Education News Roundup: Jan 19, 2016

MLK2016

Education News Roundup

Education News Roundup

Today’s Top Picks:

 

Sen. Dabakis looks to amend the state constitution to again send all income tax funding to public schools. It was amended in 1996 to allow some funds to go to higher ed.

http://go.uen.org/5Ly (SLT)

 

Two school teachers become their first candidates to file for the eight State School Board seats up for election this year.

http://go.uen.org/5Lz (SLT)

or candidate filings

http://go.uen.org/5Mz (Utah.gov)

 

Congratulations to the Alpine, Canyons, Davis, Ogden City and Duchesne County school districts who were all named to the AP Honor Roll.

http://go.uen.org/5LA (SLT)

and http://go.uen.org/5LK (OSE)

and http://go.uen.org/5LC (College Board)

 

Emery Supt. Sitterud announces his plans to retire.

http://go.uen.org/5Mu (Emery County Progress)

 

Anxious about your ACT or SAT results? You’re not alone this year.

http://go.uen.org/5M6 (Ed Week)

 

Ed Week offers some sympathy to state education agencies as they try to implement ESSA.

http://go.uen.org/5M7 (Ed Week)

 

 

 

 

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TODAY’S HEADLINES

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UTAH

 

Dabakis wants Utah’s K-12 schools to stop sharing income tax revenue with universities

Education » Democrat-sponsored constitutional amendment would boot Utah higher education from income tax funding, reversing 1996 vote.

 

2 Utah teachers seek to take state school board back for educators

Uncertain future » Previous process ruled unconstitutional; state giving little direction.

 

Poll: Utahns give thumbs up to governor’s performance, thumbs down to Legislature

Poll » Herbert has a 2-1 approval margin; only 39% approve of the job lawmakers are doing, citing the controversial state prison move and Medicaid expansion fiasco as examples.

 

Legislators set personal goals for upcoming legislative session

 

Bishop set to unveil ‘Grand Bargain’ bill on public lands for Utah

 

The history and law behind Utah’s bid to gain federal public lands

Legal case » Consultants hired by the state say the feds can’t retain the lands indefinitely, but other experts disagree.

 

5 Utah school districts make AP Honor Roll

Education » Districts in the U.S. and Canada are recognized.

 

Pilot Program Helps Teachers Better Educate Preschoolers With Learning Disabilities

 

Tech pipeline seeks to fill $2 billion job opportunity for children in Southern Utah

 

Superintendent Sitterud announces retirement

 

8 Beaver Dam High School students receive diplomas

 

Martin Luther King, Jr. Day event puts the focus on equity in schools

 

Utahns honor legacy, activism of Martin Luther King Jr.

 

Sensory-impaired students ‘touch tour’ Utah Jazz’s Vivint Arena

 

Government officials visit Sierra Bonita in Nebo School District

 

Cache schools improve IT customer satisfaction

 

Plans for new school building move full STEAM ahead

 

Two Pahokee High students are headed to the Sundance Film Festival in Utah for documentary on prom

 

High School Musical Stars Prepare for 10th Anniversary Reunion

 

Should schoolteachers be required to pay for services of unions they haven’t joined?

 


 

 

OPINION & COMMENTARY

 

Thumbs up, thumbs down

 

‘Promise Partnership’ is producing real results

 

Retool education for the digital economy

 

Give us a miracle, legislators, and support public ed

 

Why Don’t the Presidential Candidates Want to Talk About Education?

 

The Real Problem With Lunch

 

Ten things every American should know

 

Parallel Play in the Education Sandbox

The Common Core and the Politics of Transpartisan Coalitions

 


 

 

NATION

 

Score-Report Holdups Mar College-Testing Season

Holdups frustrated students, counselors

 

ESSA Poses Capacity Challenges for State Education Agencies

 

What happened when one state tried to rewrite the Common Core

Inside Louisiana’s painful struggle over standards

 

Colorado school staff missed red flags in deadly 2013 shooting: report

 

Jeb Bush says education plan promotes choice

 

Case Could Widen Free­Speech Gap Between Unions and Corporations

 

In Omaha, and Much of US, Debate Over Sex Education Rages On

 

HIV Testing Uncommon in Teens Despite Recommendations: CDC

 

First Lady, School Meal Directors May be Headed for Truce

 

Transgender student who fought District 211 gets locker room access

 

