Education News Roundup: Dec. 23, 2015

 

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Education News Roundup

Education News Roundup

Today’s Top Picks:

 

The really, really good news: There will be no news roundups cluttering your inboxes for the rest of the week. The roundup will return on Monday.

 

New Census report shows Utah now has as many people as Chicago — that is, 3 million. But the state’s fertility rate is slowing.

http://go.uen.org/5yj (SLT)

and http://go.uen.org/5ym (DN)

or a copy of the report

http://go.uen.org/5yk (Census)

 

AP previews Sen. Van Tassell’s American Indian education bill (http://le.utah.gov/~2016/bills/static/SB0014.html).

http://go.uen.org/5yy (OSE)

and http://go.uen.org/5yz (KSL)

and http://go.uen.org/5yK ([Flagstaff] Arizona Daily Sun)

 

The U.S. Department of Education is asking 12 states — Utah is not among them — to address their low student participation in state testing.

http://go.uen.org/5yH (Ed Week)

 

St. Paul, Minn., teacher alleges unsafe work environment in a school where he was assaulted by a student.

http://go.uen.org/5yo (Star-Tribune)

 

 

 

 

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TODAY’S HEADLINES

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UTAH

 

Utah’s official population nearly hits 3 million in end-of-year count

2015 census » Utah was 4,081 people shy of milestone in July.

 

Utah aims to draw teachers to schools near reservations

 

Study: Utah employers, Hill Air Force Base can’t find qualified employees

 

Road issues continue to vex San Juan County

 

Closer scrutiny for new boundary proposals

 

Deseret News heroes of 2015: 7 people who made a difference this year

 

Utah Valley Educator of the Week: Molly Murdock

 

Utah Valley Student of the Week: Dylan Whiting

 


 

 

OPINION & COMMENTARY

 

State Budget

 

America’s anti-Muslim hysteria comes to a Virginia school

 

An Unsung Hero of Black Education

Businessman and philanthropist Julius Rosenwald helped build thousands of quality elementary schools in the segregated South.

 

We can change the food, but can we change the lunchroom?

Encouraging kids to eat fruits and vegetables starts with changing the school menu, but it might also need a change in the lunchroom. Can we build lunchrooms that reflect the desire to eat right?

 

Don’t ignore economic inequality at schools, especially during the holidays

 


 

 

NATION

 

Education Department Asks 12 States to Address Low Test-Participation Rates

 

As New SAT Looms, Students Opt for Multiple College-Entrance Tests

 

Creationist Sylvia Allen to lead Arizona Senate education panel

 

St. Paul teacher speaks of struggles as he begins legal action against district St. Paul teacher assaulted by a student describes injuries, alleges unsafe climate.

 

What Is Fair? High School Students Talk About Affirmative Action

 

Moody’s drops Chicago Board of Education rating deeper into ‘junk’

 

10-year-old moves Clinton with question about bullying

 

Michigan Schools Try Out Gold Standard of Concussion Tests

 

Turtles kept in many schools and homes again tied to Salmonella

 

Boko Haram Violence Forces 1 Million Children From School

 

 

 

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UTAH NEWS

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Utah’s official population nearly hits 3 million in end-of-year count

2015 census » Utah was 4,081 people shy of milestone in July.

 

Utah’s new official population for 2015 is nearly 3 million — but it fell just 4,081 people short of that milestone.

To be exact, the population is 2,995,919, according to estimates released Tuesday by the U.S. Census Bureau.

But that estimate is for the state’s population as of July 1 — six months ago. So, “We’re definitely beyond 3 million now,” said Phil Dean, state budget director and chief economist.

In fact, Gov. Gary Herbert held a news conference Oct. 26 saying that Utah probably passed the 3 million point about then. “Based on the Census numbers, it may have been a teeny bit earlier,” Dean said.

That means the number of Beehive State residents now is slightly larger than the population of Chicago.

It is roughly the same as the nation of Mongolia, and just ahead of Armenia, Lithuania and Albania.

The Census estimates that Utah added 51,421 residents between July 1, 2014 and July 1, 2015 — the equivalent of adding a city the size of Murray during that year. It means Utah’s population increased by about 141 people every day.

Utah’s growth rate of 1.75 percent during the year slipped a bit to the sixth fastest among the 50 states, the Census reported. Utah now ranks No. 31 in total population, up from No. 33 last year. It just passed Arkansas and Mississippi.

