Education News Roundup: Nov. 18, 2015

201516calendarEducation News Roundup

Today’s Top Picks:

 

Utah’s public school enrollment growth will be costly.

http://go.uen.org/5cB (DN)

and http://go.uen.org/5cD (UP)

or a copy of the report

http://go.uen.org/5cC (Legislature)

 

There are more homeless students in Utah’s public schools.

http://go.uen.org/5cE (DN)

or a copy of the report

http://go.uen.org/5dl (Department of Workforce Services)

 

And northwest Utah County is growing especially fast.

http://go.uen.org/5cF (PDH)

 

ESEA rewrite conference gets started today in Washington.

http://go.uen.org/5cH (Ed Week)

and http://go.uen.org/5cI ([Washington, DC] The Hill)

 

USA Today asks the question: How vulnerable is high school football now?

http://go.uen.org/5cM (USAT)

 

 

 

 

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TODAY’S HEADLINES

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UTAH

 

Price tag for school enrollment growth at least $90 million

 

Utah homelessness drops, but number of homeless schoolchildren is up

 

Expect more than 400,000 residents in northwest Utah County by 2050

 

Crowding at Corner Canyon and too-few students at Alta sparks controversy

 

State law brings changes to school policies, procedures

 

Take or toss? Getting kids to make healthy choices

 

Obama administration opposes Bishop’s overhaul to land, water fund

 

Nonprofit groups challenge Utah political disclosure law

HB43 could force them to reveal donors if they speak out on issues.

 

First lady honors SLC’s Spy Hop after-school program National recognition » The after-school program is one of 12 selected for an arts award.

 

Farmington basketball coach honored by students, community

 

For South Summit students, college is just an application away Event aims to help every student who wants to go to college apply

 

Park City High students get down to business Three from PCCAPS earn acceptance into prestigious business program at the University of Utah

 

Maple Mountain High School athletes inspired by movement

 

Local students and teachers create art with electricity

 

Candy laced with drugs being circulated at Utah high school

 

Provo teen taken off life support months after fiery crash

 

Parowan High students present ‘The Addams Family’

 

Educator of the week: Travis Proctor in Goshen

 

Student of the Week: Libby Anderson

 


 

 

OPINION & COMMENTARY

 

Students need facts about climate change

 

Logan High did not ignore Veterans Day

 

Paris headmaster on outpouring of support: ‘we know we are not alone’

 

Turning ‘Hard-to-Teach’ Kids Into Superstars Clinton should encourage district schools to adopt some of the practices contributing to charter school success.

 

Chicago Is Making Coding Education Mandatory. Is That a Good Idea?

A school computer science program developer explains the pros and cons.

 

New Michael Moore Film Looks to Europe for Education Policy Ideas

 

A Bad Bargain

How teacher collective bargaining affects students’ employment and earnings later in life

 


 

 

NATION

 

With the ESEA Conference Set to Kick Off, Is the End Near for NCLB?

 

L.A. Unified explores possibility of becoming an all-charter district

 

Why Arizona teachers stay or leave the profession

 

State auditor warns school districts on background checks

 

High court hears arguments on state superintendent’s powers

 

Calls Mount to Remove Metal Detectors from NYC Schools

 

Is the future of high school football on the line?

 

 

 

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UTAH NEWS

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Price tag for school enrollment growth at least $90 million

 

SALT LAKE CITY — It will take more than $90 million to cover the cost of an additional 9,730 students expected to enroll in Utah schools next fall, legislative leaders were told Tuesday.

The projected 1.5 percent increase in enrollment growth comes as schools are already dealing with nearly 3,400 more students showing up than the 2015 Legislature funded.

That alone will cost schools up to an extra $17 million this budget year, members of the Legislature’s Executive Appropriations Committee were told in a report from staff that said next year’s enrollment is projected to reach nearly 644,000 students.

“Growth is slowing from what we can tell, but we’re still growing,” said Ben Leishman, a legislative fiscal analyst for public education.

Leishman said enrollment growth peaked in 2006, at 3.1 percent, but the number of students continues to climb.

The price tag for next year’s enrollment increase would actually be more than $97 million if the state uses the traditional way of calculating funding for students attending charter schools, where most of the growth is occurring, he said.