U.S. Supreme Court to Weigh Church-State Aid Case With Potentially Broad Impact

 

Police investigate threats against schools in five states

 

Toshiba Launches Surveillance Education Program

 

Water Contamination Raises Health Concerns for Mich. Students

 

Solving The Special Ed Teacher Shortage: Quality, Not Quantity

 

Microsoft Expands Its Minecraft Empire to Your Kid’s School

 

Students recite ‘I Have a Dream’ speech at the Lincoln Memorial

Dozens of children gathered on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial Friday to deliver the “I Have A Dream Speech” of civil rights leader Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

 

 

 

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UTAH NEWS

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Dabakis wants Utah’s K-12 schools to stop sharing income tax revenue with universities

Education » Democrat-sponsored constitutional amendment would boot Utah higher education from income tax funding, reversing 1996 vote.

 

Utah’s Constitution requires that revenue from the state’s income tax be spent supporting public education. And in 1996, that constitutional mandate was broadened to include Utah’s public colleges and universities.

But one state senator hopes to undo that change, arguing that elementary, middle and high schools would benefit from hundreds of millions of additional dollars each year if not for the revenue split between public and higher education.

When lawmakers passed the 1996 amendment, according to Sen. Jim Dabakis, D-Salt Lake City, they guaranteed Utah schools would have the largest classrooms and lowest per-pupil funding in the country.

“What they did in the mid-’90s was they stole generational money from our K-12 school children and pretended like everything was fine,” Dabakis said.

Dabakis is sponsoring a constitutional amendment that would repeal the 1996 change, leaving only the public education system as a beneficiary of income tax revenue.

He said both education systems deserve more resources, but tying them together gave lawmakers the political cover to fund other priorities while schools competed for limited income tax resources.

http://go.uen.org/5Ly (SLT)

 


 

 

2 Utah teachers seek to take state school board back for educators

Uncertain future » Previous process ruled unconstitutional; state giving little direction.

 

Scott Neilson, a high school teacher in the Nebo School District, has filed to run for the board’s District 13 seat, currently held by technology lobbyist Stan Lockhart.

And Granite School District elementary teacher Kathleen Riebe has filed to run for the board’s District 10 seat, currently held by software engineer and board Chairman David Crandall. Lockhart and Crandall have not indicated whether they will seek to remain on the board.

“We need to support our teachers, and we need to support the educational process,” Riebe said. “As I looked at the credentials of some of the people on the board, there’s not a lot of education background.”

Eight of the school board’s 15 seats are up for election this year, according to Mark Thomas, elections director for the Utah Lieutenant Governor’s Office.

The filing deadline for candidates is March 17, a date Thomas said was selected by the elections office due to a lack of direction from state law.

http://go.uen.org/5Lz (SLT)

 

Candidate filings

http://go.uen.org/5Mz (Utah.gov)

 


 

 

Poll: Utahns give thumbs up to governor’s performance, thumbs down to Legislature

Poll » Herbert has a 2-1 approval margin; only 39% approve of the job lawmakers are doing, citing the controversial state prison move and Medicaid expansion fiasco as examples.

 

A new poll shows that Utahns approve of Gov. Gary Herbert’s job performance by a 2-1 margin.

But they don’t care much for the Legislature.

A plurality of Utahns actually give it failing marks.

That’s according to a statewide poll by the The Salt Lake Tribune and the Hinckley Institute of Politics, conducted by SurveyUSA.

It shows that 55 percent approve of Herbert’s performance, while 27 percent disapprove and 18 percent were unsure.

But for the Legislature, only 39 percent approved of its work while 43 percent disapproved and 18 percent were not sure.

Lee Garner of West Point in Davis County was among poll participants who liked the work of the governor, but not the Legislature.

“The governor seems to have a good grasp on what the state needs on education and jobs,” he said. “The Legislature has been stingy with education money. … It doesn’t like anything that doesn’t take care of its own interests. … They follow their own opinion, and not the opinion of the people they represent.”

http://go.uen.org/5Lx (SLT)

 


 

 

Legislators set personal goals for upcoming legislative session

 

Cache County’s representatives in the Utah Legislature are looking ahead to issues like the state budget, public education and health care as the 2016 session approaches its start Jan. 25.

“What we need to look at is how to best invest the state’s money in order to get the best results, and all of us on the Legislature are working towards that same goal,” Sen. Lyle Hillyard, R-Logan, said about the state’s common priority. “It’s not only about budgeting the money correctly, but also spending it in the most effective way we can.”

