Education News Roundup: Nov. 10, 2015

"Veterans' Day" by Jake Bellucci/CC/flickr

“Veterans’ Day” by Jake Bellucci/CC/flickr

Education News Roundup

Today’s Top Picks:

 

Housekeeping note: There will be no roundup on Wednesday, Nov. 11, which is Veterans Day.

 

Will a Special Session of the Legislature address Utah State Board of Education elections?

http://go.uen.org/58A (UP)

 

Poll finds Utahns want more funding for public education.

http://go.uen.org/58B (UP)

 

Utah’s dual immersion program gets more national props.

http://go.uen.org/59c (Atlantic)

 

High school graduation rates are rising nationally.

http://go.uen.org/58F (WaPo)

and http://go.uen.org/599 (USAT)

or a copy of the report

http://go.uen.org/58G (Alliance for Excellent Education)

 

Need a laugh? Check out this rant on school drop-off zones.

http://go.uen.org/59d (Video)

 

 

 

 

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TODAY’S HEADLINES

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UTAH

 

Special Session Will Address State School Board Election Mess, Not ‘Count My Vote’ Compromise

 

Poll: Utahns Don’t Think Public Schools Get Enough Funding

 

STEM expo seeks to prepare high school students for ‘today and tomorrow’

 

Cache District prepares for new schools with teacher assignments

 

Utah kids could get new statewide test before kindergarten

 

Fifth-graders place flags on graves for Veterans Day

 

Highland teen to represent the state nationally as Young Woman of Utah 2016

 

Amended, lesser charges filed against Provo High student in hazing incident

2 other teens plead guilty to crimes in juvenile court

 

Student testifies of alleged sexual relationship with former Utah teacher Courts » Justin James Davenport, 34, charged with having sexual contact with female student, 15.

 

Wife of Mormon mission president dies in West Africa Raelene Hill’s role was “woven into the fabric” of the Ghana Accra West Mission, she said.

 

High school students tackle new shows and old classics this year

 

The importance of early exposure to STEM fields

 


 

 

OPINION & COMMENTARY

 

Veterans Day gets short shrift in schools

 

The Economic Imperative of Bilingual Education States including Utah and Montana are aggressively pushing for programs that give native English speakers a competitive edge.

 

Reformers’ push to improve education is worthy of celebration — but is there a dark side, too?

Changing the good vs evil mindset of the education reform debate

 

Schools Can’t Stop Kids From Sexting. More Technology Can.

 

A Growing Movement

America’s Largest Charter School Communities

 

Core Principles for Transforming Remediation within a Comprehensive Student Success Strategy

 

School Drop-Off

 


 

 

NATION

 

The nation’s high school dropout rate has fallen, study says

 

Feds now recommending seat belts for school buses

 

Hillary Clinton rebukes charter schools

The decades-long proponent of charters criticizes the schools for cherry-picking kids.

 

White House Convenes Summit on ‘Next Generation’ High Schools

 

$400K Breakthrough Prize goes to teen, school for 7-min film on relativity

 

Job training system in Mass. falls short, study says State facing lack of labor

 

Motorola Provides $420 Million in Financing for School Safety Technology

 

‘Nobody dies in my classroom’: Volusia teacher saves choking sixth-grader Silver Sands teacher saves choking student

 

 

 

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UTAH NEWS

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Special Session Will Address State School Board Election Mess, Not ‘Count My Vote’ Compromise

 

There may well be a special legislative session next Wednesday, but SB54 will be taking a back seat at it, Capitol Hill sources tell UtahPolicy.

There is in the works an attempt to quickly get both the state and Utah Republican Party to draft a letter outlining how they read SB54’s language and to get those arguments before either a state or federal judge for a timely ruling; sources told UtahPolicy Monday morning.

That way SB54 WOULD NOT have to be changed in a substantial way in any special session: Let the judge’s ruling apply to the 2016 election cycle, sources said.

However, there could be a special session next week to deal with another election issue – how voters pick the Utah State Board of Education’s 15 members.

Several weeks ago GOP Gov. Gary Herbert announced that he would not be calling together a special committee to recommend candidates for the Utah State School Board.