The legislative leaders who serve on the committee questioned the amount of money it will take to pay for enrollment growth in the budget year that begins July 1, 2016. Last year, it took about $55 million to cover increased enrollment.

http://go.uen.org/5cB (DN)

 

http://go.uen.org/5cD (UP)

 

A copy of the report

http://go.uen.org/5cC (Legislature)

 

 


 

 

Utah homelessness drops, but number of homeless schoolchildren is up

 

SALT LAKE CITY — The numbers of chronically homeless Utahns are so low, service providers and government officials know them by name. And family homelessness is down 10 percent from a year ago, a new state report says.

But the report also indicates the number of homeless Utah schoolchildren increased slightly from a year ago and notes a wide disparity between the homeless counts led by the state Department of Workforce Services and that of the Utah State Office of Education.

Different counting methods account for differences in the data, officials say.

Workforce Services relies on the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development’s definition of homelessness. Meanwhile, state education officials use the federal McKinney-Vento Homeless Education Assistance Act guidelines.

How much difference does it make?

According to statistics from the Utah State Office of Education, some 11,280 schoolchildren were doubled up or couch surfed in housing with friends, families and others in 2015 — up about 2 percent from 2014.

But the HUD count says nearly 900 enrolled schoolchildren were homeless in 2015, up about 8 percent from the previous year.

http://go.uen.org/5cE (DN)

 

A copy of the report

http://go.uen.org/5dl (Department of Workforce Services)

 

 


 

 

Expect more than 400,000 residents in northwest Utah County by 2050

 

The technology boom is reverberating with a cause and effect throughout Utah County in apartment, condominium and single-family home construction.

By 2050, three cities — Eagle Mountain, Lehi and Saratoga Springs — are projected to outpace the rest of the county with more than 400,000 residents, nearly one-third of the projected total county population.

“Obviously the area is growing fast, so we have a lot of work to do,” said Cameron Boyle, Lehi public relations.

The Utah Foundation Report estimates there will be 1.2 million people living in Utah County by 2050. Put in perspective, the population of Salt Lake County is now at 1 million.

Taken as a whole, those cities are on fast forward, as is their northern Salt Lake County neighboring city, Herriman, leading out in population growth and projected rooftops in Utah.

With a possible population at buildout of more than 200,000, Eagle Mountain could become one of the largest cities by population of the three. With a current population of 27,000, the community has extensive space for growth.

http://go.uen.org/5cF (PDH)

 

 


 

 

Crowding at Corner Canyon and too-few students at Alta sparks controversy

 

Sandy, Utah — Sparks are set to fly at the Canyons School Board meeting Tuesday night. After months of discussion, new boundary proposals and talk from parents about a possible expansion to the brand new Corner Canyon High School, there will be a vote.

The possible boundary moves and talk of a multi-million dollar expenditure have some parents in the district upset. The problem the district is dealing with is a numbers one: the new Corner Canyon High School is operating with hundreds more kids that it was built for.

Parents say there are not enough lockers and already there are more than a dozen portables in use. The over crowding at a brand new school is happening, while Alta High, just two miles away, is well below capacity and losing programs like AP classes because of dipping enrollment numbers.

http://go.uen.org/5d3 (KUTV)

 

 


 

 

State law brings changes to school policies, procedures

 

KAYSVILLE—Effective this year, students must successfully complete a basic civics test before earning their diplomas.

The new rule was passed by the 2015 Utah Legislature and was presented as an information item to the Davis School District Board of Education at their Nov. 3 meeting.

http://go.uen.org/5dj (DCC)

 


 

 

Take or toss? Getting kids to make healthy choices

 

Getting children excited about eating vegetables is no small task, so even with new government-mandated school lunch regulations requiring students to take either a fruit or a vegetable with their lunch, it’s not too surprising many students have found a way around actually eating their broccoli and lima beans: the trash.

According to a national study by LabDoor.com, when it comes to school lunch students throw away 73 percent of their vegetables, 47 percent of their fruit, 19 percent of their entrees and 25 percent of their milk.

The question is, what is standing in the way of kids eating the healthy food offered to them and what can parents do to encourage better eating habits while at school?