Hillyard, who serves as the Senate’s Executive Appropriations Chairman, called his main priority for the session the state budget, explaining his biggest challenge would be getting both the House and the Senate’s visions for the budget together. As part of the budget, Hillyard will place priorities for public education and law enforcement, noting the state’s teachers and police officers have low salaries that are affecting the state’s turnover rates.

“Utah’s in a unique position due to our high number of children and families compared to other states, so our public education needs are as strong as ever,” he said. “The problem is that we’re seeing people deciding to leave the state, or otherwise not getting into education at all because we’re not able to pay them enough to stay.”

http://go.uen.org/5Mr (LHJ)

 


 

 

Bishop set to unveil ‘Grand Bargain’ bill on public lands for Utah

 

SALT LAKE CITY — Rep. Rob Bishop is set to unveil his “Grand Bargain” Wednesday at the Utah State Capitol, a measure that is touted as one of the most ambitious public lands bills to chart a course for recreation, conservation and industry in Utah.

Bishop’s office on Friday made the announcement for the Wednesday event, which will also include Rep. Jason Chaffetz, R-Utah, and Gov. Gary Herbert.

More than three years in the making, the Public Lands Initiative process has tapped more than 100 stakeholders interested in the destiny of some 18 million acres in eastern Utah, carving out landscape level designations that aim to put an end to contentious land disputes.

http://go.uen.org/5Lm (DN)

 

http://go.uen.org/5LQ (KSL)

 


 

 

The history and law behind Utah’s bid to gain federal public lands

Legal case » Consultants hired by the state say the feds can’t retain the lands indefinitely, but other experts disagree.

 

In the 1780s, Maryland was worried about its neighbors as America’s newly independent states pondered how to bind 13 former British colonies into a single nation.

Virginia and Pennsylvania envisioned their borders extending far into “unoccupied” land to the west, and Maryland feared that its influence would wane should those states gain large empires. It insisted these lands be reserved for future states and sold to pay down a massive war debt and fund ongoing government operations.

The historic compromise to resolve this impasse led to the principles Utah is now invoking as it builds a legal case to demand that the federal government hand over title to 31 million acres of public lands.

http://go.uen.org/5LF (SLT)

 


 

 

5 Utah school districts make AP Honor Roll

Education » Districts in the U.S. and Canada are recognized.

 

Students in the Alpine, Canyons, Davis, Ogden City and Duchesne County School Districts earned a spot on last year’s AP Honor Roll for their performance on Advanced Placement tests.

The honor roll, released annually, recognized 425 school districts in the U.S. and Canada that increased AP test participation while maintaining or improving success rates.

http://go.uen.org/5LA (SLT)

 

http://go.uen.org/5LK (OSE)

 

http://go.uen.org/5LC (College Board)

 


 

 

Pilot Program Helps Teachers Better Educate Preschoolers With Learning Disabilities

 

Teachers at six preschool programs in Utah are being trained in how to be more comfortable and confident teaching kids with developmental delays. It’s a pilot program born out of a partnership between the state office of education and the national Early Childhood Technical Assistance Center.

The Northern Utah YMCA in Ogden serves about 85 children, mostly from immigrant and low-income families. Stella Patino is the early childhood education director there. She says the program has introduced teachers to ways of getting hard-to-reach kids engaged.

“So it’s not just a teacher reading a book,” Patino says. “The child is participating. Making sounds of the animals. Moving like the animals in the story. Incorporating a lot of language and actions and movements.”

In addition to the YMCA program in Ogden, the Jewish Community Center in Salt Lake City as well as the school districts of Jordan, Sevier, Ogden and Washington County are getting this training.

http://go.uen.org/5LT (KUER)

 

http://go.uen.org/5Mk (KUTV)

 

http://go.uen.org/5LU (USOE)

 


 

 

Tech pipeline seeks to fill $2 billion job opportunity for children in Southern Utah

 

  1. GEORGE – To take advantage of a $2 billion opportunity, Southern Utah needs to strengthen its “tech pipeline” and parents need to encourage their children to pursue STEM and computer science education. Such was one of the messages given at the 2015 “What’s Up Down South Economic Summit” held at the Dixie Center St. George Thursday.

