Education News Roundup: Sept. 1, 2015

Education News Roundup

Today’s Top Picks:

USDB-Model-02

Model of Utah Schools for the Deaf and the Blind (USDB) new Salt Lake City campus. (Model and photo by Jacoby Architects)

There’s follow up on yesterday’s SAGE test results news.

http://go.uen.org/4wU (DN)

and http://go.uen.org/4xl (OSE)

and http://go.uen.org/4wW (LHJ)

and http://go.uen.org/4xx (KSL)

and http://go.uen.org/4xB (KSTU)

 

KUER looks at the student achievement gaps between Native American students and other Utah students.

http://go.uen.org/4xF (KUER)

 

Nationally, House Ed Chair Klein gives better than 50-50 odds for a new ESEA this session.

http://go.uen.org/4xL (Pioneer Press)

 

Appeals court rules Arkansas students don’t have a Constitutional right to switch schools.

http://go.uen.org/4×3 (WSJ)

and http://go.uen.org/4xK (Ed Week)

or a copy of the ruling

http://go.uen.org/4×4 (Eighth Circuit Court of Appeals)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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TODAY’S HEADLINES

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UTAH

 

Educators expected successes in second year of SAGE

 

Native American Education: Can Utah Close the Gap?

 

Utah Schools for the Deaf and Blind to build new campus

 

Salt Lake School District Superintendent McKell Withers announces retirement

 

State report: E-cigarette use doubles among Utah youths State report » Almost twice as many youths statewide used e-cigarettes in 2015 compared with 2013.

 

‘We will never forget’: Draper police escort fallen officer’s son to school to honor sacrifice

 

School bus and pick up truck involved in fatal crash

 

Former Utah teacher sentenced to prison for sexually abusing student Courts » Donald Nelson Bills will serve eight years to life, pay fine of $85,715.

 

ADA 25th Year Celebration and Annual Golden Key Awards

 

West Jordan school safety assembly working to raise awareness

 

What would it look like if we treated education like we do pro sports?

 

Parents rejoice after children bring home honest PTA school fundraiser form

 

ACLU says new Nevada education law violates separation of church and state

 

 


 

 

OPINION & COMMENTARY

 

Thumbs up, thumbs down

 

Utah charter schools experience phenomenal growth, should remain an option for students

 

Shrinking our new prison while fixing public education

 

Why is There no Freedom in Calculus?!

 

Fixing School Lunch Inequities

 

 


 

 

NATION

 

Rep. John Kline anticipates new education law

 

Children Don’t Have Constitutional Right to Switch Schools, Appeals Court Rules Parents aren’t guaranteed public-school choice in Arkansas case

 

New analysis argues that better teachers are flocking to better schools

 

Hard Evidence: Teachers’ Unconscious Biases Contribute To Gender Disparity

 

Report: Chronic school absenteeism is contributing to academic gaps

 

Florida First State To Require Concussion Training For High School Athletes

 

Missouri Teenagers Protest a Transgender Student’s Use of the Girls’ Bathroom

 

Marco Rubio Says Nation Doesn’t Need US Education Department

 

David Vitter courts anti-Common Core voters with new television ad

 

First Lady to Tap U.S. Students in Education Equity Campaign for Girls

 

 

 

 

 

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UTAH NEWS

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Educators expected successes in second year of SAGE

 

SALT LAKE CITY — School leaders are diving into this year’s SAGE results after having their first look at scores from the year-end assessment over the weekend.

Overall improvement in proficiency rates from 2014 was something they expected to see, but some of the numbers are showing surprisingly rapid trends of improvement happening consistently across the state.

Math, the subject students previously struggled with the most, had a proficiency rate 5.4 percentage points above that of last year, more than any other subject. Those gains were even more pronounced for high schoolers, who produced a statewide average proficiency rate more than 17 percentage points higher in secondary math III.

It’s a staggering climb to make in one year, but education leaders say that shouldn’t diminish people’s confidence in SAGE as a valid assessment of students’ yearly progress toward college and career readiness.

http://go.uen.org/4wU (DN)

 

http://go.uen.org/4xl (OSE)

 

http://go.uen.org/4wW (LHJ)

 

http://go.uen.org/4xx (KSL)

 

http://go.uen.org/4xB (KSTU)

 

 


 

 

Native American Education: Can Utah Close the Gap?