Sharon Stucki, supervisor for the child nutrition program for Washington County School District, said each school is different and each demographic is different in terms of what students eat, and what gets tossed.

http://go.uen.org/5d2 (SGS)

 

 


 

 

Obama administration opposes Bishop’s overhaul to land, water fund

 

Washington • The Obama administration said Wednesday it opposes legislation by Rep. Rob Bishop to overhaul a public lands program, arguing the Utah Republican’s efforts would damage work to preserve recreation areas and instead divert funds to the oil and gas industry.

“The draft bill proposes overly prescriptive, top-down and arbitrary limits on federal lands acquisition, which would undermine efforts to create, protect and preserve public access to some of our nation’s most important outdoor spaces,” Principal Deputy Assistant Interior Department Secretary Kristen J. Sarri said in written testimony to the House Natural Resources Committee on Wednesday.

The Obama administration opposes Bishop’s legislation, she added, and supports passage of another bill — with 195 co-sponsors — to reauthorize the Land and Water Conservation Fund in its current form.

Bishop’s legislation would require more money from the fund — which is paid for by oil and gas royalties and not taxpayers — to go to grants to states; significantly restrict how much land the federal government can buy in the West; and pour new cash into education and training for oil and gas industry workers.

http://go.uen.org/5di (SLT)

 


 

 

Nonprofit groups challenge Utah political disclosure law

HB43 could force them to reveal donors if they speak out on issues.

 

A lawsuit filed Tuesday claims that a Utah law is so vague that it could force groups such as the LDS Church, Planned Parenthood and the Utah Taxpayers Association to disclose all their donors if they speak out on political issues.

Three nonprofits — the Utah Taxpayers Association, Utah Taxpayers Legal Foundation and Libertas Institute — filed suit in U.S. District Court challenging HB43, which was passed in 2013 and sponsored by House Speaker Greg Hughes, R-Draper.

It grew out of scandals involving former Utah Attorney General John Swallow.

House investigators said Swallow funneled hundreds of thousands of dollars in donations from payday lenders through a nonprofit, among others, to hide donors’ identity. Money was used to help Swallow in his race against Sean Reyes, and to help defeat state Rep. Brad Daw, R-Orem, who pushed bills that payday lenders disliked.

Hughes said he wanted to close loopholes that allowed donors to remain secret. But the nonprofits say in their lawsuit that the bill was written too vaguely.

http://go.uen.org/5dc (SLT)

 


 

 

First lady honors SLC’s Spy Hop after-school program National recognition » The after-school program is one of 12 selected for an arts award.

 

Washington • There were no audio glitches at the White House on Tuesday as after-school programs were honored by first lady Michelle Obama, but had there been an awkward squeal or a little feedback, Salt Laker Kitzia Rodriguez could have stepped in to help.

Rodriguez, a 19-year-old University of Utah student, spent hundreds of hours after school learning audio mixing and editing through Salt Lake City-based Spy Hop Productions, which was one of 12 programs in the country to earn the 2015 National Arts and Humanities Youth Program Awards.

“I’ve always said I never lost anything going to Spy Hop. All I’ve done is gain like really positive things,” Rodriguez said after the short ceremony, still beaming from hugging Obama. “I’ve gotten experience; I’ve gotten friends for life. It’s just been a completely positive experience.”

About 20,000 students have flowed through Spy Hop’s programs since its founding in 1999, and nabbing national recognition could help boost its cachet. The award honors the nation’s best after-school programs and Spy Hop was chosen from a pool of 285 nominees.

http://go.uen.org/5cR (SLT)

 


 

 

Farmington basketball coach honored by students, community

 

FARMINGTON — In honor of longtime basketball coach Vance Downs, the Farmington Jr. High basketball court will be refinished and named after him.

Downs is retiring after a more than 30-year career at the junior high, and one of his former students set up a GoFundMe account* for the court makeover.

http://go.uen.org/5d6 (KSL)

 

 


 

 

For South Summit students, college is just an application away Event aims to help every student who wants to go to college apply

 

Amy Regan has been working with students from low-income families for nearly a decade, so she knows the obstacles those who would be first-generation collegians face.

One of the challenges, though, can be easily resolved. That’s why Regan, an adviser with the federal Educational Talent Search Program at South Summit High School, urged the school to participate in Utah College Application Week.

http://go.uen.org/5df (PR)

 

 


 

 

Park City High students get down to business Three from PCCAPS earn acceptance into prestigious business program at the University of Utah

 

Drew Castellanos has always thought it would cool to start a business. He’s wondered what it would feel like to take an idea, build it from scratch, and turn it into something real and lasting.