Dr. Eric Pedersen, the Dean of Science and Technology and professor of web development at Dixie State University and an active tech entrepreneur spoke at a breakout session during the summit. He asked attendees how many had children or grandchildren involved in music or sports; whether piano lessons, baseball, football or soccer.

“As a culture we’re really good at those things but we suck at technology,” Pedersen said. “I don’t know how else to say it.”

http://go.uen.org/5Mn (SGN)

 

http://go.uen.org/5Mo (SGS)

 


 

 

Superintendent Sitterud announces retirement

 

The Emery County School Board met for their monthly meeting at San Rafael Junior High.

Superintendent Kirk Sitterud announced his plans to retire on July 1. “I think new ideas, resources and perceptions are good. I have been with the Emery County School District for 44 years, 19 as the superintendent. It has been challenging and rewarding. I have gained more than I ever could have imagined. I appreciate the time I had to spend with the students. I appreciate the people I have worked with. The board members are my heroes. It is the ultimate in volunteerism for the pay you get. I appreciate the administrators. I value our teachers and everyone of us supports the interactions of the teachers and students. I will work hard until my retirement to make sure things run as smoothly as possible. Thank you all for what you have done,” said Superintendent Sitterud.

http://go.uen.org/5Mu (Emery County Progress)

 

 


 

8 Beaver Dam High School students receive diplomas

 

As Mark Coleman relayed the story, he couldn’t help but smile.

It was the middle of December, a seemingly normal day at work for the mother of one of the 14 Beaver Dam High School students who was disqualified from graduating last spring. The woman’s day changed in an instant when her child walked into the room, donning a graduation gown and clutching a high school diploma.

The moment was made even more special, Coleman said, because the mother had no idea it was going to happen.

“Sometimes you have to go through an embarrassment to figure out who you are,” said Coleman, BDHS principal and superintendent of the Littlefield Unified School District. “That student did not have a lot of confidence in themselves prior to that moment, but they made a commitment to themselves that they were going to get that diploma.”

Seven months after school officials found what they described as “scoring irregularities” for an online class required for graduation, a discovery that prevented nearly half of the school’s graduating class from earning their diplomas, eight students have completed the necessary testing to successfully graduate from BDHS.

http://go.uen.org/5LN (SGS)

 


 

 

Martin Luther King, Jr. Day event puts the focus on equity in schools

 

OGDEN — Participants in Ogden’s Martin Luther King, Jr. Freedom Breakfast and March celebrated King’s sacrifice and accomplishments, and were reminded that the quest for equality is not over.

“We think about Dr. King’s words, ‘Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere,’ and when we think about it, it’s our youth whose future is at stake,” said Jackie Thompson, educational equity director for Davis School District.

The breakfast and march, an annual event, was held on Jan. 18, in the Marshall White Community Center at 222 28th St. It was sponsored by the Ogden branch of the NAACP, Weber State University’s Black Scholars United, and the university’s Center for Community Engaged Learning and Diversity and Inclusive Programs.

Traditionally, audience members are treated to a keynote speech during breakfast, but this year there was a panel discussion focused on the theme, “The Fierce Urgency of Now. Stand up for equal discipline of all children in schools.”

“The school-to-prison pipeline is a huge issue,” said Thompson, who was one of four panelists. “When we look and see that the majority of students who are being disciplined disparately would be our students that are differently abled, our students of color, and male students, it is huge.”

http://go.uen.org/5Mq (OSE)

 


 

 

Utahns honor legacy, activism of Martin Luther King Jr.

 

Monday’s luncheon was one of several events honoring the life and legacy of King.

More than 100 Utahns, including Salt Lake City Mayor Jackie Biskupski, gathered at East High School for a rally, followed by a march through the rain to the University of Utah campus.

Speaking at the rally, Biskupksi introduced herself as “the only lesbian mayor in the United States,” and said she would not be where she is if not for the activism of a group of East High School students in 1995.

That year, students at the school created the state’s first Gay Straight Alliance, and the ensuing backlash prompted the Salt Lake City School District to shut down all extracurricular clubs amid threats that Utah’s lawmakers would change state law or forgo millions of dollars in federal education funding if the alliance remained.

The students, supported by the American Civil Liberties Union, sued the school district, which ultimately reversed its decision.