Pam Perlich, director of demographic research for the University of Utah’s Kem C. Gardner Policy Institute, said most of the recent growth came from “natural increase,” or births minus deaths.

But she said that natural increase is slowing. “We still have the nation’s highest fertility rate, but it’s way down from where it was” before the recession — as parents may have delayed having children for economic reasons, she said. Also, she said the state’s death rate has been creeping upward.

http://go.uen.org/5yj (SLT)

 

http://go.uen.org/5ym (DN)

 

A copy of the report

http://go.uen.org/5yk (Census)

 


 

 

Utah aims to draw teachers to schools near reservations

 

SALT LAKE CITY— Utah lawmakers are working on a $2 million pilot program to attract and keep teachers in remote public schools near American Indian reservations, where turnover can top 50 percent.

Vernal Republican Sen. Kevin Van Tassell says some schools are five hours from metropolitan areas and it can be difficult to recruit teachers.

Van Tassell wants to start a grant program helping schools to attract or recruit teachers by handing out signing bonuses or boosting pay.

Eligible schools must have a student population that is at least 29 percent American Indian or Alaska Native.

http://go.uen.org/5yy (OSE)

 

http://go.uen.org/5yz (KSL)

 

http://go.uen.org/5yK ([Flagstaff] Arizona Daily Sun)

 

 


 

 

Study: Utah employers, Hill Air Force Base can’t find qualified employees

 

HILL AIR FORCE BASE — Utah companies — including the state’s largest single-site employer, Hill Air Force Base — are having a hard time finding qualified employees to fill open positions.

Those are the findings in “Is This the Place? A Survey of Utah Employers,” a new report from The Utah Foundation that found the state’s employers are being plagued by an inability to find qualified workers for open positions. And perhaps not coincidentally, it found state wages offered for skilled positions are often below national median levels.

The UF, a non-partisan research organization, surveyed more than 150 businesses across the state, most of which have headquarters along the Wasatch Front.

http://go.uen.org/5yx (OSE)

 

 

 

Road issues continue to vex San Juan County

 

San Juan County (and many of the nearly 3,000 students in the San Juan School District) are left holding the bag after the federal government decreased funding for the maintenance of bus routes on the Navajo Nation.

As a result, a difficult situation is becoming even more unmanageable as road maintenance crews fall farther behind an overwhelming schedule.

The result of the transportation challenges strike to the very heart of the education effort. Missed school days are a key indicator of a challenge for struggling students.

In the past school year, students in some areas missed more than ten days of school due to inaccessible roads.

http://go.uen.org/5yL (San Juan Record)

 


 

 

Closer scrutiny for new boundary proposals

 

FARMINGTON—Four new boundary options for elementary schools in south Kaysville and north Farmington were presented to members of the Davis School District Board of Education and concerned parents last week.

While boundaries are being redrawn for six schools, the boundaries proposed for the northern-most schools have not received the opposition that has grown from the proposal for the two southern schools.

http://go.uen.org/5yM (DCC)

 


 

 

Deseret News heroes of 2015: 7 people who made a difference this year

 

Most heroes don’t think of themselves as extraordinary people.

In fact, if you were to ask any of the people on this list if they think of themselves as heroes, they’d probably say no.

What they all have in common, however, is a desire to make a difference.

Education: Shauna Tominey

Shauna Tominey, a research scientist and director of early childhood programming and teacher education at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence, focuses on building social skills and resilience in children from underprivileged families — cutting-edge areas of concern as it becomes increasingly apparent that education achievement gaps cannot be closed through academics alone.

Tominey emphasizes aspects of early childhood development that were often overlooked in the past 15 years, a period when pressure to get more information and academic skills into children at ever earlier ages crowded out the social and emotional growth that makes for healthy adults.