 

A Utah lawmaker is working on a plan to address one of the largest education achievement gaps in the state. Native Americans here perform worse than any other racial or ethnic group.

http://go.uen.org/4xF (KUER)

 

 


 

Utah Schools for the Deaf and Blind to build new campus

 

CANYON RIM — Begining in August 2016, sensory impaired students in the Salt Lake area will have a new place to attend school.

Earlier this week the Utah Schools for the Deaf and Blind announced construction of a new building located at 1655 E. 3300 South. The 48,000-square-foot building will provide more space to accommodate blind and visually impaired, deaf-blind, and deaf and hard of hearing students and their families in the surrounding area.

http://go.uen.org/4xg (DN)

 

 


 

 

Salt Lake School District Superintendent McKell Withers announces retirement

 

SALT LAKE CITY — Salt Lake City School District Superintendent McKell Withers has announced his plan to retire at the end of the 2015-16 school year after holding the position for 13 years.

The announcement came in a letter Withers sent to the district’s Board of Education on Friday where he said “it is time for me to consider other avenues to support our students, families and staff.” He will keep the position until June 30.

http://go.uen.org/4xh (DN)

 


 

 

State report: E-cigarette use doubles among Utah youths State report » Almost twice as many youths statewide used e-cigarettes in 2015 compared with 2013.

 

Veronica Ford delivered a message Monday to fellow Utah teenagers: Don’t fall for the cool mist and bright-colored packaging of increasingly popular e-cigarettes.

Ford, 14, spoke at a news conference in Salt Lake City, where state health officials sounded the alarm about a report that shows nearly twice as many Utah youths used e-cigarettes in 2015 compared with 2013.

“We are on the brink of being the first generation that is tobacco-free, but an electronic device and some candy-flavored juice are threatening to jeopardize all our hard work,” said Ford, of Davis County. “Nicotine and its effects on the developing brain are no joke.”

While the number of youths who reported using e-cigarettes nearly doubled to 10.5 percent in 2015, adult use of the battery-powered electronic vaporizers that heat liquid nicotine into an inhalable mist has remained steady, state officials said.

http://go.uen.org/4wP (SLT)

 

http://go.uen.org/4wR (DN)

 

http://go.uen.org/4xq (PDH)

 

http://go.uen.org/4xr (CVD)

 

http://go.uen.org/4xs (SGS)

 

http://go.uen.org/4wS (KUER)

 

A copy of the report

http://go.uen.org/4wQ (Tobacco-free Utah)

 


 

 

‘We will never forget’: Draper police escort fallen officer’s son to school to honor sacrifice

 

DRAPER — Bensen Johnson’s eyes lit up Tuesday morning when he walked outside to see four Draper Police Department vehicles round the corner and park in front of his house with their lights flashing.

Two years ago, Bensen’s father, Draper Police Sgt. Derek Johnson, was shot and killed in the line of duty. To honor Johnson, a Draper police motorcade escorted Bensen to school Tuesday morning on the anniversary of his father’s death.

Bensen, 8, was silent but smiling as he greeted the police officers, all of whom have become his close friends since he lost his father.

http://go.uen.org/4xf (DN)

 


 

 

School bus and pick up truck involved in fatal crash

 

A head-on crash between a school bus and pickup truck killed two people near Payson Tuesday afternoon.

No students were on the bus or injured, according to Lt. Bill Wright of the Payson Police Department.

The crash killed two people traveling in the pickup truck, Wright said. Two additional passengers in the truck and the driver of the school bus driver were seriously injured and have been transported to Mountain View Hospital.

The crash, according to the Utah County Sheriff’s Department, happened at 860 E. Arrowhead Trail near the Spanish Fork and Payson border.

http://go.uen.org/4×9 (KUTV)

 

http://go.uen.org/4xa (SLT)

 

http://go.uen.org/4xo (PDH)

 

http://go.uen.org/4xv (KTVX)

 

http://go.uen.org/4xw (KSL)

 

http://go.uen.org/4xA (KSTU)

 

 


 

 

Former Utah teacher sentenced to prison for sexually abusing student Courts » Donald Nelson Bills will serve eight years to life, pay fine of $85,715.

