Education News Roundup: Aug. 14, 2015

"School Bus" by Cast a Line/CC/flickr

“School Bus” by Cast a Line/CC/flickr

Education News Roundup

Today’s Top Picks:

 

Utah State Charter School Board considers terminating two school charters.

http://go.uen.org/4nF (DN)

and http://go.uen.org/4nO (SLT)

and http://go.uen.org/4oc (PDH)

and http://go.uen.org/4ob (CVD)

and http://go.uen.org/4nW (KSL)

and http://go.uen.org/4nY (MUR)

 

Trib looks at Utah student and teacher demographics.

http://go.uen.org/4nH (SLT)

 

Gov. Herbert and Education Advisor Tami Pyfer discuss education ahead of school opening.

http://go.uen.org/4od (UPR)

 

Utah State Board of Education Members Brittney Cummins and Stan Lockhart discuss science and engineering standards.

http://go.uen.org/4nU (Utah PoliticoHub) video

 

Washington Supreme Court fines the state $100,000 for not funding schools.

http://go.uen.org/4nK (Seattle Times)

and http://go.uen.org/4o1 (Ed Week)

and http://go.uen.org/4nL (Reuters)

and http://go.uen.org/4nZ (NYT)

and http://go.uen.org/4o0 (AP)

or a copy of the ruling

http://go.uen.org/4nM (Washington Supreme Court)

 

Pew Research Center offers up five facts about school ahead of … school opening.

http://go.uen.org/4o8 (Pew)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

————————————————————

TODAY’S HEADLINES

————————————————————

 

 

UTAH

 

Board proposes closing 2 charter schools, putting school year in jeopardy

 

Utah educators are whiter than the students they teach Utah schools » Change is underway, but the share of ethnic and racial minorities remains much lower among educators than among the kids they teach.

 

Utah Educators Want Legislative Consistency

 

Property tax increase giving Washington County teachers hope

 

Hildale school nearly doubles head count in second year

 

Guv encourages Utah parents to ditch the school carpools in favor of walking

 

Positive start for Washington County Schools

 

UHSAA panel of principals rules on prep transfers

 

Inside our schools

 

How one teacher’s union is struggling for relevance in a hostile political landscape

 

 


 

 

OPINION & COMMENTARY

 

The Smart Questions Club: Utah Ed Science and Engineering Standards

 

The complicated politics of national standards: The many sources of opposition (part 1 of 3)

 

Health barriers to learning and the education opportunity gap

 

 


 

 

NATION

 

School funding back on table as court fines state $100,000 a day The state’s highest court said promises are no longer enough when it comes to adequate funding for public schools. Lawmakers and the governor are meeting Monday to decide how to respond.

 

Texas to Hold Districts Accountable for Failing Schools

 

Hispanic Poverty in Rural Areas Challenges States

 

So Nevada Passed a Historic School Choice Law. What’s Next?

 

Cops in schools: Way to rebuild community trust in law enforcement?

With public trust in law enforcement plummeting, some believe the growth of police in schools can help restore confidence. Critics are concerned that too many children are being arrested for nonviolent offenses.

 

New court claim alleges that LePage broke state law in dispute with Eves Added to an earlier federal court filing, the new claim illustrates that LePage ‘also violated Maine law when he blackmailed Good Will-Hinckley to coerce it into firing Speaker Eves,’ says Eves’ attorney.

 

Student sues after high school denies anti-abortion club

 

Prosecutor: NY­Based ‘Scam Charity’ Duped High School Kids

 

Zuckerberg education fund expands reach of $120 million grant to help Bay Area schools

 

Dan Rather Announces Prize to Improve Texas Education

 

5 facts about America’s students

 

 

————————————————————

UTAH NEWS

————————————————————

 

Board proposes closing 2 charter schools, putting school year in jeopardy

 

SALT LAKE CITY — The Utah State Charter School Board on Thursday proposed closing two charter schools in Salt Lake County that were on probation for budget and academic problems, among others.

