Education News Roundup: Aug. 25, 2015

BoarddistrictsEducation News Roundup

Today’s Top Picks:

 

There’s some follow up on Sen. Jackson’s plan for a partisan school board.

http://go.uen.org/4ti (Utah Political Capitol)

 

Weber State looks to increase Hispanic enrollment.

http://go.uen.org/4tJ (Weber State Signpost)

 

Study estimates 10-15 percent of students are chronically absent. The group is looking to push recognition of truancy as a major impediment to student achievement.

http://go.uen.org/4t6 (WaPo)

or a copy of the report

http://go.uen.org/4t7 (Center for American Progress)

 

ENR thought he’d share a moment of gratitude with you. He is grateful he is not the spokesman for Albuquerque Public Schools.

http://go.uen.org/4tC (Albuquerque Journal) and in a separate story http://go.uen.org/4tD (Albuquerque Journal) And he is grateful he is not the spokesman for the Arizona Board of Education.

http://go.uen.org/4tw (Arizona Republic)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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TODAY’S HEADLINES

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UTAH

 

Jackson Continues to Push Partisan School Board Elections

 

WSU strives to increase Hispanic enrollment

 

Trib Talk: Discrimination in SLC schools?

 

School teacher fighting for life with multiple gunshot wounds

 

Salt Lake City warning parents of construction projects on way to school

 

New principals for Wellington, Bruin Point schools

 

Forum aims to educate women on money management

 

What’s Up With That? Entrance fee at football game one-time occurrence

 

Head Start is currently enrolling for pre-school children ages three and four

 

Marching band not allowed to perform Christian hymn — crowd sings it anyway

 

 


 

 

OPINION & COMMENTARY

 

Hiring the best teachers

 

Effort at Utah high schools making strides in helping curb sex trafficking

 

What Do Americans Really Think About Education Policy?

Two recent polls conflict in their findings on what adults think about standardized testing, the opt-out movement, and the Common Core.

 

Why Do Public Schools Have a Teacher Shortage?

 

Dear John Kasich: Here’s What Teachers Actually Do In Their Lounges

Hint: It is not where they “sit together and worry about, oh woe is us.”

 

Why Vouchers Won’t Fix Vegas Schools

 

Educator Competencies for Personalized, Learner-Centered Teaching

 

 


 

 

NATION

 

Why some in education believe truancy deserves much more attention

 

$1.3M settlement reached over botched student testing program

 

Education board: 5,000 Arizona 4th-graders need remedial reading lessons

 

Report: Most Parents of College-Bound Students Unaware of Upcoming SAT Changes

 

Jerry Brown to sign bill to suspend California high school exit exam for 2015 Senate Bill 725 allows students who’ve fulfilled all other graduation requirements to receive diploma

 

History standards approved for K-12, despite concerns

 

Landscape of Children’s TV Shifted Beneath ‘Sesame Street’

‘Sesame Street’-HBO Deal Reflects World of More Channels, Platforms

 

Square Root of Kids’ Math Anxiety: Their Parents’ Help

 

Vast changes in New Orleans’ teaching workforce as education revolution upends city

 

State Takeover of Schools Harms Black, Latino Communities, Report Contends

 

Denver DA looking to arrest former APS deputy superintendent

 

Moya sues APS, Skandera; AG launches investigation

 

Diane Douglas calls DPS, says board leader grabbed her arm

 

Teacher turns lesson plans into million-dollar business

 

State’s $37 million PE program did little to curb childhood obesity

 

School lunch fruits and veggies often tossed in trash, study finds

 

 

 

 

 

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UTAH NEWS

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Jackson Continues to Push Partisan School Board Elections

 

“This plan is more or less a genuine compromise. This is in the spirit and heart of compromise as it gives supporters of nonpartisan, partisan, and governor-appointed elections something they can support, while actually requiring them to accept something they don’t like,” Senator Al Jackson (Republican – Highland) said of his proposal to reform Utah State School Board election procedures. Debate on the matter continued to rage on Wednesday during the August meeting in the Education Interim Committee.

The proposal, which was put together by Jackson and Senator Evan Vickers (Republican – Cedar City), seeks to remedy the issue of the status quo (which the courts noted were illegal an needed to change) by shrinking the state school board from 15 to 13 members. Of those 13 members, four would be chosen through a partisan election, four through a nonpartisan election, and the final five appointed by the governor and confirmed by the Senate. The new seats would be based on Utah’s congressional districts, with each district being represented by a partisan and nonpartisan school board member.