 

A former Provo High teacher who pleaded guilty to sexually abusing a student was sentenced Monday to prison for up to life.

Donald Nelson Bills, 55, pleaded guilty in July to first-degree felony counts of attempted forcible sodomy and attempted object rape, as well as second-degree felony counts of forcible sexual abuse and obstruction of justice, and third-degree felony tampering with a witness.

Ten other similar charges were dismissed as part of a plea deal.

On Monday, 4th District Judge James Taylor ordered Bills to serve prison time on all five counts and ordered the terms to run consecutively — for a cumulative sentence of eight years to life.

“We place great trust in our teachers,” he said, according to the Daily Herald.

The judge also ordered Bills to pay a fine of $85,715.

http://go.uen.org/4xb (SLT)

 

http://go.uen.org/4xc (DN)

 

http://go.uen.org/4xp (PDH)

 

http://go.uen.org/4xu (KUTV)

 

http://go.uen.org/4xy (KSL)

 

http://go.uen.org/4xC (KSTU)

 

 


 

 

ADA 25th Year Celebration and Annual Golden Key Awards

 

Every year the Utah Governor’s Committee on Employment of People with Disabilities and their partners honor people and businesses with the Golden Key Award.

It recognizes those who have helped promote employment opportunities for people disabilities.

Kelly Kelsey and Leah Lobato share more about this year’s ceremony and the recipients.

http://go.uen.org/4xz (KTVX)

 

 


 

 

West Jordan school safety assembly working to raise awareness

 

WEST JORDAN, Utah — West Jordan police and the Utah Department of Transportation teamed up with Westland Elementary School Monday to give kids an unforgettable lesson about safety.

Westland Elementary students gathered in the school gymnasium for a safety assembly, where they were visited by a K-9 officer and another officer who rode in to the school on her police motorcycle.

The goal was teaching children that no matter what an officer looks like- furry or on wheels- they are always your friend.

http://go.uen.org/4xD (KSTU)

 


 

 

What would it look like if we treated education like we do pro sports?

 

“See what she did there?” asked Keegan-Michael Key. “She’s bringing an introvert into the discussion y’all. That’s a teacher-of-the-year play, right there.”

Sports is in a world all it’s own, and the bureaucracy of education is nothing to laugh at, but when Comedy Central’s Key & Peele combined the two in a recent sketch, hilarity ensued.

http://go.uen.org/4xi (DN)

 

 


 

 

Parents rejoice after children bring home honest PTA school fundraiser form

 

Apparently honesty is the best policy, even when it comes to going viral.

http://go.uen.org/4xj (DN)

 

 


 

 

ACLU says new Nevada education law violates separation of church and state

 

A new Nevada law that would create educational savings accounts that parents could use to mix and match educational needs has come under fire, with the ACLU filing a lawsuit alleging that parents who choose to use those funds to pay tuition at religious schools would be violating the state’s Blaine Amendment.

http://go.uen.org/4xk (DN)

 

 

 

 

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OPINION & COMMENTARY

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Thumbs up, thumbs down

(Ogden) Standard-Examiner editorial

 

Thumbs up: To STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) courses and the impact STEM is having on jobs for graduates. Utah is among the leaders in defense and aerospace jobs  because of STEM-emphasis training.

http://go.uen.org/4xm

 


 

 

Utah charter schools experience phenomenal growth, should remain an option for students Deseret News op-ed by Howard Headlee, chairman of the state charter school board

 

Charter schools are the R & D laboratories of our public education system. Each one is unique, exploring different solutions for a different group of students. Some charter schools perform exceptionally well and have long waiting lists. Other charter schools have struggled. And when it becomes clear that an experiment isn’t working, we shut it down and try something else.

The whole purpose of having R & D labs is to discover new and better ways to do things. And when it comes to educating our children, we have a moral obligation to our children to take the solutions we are discovering in our charter schools and cross-pollinate them into our neighborhood schools so that every child can benefit from what we are learning.