Alianza Academy, a K-8 charter with campuses in West Valley City and South Salt Lake, and the Wasatch Institute of Technology, a charter high school in Murray, could face closure pending a final decision by the board in its September meeting or sooner.

The two schools have until Tuesday to appeal the board’s unanimous decision.

http://go.uen.org/4nF (DN)

 

http://go.uen.org/4nO (SLT)

 

http://go.uen.org/4oc (PDH)

 

http://go.uen.org/4ob (CVD)

 

http://go.uen.org/4nW (KSL)

 

http://go.uen.org/4nY (MUR)

 

 


 

 

Utah educators are whiter than the students they teach Utah schools » Change is underway, but the share of ethnic and racial minorities remains much lower among educators than among the kids they teach.

 

Joyce Gray became Utah’s first black school principal in 1984 after assuming the top post at Arcadia Elementary.

After three decades in education, the Virginia native believes Utah’s educators have become more diverse during the course of her career, but there’s still work to be done before Utah schoolteachers reflect Utah’s students.

“It’s good for [students] to see the diversity so they know they live in a society that is comprised of more than one race,” she said. “Not one culture, but many, many ethnicities and many, many cultures.”

In Utah, 1 in 4 public-education students is part of a racial or ethnic minority group.

But their teachers are overwhelmingly white. Out of roughly 31,000 certified teachers and principals, 89 percent self-identify as Caucasian.

That leaves just one in 10 educators who are either racially diverse or who declined to indicate a racial identity as part of their certification.

The gap is largest for Utah Latinos, who make up 16 percent of public school students but only 2.1 percent of teachers and principals.

http://go.uen.org/4nH (SLT)

 

 


 

 

Utah Educators Want Legislative Consistency

 

Utah Governor Gary Herbert and his top education advisor, Tami Pyfer, are traveling the state to meet with public educators and administrators prior to the beginning of the 2015-16 school year.

On Wednesday they met with administrators and teachers in the Box Elder School District where they discussed the need for qualified teachers to help educate Utah’s youth. Pyfer said the teacher shortage is real and is having an impact on Utah schools.

The U.S. Department of Education has released a list outlining a state-by-state rundown of teacher shortages.  In Utah, Foreign Language educators are included on the list along with a need for teachers in mathematics, physics, special education and speech language pathology.

http://go.uen.org/4od (UPR)

 


 

 

Property tax increase giving Washington County teachers hope

 

In order to help offset inflation-related costs to the Washington County School District, the St. George city council has approved an 3 percent increase in property taxes.

The increase is a little over $11 a year for an average home that costs about $230,000. With this increase, those tax payers will be paying a little less than a dollar a month.

http://go.uen.org/4nV (KUTV)

 


 

 

Hildale school nearly doubles head count in second year

 

HILDALE The first day of school is filled with emotion, but at Hildale’s Water Canyon School the excitement and nervousness Thursday morning welled up from desert residents who have struggled to get a public education in town for nearly a generation.

Water Canyon began its sophomore year at 8:10 a.m. when the first bell rang and Principal Darin Thomas welcomed everyone over the public address system, assuring them that, “We are going to have so much fun here.”

In his first year at the helm of Water Canyon, Thomas was honored as the 2014-15 Rural School Principal of the Year by the Utah Association of Elementary School Principals, and as he shook hands, fist-bumped or wrapped an arm around new arrivals Thursday, his energy was inspiring.

http://go.uen.org/4nR (SGS)

 

http://go.uen.org/4of (USAT)

 


 

 

Guv encourages Utah parents to ditch the school carpools in favor of walking

 

In preparation for the new school year, Gov. Gary Herbert joined students and parents from Highland Park Elementary School on Thursday to promote school walking groups as a greener, cleaner alternative to carpools.