In an important contribution to the pushback against academic tunnel vision, Tominey this year coauthored “Stop, Think, Act: Integrating Self-Regulation in the Early Childhood Classroom” (Routledge, 130 pages, $34.95 paperback).

http://go.uen.org/5yw (DN)

 


 

 

Utah Valley Educator of the Week: Molly Murdock

 

Molly Murdock teaches kindergarten at Mapleton Elementary. She was selected as the Daily Herald’s Utah Valley Educator of the Week for her great, longstanding influence on young minds.

http://go.uen.org/5yA (PDH)

 


 

 

Utah Valley Student of the Week: Dylan Whiting

 

Dylan Bryan Whiting, 12, is from Salem and attends Mt. Loafer Elementary. He was selected as the Daily Herald’s Utah Valley Student of the Week.

http://go.uen.org/5yB (PDH)

 

 

 

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OPINION & COMMENTARY

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State Budget

Deseret News editorial

 

A growing Utah economy has allowed Gov. Gary Herbert to put forth a proposed budget that, for the second consecutive year, includes generous allotments for public education. It would also increase spending in the areas of water management and programs to help air quality. What the governor has offered in his $14.8 billion budget provides a good template for the Utah Legislature when it sits down next month to begin cobbling together an overall spending package.

As for education, the governor’s budget calls for $422 million in new spending for public and higher education, including an unprecedented 4.75 percent increase in per-pupil spending. These are healthy upward adjustments, and we are fortunate that our economic situation allows for such substantial investments. But it’s important to note that excellence in the education system isn’t something that will automatically happen by throwing money at our schools. How funds are spent is as important as the raw number of dollars that flow from the state to the school districts.

What the governor has done, however, is in concert with what the majority of citizens want, according to public opinion surveys.

http://go.uen.org/5yl

 


 

 

America’s anti-Muslim hysteria comes to a Virginia school Washington Post editorial

 

IN THE midst of World War I, and at war with the Kaiser’s army in Europe, the United States contended with waves of anti-German hysteria, often provoked by the specter of the German language itself. Iowa and Nebraska tried to ban instruction at schools in the tongue of Schiller and Goethe; elsewhere, there were efforts to find new names for dachshunds, sauerkraut, hamburgers — even German measles.

A similar xenophobic panic, in this case directed at Muslims and Islam, is emerging lately — especially since the carnage in Paris and San Bernardino, Calif. — incited by the irresponsible rhetoric of some politicians, most notably Donald Trump. A spike in vandalism, arson, threats and violence has been directed at mosques and Muslim homes and businesses. Last week, in Virginia’s Shenandoah Valley, the target of intolerance was a public school where, in a world geography class on Islamic culture, a teacher assigned her students to try their hand at Arabic calligraphy by copying the shahada, the Muslim profession of faith recited in daily prayers.

For her trouble, the teacher, Cheryl LaPorte, and the school, Riverheads High School in Augusta County, west of Charlottesville, became the target of vicious threats, emails and invective, including from some parents. The venomous outpouring, along with threats of disruption, prompted Schools Superintendent Eric W. Bond to cancel classes last Friday, thus starting winter break a day early.

Ms. LaPorte might have chosen a more secular bit of Arabic calligraphy for her students to copy; henceforth, the school system announced, that will be the case. But the overreaction — some emails suggested putting the teacher’s head on a spike, and many accused the school of anti-Christian indoctrination — was wildly out of proportion to the assignment itself.

http://go.uen.org/5ys

 


 

 

An Unsung Hero of Black Education

Businessman and philanthropist Julius Rosenwald helped build thousands of quality elementary schools in the segregated South.

Wall Street Journal commentary by columnist JASON L. RILEY

 

“Rosenwald,” a documentary film about the early 20th-century philanthropist Julius Rosenwald, disappeared from theaters much too quickly after being released in August. An Academy Award nomination next month, when the honorees will be announced, may be a long shot for writer-director Aviva Kempner, but it would give the film the wider audience it deserves. It also would be a public service.

The Chicago-based Rosenwald, a son of German-Jewish immigrants, made his fortune in the early 1900s running Sears, Roebuck & Company when it was the nation’s largest retailer. The film’s main focus, however, is Rosenwald’s largely unsung philanthropic collaboration with Booker T. Washington, the former slave and black educator best known for his self-help philosophy and for training black teachers in the post-Civil War South. After Reconstruction ended, white backlash resulted in scarce funding for black public education in southern states, where nearly 90% of the black population lived. Washington therefore sought assistance from northern philanthropists like Rosenwald, who graciously obliged.

In 1911, Rosenwald agreed to help Washington build a handful of elementary schools in rural Alabama under a matching-grant program. Rosenwald put up part of the money, and the balance came from local residents in the form of cash and labor. The two men were impressed with the results and began thinking regionally. Within six years, the Julius Rosenwald Fund had been created and more than 600 Rosenwald schools constructed across the South. This initiative increased both the quantity and quality of black education. The buildings had modern lighting and sanitation. Classrooms had adequate supplies of books and desks and blackboards. The teachers were better trained and better paid.