I was disappointed to read in a recent Deseret News op-ed the leader of the UEA continues to spread so much misinformation and resentment toward charter schools (“Data do not support expansion of Utah charter schools,” Aug. 20). Apparently her interests have blinded her to the beneficial discoveries that are occurring within our successful charter schools. But in reality, ignoring those advancements is the biggest betrayal of our children and taxpayers.

http://go.uen.org/4wT

 

 


 

 

Shrinking our new prison while fixing public education Deseret News op-ed by Lynn Stoddard, a retired teacher and administrator

 

Now that the location for the new Utah prison has been approved, there is another thing to consider before the architect gets too far along. What provision will be made if the prison starts out with 5,000 beds, and in 10 years only half that number is needed? Or in 20 years, only 1,000 beds are needed? It may be wise for the architect to design a flexible, modular prison where modules could be sold and moved away when they are no longer needed.

What would happen to the prison population if virtually every student entered school and graduated with a firm resolve to be a contributor and not a burden to society? What if the main source of inmates, the dropouts and push-outs from school, could be drastically reduced?

http://go.uen.org/4xn

 

 


 

 

Why is There no Freedom in Calculus?!

Utah Political Capitol commentary

 

Welcome to the UPC Show with Curtis Haring, Alex Cragun, and Dylan McDonnell!

This week Alex starts us off by giving us a recap of who Joe Hill was and his impact on labor relations. We soon go to the present day to discuss if partisan school boards are a good thing, and should food be taxed for Medicaid expansion?

In the second half of the show, we mock the problems the West Jordan City Council and Mayor are having, how Jackie Biskupski is now untying the hand behind her back in her race for Salt Lake City Mayor, and Governor Herbert’s well thought out 12 (yes 12) step program to improve the DABC.

http://go.uen.org/4xt (audio)

 


 

 

Fixing School Lunch Inequities

(Washington, DC) Roll Call op-ed by Susan Levin, director of nutrition education for the Physicians Committee

 

The Healthy Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010 is gradually fixing school lunch inequities. But to make sure all children continue to have growing access to healthful school lunches, the Senate must not weaken the legislation when its reauthorization is considered on Sept. 17.

Reversing current provisions that require more fruits, vegetables, and whole grains would reverse new findings such as those from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. A recent study the organization conducted found that schools with more racially, ethnically diverse student bodies now have greater access to these foods every day thanks to the act.

That’s good news. But even better: Students are eating those healthier lunches. Research published in the journal Childhood Obesity found that under the new policies, consumption of fruits and vegetables has increased, while plate waste has decreased.

http://go.uen.org/4×7

 

 

 

 

 

 

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NATIONAL NEWS

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Rep. John Kline anticipates new education law St. Paul (MN) Pioneer Press

 

Rep. John Kline says the chances are “far better than 50-50” that Congress will hammer out a bipartisan bill this fall to replace the No Child Left Behind law.

“We all want to get this done,” Kline said Thursday during a break between radio and television interviews at the Minnesota State Fair.

The 2nd District congressman from Burnsville, who chairs the House Education and Workforce Committee, will spearhead the overhaul effort. Congressional leaders chose him to chair the House-Senate conference that will try to resolve differences between bills passed by the two chambers.

The House passed Kline’s bill last month with no Democratic votes. The Senate later passed a bipartisan compromise.

Kline said he realizes House members will have to compromise to craft a bill that can pass both chambers. President Barack Obama opposes Kline’s bill and has criticized the Senate version.

http://go.uen.org/4xL

 


 

 

Children Don’t Have Constitutional Right to Switch Schools, Appeals Court Rules Parents aren’t guaranteed public-school choice in Arkansas case Wall Street Journal

 

Public-school parents don’t have a constitutional right to decide where to send their children to school, an appeals court ruled.

The Eighth U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals on Monday rejected claims by a group of Arkansas parents that they had a right to transfer their kids out of a struggling school district in northeast Arkansas to neighboring districts where they thought the children could be better educated.

School officials rejected the transfer applications because they said the children’s assigned district, which is predominantly African-American, is still subject to a desegregation order from more than 40 years ago. The parents, who are white, sued for violations of due process and equal protection, claiming they had a constitutional right to move their kids. A lower court last year dismissed the parents’ complaint.

In a 2-1 decision, the appeals court in St. Louis agreed with the lower court’s decision, saying the Constitution doesn’t guarantee so-called public-school choice.

http://go.uen.org/4×3

 

http://go.uen.org/4xK (Ed Week)

 

A copy of the ruling

http://go.uen.org/4×4 (Eighth Circuit Court of Appeals)

 


 

 

New analysis argues that better teachers are flocking to better schools Washington Post

 

A new analysis of New York City school data shows that teachers who scored low in the city’s evaluation system are concentrated in struggling schools that tend to serve poor and minority students, while teachers with strong ratings are most likely to be found in schools where students test well and tend to be white and Asian.