A free app from the Utah Department of Transportation is supposed to help students ditch carpools and set up walking school bus groups. The app allows parents to create and join walking groups, send messages to coordinate leading walks and notify other parents when students have arrived at school.

http://go.uen.org/4nG (SLT)

 

http://go.uen.org/4nP (DN)

 

 


 

 

Positive start for Washington County Schools

 

The Washington County School District is looking forward to a positive year.

Richard Holmes, assistant superintendent for secondary schools said there has been growth and the district has new plans for the new school year, which started Thursday. Several schools have undergone new additions, including Hurricane Middle School, which does not begin classes until August 17 due to a construction project.

Holmes said the project was started about a year ago and includes the addition of 14-15 new classrooms as well as an expansion on the cafeteria commons area.

http://go.uen.org/4nS (SGS)

 

http://go.uen.org/4nX (KSTU)

 

 


 

 

UHSAA panel of principals rules on prep transfers

 

MIDVALE — The Utah High School Activities Association held two transfer hearings Thursday morning.

http://go.uen.org/4oe (DN)

 


 

 

Inside our schools

 

Arrowhead Elementary School

Utah Online School K-8

http://go.uen.org/4nT (SGS)

 


 

 

How one teacher’s union is struggling for relevance in a hostile political landscape

 

Kim Schroeder, president of the Milwaukee Teachers’ Association, the local NEA affiliate, says the union has struggled to respond to the adverse climate and has had to rethink how it relates to teachers, policy makers and the general public. The conversation has been edited for length and clarity.

http://go.uen.org/4nQ (DN)

 

 

 

 

 

————————————————————

OPINION & COMMENTARY

————————————————————

 

The Smart Questions Club: Utah Ed Science and Engineering Standards Utah Politico Hub commentary by Utah State Board of Education Members Brittney Cummins and Stan Lockhart

 

Join Utah Board of Education members Brittney Cummins and Stan Lockhart as they talk science standards. The Utah Board of Education is implementing new science standards in September. Some have expressed concern that the standards include controversial topics such as global warming and evolution. What should you know and understand about the Utah Board of Education’s process to adopt these standards and what does it really mean?

http://go.uen.org/4nU video

 


 

 

The complicated politics of national standards: The many sources of opposition (part 1 of 3) Brookings Institute commentary by Patrick McGuinn, associate professor of political science and education and chair of the department of political science, Drew University

 

Advocates of the Common Core State Standards say that high, uniform academic standards are essential to improving American students’ academic performance—to prepare them better for college or career and to enhance our nation’s ability to compete in the global marketplace. However, surveys of teachers and the general public reveal growing opposition to the Common Core as it entered its first year of full implementation nationwide in 2014-15. These same surveys also show that most people do not know much about the Common Core, and that much of what they think they know is incorrect.

Opposition to the Core does not stem from a single source and is not confined to members of one political party. People dislike the Common Core for different reasons. In this post, I will identify various sources of opposition to the Common Core as well as assess (and in some instances dispel) the stated reasons for opposition. It is also important to understand the unusual political alliances that have emerged in opposition to the Common Core implementation, and how they may play out longer term. In a future post, I will analyze their likely effects on the future of the Common Core.

http://go.uen.org/4nJ

 


 

 

Health barriers to learning and the education opportunity gap Education Commission of the States analysis

 

Education is a critical pathway by which children can rise out of the cycle of poverty. Billions of dollars are invested annually in America’s public schools and considerable improvement has been made in academic achievement and educational attainment. However, certain school-aged cohorts — entire communities of youth — have been left behind. An under-appreciated fact is that these same youth are disproportionately affected by a constellation of health problems that subvert their motivation and impair their ability to learn.