Washington died in 1915 and Rosenwald in 1932, but the education program continued at the latter’s request, ending in 1948. By that time, some 5,300 Rosenwald schools had been built and more than a third of black children in the rural South had attended one.

http://go.uen.org/5yn

 


 

 

We can change the food, but can we change the lunchroom?

Encouraging kids to eat fruits and vegetables starts with changing the school menu, but it might also need a change in the lunchroom. Can we build lunchrooms that reflect the desire to eat right?

Christian Science Monitor op-ed by Mara Fleishman of Food Tank

 

One day while I was volunteering at my daughter’s elementary school lunchroom at an event called “Rainbow Day”, something started to click for me. “Rainbow Days,” created by our district’s food service team, introduces kids to the concept of “eating a rainbow” and helps them develop a taste for and understanding of the need to eat a variety of colors. You give the kids stickers if they can get 5 colors on their plate from the salad bar. Kids seem to really like this event, particularly the K-3 grades. You can tell just by watching how well kids are able to engage with experiential food and nutrition learning at lunch. That understanding was the start of my ‘Aha’ moment. Why is the lunchroom the only room in the school that provides NO learning opportunities? Why are kids eating in a make-shift cafeteria? Why are they given only 20 minutes to shovel food down? How could anyone get excited about food in an institutional setting like this?

In my prior for-profit life we were trained to look for market opportunities, low hanging fruit, overlooked categories. That type of critical vision is ingrained in me and has played a key role in my new non-profit world. Having worked for Whole Foods Market for nearly 13 years, one thing was very clear to me: food presentation and the environment in which you are getting your food matters. Regardless of the different food facts, quality standards and certifications – the number one reason people shopped at Whole Foods was how it made them feel when they walked in.

Looking around at the school lunchroom, the way it made me feel was yuck!

http://go.uen.org/5yr

 


 

 

Don’t ignore economic inequality at schools, especially during the holidays NewsHour commentary by Paul Chylinski, activities director at Loara High School in Anaheim Union High School District in California

 

Some time ago, members of the student government that I advise came to me to share something that most, if not all, teachers have experienced at this time of year — that uncomfortable feeling when casual talk of holiday vacations and presents comes to dominate the hallways and the realization that not everyone is participating.

Schools bring together hundreds, often thousands of kids, from all different economic backgrounds, and the reality is that some are more financially fortunate than others. This group of students was determined to do something about that.teacherslounge

We started the “Winter Wishes” program as a way to grant the wishes of as many students as possible this holiday season. As activities director and student government advisor, I receive the Google form that students use to make their wishes. I got one this year that broke my heart. A student had written to say his mother had been ill and had fallen on some hard times. They were struggling to make the rent, buy food and pay the bills. He asked for some money so that his mother wouldn’t feel she had let her children down.

I shared the story with another teacher and her husband who later handed me a $250 Visa Gift card and $250 Wal-Mart card to give to the student. We presented it confidentially; the student almost collapsed with joy.

After working as an activities director and social science teacher for 26 years, I have come to realize that the biggest lesson we can teach our kids is about love and acceptance inside and outside of the classroom. Although these lessons need to be taught throughout the school year, the holidays are a particularly important time to let kids know they matter.

http://go.uen.org/5yI

 

 

 

 

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NATIONAL NEWS

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Education Department Asks 12 States to Address Low Test-Participation Rates Education Week

 

If you’ve been wondering how many states had significant issues with test participation last spring, there’s an answer from the U.S. Department of Education.

Twelve states have received letters from the Education Department in recent months asking them to address lower-than-required participation rates on state exams for groups of students or districts, or statewide.

The states to receive these letters are: California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Idaho, Maine, New York, North Carolina, Oregon, Rhode Island, Washington, and Wisconsin. (Click the individual link to see each state’s letter from the department.) Some of the copies of the letters are undated, but several were sent in either early November or early December.

The Education Department’s letters ask states to specify how they will address their local or state participation rates for the 2015-16 school year. The department includes possible examples of how states could act, such as lowering a school or district’s rating on state accountability systems, and counting non-participating students as not proficient for accountability purposes.