“That seems really gratifying to me,” he said.

That ambition is now one step closer. Castellanos and two other seniors in the Park City Center for Advanced Professional Studies (PCCAPS) program — Julia Lazzaroni and Walker Hess — have been accepted into the University of Utah’s Business Scholar Program at the David Eccles School of Business. The program’s aim is to provide a hands-on, personalized learning environment for high-achieving freshman at the university who are interested in business.

http://go.uen.org/5dg (PR)

 


 

 

Maple Mountain High School athletes inspired by movement

 

Especially for Athletes (E4A) is a movement specifically designed to inspire athletes and those with whom they associate, to maximize their athletic potential and to use their talents and social influence to assist and lift others. E4A is seeking to build a culture of athletes focused on changing lives through better use of the attention and influence they have access to.

Founder Dustin Smith said, “We all experience different levels of attention during our lives and moments when our actions have greater reach and potential for influence. For athletes, that attention is often times magnified, which brings about an even greater responsibility and opportunity. E4A refers to that extra level of attention as the ‘Sport Light.’”

“The Especially For Athletes program is something we firmly believe in as an athletic department at Maple Mountain High School,” said MMHS Athletic Director, Dave Boyack. “The ideas presented by Dustin Smith are things we want every student athlete involved in on a daily basis here. We know that as a group we can make a difference. Our kids are excited to be a part of this. We will Keep Our Eyes Up. We will Do The Work.”

http://go.uen.org/5cW (PDH)

 


 

 

Local students and teachers create art with electricity

 

CEDAR CITY – Lindsay Balfour, a “maker educator” from the Children’s Creativity Museum in San Francisco spent two busy days in Cedar City teaching workshops about paper circuits.

Maker education emphasizes learning science, technology, engineering, arts, and math through making and doing.

Lindsay visited two fifth grade classes at Fiddlers’ Elementary on Nov. 5 and taught the students to make paper gems with simple circuits inside. When the gems are pressed, they turn on an LED light, causing the gems to glow. The students attached their paper gems to a board that will be displayed in the school for other students to see and interact with.

http://go.uen.org/5dh (Iron County Today)

 

 


 

Candy laced with drugs being circulated at Utah high school

 

Parents in Box Elder School District are being warned about “gummy” candy being circulated among students that has been injected with a combination of alcohol and prescription medication.

A letter from district Superintendent Ron Tolman emailed Friday says that to the district’s knowledge, the candy is being passed around only at Box Elder High School. Police are aggressively pursuing the matter, he said.

“The candy appears to be repackaged in plastic bags and given or sold to other students,” Tolman’s letter said. “At this point we believe this to be isolated to the Brigham City area, but want all parents to be aware of it so that you could visit with your students.”

http://go.uen.org/5cO (SLT)

 

http://go.uen.org/5cT (DN)

 

http://go.uen.org/5cU (OSE)

 

http://go.uen.org/5d0 (CVD)

 

http://go.uen.org/5d4 (KUTV)

 

http://go.uen.org/5d5 (KTVX)

 

http://go.uen.org/5d7 (KSL)

 

http://go.uen.org/5d8 (KSTU)

 

http://go.uen.org/5dk ([London] Daily Mail)

 

 


 

 

Provo teen taken off life support months after fiery crash

 

A 15-year-old Provo girl who suffered burns on over half of her body during a fiery off-road vehicle accident in July died Monday after she was taken off of life support.

Baylee Hoaldridge suffered third-degree burns on more than 60 percent of her body after the rented utility terrain vehicle (UTV) she was riding in crashed and burst into flames on July 4.