Scientists and stakeholders agree that students must be healthy to be ready to learn. If a child needs but doesn’t have eyeglasses, can’t sleep because of poorly controlled asthma, feels unsafe at school, is hungry or cannot focus attention, motivation and ability to learn are greatly limited. In communities with high rates of poverty, these conditions are endemic.

http://go.uen.org/4nI

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

————————————————————-

NATIONAL NEWS

————————————————————-

 

School funding back on table as court fines state $100,000 a day The state’s highest court said promises are no longer enough when it comes to adequate funding for public schools. Lawmakers and the governor are meeting Monday to decide how to respond.

Seattle (WA) Times

 

OLYMPIA — Prodded by a $100,000-a-day fine, Gov. Jay Inslee and legislative leaders plan to dive back into the school-spending dispute Monday after the latest state Supreme Court repudiation of Washington’s chronic underfunding of public schools.

The court on Thursday morning delivered a unanimous order that made good on its earlier threat of sanctions, slamming the state for failing to come up with a plan to adequately fund K-12 education, as required by its 2012 McCleary decision. The court in September held the state in contempt, but agreed to hold off on any punishment until the end of the 2015 legislative session.

The justices remained unsatisfied. Despite a record-setting 176-day session and a two-year budget agreement that pushed substantial new money into the K-12 system, the court said lawmakers had again failed to live up to what the state constitution calls the state’s “paramount” duty — amply funding schools.

Along with the fines, the court’s 11-page order encouraged Inslee to call a special session so that lawmakers can finish their work. The justices ordered the fines be held in a special account “for the benefit of basic education” until the state succeeds in addressing the issues the court raises.

The ruling marked the first time that the court has sanctioned the governor and Legislature. But it is not the first showdown between a state supreme court and lawmakers over school funding. New Jersey’s Supreme Court for example, once shut down schools for eight days, and Kansas’ court has threatened to do so.

And the ruling left many unanswered questions, including whether lawmakers will agree to pay the fine and, if they do, where the money would come from. Some lawmakers argued a special session is not needed, saying they can wait until the next regular session in January to take up the court’s concerns.

http://go.uen.org/4nK

 

http://go.uen.org/4o1 (Ed Week)

 

http://go.uen.org/4nL (Reuters)

 

http://go.uen.org/4nZ (NYT)

 

http://go.uen.org/4o0 (AP)

 

A copy of the ruling

http://go.uen.org/4nM (Washington Supreme Court)

 

 


 

 

Texas to Hold Districts Accountable for Failing Schools Texas Tribune

 

If school district leaders don’t fix failing schools, the state may strip their authority under a new law effective Sept. 1.

“We wanted to apply both a carrot and a stick to the boards saying we’re going to let you have the flexibility to do what you want to do, but we also expect to hold you responsible at some point,” said state Rep. Jimmie Don Aycock, R-Killeen, the primary author of House Bill 1842. “The whole district is responsible for turning those schools around.”

The new law sets deadlines for each step in a new reform process advocates say puts pressure on districts to improve failing schools, and allows the Texas education commissioner to install a board of managers replacing district leaders who fail to fix underperforming campuses.

http://go.uen.org/4o7

 


 

 

Hispanic Poverty in Rural Areas Challenges States Stateline

 

Today, one in four babies born in the U.S. is Hispanic. Increasingly they are being born into immigrant families who’ve bypassed the cities—the traditional pathway for immigrants—for rural America.

Hispanic babies born in rural enclaves are more likely to be impoverished than those in the city. And it’s harder for them to receive help from federal and state programs, such as the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC). Consistent health care also is hard to come by, particularly if their parents are undocumented and are fearful of being discovered and deported—even though the children are U.S. citizens.

As a result, many researchers say, many of these children may never realize their full potential and escape poverty.

“These babies are starting behind the starting line,” said Daniel Lichter, a Cornell University researcher and coauthor of a recent study on their situation. “And their opportunities as they move into adulthood are jeopardized. These are American citizens at risk of failing to thrive.”

A handful of states and municipalities are experimenting with ways to reach and help Hispanic families with young children living in rural areas, from health care initiatives to home visiting programs to bilingual preschool programs.

http://go.uen.org/4o6

 


 

 

So Nevada Passed a Historic School Choice Law. What’s Next?