In addition, Jackson’s proposed bill would require an amendment to Utah’s constitution, which doesn’t allow appointed school board members.

http://go.uen.org/4ti (Utah Political Capitol)

 


 

 

WSU strives to increase Hispanic enrollment

 

After moving from Jalisco, Mexico to Utah with her family at age 8, Ana Reyes watched her parents work arduously for little pay. She wanted to break the stereotype commonly associated with Latinos.

“Latinos aren’t just a minority group that only work at restaurants,” Reyes, a senior in business multimedia at Weber State, said.

In high school, she dreamed of going to  college, but her high school counselor told her that she would not be able to because of her immigration status. Worse, the counselor told Reyes if she did go to college, she would not be able to afford it.

After that experience, when Reyes’ physics teacher asked her if she planned to go to college, Reyes emphatically said “No.”

“He told me, ‘Don’t let anything stop you from going to college,’” Reyes said. “He was the one who pushed me a little bit.”

http://go.uen.org/4tJ (Weber State Signpost)

 


 

 

Trib Talk: Discrimination in SLC schools?

 

The U.S. Department of Education’s Office for Civil Rights is looking into allegations of unfair treatment and discrimination of minority students in Salt Lake City schools.

On Tuesday at 12:15 p.m., Salt Lake City School Board member Michael Clara, Salt Lake City School District superintendent McKell Withers and Tribune education reporter Benjamin Wood join Jennifer Napier-Pearce to talk about the federal investigation.

http://go.uen.org/4tc (SLT)

 

 


 

 

School teacher fighting for life with multiple gunshot wounds

 

A new school teacher who was supposed to start classes today in Salt Lake City is fighting for her life after being shot several times.

Jai Hogue, 42, was one of two women shot during a tense and terrifying hostage situation on Saturday in Millcreek at 3300 South, 700 East.

“I ran up to her and she had been shot multiple times. There was blood everywhere,” said one witness who did not want to be identified. “I heard a man yell out get the “F” away or you will be next.”

Hogue, who had been a librarian at the Open Classroom Charter School in Salt Lake was starting as a new teacher for the pre-kindergarten classes.

http://go.uen.org/4tj (KUTV)

 

http://go.uen.org/4tl (KSL)

 

http://go.uen.org/4tk (DN)

 

 


 

 

Salt Lake City warning parents of construction projects on way to school

 

SALT LAKE CITY – The city is warning parents and students about a few construction project as the back-to-school rush begins.

Officials said many of the projects are in school zones.

http://go.uen.org/4tm (KSTU)

 

 


 

 

New principals for Wellington, Bruin Point schools

 

Stacy Basinger and Dina Wise have a lot in common.

Both taught for a long time at Wellington Elementary.

Both taught upper and lower grades in that school.

Both live in Miller Creek.

Both women got their bachelors degrees from Utah State and their Masters from Southern Utah University.

And with the appointment of Wise as principal to Bruin Point Elementary, both have the experience of being a principal at the district’s smallest school.

http://go.uen.org/4tI (Price Sun Advocate)

 


 

 

Forum aims to educate women on money management

 

OREM — The Utah Women & Leadership Project will host an event called Cents and Sensibility: Women and Money on Sept. 9 to educate young women about the importance of proper money management.

The event is partnered with the Utah Education Network, which will have live streaming online and broadcast the event on UEN-TV. Additionally, videos of the sessions will be available at uen.org.

http://go.uen.org/4tb (DN)

 

 


 

 

 

What’s Up With That? Entrance fee at football game one-time occurrence

 

Question: At the Logan High School football game last Friday, students were charged $5 to attend. Usually, students get in for free if they show their student ID card. Is this a new policy at Logan High? What is the money going toward?