That’s because a judge has ruled that the state’s current board election process is unconstitutional.

Currently, a committee screens potential candidates and recommends a few in each district up for election to the governor, who in turn puts two names on the general election ballot.

Lawmakers failed in the 2015 Legislature to change the now-illegal process.

But half of the board is up for election in 2016, so something must be done to allow for a legal election/candidate selection process to go forward.

http://go.uen.org/58A (UP)

 

 


 

 

Poll: Utahns Don’t Think Public Schools Get Enough Funding

 

Same old song and dance. Utahns say the funding for public education in the state is simply not enough.

A Dan Jones & Associates survey finds 2/3 of Utahs (66%) say the funding for public education is too little. About a quarter (27%) say it’s about right.

http://go.uen.org/58B (UP)

 

 


 

 

STEM expo seeks to prepare high school students for ‘today and tomorrow’

 

LAYTON — Wayne Young first heard about ARW Engineers, he said, at a Utah State University career night three years ago.

At the event, Young talked with the president of the Ogden-based structural consulting firm and decided it was the job he wanted. He later scored a professional engineering internship with the company.

Young’s role was reversed Monday at the Northern Utah STEM Career and College Exposition, as he was the one introducing ARW Engineers to students.

http://go.uen.org/58Q (DN)

 

http://go.uen.org/58S (OSE)

 

 


 

 

Cache District prepares for new schools with teacher assignments

 

In preparation for the opening of the Ridgeline High School in Millville and the as-yet-unnamed high school in North Logan, the Cache County School District is beginning the process of assigning teachers to different schools.

http://go.uen.org/592 (LHJ)

 


 

 

Utah kids could get new statewide test before kindergarten

 

SALT LAKE CITY — Utah schools could start giving kids a new statewide test to measure their academic skills before they start kindergarten.

http://go.uen.org/58Y (PDH)

 

http://go.uen.org/595 (BYU Universe)

 

 


 

 

Fifth-graders place flags on graves for Veterans Day

 

Fifth-grader Daytona Horspool has never met her grandpa, but that doesn’t mean she doesn’t know what he did for his country during the Vietnam War.

“If he were here today, I would tell him thank you, and I would give him a big, fat hug and tell him I love him,” Daytona mentioned as she meticulously wiped the dirt and debris from the headstone of her grandpa, Vietnam War veteran Franklin H. Staheli.

Washington Elementary’s fifth graders placed flags in memorial markers in front of each veteran’s grave at Washington Cemetery in honor of the coming Veterans Day holiday. The tradition started in 2001, and the project’s instigator, Burke Staheli, hopes to continue doing it for years to come.

http://go.uen.org/594 (SGS)

 

 


 

Highland teen to represent the state nationally as Young Woman of Utah 2016

 

Madeleine Arnold has been called a jewel and one in a million.

The 17-year-old Lone Peak High School senior is also called the Distinguished Young Woman of Utah for 2016.

She received that title last month and will represent Utah at the Distinguished Young Woman of America program in Mobile, Alabama in June.

http://go.uen.org/58W (PDH)

 


 

 

Amended, lesser charges filed against Provo High student in hazing incident

2 other teens plead guilty to crimes in juvenile court

 

PROVO — Amended charges have been filed against a Provo High School student in connection with a hazing incident involving members of the wrestling team.

Luis Antonio Castellanos, 18, is now charged in 4th District Court with child abuse, a third-degree felony, two counts of sexual battery, a class A misdemeanor, two counts of unlawful detention, a class B misdemeanor, and two counts of hazing, a class B misdemeanor, Utah County Attorney Jeffrey Buhman said Monday.

Under the amended information, three counts of aggravated kidnapping, a first-degree felony, were dropped. Castellanos also was originally charged with two counts of forcible sexual abuse, a second-degree felony, and attempted forcible sexual abuse, a third-degree felony.

“We felt (the amended charges) more accurately reflect the conduct that occurred,” Buhman said.

http://go.uen.org/58R (DN)

 

http://go.uen.org/58X (PDH)

 

http://go.uen.org/59g (KSL)

 


 

 

Student testifies of alleged sexual relationship with former Utah teacher Courts » Justin James Davenport, 34, charged with having sexual contact with female student, 15.