Education Week

 

Remember that “groundbreaking, historic, sweeping” school choice law Nevada passed back in June that allows public school parents to use state dollars for private or home schooling?

Well now comes the hard part: making it work in the real world. And it appears the new law has already hit some stumbling blocks which, to be fair, should be expected, given that there’s really no precedent for this kind of program.

Among the questions cropping up as the school year approaches: Will there be enough private schools to meet demand? How will parents who’ve already been paying out of pocket for private tuition react? What will the impact be on both private and public schools?

http://go.uen.org/4o2

 

 


 

 

Cops in schools: Way to rebuild community trust in law enforcement?

With public trust in law enforcement plummeting, some believe the growth of police in schools can help restore confidence. Critics are concerned that too many children are being arrested for nonviolent offenses.

Christian Science Monitor

 

The 8-year-old boy sat in a chair, sobbing, as a sheriff’s deputy handcuffed him around the biceps because his wrists were too small.

“You don’t get to swing at me like that,” the deputy said to the boy, who was diagnosed with ADHD, while a teacher recorded the incident in Covington, Ky., last fall.

“You can do what we’ve asked you to or you can suffer the consequences,” the officer continues.

The video went viral, and the deputy is now facing a federal lawsuit filed by the American Civil Liberties Union. The sight of a uniformed police officer handcuffing an elementary school student may be surprising, even shocking. But police presence in schools is not new. After growing steadily for decades, the trend accelerated in the wake of school shootings such as the one at Columbine High in Colorado. Today, more than 19,000 police officers are now employed full time in American schools.

Many parents and teachers say that having police in schools makes them feel safer and gives them greater peace of mind. Police say that working in schools can help give children a positive opinion of law enforcement to carry into adulthood, as well as allow officers to cultivate leads on crime that could be occurring outside the school walls. While not denying that controversial incidents have occurred, the National Association of School Resource Officers argues that those point to a need for proper training and that the presence of law enforcement in schools can offer benefits for both students and teachers.

http://go.uen.org/4o5

 


 

 

New court claim alleges that LePage broke state law in dispute with Eves Added to an earlier federal court filing, the new claim illustrates that LePage ‘also violated Maine law when he blackmailed Good Will-Hinckley to coerce it into firing Speaker Eves,’ says Eves’ attorney.

Portland (ME) Press Herald

 

AUGUSTA — Democratic House Speaker Mark Eves has filed an additional court claim against Gov. Paul LePage, alleging that he broke state law when he threatened to withhold funds from a Fairfield school unless it ended its employment contract with Eves.

The new claim, which will be added to a civil lawsuit already filed in federal court, alleges that LePage violated Maine’s tort claim law by intimidating Good Will-Hinckley, threatening to withhold $530,000 in annual state funding for the private school unless it terminated its contract to hire Eves. The school eventually rescinded a job offer to make Eves its next president.

David Webbert, Eves’ attorney, said in a statement that the claim illustrates that LePage “also violated Maine law when he blackmailed Good Will-Hinckley to coerce it into firing Speaker Eves.”

He added, “This state law claim adds to the speaker’s case against the governor and will be considered as part of the lawsuit in federal court.”

Webbert said that the governor has 120 days to reply to the claim. Attorney General Janet Mills and Cynthia Montgomery, the governor’s legal counsel, were notified of the claim, a requirement under Maine law.

http://go.uen.org/4nN

 

 


 

 

Student sues after high school denies anti-abortion club Associated Press via Las Vegas Sun News

 

A student is suing her Las Vegas high school and the Clark County School District for denying her bid to start an anti-abortion club on campus.

Attorneys filed the lawsuit Thursday in Nevada’s federal court on behalf of student Angelique Clark.