On Tuesday, the department also released guidance for states in which it said that under the Every Student Succeeds Act, states need plans to address situations in which participation rates that dip below the required 95 percent.

http://go.uen.org/5yH

 


 

 

As New SAT Looms, Students Opt for Multiple College-Entrance Tests Education Week

 

With the rollout of the redesigned SAT coming in March, this year’s high school juniors face a dilemma: Should they take the current SAT, the new SAT, the ACT—or some combination of all three?

Officials from ACT, Inc. and the College Board, which owns the SAT, say they don’t know how many students take both college-entrance exams but each reported that participation is up this fall.

A survey of parents of college applicants by Kaplan Test Prep released in November shows that 43 percent say their child plans to take both the SAT and ACT—often to see which test results in the higher score.

Deciding which exam to take has added a layer of pressure to what some say is an increasingly stressful college search process.

http://go.uen.org/5yG

 


 

 

Creationist Sylvia Allen to lead Arizona Senate education panel

(Phoenix) Arizona Republic

 

One of the best-known lightning rods in the Arizona Legislature will now help shape the future of education.

Senate President Andy Biggs named Sen. Sylvia Allen, R-Snowflake, chairwoman of the Senate Education Committee. Allen replaces Kelli Ward, who resigned the Senate earlier this month to focus on her congressional run.

Allen is best known for her controversial public comments over the years. During a legislative hearing in 2009, she said the Earth is 6,000 years old, a belief held by “Young Earth” biblical creationists. In 2013, a Facebook post about chem-trail conspiracies gained widespread media attention, as did a March comment suggesting mandatory church attendance.

Last year, Navajo County Sheriff K.C. Clark accused Allen of trying to interfere with a criminal investigation of her son-in-law.

Allen, who graduated from Snowflake High School and did not attend college, is co-founder of George Washington Academy, an EdKey, Inc. charter school in Snowflake.

As chairwoman, she will control which legislative education proposals succeed and which ones die.

http://go.uen.org/5yJ

 


 

 

St. Paul teacher speaks of struggles as he begins legal action against district St. Paul teacher assaulted by a student describes injuries, alleges unsafe climate.

Minneapolis (MN) Star-Tribune

 

St. Paul teacher John Ekblad has no memory of a Dec. 4 attack by a student that put him in the hospital with a concussion.

But he is well aware of the aftereffects.

Headaches, 24/7, he said. Numbness in his right arm. A loss of hearing in his right ear.

“I’m kind of broken right now,” Ekblad told reporters Tuesday — a day after his attorneys filed a claim against the district, saying it created an unsafe environment for students, teachers and other staff members.

The notice, which has yet to take the form of a lawsuit, seeks to trigger mediation talks that could include a request for damages of more than $50,000.

http://go.uen.org/5yo

 


 

 

What Is Fair? High School Students Talk About Affirmative Action NPR

 

Now that the Supreme Court is considering the issue of affirmative action in college admissions, all kinds of groups are weighing in. But we’re not hearing from the people who will be most affected by the court’s decision: college-bound teenagers.

The teenagers we talked to attend two suburban high schools near Washington, D.C.: One is majority black and the other school has a mix of Latino, black, white and Asian students. The 16- and 17-year-olds knew little or nothing about the case that’s before the Supreme Court — Fisher v. University of Texas at Austin — or about Abigail Fisher, the young woman who sued the university back in 2008. Fisher was denied admission because, she argued, the university wanted more minorities and she was white.

So here’s the question we asked the students:

Should College Admissions Decisions Take Race Into Consideration?

http://go.uen.org/5yC

 


 

 

Moody’s drops Chicago Board of Education rating deeper into ‘junk’

Reuters

 

Moody’s Investors Service on Monday dropped the Chicago Board of Education’s credit rating deeper into “junk” territory, citing the public school district’s “precarious liquidity position.”

The rating on $5.5 billion of the district’s general obligation debt was lowered to B1 from Ba3, and Moody’s warned that it is under review for a further downgrade.

The Chicago Public Schools “has increasingly relied on market access and cash flow borrowing to maintain ongoing operations,” the credit rating agency said in a statement, adding that the downgrade also reflects the district’s structurally imbalanced fiscal 2016 budget.

The nation’s third-largest public school district is facing a cash shortfall next month and has approved new short- and long-term borrowings to raise operating funds. The district’s $5.7 billion budget could also spring a $480 million hole if the state of Illinois does not substantially beef up its share of pension funding for the district, the state’s biggest.