“Their activism got me off my couch and into my community,” Biskupski said. “For many of us, what happened at East High School 20 years ago was the beginning of a march toward change.”

http://go.uen.org/5LD (SLT)

 


 

 

Sensory-impaired students ‘touch tour’ Utah Jazz’s Vivint Arena

 

SALT LAKE CITY — Oscar Martinez hasn’t seen the Utah Jazz play, but he can appreciate their talent now that’s he been able to gauge just how high a net is – with his guide cane.

“Yeah, they’re high,” Martinez said. “I don’t know how the players do that!”

The Utah Jazz organization recently invited Oscar and his classmates from the Utah Schools for the Deaf and Blind to tour Vivint Smart Home Arena; not just to tour but also to touch, so they could get a hands-on sense of all that’s entailed in a venue like the Jazz’s home court.

http://go.uen.org/5Ml (KSL)

 


 

 

Government officials visit Sierra Bonita in Nebo School District

 

Student Council members invited Senator Deidre Henderson and Representative Mike McKell to visit Sierra Bonita Elementary in Nebo School District. The legislators were able to participate in upper grade math lessons and lower grade guided reading.

Senator Henderson showed sixth grade students how laws are passed and gave students an opportunity to participate through a mock process. Representative McKell taught fourth grade students about Utah history and government. One of the highlights of Sierra Bonita’s Legislator Education Day was a stop into Miss Peggy’s medically fragile unit, where the legislators were able to meet some extraordinary students.

“Senator Henderson and I had a great visit at Sierra Bonita Elementary today,” Representative McKell said. “Sierra Bonita’s student council was outstanding, and they were great hosts. You should continue to be very proud of the students in the Nebo School District.”

http://go.uen.org/5Ms (PDH)

 


 

Cache schools improve IT customer satisfaction

 

The technology and IT departments at Cache County School District drastically improved customer satisfaction by 57 percent over the past year after a major overhaul of procedures.

Tim Smith, chief information officer at the district, presented the results to the Board of Education during its Jan. 14 meeting.

“We had what I would call a customer service crisis in the technology department when I came aboard,” Smith said. “We had pretty low ratings when it came to serving our customers.”

http://go.uen.org/5LM (LHJ)

 



 

 

Plans for new school building move full STEAM ahead

 

CEDAR CITY — The public got their first glimpse of the plans for the new Cedar North Elementary school building this week after the Iron County School District released renderings of the new design.

Contractors will be invited to place bids for construction at the end of February, Superintendent Shannon Dulaney said, adding that the district is planning to break ground some time in early spring when the ground thaws.

Students will attend school in the current building while the new structure is erected where the south playground is now, Iron County School District Building Consultant Hunter Shaheen said. Once the new building is complete, he said, classes will move and demolition of the old school will begin.

http://go.uen.org/5Mt (SGN)

 


 

 

Two Pahokee High students are headed to the Sundance Film Festival in Utah for documentary on prom

 

PAHOKEE, Fla. – Two students from Pahokee High School are headed to Utah next week for the Sundance Film Festival .

They were part of a documentary shot last year, called “The Send-Off .”

Patrick Bresnan of Austin, Texas, directed the film.

He says his parents moved to West Palm Beach ten years ago, and since then he’s frequently visited Pahokee and Belle Glade.

“There’s an incredible community of educators, pastors, parents, who’ve really worked hard to make this a really great place to live,” he says.

While visiting two years ago, he says he stumbled upon a huge block party surrounding a group of teens headed to prom.

“There were several thousand people, there were cars lined up for half a mile. The whole community of Pahokee had come out to see their seniors and juniors,” he says.

Patrick says the scene was so memorable to him, that he had to make a documentary about it.

http://go.uen.org/5Mw ([West Palm Beach, FL] WPTV)

 


 

 

High School Musical Stars Prepare for 10th Anniversary Reunion

 

BroadwayWorld previously reported the exciting news that the stars of HIGH SCHOOL MUSICAL will have a reunion as part of a special airing of the Disney Channel Original Movie this Wednesday at 8 p.m. on the Disney Channel. In anticipation, the actors got together to revisit their roots and chill in the basketball gym at East High. Check out pictures of the group, below!

http://go.uen.org/5Mv (BroadwayWorld)

 


 

Should schoolteachers be required to pay for services of unions they haven’t joined?