 

An ex-Ogden School District teacher was ordered to stand trial Monday on charges related to an alleged sexual relationship with a 15-year-old student.

Justin James Davenport, 34, is charged in 2nd District Court with two counts of first-degree felony rape, four charges of first-degree felony sodomy and one count of second-degree felony forcible sexual abuse.

He is accused of having sexual contact with one of his female students at Highland Junior High School during a relationship that lasted from January 2013 through November 2013.

After hearing testimony from the alleged victim on Monday, Judge Joseph Bean ruled there was enough evidence for the case to move forward to trial, according to Deputy Weber County Attorney Benjamin Willoughby.

http://go.uen.org/58P (SLT)

 

http://go.uen.org/58U (OSE)

 

http://go.uen.org/59f (KTVX)

 


 

 

Wife of Mormon mission president dies in West Africa Raelene Hill’s role was “woven into the fabric” of the Ghana Accra West Mission, she said.

 

Ruth Raelene Hill, wife of Mormon mission President Norman C. Hill of the Ghana Accra West Mission, died Sunday due to complications from a medical procedure.

She was 64.

Known for her pragmatic thinking, problem solving and individual initiative, Hill was much loved by the LDS missionaries in that West African capital.

After taking endless middle- of-the-night calls from young men with stomach and digestive problems, the mission mom figured out they weren’t cooking their food thoroughly enough so she got permission to supply microwave ovens in every apartment.

Raelene Hill — who once was the only female teacher at western Utah’s Tintic High and had to drive the bus to take the drill team and cheerleaders to games — was a strong, independent Mormon.

http://go.uen.org/58O (SLT)

 

http://go.uen.org/590 (DN)

 

http://go.uen.org/58Z (PDH)

 

http://go.uen.org/591 (KUTV)

 

http://go.uen.org/59e (KSL)

 

 


 

 

High school students tackle new shows and old classics this year

 

High school students are tackling big roles on stage this fall, some trying new musicals like “Big Fish” while others are doing proven classics like “Les Miserable” and “Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat.” There are even a couple of Christmas-themed shows for those ready to celebrate the holidays in November.

http://go.uen.org/58T (OSE)

 


 

 

The importance of early exposure to STEM fields

 

Chloe Girvan is not tech-savvy.

The 41-year-old freelance writer and former lawyer never developed an affinity for computers.

Growing up in the 1970s and ’80s in Ontario and California, she thought her children could also get by as long as they had a strong tennis game, manners and good grades. That’s until this summer, when one of her daughter’s experience in coding camp served her humble pie, as she puts it.

“It was finally clear to me that computer education is a must for (kids),” said Girvan, who lives in Montreal.

Every child, no matter a career path, is going to need a fundamental level of technological competence. According to the National Science and Technology Council (NSTC), the need for stronger science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) skills applies to both STEM and non-STEM occupations.

http://go.uen.org/58H (DN)

 

 

 

 

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OPINION & COMMENTARY

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Veterans Day gets short shrift in schools

(Logan) Herald Journal letter from Bacon Nivison

 

Veterans Day is a time when Americans honor those who have served in the U.S. military. We express gratitude to those who have made great sacrifices to preserve the traditional American principle of freedom/responsibility. All of the men and women throughout history who fought in battles, served in the National Guard and the reserves or were stationed in a base, stateside or overseas, did their part to protect the safety and rights of Americans and our allies. A great many of these individuals provided this service purely at the request/demand of our government (i.e. Vietnam, North Korea). Beyond the price paid, willingly or not, the reward for many of these people has been derision and name calling upon their return home — “baby killer!”