The analysis, by Families for Excellent Schools, an advocacy group that has been campaigning to expand public charter schools, shows a strong correlation between teacher quality — as measured by the city’s system — and how students perform on standardized tests.

“The data shows just how tightly linked student achievement is to teacher quality, and helps lay bare the fault lines of educational inequality in New York City’s schools: race and poverty are the most critical factors for whether you have good teachers in the classroom,” said Khan Shoieb, a spokesman for Families for Excellent Schools.

http://go.uen.org/4wX

 

A copy of the report

http://go.uen.org/4wY (Families for Excellent Schools)

 

 


 

 

Hard Evidence: Teachers’ Unconscious Biases Contribute To Gender Disparity NPR Morning Edition

 

Girls often outperform boys in science and math at an early age but are less likely to choose tough courses in high school. An Israeli experiment demonstrates how biases of teachers affect students.

http://go.uen.org/4xE

 


 

 

Report: Chronic school absenteeism is contributing to academic gaps Washington Post

 

The nation’s large and persistent education achievement gaps are rooted in a largely hidden crisis of chronic absenteeism from school, especially among low-income and minority children, according to a new report that compiles recent research on school attendance.

School districts tend to focus on truancy, or skipping class. But that focus misses a big part of the problem, according to the report by two nonprofits: Attendance Works, a group that seeks to highlight the connection between attendance and academic success, and the Healthy Schools Campaign.

Absenteeism rates among kindergartners are nearly as high as those among high school freshmen, according to the report. An estimated 1 in 10 kindergartners misses at least 18 days of school, or nearly a month of class, per year.

Many of those absences are excused: Young children often miss school not because they’re skipping class but because they or their parents are suffering from mental or physical health problems.

Fourteen million absences — or one-third of all missed school days — are due to asthma, the leading cause of absenteeism, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Tooth decay, which is five times more common than asthma, accounts for 2 million missed school days each year.

School districts and states that focus just on unexcused absences might not notice or intervene when a 5-year-old misses class frequently because of ill health. But chronic absence is harmful no matter its cause, the report says.

http://go.uen.org/4wZ

 

A copy of the report

http://go.uen.org/4×0 (Attendance Works)

 

 


 

 

Florida First State To Require Concussion Training For High School Athletes StateImpact Florida

 

There’s growing concern about the risks of concussions in young athletes. For years, high school coaches have had to take courses on the dangers of head injuries. This year, for the first time, all high school athletes in Florida are required to educate themselves about concussions before they can compete.

As the George Jenkins High School football team practices in the mid-August heat, senior Gavin Engle takes a knee on the sidelines. He was injured in a helmet to helmet collision three days before, and realized he was feeling the effects of a concussion.

“I kind of laid on the ground for a second,” Gavin says. “It took me a minute to get it together. The light hurts, your head hurts, it hurts your eyes, it just makes everything feel like it’s pounding.”

Gavin stopped playing and saw a doctor — but state officials worry that not all athletes would take themselves out of action.

So, the governing body for the state’s high school sports passed a new rule this summer. The Florida High School Athletic Association (FHSAA) has mandated that all athletes have to watch a video about concussions and sign a form saying they understand concussion risks. Florida schools are the first in the country to take this step, and football programs –with their big rosters and summertime practices — are already dealing with the extra paperwork.

http://go.uen.org/4×8

 


 

 

Missouri Teenagers Protest a Transgender Student’s Use of the Girls’ Bathroom New York Times

 

A transgender high school student in Missouri is facing backlash from her peers after requesting to use the girls’ bathrooms and locker room.

More than 100 students at Hillsboro High School, about an hour south of St Louis, walked out of class on Monday in protest.

“I’m hoping this dies down,” said Lila Perry, the 17­year­old who began identifying as a girl publicly in February. “I don’t want my entire senior year to be like this.”

Ms. Perry, who began feeling “more like a girl than a boy” when she was 13, said school officials gave her permission to use the girls’ facilities as the new school year began.