Answer: The Aug. 21 game against Box Elder High School was a Utah High School Activities Association endowment game. This is an extra game that the two schools are allowed to play if they charge an entrance fee to students, faculty and staff. Normally, those three groups get into games for free.

http://go.uen.org/4tf (LHJ)

 

 


 

 

Head Start is currently enrolling for pre-school children ages three and four

 

Head Start is currently enrolling three- and four-year-old children for fall session. If you have a child who will turn three or four by September 1, call our toll free number at 1-800-796-6070 to obtain an application for the 2015-2016 year. You can also go to website suu.edu/headstart. Applications can be completed at the St. George site located at 494 E. 900 South, or in Cedar City at 2390 W. Highway 56 #1, or in LaVerkin at 706 N. 195 West. The classes are free and nutritious meals are served. Classes are also available in Parowan, Beaver, Delta and Fillmore.

http://go.uen.org/4th (SGS)

 


 

 

Marching band not allowed to perform Christian hymn — crowd sings it anyway

 

The Brandon High School marching band in Mississippi found itself on the bench for the school’s first football game of the season after a court order kept it from performing the Christian hymn, “How Great Thou Art,” according to The Clarion-Ledger.

But that didn’t stop the crowd from throwing a Hail Mary and singing it anyway.

http://go.uen.org/4td (DN)

 

 

 

 

 

 

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OPINION & COMMENTARY

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Hiring the best teachers

(St. George) Spectrum editorial

 

The state of Utah, along with much of the rest of the United States, is facing a teacher shortage and the situation looks like it’s going to get worse before it gets better.

A number of school districts in the state were and are scrambling fill positions right up until the start of classes this year while enrollment in teacher-preparation programs has fallen nationwide and here in Utah as well.

Is it any wonder?

The economy is in recovery mode. There are numerous other more lucrative opportunities in the workforce. Legislators and school districts around the nation continue to put pressure on teachers to jump through endless hoops in the quest for better performance from students on high-stakes achievement tests.

Who would want to enter the profession?

http://go.uen.org/4tg

 


 

 

Effort at Utah high schools making strides in helping curb sex trafficking Deseret News editorial

 

By themselves, the numbers are shocking. More than 100,000 American children are victims of sex trafficking every year. Shocking, too, are the individual stories of each child forced into exploitation. While law enforcement agencies have become increasingly focused on the problem, an organization operating on Utah high school campuses is making strides in raising awareness among those most vulnerable to the practice.

The organization is called Backyard Broadcast, and it was recently profiled in the Deseret News. Student members aim to deliver information to their peers about the scope and nature of the problem and the ways traffickers target teenagers. Those involved in the program deserve respect and commendation for taking the initiative to spread awareness of a problem that is much more prevalent than people may believe.

http://go.uen.org/4te

 

 


 

 

What Do Americans Really Think About Education Policy?

Two recent polls conflict in their findings on what adults think about standardized testing, the opt-out movement, and the Common Core.

Atlantic commentary by MIKHAIL ZINSHTEYN, program manager at the Education Writers Association, AND EMILY RICHMOND,  public editor for the National Education Writers Association

 

Getting a read on the American public’s views on education is no easy task, made more complicated by just how much local schools vary. In a country with more than 13,000 school districts that enroll nearly 50 million students, a range of experiences and perspectives are to be expected.

According to two polls released this month by different organizations, U.S. adults maintain divergent views on some of the most controversial topics in public education today. For both policymakers and political candidates, the poll results at times say conflicting things, even if the questions were worded differently.

* Common Core: In the Education Next public opinion poll, 49 percent of U.S. adults said they support the Common Core State Standards; in the other poll, conducted by PDK/Gallup, 24 percent of adults share that view, while more than half said they oppose the common standards for English language arts and mathematics adopted by most states.

* Testing: 59 percent of adults, and 52 percent of parents, opposed allowing parents to prevent their children from taking standardized tests, the Education Next poll finds. It said 25 percent of U.S. adults support the ability to opt out. The PDK/Gallup poll shows that 44 percent of U.S. adults—and 40 percent of parents—believe that parents should be permitted to opt their students out of standardized tests. And parents surveyed by PDK/Gallup were more likely to support the practice than in the Education Next poll by a margin of 47 to 32 percent.

* Charter Schools: The polls captured different levels of support for charter schools among U.S. adults. Charters, which are publicly funded but are typically run by private nonprofit or for-profit groups, have the support of 64 percent of adults, according to PDK/Gallup. The Education Next poll found that 47 percent of adults favor the creation of charter schools.