 

In a case that could cause chaos for teacher unions and other public employee unions, the Supreme Court heard arguments this week from a handful of California teachers who say they should not be required to pay for services provided by unions they haven’t joined.

http://go.uen.org/5LI (DN)

 

 

 

 

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OPINION & COMMENTARY

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Thumbs up, thumbs down

(Ogden) Standard-Examiner editorial

 

THUMBS UP: To Khol Gill, a sixth-grader at Mountain View Elementary School in Layton, who raised $1,600 to purchase a bust honoring slain DEA agent Enrique “Kiki” Camarena.

Khol began by visiting Mayor Bob Stevenson last year to make a pitch for the bust. Stevenson advised Khol to come back with a plan for the city council.

He did better than that — he returned with the $1,600, which he raised from the city’s schools.

http://go.uen.org/5LL

 


 

 

‘Promise Partnership’ is producing real results

Salt Lake Tribune op-ed by Martin Bates, superintendent of Granite School District, and Mark Bouchard, senior managing director of CBRE

 

Last year, the 37 businesses, government institutions, faith groups, non-profits, school districts and institutions of higher education that comprise the Promise Partnership Regional Council told you about our early efforts to achieve results for the 370,700 children in our four-school district region. This week, we are releasing the second chapter of our story, which tells of a tremendous opportunity: the opportunity to work collectively to support each of Utah’s children from birth to career.

Nearly one in three of Utah’s children live in the Promise Partnership Region, and “Results Matter: The 2016 Results Report of the Promise Partnership Regional Council” describes how we are working together differently so that every child in our region can reach eight crucial milestones.

It celebrates changes that are possible when we put data, children and outcomes at the center of our work and when we challenge ourselves to move from talk to action. The report calls attention to where startling inequities persist and it challenges each of us to align our state’s many related education, health, and family financial stability efforts in mutually reinforcing ways.

By working together differently over the past year, the aligned contributions of PPRC members are beginning to improve outcomes for our children.

http://go.uen.org/5LH

 


 

 

Retool education for the digital economy

Deseret News commentary by columnist John Florez

 

What’s wrong with education? “There are ‘too many hands on the steering wheel,’ making it unclear who is in charge and who is responsible for what.” That was a finding made by former Utah Gov. Mike Leavitt’s Employers Education Coalition (EEC) 14 years ago.

Sen. Howard Stephenson, chairman of the Utah Senate Public Education Appropriations Subcommittee, lauded the EEC finding and the need for the development of coherent management structure. Also, Senate President Wayne Niederhauser has expressed his frustration over being asked to vote on a bill “despite having little or no context on how the policy would contribute to a larger state plan.”

Three years ago, the Legislature established the Legislative Education Task Force that would provide a vision and prioritize bills that advance the state’s education objectives; however, legislators appear to ignore the task force’s intent. There is much handwringing with many groups, including the governor’s Commission on Education Excellence started years ago, and various business and legislative groups making cosmetic fixes.

While all our leaders know the problem — too many hands on the steering wheel — they seem to have perpetuated a dysfunctional education system that is wasteful, chaotic and denies students the education they deserve. It seems lawmakers lack the courage to expend their political capital to retool education for the digital economy.

http://go.uen.org/5LJ

 


 

 

Give us a miracle, legislators, and support public ed

Salt Lake Tribune letter from Robert V. Bullough Jr.

 

In anticipation of this year’s upcoming legislative session, I hope for a miracle.

Perhaps, before messing with education policy in Utah this year, Sen. Howard Stephenson and Republican members of the Legislature, not to mention their very heavily invested charter school profiting family members and friends, might do some serious homework.

Believing in miracles, I suggest they begin by reading Christopher and Sarah Lubiennski’s book, “The Public School Advantage: Why Public Schools Outperform Private Schools” (Chicago, 2014).

http://go.uen.org/5LG

 


 

 

Why Don’t the Presidential Candidates Want to Talk About Education?

Slate commentary by columnist Laura Moser

 

If you’re, say, a K–12 education blogger who eagerly tunes in to presidential debate after debate in the hopes of encountering some juicy electoral fodder, you might have noticed something: None of the candidates are talking about education. Like, at all. Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders have offered competing plans to tackle college affordability, and numerous candidates in the Republican field have squabbled over who hates the Common Core standards the most. But as for actual main-course education conversations—it just isn’t what’s for dinner this cycle. Even with the much-delayed passage of a new Elementary and Secondary Education Act, K–12 as an election topic has been low, low on the list of election priorities—below, well, everything.