The Hoaldridges’ family attorney Paxton Guymon confirmed the death Tuesday and said in a statement that the family is “heartbroken.”

http://go.uen.org/5cP (SLT)

 

http://go.uen.org/5cS (DN)

 

 


 

Parowan High students present ‘The Addams Family’

 

Theater students at Parowan High School will be presenting their latest performance, “The Addams Family,” starting Wednesday night and continuing until Tuesday.

http://go.uen.org/5d1 (SGS)

 


 

 

Educator of the week: Travis Proctor in Goshen

 

Travis Proctor has taught fifth grade for 18 years. He was selected as Educator of the Week to be recognized in the Daily Herald.

http://go.uen.org/5cX (PDH)

 


 

 

Student of the Week: Libby Anderson

 

Libby Anderson, 11, from Mapleton attends sixth grade at Hobble Creek Elementary and was chosen to be honored as the Daily Herald’s Student of the Week.

http://go.uen.org/5cV (PDH)

 

 

 

 

 

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OPINION & COMMENTARY

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Students need facts about climate change

(Logan) Herald Journal letter from Paul C. Rogers

 

The Utah Office of Education will be voting in early December on “Science with Engineering Education Standards” addressing, among other things, 6th and 8th grade climate science. Proposed alterations to previous standards now include a watering down of direct statements about the international scientific consensus of human-caused climate change. For 6th graders there is no mention of fossil fuel’s role in temperature change. Rather, students are asked to address how the natural greenhouse effect “maintains the Earth’s energy balance at a relatively constant temperature.” Eighth graders are asked to “Analyze and interpret data on the factors that change global temperatures and their effects on regional climates” (rather than the original query dealing more directly with global “rising” temperatures).

In Utah, let’s leave learning standards to disciplinary specialists and technical writers who know these subjects and how to communicate them to students. Education should be based on the best knowledge available, not individual belief systems and personal whims of those holding power. Scientific consensus is very difficult to come by, yet human-caused climate warming is affirmed by 97 percent of climate scientists in the world. Our children will need to understand the facts and (hopefully) help to build a better world based on those facts. Please join Utah Moms for Clean Air in telling the State Office of Education to keep the language about climate change factual, clear, and direct.

http://go.uen.org/5cZ

 


 

 

Logan High did not ignore Veterans Day

(Logan) Herald Journal letter from Chris Rasmussen

 

I think it only fair to let you know what happened inside Logan High School on Veteran’s Day. We had a wonderful assembly that was put together on our veterans’ behalf. Originally, the assembly planned fell through so the alternative was to have a veterans’ activity with 2nd hour, where a video would be shown called “Those Who Dared.” After a discussion with students, we were to have a letter-writing opportunity. These letters of gratitude would be delivered to our community’s veterans.

Students came into the office wanting a little more than that so another assembly was planned. Wednesday morning as the students entered the auditorium listening to patriotic music, they were greeted by their studentbody officers. They were led in the “Pledge,” which was followed by a wonderful rendition of the National Anthem, sung by the audition choir “Crimson Colony.” Then from the balcony came a solo trumpet played by Kendal Nielson. His rendition of “Taps” was wonderful.

http://go.uen.org/5cY

 

 


 

 

Paris headmaster on outpouring of support: ‘we know we are not alone’

NewsHour commentary by NICHOLAS HAMMOND, headmaster of The British School of Paris, an international school with more than 750 students from 52 countries

 

We held our weekly assembly as normal first thing on Monday morning. Students came into the hall and sat quietly. We talked about what had happened.

I’ve never given an assembly to a more attentive student body, even the ones who are usually away in their own thoughts seemed engaged and were listening. They were absolutely still and silent in our minute’s silence. This mattered to them. They applauded once the assembly finished; this is unusual.

The attacks occurred not far from where we sat, about 15 miles. Some of our students had attended the football match Friday evening; some of our children live in central Paris.

During Monday’s meeting, we followed the advice of in-service teacher trainings on trauma and also applied bereavement and counseling training.

Our tutors spoke about the importance of working together, supporting each other and ensuring that we remain a community bound by ideals of co-operation, reason and understanding. We talked about how it was perfectly natural to be a little bit scared and that it was normal to be concerned. We talked about the incident being serious rather than sad.

http://go.uen.org/5db

 


 

 

Turning ‘Hard-to-Teach’ Kids Into Superstars Clinton should encourage district schools to adopt some of the practices contributing to charter school success.

U.S. News & World Report op-ed by Nina Rees, president and chief executive officer of the National Alliance for Public Charter Schools

 

When former Secretary Hillary Clinton said last week that most charter public schools don’t take, or are quick to get rid of, the “hardest to teach” students, it caught many in the charter movement by surprise. Clinton has supported our work for two decades, recognizing the importance of providing public school choices to parents. Other charter defenders have rebutted Clinton’s remarks, pointing out that charter schools have been a lifeline for students and parents in low-income communities – especially students of color, who are thriving in charter schools. And noted education researcher Robert Pondiscio pointed out that district-run schools in higher income areas have several avenues to avoid teaching the students they don’t want to keep.