Veterans Day provides us with the opportunity to express our appreciation for the price paid by American veterans. Whether one agrees with the battles fought or not, American veterans served us all, and did so at the request of our government. One of the many rights/privileges they defended was the opportunity for education, and higher education, and all of the freedom of expression that opportunity represents. Thus it seems quite a mystery that of all the holidays respected and enjoyed by the American education system itself, Martin Luther King Jr. Day, Presidents’ Day, Pioneer Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Break, “Holiday” Break (which I prefer to think of as “Christmas”), Veterans Day is ignored.

http://go.uen.org/593

 

 


 

 

The Economic Imperative of Bilingual Education States including Utah and Montana are aggressively pushing for programs that give native English speakers a competitive edge.

Atlantic commentary by columnist MELINDA D. ANDERSON

 

Garland Independent School District, a fast-growing suburb northeast of Dallas, has undergone a dramatic demographic shift. Like districts across Texas, Garland schools are blacker, browner, and more racially diverse than a generation ago. The multicultural panorama in Garland schools is reflected in its academic offerings. Still, in a school district with a Hispanic majority, and a state where more than a third of residents are Spanish speakers, Garland chose Mandarin Chinese as the focus of its newly launched language-immersion program at Weaver Elementary School. Increasing Garland students’ marketability in a global economy was the rationale. “It’s preparing students for the future and hopefully, lots of possibilities as they get older,” the school’s principal, Jennifer Miley, told the Dallas Morning News.

In a break with tradition, more schools are adopting language-immersion programs, in which English and another language are integrated into the curriculum and instruction. The Center for Applied Linguistics, a D.C.-based nonprofit, found an exponential growth in foreign-language immersion in a comprehensive survey of public schools and some private schools. Over a 40-year span language-immersion schools grew steadily, with the largest increase in the decade that started in 2001. Spanish remains the most popular for immersion programs at 45 percent, followed by French (22 percent) and Mandarin (13 percent), with a wide array of languages rounding out the list of 22 selections—from Hawaiian and Cantonese to Japanese and Arabic.

As two-way immersion grows, the variety of language options now available marks a turning point in the evolution of bilingual education. Once the mainstay of immigrant children, bilingual instruction has a new band of converts: English-speaking parents, lawmakers, and advocacy groups. Research shows that students gain cognitive and academic benefits from bilingualism. Yet an overarching reason for the heightened interest is giving U.S. students a jump on the competition in a global workforce. And some activists find even with this flurry of attention, equal access to dual-immersion remains a thorny issue and persistent challenge.

While many states, including Montana and Oregon, have fully embraced two-way immersion, seemingly none has adopted the approach with the intensity of Utah. In a fairly racially and ethnically homogeneous state, Utah invested millions in language immersion teaching Mandarin Chinese, French, German, Portuguese, and Spanish. Governor Gary Herbert set a target in 2010 for the development of 100 programs in intensive dual-language serving 25,000 students by 2015. Utah met that goal two years ago, and the brisk pace continues with the launch of additional programs.

Utah’s expansion of dual-immersion is designed with one major purpose: to make the state’s future workers attractive to global companies.

http://go.uen.org/59c

 


 

 

Reformers’ push to improve education is worthy of celebration — but is there a dark side, too?

Changing the good vs evil mindset of the education reform debate Hechinger Report commentary by MICHAEL PETRILLI, president of the Thomas B. Fordham Institute

 

The Achilles heel of the West, I read the other day, is that many people struggle to find deep, spiritual meaning in our secular, affluent society. How can we compete with the Messianic messages streaming from the Islamic State and other purveyors of dystopian religious fundamentalism?

It made me reflect on my own life. How do I find meaning? Largely from my role as a father, a role I cherish and for which I feel deep gratitude. But ever since I lost faith in the Roman Catholic Church of my upbringing — not long after I nearly succumbed to cancer at age 18 — much of my life’s meaning has come from my view of myself as an education reformer.

I suspect I am not alone. We are drawn as humans to heroic quests, and those of us in education reform like to believe that we are engaged in one. We’re not just trying to improve the institution known as the American school; we are literally saving lives, rescuing the American Dream, writing the next chapter of the civil rights movement.

When people speak of Arne Duncan with tears in their eyes — explaining earnestly that he has always put kids first — it is because he epitomizes the virtuous self-image of the education reform movement. He has been our Knight Galahad. He was our Moses, leading us to the Promised Land of better opportunities for all of America’s children. Now that he’s stepping down, he will always be revered by some as St. Arne.