A column in Education Week on Tuesday by well-known education researcher Rick Hess suggests one explanation for this omission: Candidates aren’t talking about education because voters don’t seem all that interested it. Hess looked at a slew of big polls conducted over the course of 2015 that asked voters to name the “nation’s most important problem.” In voters’ answers, education peaked last winter: In January, education ranked in fifth in a CBS poll, and in February, 7 percent of Gallup respondents said education was the country’s most important problem.

But those figures, already modest, have been steadily declining over the past year. Hess writes: “Overall, in just six of the 21 surveys did even 5% of respondents name education as the nation’s top problem” and “Since May … it’s been seventh or lower in 14 of 16 polls. Of the eight polls conducted after Labor Day, it ranked tenth or lower six times.”

There are some obvious reasons why education—never the sexiest headline-maker, to be sure—is getting such short shrift this cycle: People are more afraid of terrorism than any time since 9/11, and Trump has shoved immigration to center stage, and by comparison “education isn’t as urgent a concern.” And perhaps it’s also that, unlike some of those areas, educational debates in the age of reform seldom divide so cleanly along party lines.

http://go.uen.org/5Mh

 

 


 

 

The Real Problem With Lunch

New York Times op-ed BETTINA ELIAS SIEGEL who writes about children and food at The Lunch Tray

 

Houston — THERE’S something about comparing America’s school food to the superior meals in other countries’ schools that we seem to enjoy, in a masochistic sort of way.

The latest example is Michael Moore’s new documentary, “Where to Invade Next,” which opens nationwide next month. Mr. Moore visits a village in Normandy and finds schoolchildren eating scallops, lamb skewers and a cheese course. He tells us, astonishingly, that the chef “spends less per lunch than we do in our schools in the United States,” and ends the segment by showing French students and adults photos of the food served in a Boston high school. As they pore over the pictures in puzzlement and horror, we read subtitled comments like “Seriously, what is that?” and “Frankly, that’s not food.”

That scene drew a lot of laughs, but as someone who has written about school food for almost six years, it made me want to scream in frustration. One might easily conclude from this segment that our students could have these same delicious meals, cooked from scratch, if only our school districts weren’t cheap, mismanaged or somehow captive to the processed food industry. But the problem with America’s school food has little to do with the schools themselves.

Let’s start with money. The federal government provides a little over $3 per student per lunch, and school districts receive a smaller contribution from their state. But districts generally require their food departments to pay their own overhead, including electricity, accounting and trash collection. Most are left with a dollar and change for food — and no matter what Mr. Moore says, no one is buying scallops and lamb on that meager budget.

Contrast this with France, where meal prices are tied to family income and wealthy parents can pay around $7 per meal. Give that sum to an American school food services director and you may want to have tissues handy as he’s likely to break down in incredulous tears.

http://go.uen.org/5Ll

 


 

 

Ten things every American should know

Fordham Institute commentary by Senior Fellow and the Vice President for External Affairs Robert Pondiscio

 

Nearly thirty years ago, a then-obscure University of Virginia professor named E.D. Hirsch, Jr. set off a hot national debate with the publication of Cultural Literacy. The book was an out-of-nowhere hit, spending six months on the New York Times best seller list on the strength of its list of five thousand people, events, books, and phrases that Hirsch declared “every American should know.”

Eric Liu, the executive director of the Aspen Institute’s Citizenship and American Identity Program, wants to revisit Hirsch’s list. Building on his recent essay, “How to Be American,” Liu argues that the United States needs such common knowledge more than ever, but that “a twenty-first-century sense of cultural literacy has to be radically more diverse and inclusive.” Liu has launched an intriguing effort to crowd-source a 2016 version of Hirsch’s famous list—which, in retrospect, was a double-edged sword: It made Cultural Literacy a best seller, but it also resulted in the book becoming what Dan Willingham has called “the most misunderstood education book of the past fifty years.” It also came out the same year as Allan Bloom’s Closing of the American Mind, an equally unlikely success. Both were tarred with a “conservative” label. (For his part, Hirsch recently insisted, “I’m practically a socialist.”)

