tier issue in the 2016 presidential campaign.

Save the Children Action Network (SCAN) is running a multi-pronged strategy in the early-

voting states of Iowa, New Hampshire and South Carolina designed to convince candidates from both parties that preschool is a winning issue among swing voters.

Mark Shriver, SCAN’s president, formed the 501c(4) organization last year to “turn up the heat” on legislators and policymakers.

“At Save the Children through the last 12 years, I’d go around the country and talk to people and they all tell me I’m doing God’s work and this is critically important,” said Shriver, 51, a former Maryland lawmaker and nephew of President John F. Kennedy. “But when push comes to shove, they’re not putting their money where their mouth is.”

Too many politicians think of education as “nice but not necessary,” Shriver said in an interview. “We’re trying to look at this from purely a political perspective. How do we make early-childhood education a priority and a necessity for the voters who are going to elect the next president of the United States?”

http://go.uen.org/4n4

 


 

 

 

American Academy to Launch National Study on Foreign Language Learning

Education Week

 

The American Academy of Arts and Sciences has formed a national commission to examine the current state of language education and conduct the first national study on foreign language learning in more than 30 years.

The commission will work with scholarly and professional organizations to review research about the benefits of foreign language instruction with the goal of starting a “nationwide conversation” about the need for investment in foreign languages and international education.

The American Academy formed the commission in response to a bipartisan request from Congress to determine how language learning influences economic growth, cultural diplomacy, and the productivity of future generations. The lawmakers made the case that America is increasingly multilingual and Americans are more engaged internationally than ever before.

“Language learning should be among our highest educational priorities in the 21st century,” American Academy President Jonathan Fanton said in a statement.

http://go.uen.org/4ns

 

http://go.uen.org/4nt (American Academy of Arts and Sciences)

 

 


 

News Corp. Planning to Sell Off Money-Losing Education Unit

New York Times

 

Amplify, a much­heralded push by News Corporation into digital education, led by Joel Klein, a former New York City schools chancellor, is nearing an inglorious end.

News Corporation, controlled by Rupert Murdoch, said on Wednesday that it would take a $371 million write­down on the education division and would move to wind down the production of tablets for schoolchildren, a key part of the unit’s offering.

Moreover, News Corporation’s chief executive, Robert Thomson, said in an earnings call with analysts that the company was in an “advanced stage of negotiations” with a potential buyer for the remaining education business.

Together, the moves highlight the difficulty that has confronted News Corporation and others looking to move teaching into the digital age, relying on the Internet and tablets to update traditional curriculums.

http://go.uen.org/4na

 

http://go.uen.org/4nw (WSJ)

 

http://go.uen.org/4ny (Bloomberg)

 

http://go.uen.org/4nx (ZD Net)

 

 


 

 

5 Big Ideas That Don’t Work In Education

NPR

 

There are few household names in education research. Maybe that in itself constitutes a problem. But if there was an Education Researcher Hall Of Fame, one member would be a silver-haired, plainspoken Kiwi named John Hattie.

Hattie directs the Melbourne Education Research Institute at the University of Melbourne, Australia. He also directs something called the Science of Learning Research Centre, which works with over 7,000 schools worldwide.

Over the past 28 years he has published a dozen books, mostly on a theory he calls Visible Learning. His life’s work boils down to one proposition: To improve schools, draw on the best evidence available.

Obvious? Maybe, but it’s rarely honored in reality, Hattie claims. “Senior politicians and government officials clearly want to make a difference,” he says. “But they want to do this, that and the other silly thing which has failed everywhere else, and I want to know why.” In a new paper, “What Doesn’t Work In Education: The Politics Of Distraction,” published by Pearson Education, Hattie takes on some of the most popular approaches to reform.

Small classes. High standards. More money. These popular and oft-prescribed remedies from both the right and the left, he argues, haven’t been shown to work as well as alternatives.

http://go.uen.org/4nm

 


 

 

U.S. Education Department Awards 38 States, D.C., and the Virgin Islands $28.4 Million in Grants to Help Low-Income Students Take Advanced Placement Tests

U.S. Department of Education

 

The U.S. Department of Education announced today that it has awarded $28.4 million in Advanced Placement (AP) grants to 38 states, Washington, D.C., and the Virgin Islands as part of its efforts to boost college- and career-readiness for historically underserved students. The grants will help defray the costs of taking advanced placement tests for low-income students.

“Advanced Placement classes and the corresponding exams come with very high expectations for our students, as well as important early exposure to the demands and rigor of college-level courses, all while still in high school,” said John King, senior advisor delegated duties of deputy secretary of education. “These grants are a smart investment in equity and a way to eliminate barriers for low-income students, level the playing field and allow more students to access the college-level critical thinking and reasoning skills taught in AP courses.”

http://go.uen.org/4n5

 

 


 

 

 

‘Sesame Street’ is moving to HBO

USA Today

 

How do you get to Sesame Street? Well, you can start by going to HBO.

Sesame Workshop, the nonprofit behind the classic children’s show, announced a new partnership with HBO on Thursday that will bring the next five seasons of the series to the premium cable channel and its streaming services.

The partnership means that Sesame Street will be able to produce almost twice as much new content in each season. The show will still be made available to PBS and its member stations, which has aired the program since 1969,  only now it will be free of charge for them after a nine-month window.

The deal moves HBO back into the kids programming business, which it abandoned years ago, at a much lower cost than creating its own original series.  Rival Netflix has moved aggressively into that arena with shows from DreamWorks Animation and others, and says kids programming has been a major driver of subscriber growth among families.

http://go.uen.org/4nn

 

http://go.uen.org/4np (AP)

 

 

 

 

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CALENDAR

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USOE Calendar

http://www.schools.utah.gov/main/CALENDAR.aspx

 

 

UEN News

http://www.uen.org

 

 

August 13:

Utah State Charter School Board meeting

9 a.m., 250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://go.uen.org/1pn

 

 

August 17:

Administrative Rules Review Committee meeting

9 a.m., 445 State Capitol

http://le.utah.gov/Interim/2015/html/00003630.htm

 

 

August 18:

Executive Appropriations Committee meeting

2 p.m., 445 State Capitol

http://le.utah.gov/Interim/2015/html/00003644.htm

 

 

August 19:

Education Interim Committee meeting

8:30 a.m., 30 House Building

http://le.utah.gov/Interim/2015/html/00003537.htm

 

Government Operations Interim Committee meeting

8:30 a.m., 20 House Building

http://le.utah.gov/Interim/2015/html/00003552.htm

 

 

August 27:

Charter School Funding Task Force meeting

1 p.m., 210 Senate Building

http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2015&com=TSKCSF

 

 

September 17-18:

Utah State Board of Education meeting

250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspx

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