Like most religious legends, this one only works well as a struggle between good and evil. So if reformers are on the side of the angels, at least in our own minds, who gets cast as the devil?

I believe that it is this near-religious fervor that gives the reform movement much of its energy and its moral standing. Thus, it should not be dismissed lightly. To the degree that it helps us continue to strive—for better schools, and better policies, and better outcomes for kids— it is worthy of celebration.

But there’s a dark side, too.

http://go.uen.org/59b

 


 

Schools Can’t Stop Kids From Sexting. More Technology Can.

New York Times op-ed by JONATHAN ZIMMERMAN, author of “Too Hot to Handle: A Global History of Sex Education”

 

“YOUTH is subjected by our civilization to aggressive sex stimuli and suggestiveness oozing from every pore.” So declared the education professor Clark Hetherington in 1914, condemning the proliferation of racy movies and tell­all magazines. Lest adolescents succumb to the “indulgence” on display, he wrote, schools needed to teach “self­control” and “higher standards.”

Sound familiar? For the past century, we’ve been worrying that new forms of media are fostering sexual immorality in the young. And we’ve called upon our schools to stem the evil tide. Witness the recent “sexting” revelations at Cañon City High School in Colorado, where it is reported that 100 students traded naked pictures of themselves and one another. As the story went viral, critics have inevitably asked why the school hadn’t done more to educate students about sexting.

The schools are an easy target, but the wrong one. Public ambivalence about youth sexuality limits what the schools can do, nor do we have strong evidence that schools can affect teenagers’ behavior, in any event. And it’s hardly certain that youth sexting is the dangerous scourge that most adults imagine.

Let’s be clear: There are serious risks associated with teen sexting, including bullying and exposure to adult sexual predators. And we know that kids who sext are more likely to have sex than those who don’t. But beyond that, nobody has ever shown that the sexting induces kids to engage in riskier behavior.

http://go.uen.org/58C

 

 


 

 

A Growing Movement

America’s Largest Charter School Communities National Alliance for Public Charter Schools analysis

 

Charter schools are the fastest-growing choice option in U.S. public education. Over the past five years, student enrollment in charter public schools has grown by 62 percent. In 43 states and the District of Columbia, more than 2.9 million students now attend charter schools —which is more than six percent of the total number of students enrolled in all public schools. The number of districts with a major charter school presence continues to grow, with 14 districts now having 30 percent or more of their students enrolled in charter schools. In more than 160 districts, at least 10 percent of students attend charter public schools. The ten districts with the largest numbers of charter students enroll nearly one-quarter of all charter school students. Due to a successful track record of meeting students’ specific needs, parental demand for charter public schools is at an all-time high.

In some communities, the growth of charter public schools has been striking. In the decade after Hurricane Katrina, the New Orleans public school system rebuilt into an almost entirely public charter school system. In New York City, the number of charter students has quadrupled since 2008. The nation’s capital also has a sizeable charter school population, enrolling 44 percent of District of Columbia public school students.

http://go.uen.org/58E

 


 

 

Core Principles for Transforming Remediation within a Comprehensive Student Success Strategy Education Commission of the States commentary

 

Colleges and postsecondary systems across the nation have demonstrated remarkable progress since Core Principles for Transforming Remediation was published in 2012. States and institutions are phasing out standalone or multi-course remediation sequences, resulting in tens of thousands of students more quickly enrolling in and completing college-level courses.

Building on this progress, we have updated the principles to focus even greater attention on scaling practices that can provide all students—especially those who are low-income or from historically underserved communities—with the guidance, support and skills they need to enter a coherent program of study and move toward their academic goals. We present these revised principles for transforming remediation in the context of a broader set of student success strategies that growing evidence suggests will enable institutions to significantly increase their students’ timely completion of certificates, licenses and degrees with labor market value.

http://go.uen.org/58z

 

 


 

 

School Drop-Off

Jenny On the Spot rant by Jenny Ingram

 

There are rules to dropping one’s kids off at school. The first rule is… PULL FORWARD.

http://go.uen.org/59d (Video)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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NATIONAL NEWS

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The nation’s high school dropout rate has fallen, study says Washington Post

 

The U.S. high school dropout rate has fallen in recent years, with the number of dropouts declining from 1 million in 2008 to about 750,000 in 2012, according to a new study to be released Tuesday.