It’s important to remember that polls are like “dipping a thermometer into a giant melting pot of American society,” says Jonathan Supovitz, the co-director of the Consortium for Policy Research in Education at the University of Pennsylvania. “You’re bound to get different readings in different places.”

Given that caveat, how accurate or useful is polling data?

http://go.uen.org/4tx

 

 


 

 

Why Do Public Schools Have a Teacher Shortage?

Slate commentary by Judy Levy Pordes, retired teacher, school leader for 40 years

 

Teaching is not a particularly well-respected position. Many people do not want to be a part of a profession that is often looked down upon. Too many of today’s politicians and corporate leaders talk about the poor quality of teachers without having any idea of what they are talking about. They’ve never been in a classroom.

I find that when I mention to others, particularly the techies in Silicon Valley, that I recently retired from teaching, the response is a mumbled, “Oh, that’s nice,” and they move on. Virtually no one asks any questions about what I did except perhaps what I taught. Many (most?) people think that someone’s salary is a reflection of his or her status, so teachers, who don’t make much money, are therefore low in terms of respect.

Teachers don’t get much respect in schools, either. All too often administrators in public school, sometimes in the school itself and sometimes districtwide, set down rules, expectations, etc., that teachers are required to follow. Too frequently these demands on teachers require them to do things that the teachers know will be time-consuming and will detract from their teaching. They don’t have a positive impact in the classroom. But the teachers have no choice. Teachers’ voices are not heard enough nor sufficiently requested when it comes time for decision-making.

Many teachers have acquired loans going to college. Their potential salaries will do little to help them repay their debt and still have a materially comfortable life.

Nowadays, anyone good in math or science can make a lot more money in industry rather than in teaching. So fewer strong students go into teaching.

http://go.uen.org/4tF

 

 


 

Dear John Kasich: Here’s What Teachers Actually Do In Their Lounges

Hint: It is not where they “sit together and worry about, oh woe is us.”

Huffington Post commentary by Education Editor Rebecca Klein

 

Last Wednesday, GOP presidential candidate and Ohio Gov. John Kasich lashed out at an unlikely target: teachers lounges.

While speaking at the New Hampshire education summit — an event attended by Republican presidential candidates and sponsored by education news outlet The Seventy Four and the American Federation for Children — Kasich said he would abolish all teachers lounges if he had the power.

“If I were not president, but if I were king in America, I would abolish all teachers lounges, where they sit together and worry about, oh woe is us,” Kasich said after complaining about teachers unions.

Kasich spokesman Rob Nichols said the governor’s comment on teachers lounges were part of a larger metaphor.

“He thinks teachers have far more support in their communities than they sometimes give themselves credit for and they shouldn’t pay attention to the small number of pot-stirrers in their ranks who try to leverage problems for political gain,” Nichols said in a statement, per CNN. “Anyone thinking he was making a comment on buildings or school architecture or space usage might need to look up the word ‘metaphor’ in a dictionary.”

Even if Kasich was speaking about teachers lounges metaphorically, we had to ask educators on Facebook and Twitter: What actually happens in these rooms?

http://go.uen.org/4ty

 

 


 

 

Why Vouchers Won’t Fix Vegas Schools

New York Times op-ed by Brittany Bronson, an English instructor at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas

 

LAS VEGAS — FOR the past year, I’ve lived next door to a public elementary school. With my windows open in the morning, I can hear children’s laughter on the playground, and at 9 a.m., the Pledge of Allegiance over the intercom. My afternoon commute takes me past the entrance, where I see a diverse group of parents collecting their children, from white moms in yoga pants to Muslim women in hijab guiding their kids carefully through the crosswalk.

Only a quarter­mile away, on the other side of my apartment complex, is a private school. These students wear identical uniforms, but still manage to showcase the diversity of the city.

For now, it’s heartening to see at least some amount of ethnic and economic variety within our local schools. But now that the state has approved a radical new voucher system, that’s about to change.

http://go.uen.org/4tE

 


 

 

Educator Competencies for Personalized, Learner-Centered Teaching Council of Chief State School Officers analysis

 

The Council of Chief State School Officers (CCSSO) and Jobs for the Future (JFF) are proud to release a set of educator competencies for personalized learning, a guide to help teachers lead and thrive in personalized learning environments.