But there hasn’t been as much focus on why charter public schools help “hard to teach” students thrive. After all, as the latest report on charter school enrollment shows, charter public schools are most commonly found in urban neighborhoods with tough socioeconomic challenges. But instead of excuses, they’re getting results. What are charter schools doing differently that’s working? I see three things.

First, charter public schools have a different mindset than district-run schools. The way Clinton formulated her statement – referring to the “hardest-to-teach kids” – is more commonly found among school district and union officials who are trying to explain away failure. Charter school teachers and leaders aren’t Pollyannas. They know that students bring all sorts of personal, academic and social issues to the classroom. But charter schools are committed to leaving that baggage at the door http://go.uen.org/5cJ

 

 


 

 

Chicago Is Making Coding Education Mandatory. Is That a Good Idea?

A school computer science program developer explains the pros and cons.

Reason commentary by Scott Shackford

 

“Just make it a requirement.”

That’s what Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel said the government should do to make education in computer coding and programming available to public school students.

“You’d be amazed to if you make the goal, how much all the other choices will be made to get to that goal,” he told people attending a tech event in October sponsored by the Washington Post.

Emanuel wants the federal government to make the same mandate he is attempting to implement back in his home city. Chicago Public Schools is rolling out computer science classes at all levels of education, and the goal is eventually to require some mandatory computer science education in order to graduate from high school.

Should we bristle at the idea of yet another inflexible government mandate in public education or commend Emanuel for recognizing how important computer education is for today’s students as they prepare to enter the work force?

http://go.uen.org/5de

 

 


 

New Michael Moore Film Looks to Europe for Education Policy Ideas Education Week commentary by columnist Mark Walsh

 

Filmmaker Michael Moore is not the type of director or star who seeks to slip in unnoticed to a theater for an advance screening of his latest film.

First, there is a rather loud voice. Then there is the long hair, his trademark ball cap and glasses, and his self-acknowledged—ahem, how shall we put it?—heft. (He could stand to lose 100 pounds or so, he would say later.)

Moore, the director of provocative documentaries such as  “Roger & Me,” “Bowling for Columbine,” “Fahrenheit 9/11,” and “Sicko,” has a new film coming soon that explores solutions to various U.S. policy problems, including several in education, by heading to Europe.

“Where to Invade Next” follows Moore as he sits down with students in France to eat four-star school lunches (complete with cheese course), asks students and educators in Finland whether a lack of homework is the key to that nation’s educational success, and rolls his cameras as German students learn poignant lessons about their nation’s most shameful legacy—the Holocaust.

There is also a look at Europe’s more progressive attitude on sex education (in France again), and a virtually free higher education system in Slovenia that is even attracting American students.

The new film shows a softer, less abrasive side of the filmmaker, whose other works often showed Moore confronting corporate executives, politicians, and most famously, in “Bowling for Columbine,” Charlton Heston for his role as head of the National Rifle Association.

http://go.uen.org/5da

 

 


 

 

A Bad Bargain

How teacher collective bargaining affects students’ employment and earnings later in life Education Next analysis by Michael F. Lovenheim, associate professor of policy analysis and management at Cornell University, and Alexander Willén, a doctoral student in policy analysis and management at Cornell University

 

On the eve of the Seattle teachers strike in September 2015, the Seattle Times condemned the impending walkout, accusing the union of “stiff-arming more than 50,000 kids and their families.” Yet the teachers insisted that their strike was about children’s education, not just teacher pay, and commanded widespread support from parents and the community at large.

Seattle teachers and administrators reached an agreement in one week, but the question of how unions affect public education is far from settled. According to the recent Education Next poll (see “The 2015 EdNext Poll on School Reform,” features, Winter 2016), the public is divided as to whether teachers unions have a positive or negative impact on schools, and, until now, researchers have been unable to document the effects of collective bargaining on students’ long-term outcomes.

Today, more than 60 percent of teachers in the United States work under a union contract. The rights of teachers to unionize and bargain together have expanded dramatically since the late 1950s, when states began passing “duty-to-bargain” (DTB) laws that required school districts to negotiate with teachers unions in good faith. Recently, though, states such as Wisconsin, Indiana, Michigan, and Tennessee have sought to weaken the ability of teachers unions to negotiate contracts in K–12 education.