The number of “dropout factories” — high schools in which fewer than 60 percent of freshmen graduate in four years — declined significantly during the same period, according to the study by a coalition of education groups.

“Clear progress is being made,” said Bob Wise, a former West Virginia governor who heads the Alliance for Excellent Education, one of the organizations that published the study. “It’s not a total success yet. We shouldn’t take a victory lap. But we can at least start warming up.”

The new dropout data is not surprising because the nation’s high school graduation rate has been steadily rising. Eighty-one percent of the Class of 2013 graduated on time, the highest since states began calculating graduation rates in a uniform way in 2010.

http://go.uen.org/58F

 

http://go.uen.org/599 (USAT)

 

A copy of the report

http://go.uen.org/58G (Alliance for Excellent Education)

 

 


 

 

Feds now recommending seat belts for school buses (Washington, DC) The Hill

 

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) is recommending seat belts for school buses for the first time.

School buses and other multiple-person vehicles like motorcoaches have typically been exempt from federal regulations that require seat belts in most other vehicles, although safety groups have for years pushed for the requirement to be added to buses.

NHTSA Administrator Mark Rosekind said this week that his agency is recommending three-point seat belts for school buses, which cover passengers’ shoulders and laps, but he stopped short of saying he would craft new rules to require them.

http://go.uen.org/58K

 

http://go.uen.org/58L (School Transportation News)

 


 

 

Hillary Clinton rebukes charter schools

The decades-long proponent of charters criticizes the schools for cherry-picking kids.

Politico

 

Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton sounded less like a decades-long supporter of charter schools over the weekend and more like a teachers union president when she argued that most of these schools “don’t take the hardest-to-teach kids, or, if they do, they don’t keep them.”

Her comments in South Carolina came straight from charter school critics’ playbook and distanced her from the legacies of her husband, former President Bill Clinton — credited with creating a federal stream of money to launch charters around the country — and President Barack Obama, whose administration has dangled federal incentives to push states to become more charter friendly.

The change in tone on charter schools mirrors other moves Clinton has made to nail down the support of liberal blocs in the face of the progressive challenge of Bernie Sanders, including her recent decision to oppose the Trans-Pacific Partnership. And like her reservations about free trade, her new rebuke of charter schools suggests she’ll be less willing to challenge core Democratic constituencies than either her husband or Obama.

http://go.uen.org/58J

 

http://go.uen.org/59a (Ed Week)

 


 

 

White House Convenes Summit on ‘Next Generation’ High Schools Education Week

 

High schools will be in the spotlight here in Washington today, as President Barack Obama convenes the first-ever White House summit on “next generation” high schools.

The daylong event will be a showcase of ideas that Obama has been trumpeting since his 2013 State of the Union address: schools that provide strong academic and career preparation by using time and teaching creatively and focusing on real-world experiences. He’s particularly interested in schools that focus on science, technology, engineering, and math.

Students, teachers, business leaders and philanthropists are on the guest list, along with administration luminaries including Valerie Jarrett, a senior advisor to the president; Cecilia Muñoz, the director of the White House Domestic Policy Council; Roberto J. Rodríguez, the president’s deputy assistant for education; John King, the delegated deputy secretary for the U.S. Department of Education, and Ted Mitchell, the undersecretary of education.

http://go.uen.org/58D

 

 


 

 

$400K Breakthrough Prize goes to teen, school for 7-min film on relativity USA Today

 

SAN FRANCISCO — Attention, students. Interested in science and know how to shoot a video? Care to make $400,000?

Not sleeping at your desks anymore, are you?

Meet Ryan Chester, 18, whose quirky video explaining Albert Einstein’s mind-bending Special Theory of Relativity won the inaugural Breakthrough Junior Challenge Sunday. The prize nets the North Royalton (Ohio) High School senior $250,000 toward college; $50,000 for Rick Nestoff, the physics teacher that inspired him; and $100,000 for a new school science lab.