In personalized, student-centered classrooms, gone is the default image of a teacher-an adult lecturing to students seated neatly in rows, assigning the same textbook pages to everyone, and administering the same quiz on the same day to the entire class, with the expectation of a “normal distribution” of achievement along a bell curve. Instead, teachers in personalized, learner-centered settings are called upon to assess and address individual student needs and help all reach rigorous proficiency standards. These educators promote collaborative work among groups of students; integrate learning experiences that occur outside the classroom; and, above all, foster learner independence and student voice and choice, or student agency. Achieving this ambitious vision is only possible with significant changes in the very role of the educator and the ways in which educators interact with students, peers, and the broader community.

The development of Educator Competencies for Personalized, Learner-Centered Teaching (“the Competencies”) serves as a first step in identifying the knowledge, skills, and dispositions that educators need in order to create and thrive in effective personalized, learner-centered environments. The Competencies are organized into four domains-Cognitive, Intrapersonal, Interpersonal, and Instructional. For each domain, we identified both high-level competencies and detailed “indicators,” which describe specific ways that educators can meet each competency in a personalized, learner-centered manner.

http://go.uen.org/4t8

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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NATIONAL NEWS

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Why some in education believe truancy deserves much more attention Washington Post

 

Recent battles in the edu-policy world have centered on standardized testing, teacher tenure, charter schools, vouchers and Common Core state standards. But debates over how to address poor student attendance — which is directly linked to low achievement and high dropout rates — have generated much less heat and light.

And that’s a mistake, according to the Center for American Progress, which is seeking to highlight truancy as an issue that deserves far more attention than it traditionally gets.

“Education has long been seen as the means to prosperity, but that only happens if students attend school regularly,” says a report that CAP, a left-leaning think tank that is associated with the Obama administration, released Tuesday.

The report comes as Attendance Works, a national and state initiative that advocates for effective attendance policies, is promoting September as “Attendance Awareness Month” — a chance for school to help parents understand the direct link between chronic absence, low achievement and dropping out of high school.

It’s difficult to pinpoint the size of the challenge because every state has a different definition of truancy and chronic absenteeism, and public data reporting is inconsistent. But it’s clear that attendance no small problem: An estimated 5 to 7.5 million of the nation’s 50 million students are chronically absent, meaning that they miss 20 days of class, or more than 10 percent of the school year.

Attendance problems are not confined to older teens skipping class. Younger children — as young as preschool — also miss school at high rates, often because of family instability or other factors out of their control.

http://go.uen.org/4t6

 

A copy of the report

http://go.uen.org/4t7 (Center for American Progress)

 


 

 

$1.3M settlement reached over botched student testing program Las Vegas (NV) Review-Journal

 

CARSON CITY — Nevada has reached a $1.3 million settlement with a New Hampshire company over a botched student testing program, the attorney general’s office announced Monday.

The agreement with Measured Progress Inc. avoids litigation over the failed testing system that prevented thousands of Nevada students in grades three through eight from taking federally mandated assessments under new Common Core standards this spring.

Under the settlement, Nevada will not have to pay Measured Progress $789,000 in fees. The company will also provide Nevada middle schools services and product valued at $510,000 to help students and teachers transition to new science standards.

No settlement has been reached with Smarter Balanced, which developed the electronic testing materials.

http://go.uen.org/4t1

 

http://go.uen.org/4t2 (Reno [NV] Gazette Journal)

 

http://go.uen.org/4t3 (Ed Week)

 

 


 

 

Education board: 5,000 Arizona 4th-graders need remedial reading lessons

(Phoenix) Arizona Republic

 

More than 5,000 Arizona students — about 3 percent of last year’s third-graders — need remedial reading lessons under the state’s Move on When Reading law.

The Arizona State Board of Education voted unanimously on Monday to direct schools to give remedial help to students who scored in the bottom 3 percent on last spring’s third-grade AzMERIT language test. A few board members pointed out that the students, now in fourth grade, most likely have already been identified as weak readers and are getting state-funded tutoring before or after school.

Most Arizona students failed to master language and math in the new Arizona College and Career Ready Standards, which are measured by AzMERIT, in the past school year. AzMERIT scores, approved unanimously by the Education Board this month, show the majority of students were “minimally proficient” or “partially proficient.”