Advocates for these restrictions claim that unions have a negative effect on the quality of public education and, therefore, students’ life chances. Those in favor of teacher collective bargaining, on the other hand, argue that unions make the education system more effective by empowering teachers who are in the classroom and by giving them a role in shaping their working conditions. Due to data limitations, however, empirical research has not credibly addressed the critical question of how teacher collective bargaining influences student outcomes.

In this study, we present the first evidence on how laws that support teacher collective bargaining affect students’ employment and earnings in adulthood.

http://go.uen.org/5dd

 

 

 

 

 

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NATIONAL NEWS

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With the ESEA Conference Set to Kick Off, Is the End Near for NCLB?

Education Week

 

After eight years and at least three serious attempts, Congress is finally moving forward on bipartisan, bicameral legislation to rewrite the almost-universally-despised No Child Left Behind Act, the current version of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act.

The preliminary agreement—or “framework”—as the lead negotiators, Reps. John Kline, R-Minn., and Bobby Scott, D-Va., and Sens. Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn., and Patty Murray, D-Wash., are calling it—is not the final word. Instead, it’s a jumping off point to set the stage for an official conference committee that begins Wednesday and could end this week.

The names of the lawmakers who will make up the House portion of that conference committee were just announced. It’s pretty expansive list as far as these things go, possibly because Rep. Paul Ryan of Wisconsin, the new speaker, wants to signal that many perspectives will be represented. List of Republican House conferees here. List of Democratic House conferees here. (Some familiar names on those lists, including K-12 subcommittee chairman, Rep. Todd Rokita of Indiana, and Rep. Jared Polis of Colorado, a big charter fan.)

The proposal would keep some of the NCLB law’s most-important transparency measures in place, like continued annual testing in grades 3 through 8 and once in high school. And it includes some protections for perennially foundering schools and those where poor and minority kids, or students in special education, and those just learning English, are struggling.

http://go.uen.org/5cH

 

http://go.uen.org/5cI ([Washington, DC] The Hill)

 

 


 

 

L.A. Unified explores possibility of becoming an all-charter district Los Angeles Times

 

Converting the nation’s second-largest school system into an all-charter district is a long-shot — one that requires state approval and support from a majority of teachers.

But members of the Los Angeles Unified Board of Education said they were exploring all options — even those that are unlikely — as the district contends with a charter school expansion plan spearheaded by the Broad Foundation. The plan seeks to enroll more than half the district’s students in charter schools over the next eight years.

On Tuesday, a board committee reviewed a report that outlines the process for becoming an entirely charter school district. Board members said the goal was primarily to identify how the district could benefit from the same flexibility currently provided to charters.

Charters are publicly funded, independently operated and free from some regulations that govern traditional schools. Most are non-union.

Board member Richard Vladovic said the chances of L.A. Unified becoming an all-charter district were “slim and none.”

Another board member, Monica Ratliff, who chairs the budget, facilities and audit committee, said she was “not hearing that a majority of board members want this district to go all charter.” Instead, Ratliff said the committee was simply trying to learn how it could seek more autonomy from the state.

http://go.uen.org/5cL

 


 

 

Why Arizona teachers stay or leave the profession

(Phoenix) Arizona Republic

 

It’s 3:30 p.m. on a Monday at Mensendick Elementary School in Glendale, and the students begin to file into the classroom.

Today’s topic is detention. The teacher instructs her class to gather into groups for discussions. Her question:

“What is the relationship between classroom rules and the consequences for misbehavior?” The room buzzes with ideas and chatter. Some students are trying to wrap their heads around the question.

It’s a typical classroom. Except the students aren’t typical students.

They’re teachers, each with less than two years’ experience, learning how to become better teachers — and stay passionate about their profession.

To help combat teacher turnover, some Valley district and charter schools are renewing efforts to give their teachers customized opportunities to grow and develop. Educators say it will take more to address retention, but such programs are one step in a long journey.

Programs like the one in the Glendale Elementary School District, where veteran teachers mentor their less experienced colleagues, are one example of a teacher-support program that is more personalized than the typical professional development that instructors receive.

http://go.uen.org/5cG

 

 


 

State auditor warns school districts on background checks Albuquerque (NM) Journal

 

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. — The New Mexico state auditor is warning school districts to comply with background check and licensure rules after several high-profile failures.