The district’s superintendent, Aaron D. Cornman, issued a statement saying the district “accepts all students no matter race, nationality/ethnicity, gender or sexual orientation.”

The student protest came on the heels of a school board meeting on Thursday attended by so many parents it had to be moved to a bigger location http://go.uen.org/4xG

 

 


 

 

Marco Rubio Says Nation Doesn’t Need US Education Department Associated Press

 

CARSON CITY, Nev. — Republican presidential hopeful Marco Rubio says the U.S. doesn’t need a federal Education Department, arguing that its recommendations to state and local governments often turn into mandates tied to money.

The Florida senator made the comments Tuesday during a town hall meeting in Carson City. About 200 people attended the gathering in a community center, part of a tour of northern Nevada.

“What starts out as a suggestion ends up being, `If you want money from us, you must to do it this way,’ and you will end up with a version of a national school board,” Rubio said. “We don’t need a national school board.”

Democrats pointed out that Rubio’s expensive college costs were footed in part by Pell Grants and Stafford Loans, which are administered by the Education Department.

Rubio said the department administers certain programs that have merit but those could be transferred to other agencies. “I honestly think we don’t need a Department of Education,” he said.

http://go.uen.org/4xH

 

 


 

 

David Vitter courts anti-Common Core voters with new television ad New Orleans (LA) Times-Picayune

 

U.S. Senator David Vitter is reaching out to anti-Common Core voters in the Louisiana governor’s race with a new television ad highlighting his opposition to the academic standards.

The TV spot might raise some eyebrows. As recently as last August, Vitter told CSPAN that he “strongly supported” Common Core. He only started backing off the standards in December, when the Senator suddenly announced a plan to block federal incentives for the academic benchmarks.

The advertisement highlights Vitter’s efforts to stop the federal government’s push for Common Core. In March, he got an anti-Common Core amendment into the U.S. Senate version of the federal budget bill.

http://go.uen.org/4×2

 

 


 

 

First Lady to Tap U.S. Students in Education Equity Campaign for Girls Education Week

 

First lady Michelle Obama’s Let Girls Learn initiative was the subject of a recent Education Week interview with her chief of staff, Christina Tchen. The first lady wants to enlist students and teachers in U.S. classrooms to help promote educational equity for girls around the world. Peace Corps volunteers in 11 countries, ranging from Albania to Uganda, will complete projects designed by local communities to help tear down barriers that keep girls out of school. Globally, about 62 million girls are not in school because of sanitation, transportation, poverty, and other issues, according to the U.S. Agency for International Development.

“None of us would ever accept anything less for our own daughters and granddaughters,” Obama said in a June speech in Washington. “So we have to ask ourselves, why would we accept this fate for any girl on this planet?”

The Peace Corps work joins efforts by USAID and the U.S. Department of State to address girls’ education issues. U.S. teachers can involve students through free lesson plans and correspondence with Peace Corps volunteers, Tchen said. Students can use an online toolkit to raise funds to support individual projects posted by Peace Corps volunteers, such as sending girls to empowerment camps or helping to construct a bathroom at a school.

http://go.uen.org/4xJ

 

 

 

 

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CALENDAR

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USOE Calendar

http://www.schools.utah.gov/main/CALENDAR.aspx

 

 

UEN News

http://www.uen.org

 

 

September 2:

Joint Education Conference

8 a.m., Southern Utah University, Cedar City

http://www.utah.gov/pmn/sitemap/notice/286081.html

http://le.utah.gov/jec/jec.html

 

 

September 3:

Joint Education Conference

8 a.m., Southern Utah University, Cedar City

http://www.utah.gov/pmn/sitemap/notice/286089.html

http://le.utah.gov/jec/jec.html

 

 

September 10:

Utah State Charter School Board meeting

Moab Charter School, 358 E 300 South, Moab

http://go.uen.org/1pn

 

 

September 17-18:

Utah State Board of Education meeting

250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspx

 

 

October 20:

Executive Appropriations Committee meeting

2 p.m., 445 State Capitol

http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?Year=2015&Com=APPEXE

 

 

October 21:

Education Interim Committee meeting

8:30 a.m., 30 House Building

http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?Year=2015&Com=INTEDU

 

 

October 29:

Charter School Funding Task Force

1 p.m.,  445 State Capitol

http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2015&com=TSKCSF

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