State law requires third-graders who “fall far below” the state reading standard, and are not English-language learners or in special education, to be given remedial help or spend an extra year in third grade. In April, the board decided not to hold any back this year because AzMERIT results will not be sent to schools and parents until at least October.

http://go.uen.org/4tB

 


 

 

Report: Most Parents of College-Bound Students Unaware of Upcoming SAT Changes T.H.E. Journal

 

With changes to the SAT set to take effect in March 2016, 85 percent of parents with college-bound children are still unaware of the coming update, according to a new survey from Kaplan Test Prep.

“When provided more details about the proposed changes to the SAT, the surveyed parents’ opinions about the new format were divided,” according to a news release.

Thirty percent of surveyed parents said the changes would make the test harder or otherwise responded negatively. Thirty percent said the changes were positive. Twenty percent said they were indifferent, and 15 percent said they still didn’t have enough information to form an opinion.

“However, views on specific changes reveal that a majority of parents believe the new SAT will be harder,” according to information released by Kaplan.

http://go.uen.org/4t4

 

http://go.uen.org/4t5 (Kaplan)

 

 


 

Jerry Brown to sign bill to suspend California high school exit exam for 2015 Senate Bill 725 allows students who’ve fulfilled all other graduation requirements to receive diploma Sacramento (CA) Bee

 

Gov. Jerry Brown will sign legislation to give a reprieve to thousands of California students who were blocked from graduating high school this year when the state canceled its required exit exam.

“Students who’ve been accepted into college should not be prevented from starting class this fall because of a test cancellation they could not control,” Deborah Hoffman, Brown’s deputy press secretary, said Monday. “The Governor will sign this bill to ensure these students begin their college careers.”

Lawmakers earlier Monday sent Brown Senate Bill 725, which suspends the test for the class of 2015, allowing students who’ve fulfilled all other graduation requirements to receive their diplomas. About 5,000 high school seniors were left in limbo in July when the California Department of Education canceled the year’s final administration of the exam because its contract with the provider had expired.

http://go.uen.org/4ta

 

 


 

 

History standards approved for K-12, despite concerns Sioux Falls (SD) Argus Leader

 

History teachers across South Dakota will be working with a new set of classroom guidelines after a Monday decision to approve social studies standards.

College professors balked at the new benchmarks because there isn’t a requirement for teaching early American history at the high school level.

In spite of protests, the state Board of Education agreed to overhaul the standards after an almost yearlong public hearing process. There is no requirement for teaching the first 100 years of the nation’s history, including the Revolutionary War and the drafting of the U.S. Constitution, but the rewritten standards do give teachers a choice.

http://go.uen.org/4ts

 

http://go.uen.org/4tt (Ed Week)

 

 


 

 

Landscape of Children’s TV Shifted Beneath ‘Sesame Street’

‘Sesame Street’-HBO Deal Reflects World of More Channels, Platforms Education Week

 

The deal that is sending “Sesame Street” to a new TV neighborhood—the premium channels and services of HBO—is emblematic of a fast-shifting landscape for children’s television programming, experts say.

Preschoolers and their parents have vastly larger volumes of programming available to them, on more channels, than they did when “Sesame Street” debuted in 1969, and they are increasingly watching shows not just on living room TVs, but also on platforms such as tablet computers and mobile phones.

“What’s clear is that children are moving to access more and more entertainment and educational shows not on television but on digital devices,” said Ellen A. Wartella, a professor and the director of the Center on Media and Human Development at Northwestern University’s School of Communication.

http://go.uen.org/4tr

 

 


 

Square Root of Kids’ Math Anxiety: Their Parents’ Help New York Times

 

A common impairment with lifelong consequences turns out to be highly contagious between parent and child, a new study shows.

The impairment? Math anxiety.

Means of transmission? Homework help.

Children of highly math­anxious parents learned less math and were more likely to develop math anxiety themselves, but only when their parents provided frequent help on math homework, according to a study of first­ and second­graders, published in Psychological Science.

Researchers tested 438 children from 29 public and private schools in three Midwestern states for math ability as well as math anxiety, at the beginning and end of the school year. Their parents completed questionnaires about math anxiety, and about how often they helped their children with homework.