The West Career & Technical Academy junior argues her school and the district violated the Equal Access Act and the First Amendment.

http://go.uen.org/4o3

 

 


 

 

Prosecutor: NY­Based ‘Scam Charity’ Duped High School Kids Associated Press via New York Times

 

MINEOLA, N.Y. — More than 100 New York teenagers — and dozens in Chicago, Houston and Nashville, Tennessee — were duped by a Long Island-based “scam” charity into working at concession stands at major sports and entertainment venues in those cities on the promise they would be paid $9 an hour, but most received little or no compensation, prosecutors said.

Whelton Herron, president of “The Herron Foundation,” and another man pleaded not guilty to grand larceny, conspiracy and scheme to defraud charges at their arraignments Thursday in a Long Island courtroom.

Acting Nassau County District Attorney Madeline Singas said at a press conference that the nationally known concessionaire, Aramark Sports and Entertainment Services Inc., believed the students were working as volunteers under a program it operates that allows charities to receive a percentage of income from its concession stands at places like Citi Field and Jones Beach Theater in New York and Soldier Field in Chicago.

http://go.uen.org/4o4

 

 


 

 

Zuckerberg education fund expands reach of $120 million grant to help Bay Area schools San Jose (CA) Mercury News

 

MENLO PARK — Just blocks from Facebook’s world headquarters, many students in the Ravenswood City School District are failing to read and write at state levels, but the company’s CEO Mark Zuckerberg and his wife Priscilla Chan have vowed to change that.

A year after the couple pledged $120 million to boost struggling and underprivileged Bay Area schools, the fund is expanding its reach to provide grants to local charter schools and dozens of educational organizations that operate in the Bay Area.

The couple is donating the money through Startup:Education, an organization Zuckerberg and Chan launched in 2010 to help improve the quality of public education around the country.

http://go.uen.org/4oa

 


 

 

Dan Rather Announces Prize to Improve Texas Education Time

 

Dan Rather summed up his frustration with the Texas educational system using a typically folksy saying: “God did not put Texans on Earth to be 39th in anything.”

The former longtime CBS news anchor was referring to a recent ranking by Education Week which put the Lone Star State toward the bottom of the 50 states.

It’s one reason he and his grandson, Martin, are launching The Rather Prize, a $10,000 grant to the student, teacher or administrator who comes up with the best idea to improve Texas education.

http://go.uen.org/4o9

 


 

 

5 facts about America’s students

Pew Research Center

 

In a few weeks, America’s roughly 53.5 million K-12 students will head to the classroom. Trading in swimming pools and summer jobs for math problems and history homework, these students will hit the books at one of more than 129,200 schools across the country, including about 5,700 charter schools and 30,900 private schools.

Pew Research Center has found today’s American students as a whole to be more diverse – and on track to be better educated – than their parents and grandparents. Here are five key findings about these students:

http://go.uen.org/4o8

 

 

 

 

————————————————————

CALENDAR

————————————————————

 

USOE Calendar

http://www.schools.utah.gov/main/CALENDAR.aspx

 

 

UEN News

http://www.uen.org

 

 

 

August 17:

Administrative Rules Review Committee meeting

9 a.m., 445 State Capitol

http://le.utah.gov/Interim/2015/html/00003630.htm

 

 

August 18:

Executive Appropriations Committee meeting

2 p.m., 445 State Capitol

http://le.utah.gov/Interim/2015/html/00003644.htm

 

 

August 19:

Education Interim Committee meeting

8:30 a.m., 30 House Building

http://le.utah.gov/Interim/2015/html/00003537.htm

 

Government Operations Interim Committee meeting

8:30 a.m., 20 House Building

http://le.utah.gov/Interim/2015/html/00003552.htm

 

 

August 27:

Charter School Funding Task Force meeting

1 p.m., 210 Senate Building

http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2015&com=TSKCSF

 

 

September 17-18:

Utah State Board of Education meeting

250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspx

Related posts:

Comments are closed.