But help for the district remains entangled in an ongoing budget impasse between Republican Governor Bruce Rauner and Democrats who control the legislature.

http://go.uen.org/5yp

 

http://go.uen.org/5yq (Chicago Sun-Times)

 


 

 

10-year-old moves Clinton with question about bullying CNN

 

Keota, Iowa – Hannah Tandy didn’t attend Hillary Clinton’s town hall event on Tuesday expecting to talk about the bullying she faces, but her question about it stirred the audience.

“What are you going to do about bullying?” the 10-year-old Hannah asked, standing in the front row of Clinton’s event.

Clinton responded, “Can you tell me a little bit more about why that’s on your mind?”

“I have asthma and occasionally I hear people talking behind my back,” said Hannah, a fifth-grader eliciting “awws” and applause from the audience and a long hug from the former first lady.

http://go.uen.org/5yt

 


 

 

Michigan Schools Try Out Gold Standard of Concussion Tests Associated Press

 

His story is one that plays out for thousands of athletes on thousands of high school sports teams across the country. What’s different is that Birmingham Groves is one of 62 Michigan high schools participating in a unique pilot program that does baseline testing of athletes in football and other sports to help with concussion diagnosis.

Baseline testing – a combination of memory, reaction time, attention and stress assessments – is done in major pro sports because it is considered an objective and individualized tool to help decide whether to remove an athlete from a game. The NCAA recommends baseline testing of all college athletes. While all states have laws that address preventing concussions in youth sports, many are weak and none require baseline testing.

http://go.uen.org/5yF

 


 

 

Turtles kept in many schools and homes again tied to Salmonella Reuters

 

Tiny turtles, a staple of many school science labs and an appealing family pet for people allergic to cats and dogs, may also be responsible for a growing number of salmonellosis outbreaks, a U.S. study suggests.

Sales of turtles with shells less than 4 inches long have been banned in the U.S. since the 1970s because the creatures are known carriers of Salmonella bacteria, which can cause fever, abdominal cramps and diarrhea so severe that some patients need hospitalization. Young children, the elderly and other people with compromised immune systems are particularly vulnerable to serious complications from these infections.

Despite the sales ban and the known risk, salmonellosis outbreaks tied to turtles have increased since 2006, a research team led by scientists from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) report in the journal Pediatrics.

http://go.uen.org/5yE

 


 

 

Boko Haram Violence Forces 1 Million Children From School Associated Press

 

DAKAR, Senegal — Attacks by Islamic extremist group Boko Haram in northeastern Nigeria and neighboring countries have forced more than 1 million children out of school, heightening the risk they will be abused, abducted or recruited by armed groups, the United Nations children’s agency said Tuesday.

The conflict has forced more than 2,000 schools to close in Nigeria, Cameroon, Chad and Niger, the agency said. Some have been looted or set on fire by the insurgent group whose name means “Western education is sinful.”

“The conflict has been a huge blow for education in the region, and violence has kept many children out of the classroom for more than a year, putting them at risk of dropping out of school altogether,” said Manuel Fontaine, UNICEF’s West and Central Africa Regional Director. Before the crisis, an estimated 11 million children of primary school age were already out of school in the four neighboring countries where Boko Haram stages attacks, the agency said.

Hundreds of schools in northeastern Nigeria have reopened in recent months, but many classrooms are overcrowded or are used as shelter for those displaced. Temporary learning spaces are being set up, but security remains a challenge, the agency said.

http://go.uen.org/5yu

 

http://go.uen.org/5yD (Reuters)

 

http://go.uen.org/5yv (UNICEF)

 

 

 

 

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CALENDAR

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USOE Calendar

http://www.schools.utah.gov/main/CALENDAR.aspx

 

 

UEN News

http://www.uen.org

 

 

January 6:

Public Education Appropriations Subcommittee meeting

9 a.m., 445 State Capitol

http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2016&com=APPPED

 

Utah State Board of Education study session and committee meetings

250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspx

 

 

January 7:

Utah State Board of Education meeting

250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspx

 

 

January 13-14:

Utah State Charter School Board meeting

250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://go.uen.org/1pn

 

 

January 25:

Utah Legislature

First day of the 2016 general session

http://le.utah.gov/

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