So much for good intentions. The more the math­anxious parents tried to work with their children, the worse their children did in math, slipping more than a third of a grade level behind their peers. And the children’s weaker math achievements increased their nascent math anxiety.

http://go.uen.org/4tn

 

A copy of the study

http://go.uen.org/4to (Psychological Science)

 

 


 

 

Vast changes in New Orleans’ teaching workforce as education revolution upends city New Orleans (LA) Times-Picayune

 

Gary Briggs Jr. is a young African-American man from New Orleans, who spent four years teaching in a public school. In that, he both reflects and contradicts what has changed in the city’s school workforce.

New Orleans’ teaching ranks were transformed after Hurricane Katrina. Only about one in five of the teachers who staffed the city’s public schools before the storm still work there, according to a report released Monday (Aug. 24) by the Education Research Alliance for New Orleans.

About 49 percent of the teachers in the system last year were black, instructing a student body that was 85 percent African-American. The teaching workforce was 71 percent African-American before the storm. They were replaced, largely, by white and inexperienced teachers.

But there’s a twist. Because there are fewer students and fewer jobs now, the veterans still made up almost one third of the teaching corps last year.

A number of studies have found that more experience does not correlate with better test scores. However, for New Orleanians, the question of who leads a classroom is as much about culture and social cohesion as pass rates.

http://go.uen.org/4tz

 

A copy of the report

http://go.uen.org/4tA (Education Research Alliance)

 

 


 

State Takeover of Schools Harms Black, Latino Communities, Report Contends Education Week

 

A new report from The Alliance to Reclaim Our Schools, a group including the nation’s two largest teachers’ unions, argues that state takeover of schools and school districts is “stripping political power” from black and Latino communities.

The report traces the history of what the group calls “market-based intervention and reform,” from the state takeover of three New Jersey school districts in the late 1980s and mid-1990s to the present-day push to allow state-run schools in Georgia. The authors contend that the growing number of state takeovers and achievement districts has increased segregation, dismantled community schools, and undermined the financial stability of the affected school districts.

The Alliance to Reclaim Our Schools asserts that local resistance to mayoral control of education policy in large urban districts has now given way to a broader strategy focused on usurping local control.

http://go.uen.org/4tu

 

A copy of the report

http://go.uen.org/4tv (Alliance to Reclaim Our Schools)

 

 


 

 

Denver DA looking to arrest former APS deputy superintendent Albuquerque (NM) Journal

 

Less than a week ago, Jason Martinez was the hand-picked deputy superintendent of Albuquerque Public Schools, making $160,000 a year.

Late Monday, prosecutors in Denver were seeking a warrant for his arrest after discovering he left Colorado to take the job.

Turns out the man brought in by Superintendent Luis Valentino as the new No. 2 administrator at New Mexico’s biggest school district is facing felony charges in not one, but two separate criminal cases in Colorado.

One involves four counts of child sexual assault of victims ages 8 and 13.

And the Journal learned Monday of a separate felony domestic incident this year involving a man described in court records as Martinez’s boyfriend.

The criminal charges could land him in prison for more than 20 years.

He had been released on $50,000 bail in each case and ordered to comply with certain restrictions – including getting permission from court officials to leave the state.

A motion filed by the Denver District Attorney’s Office late Monday says that prosecutors learned from the Albuquerque news media on Friday that Martinez had not only left Colorado, “but in fact was hired as Deputy Superintendent for Albuquerque Public Schools.”

http://go.uen.org/4tC

 

 


 

 

Moya sues APS, Skandera; AG launches investigation Albuquerque (NM) Journal

 

Albuquerque Public Schools chief financial officer Don Moya filed a lawsuit Monday afternoon against Superintendent Luis Valentino, New Mexico Secretary of Education Hanna Skandera and the APS Board of Education contending he is a whistleblower who was targeted because he “was insufficiently supportive” of Gov. Susana Martinez’s “political agenda.”

Moya’s attorney, Kate Ferlic, said the suit, filed in Santa Fe, claims violation of the New Mexico Whistleblower Protection Act and civil conspiracy.

The Governor’s Office called the allegations absurd.

“This allegation is so false and over-the-top that we will be filing a complaint with the State Bar against the lawyer and challenge her partner – who is an elected official – to agree to resign from office when he is unable to substantiate this absurd claim about the governor,” Gov. Susana Martinez said through a spokesman.

Ferlic’s partner is state Rep. Brian Egolf, D-Santa Fe.