Auditor Tim Keller issued the risk advisory Tuesday, stressing that better internal controls are needed. It is the first time the Auditor’s Office has taken such action.

“Schools need to come into compliance to ensure the safety of children and educators, as well as safeguard public funds,” Keller said in a statement.

The advisory notes problems in Albuquerque, Mora and Española school districts, which have each experienced recent scandals.

http://go.uen.org/5cK

 

 


 

 

High court hears arguments on state superintendent’s powers Milwaukee (WI) Journal Sentinel

 

Madison— During 21/2 hours of arguments Tuesday before the state Supreme Court, lawyers clashed over whether some of the powers of the state’s schools superintendent can be transferred to the governor.

The court’s ruling, expected by next summer, could determine whether it lets stand a decision it wrote 19 years ago that found no one could have equal or greater authority to the superintendent when it comes to public education.

In 2011, GOP Gov. Scott Walker signed a law giving him a greater say in writing administrative rules, which are used to implement state laws. Administrative rules include more specifics than statutes and carry the force of law.

Previously, the rules were written by state agencies and reviewed by the Legislature before they could take effect.

The 2011 change required the governor to sign off on — or block — all administrative rules early in the process, even for agencies that are supposed to be independent. It also gave him a second chance to veto the rules before they were finalized.

That went too far when it comes to how schools are run, according to parents of students and members of teachers unions that sued over the law.

http://go.uen.org/5cN

 

 


 

 

Calls Mount to Remove Metal Detectors from NYC Schools Associated Press

 

NEW YORK — A student has not been shot in a New York City school in 13 years, a heartening statistic in an era of commonplace school massacres. But there is a growing cry to rid the city’s schools of metal detectors, the very tool some observers credit with keeping them safe.

Some parent groups and advocates say the scanners installed at the city’s most troubled institutions more than two decades ago are now unneeded because of low crime rates, and they condemn them as discriminatory, since by and large they sit in schools serving minority neighborhoods.

http://go.uen.org/5d9

 


 

 

Is the future of high school football on the line?

USA Today

 

The thankful receiver bears a plentiful harvest, wrote poet William Blake. He wasn’t talking about football, but administrator Roger Blake very much is when he says the game is at a critical juncture: Someday, without changes, it could run out of receivers.

This Blake is executive director of the California Interscholastic Federation, which oversees athletics at 1,576 high schools. He raised eyebrows recently when he told reporters on a conference call that the next two to three years will be crucial for the future of the nation’s most popular sport.

Eight high school football players have died since this season began, five from head or neck injuries. Three more died during preseason practice from heat-related causes or sickle cell tied to exertion. And concussion concerns continue apace, as they have for several seasons.

“I believe parents are seeing the same stories and the same data and taking a step back,” Blake tells USA TODAY Sports. “What parent wouldn’t be asking, ‘Do I want my child out there?’ ”

If so, it’s hard to tell by the numbers. Roughly 1.1 million high school students play 11-man football in grades 9-12, more than any other sport. That’s down slightly — about 10,000 — for 2014, the most recent season for which a count is available from the National Federation of State High School Associations.

http://go.uen.org/5cM

 

 

 

 

 

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CALENDAR

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USOE Calendar

http://www.schools.utah.gov/main/CALENDAR.aspx

 

 

UEN News

http://www.uen.org

 

 

November 18:

Education Interim Committee meeting

8 a.m., 30 House Building

http://le.utah.gov/Interim/2015/html/00005017.htm

 

Economic Development and Workforce Services Interim Committee meeting

1:15 p.m., 20 House Building

http://le.utah.gov/Interim/2015/html/00005030.htm

 

 

November 23:

Charter School Funding Task Force

1 p.m.,  445 State Capitol

http://le.utah.gov/Interim/2015/html/00004734.htm

 

 

December 3:

Utah State Board of Education study session and committee meetings

250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspx

 

 

December 4:

Utah State Board of Education meeting

250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspx

 

 

December 7:

Executive Appropriations Committee meeting

2 p.m., 445 State Capitol

http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2015&com=APPEXE

 

 

December 10:

Utah State Charter School Board meeting

250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://go.uen.org/1pn

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