Parents, take note: That’s not too shabby a haul in exchange for a zippy 7-minute clip.

The Breakthrough Junior Challenge is a new kid-focused offshoot of the Breakthrough Prize, which leverages an array of foundations to award $3 million each to those making leaps in the fields of math, life sciences and physics. The awards for both competitions are being handed out at a ceremony in San Jose, Calif. Sunday. It is being televised live at 7 p.m. PT on National Geographic Channel, and gets an encore broadcast on the Fox network Nov. 29 on Fox at 7 p.m.

http://go.uen.org/596

 

http://go.uen.org/597 (Popular Science)

 

http://go.uen.org/598 (CBS)

 


 

 

Job training system in Mass. falls short, study says State facing lack of labor Boston Globe

 

Most of the projected job openings in Massachusetts over the next seven years will not require a four-year college degree, but an already strained vocational education system will be unable to train enough people to fill those vacancies, according to a report to be released Monday.

It warns that the state faces severe labor shortages in health care, manufacturing, and other key industries as an expanding economy and retiring baby boomers create some 1.2 million job openings by 2022.

Such shortages could undermine one of the state’s key competitive advantages — a skilled, productive workforce — making it harder to attract and retain companies, and slowing economic growth, the report, to be released by Northeastern University, finds.

http://go.uen.org/58I

 

 


 

 

Motorola Provides $420 Million in Financing for School Safety Technology THE Journal

 

Motorola will provide an initial $420 million in interest-free financing to enable school representatives to communicate more directly with first responders to emergencies. If all goes well, it may lead to a $4.2-billion investment in the program by Motorola.

Grants from the SchoolSafetyFund will allow governments and school districts to buy equipment provided by SchoolSafe Communications, which produces Web-enabled, two-way radio-based systems that allow greater and faster links between school and public safety radio systems. The equipment can be permanently installed and integrated into school and public safety data networks so that it can be remotely activated and deactivated.

http://go.uen.org/58M

 

 


 

 

‘Nobody dies in my classroom’: Volusia teacher saves choking sixth-grader Silver Sands teacher saves choking student Daytona Beach (FL) News-Journal

 

PORT ORANGE — Everything began to go dark.

With a bright red face and knees growing weaker by the second, Timothy Monahan, 11, couldn’t communicate what was wrong to his teacher, even though she was so close. He felt hopeless as he gasped for air.

“I thought, ‘This is it,” he said. “I started talking to God saying I was sorry for everything.”

A piece of sour candy was lodged in his throat during second period social studies class Thursday morning. And as the sixth-grader at Silver Sands Middle School began falling to the floor, Corey McCormack, seated behind her desk at the time, became much more than a teacher.

She became a hero.

“I noticed him standing up, his face was red and his hands were around his throat,” McCormack said. “I ran from behind my desk and turned him around and did the Heimlich maneuver.”

It worked.

http://go.uen.org/58N

 

 

 

 

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CALENDAR

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USOE Calendar

http://www.schools.utah.gov/main/CALENDAR.aspx

 

 

UEN News

http://www.uen.org

 

 

November 12:

Utah State Charter School Board meeting

9 a.m., 250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://go.uen.org/1pn

 

 

November 17:

Executive Appropriations Committee meeting

2 p.m., 445 State Capitol

http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?Year=2015&Com=APPEXE

 

 

November 18:

Education Interim Committee meeting

8 a.m., 30 House Building

http://le.utah.gov/Interim/2015/html/00005017.htm

 

Economic Development and Workforce Services Interim Committee meeting

1:15 p.m., 20 House Building

http://le.utah.gov/Interim/2015/html/00005030.htm

 

 

November 23:

Charter School Funding Task Force

1 p.m.,  445 State Capitol

http://le.utah.gov/Interim/2015/html/00004734.htm

 

 

December 3:

Utah State Board of Education study session and committee meetings

250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspx

 

 

December 4:

Utah State Board of Education meeting

250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspx

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