On the same day, New Mexico Attorney General Hector Balderas said he has assembled a team to investigate how former APS Deputy Superintendent Jason Martinez was able to work at the district for 2½ months without a mandatory criminal background check.

http://go.uen.org/4tD

 


 

 

Diane Douglas calls DPS, says board leader grabbed her arm

(Phoenix) Arizona Republic

 

State schools chief Diane Douglas today reported the president of the Arizona State Board of Education to Department of Public Safety officers, saying he grabbed her arm at a board meeting.

Douglas and board President Greg Miller, who sit next to each other at meetings, quarreled Monday morning over who had the floor during a discussion of board-staff access to teacher-certification documents in the Arizona Department of Education computer system. Board investigators must go to the education building to access the documents instead of being able to read them in their own offices.

“Get your hand off of me,” Douglas told Miller as he took the microphone away from her so she could not continue speaking.

It is the second such incident between Douglas and Miller this year. Douglas has filed a lawsuit against Miller and board Executive Director Christine Thompson because she believes she, not Thompson, has the right to hire and fire board staff.

After the meeting, Douglas and her staff filed a report against Miller with the DPS.

http://go.uen.org/4tw

 


 

 

Teacher turns lesson plans into million-dollar business USA Today

 

A kindergarten teacher turned her popular and creative lesson plans into a million-dollar business with the help of teacherspayteachers.com.

http://go.uen.org/4tp (video)

 

 


 

 

State’s $37 million PE program did little to curb childhood obesity Houston (TX) Chronicle

 

Over four years, Texas pumped $37 million in grants into public schools to boost physical education, but the program did little to reduce childhood obesity, a new study by the University of Texas at Austin found.

The program, which helped pay for new gym equipment at high-poverty middle schools across Texas, did improve students’ fitness. Students could do more push-ups and burst out a faster shuttle run, the researchers found.

But while the program, Texas Fitness Now, required schools to spend a quarter of their funding on nutrition, few schools actually did so — only 7 percent of grant funds were spent on nutrition in 2009 and 2010, the study found — so the program failed to curb obesity rates.

“You really can’t expect to make a dent in obesity unless you address consumption,” said Paul von Hippel, one of the authors of the study.

http://go.uen.org/4tK

 

A copy of the study

http://go.uen.org/4tL (Preventive Medicine)

 


 

 

School lunch fruits and veggies often tossed in trash, study finds CBS

 

New federal guidelines requiring healthier school lunches have made headlines in recent years, but that doesn’t mean kids are eating them up.

In fact, just a few years after the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act went into effect, a new study confirms what many parents suspected: a lot of school children are taking the required fruits and vegetables and throwing them directly into the trash.

The small study, published online in Public Health Reports, comes about a month before Congress is scheduled to vote on whether to reauthorize the program.

Researchers from the University of Vermont used digital photography to capture images of students’ lunch trays after they selected their food, as they were leaving the lunch line, and again at the end of their lunch as they passed the food disposal area. They found that while children placed more fruits and vegetables on their trays – as required by the USDA mandates put in place in 2012 – they consumed fewer of them. The amount of food wasted increased by about 35 percent, the researchers found.

http://go.uen.org/4tG

 

A copy of the study

http://go.uen.org/4tH (Public Health Report)

 

 

 

 

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CALENDAR

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USOE Calendar

http://www.schools.utah.gov/main/CALENDAR.aspx

 

 

UEN News

http://www.uen.org

 

 

August 27:

Charter School Funding Task Force meeting

1 p.m., 210 Senate Building

http://le.utah.gov/Interim/2015/html/00003844.htm

 

 

September 2:

Joint Education Conference

8 a.m., Southern Utah University, Cedar City

http://www.utah.gov/pmn/sitemap/notice/286081.html

http://le.utah.gov/jec/jec.html

 

 

September 3:

Joint Education Conference

8 a.m., Southern Utah University, Cedar City

http://www.utah.gov/pmn/sitemap/notice/286089.html

http://le.utah.gov/jec/jec.html

 

 

September 10:

Utah State Charter School Board meeting

Moab Charter School, 358 E 300 South, Moab

http://go.uen.org/1pn

 

 

September 15:

Executive Appropriations Committee meeting

5 p.m., 445 State Capitol

http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?Year=2015&Com=APPEXE

 

 

September 17-18:

Utah State Board of Education meeting

250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspx

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