Cultural Literacy was broadly misinterpreted as attempting to impose a WASPy canon, but it was really a curatorial effort firmly grounded in cognitive science. Language—particularly reading comprehension—runs on a common knowledge base shared between readers and speakers. Phrases like “Cinderella story” or “Dickensian squalor” are lost upon those who don’t get the references, which literate writers and speakers assume their audiences know. For educators, the upshot of Hirsch’s inventory is this: When schools fail to build a common knowledge base among our children—and particularly for those who come from low-income homes or are English-language learners—we are essentially condemning them to something less than full literacy and citizenship.

Liu has launched a website encouraging all comers to list ten things every American should know to be “culturally and civically literate.”

http://go.uen.org/5Md

 


 

 

Parallel Play in the Education Sandbox

The Common Core and the Politics of Transpartisan Coalitions

New America analysis

 

The controversy surrounding implementation of the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) offers an intriguing case study for better understanding the political dynamics—and potential limitations—of transpartisan coalitions. The Common Core was originally promoted in 2010 by a centrist bi-partisan coalition that included Democrats interested in leveraging more rigorous academic standards to improve educational opportunity and moderate pro-business Republicans concerned about workforce development. As states moved to implement the new Standards (and aligned assessments), an anti-Common Core coalition arose first on the far right among Tea Party activists and then from the left, particularly among teacher advocacy groups. From the margins, opposition flowed into the mainstream.

While temporarily united by their opposition to the CCSS, opponents across the political spectrum did not agree on the sources of their concern or on policy solutions. Understanding where the disparate sides of this coalition agreed and disagreed on the specific issue of the Common Core, and education policy more generally, can shed light on the conditions under which transpartisanship might flourish and the extent to which these types of coalitions can impact policy and remain aligned over time.

http://go.uen.org/5Ls

 

 

 

 

 

 

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NATIONAL NEWS

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Score-Report Holdups Mar College-Testing Season

Holdups frustrated students, counselors

Education Week

 

Score-report delays, technical glitches, and changes to the ACT, the SAT, and the Preliminary SAT/National Merit Scholarship Qualifying Test are adding angst to an already stressful college-search process for some high school students around the country this school year.

Testing companies’ customer-service centers and online discussion boards for school counselors have been buzzing because of a series of problems in recent months with tests from the College Board and ACT Inc.

“It’s been really frustrating—all the changes hitting all at once,” said J. Gavin Bradley, the director of college counseling at Pace Academy, an independent K-12 school in Atlanta. “College counselors are on the frontlines having to try and manage and explain all these changes while things are not going well.”

Officials at the two testing organizations are assuring the public that despite some setbacks, the new products and systems being launched will eventually help students better prepare for college and help counselors improve guidance.

http://go.uen.org/5M6

 


 

 

ESSA Poses Capacity Challenges for State Education Agencies

Education Week

 

State education agencies—often dismissed as poorly organized and thinly staffed clearinghouses—are about to get a big infusion of responsibility and authority with the recent passage of the Every Student Succeeds Act.

But it remains to be seen if those departments, most of which were hollowed out by staff and budget cuts during the recession, are up to the job.

Under ESSA, the long-delayed revision of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, state departments will be charged with more of the hands-on work in a variety of policy areas where the federal government increasingly called the shots in recent years. Some of the most important areas are holding schools accountable for overall quality, coming up with a way to evaluate teachers, and improving student outcomes.

http://go.uen.org/5M7

 


 

 

What happened when one state tried to rewrite the Common Core

Inside Louisiana’s painful struggle over standards

Hechinger Report

 

CROWLEY, La. — Carla and Carl Hebert, with two daughters and a granddaughter in tow, made the hour-long drive from their home in Lake Charles in October to watch a panel of Louisiana educators transform the controversial national Common Core standards into “Louisiana standards.”

Like many, the Heberts’ anger over the Common Core began with homework assignments. Carla remembers days when the whole family grew frustrated trying to help her granddaughter with the new, Common Core-aligned homework questions. “When you have two teachers and a dad who has four college degrees all struggling to help out with elementary school homework, something’s wrong,” she said.

The two teachers she’s referring to are her daughters, Shawna Dufrene and Tiffany Guidry. Dufrene, a fourth-grade teacher at Moss Bluff Elementary School in the Lake Charles suburb of Moss Bluff, was serving on the review panel. Meanwhile, Guidry, a former teacher and mother of three, sat in the audience with their parents. They had all come looking for big changes to the standards. But by the end of the long day, the Heberts were divided on whether the review was living up to its promise.

Their frustration speaks to a tension felt across the country; with nearly two dozen states revising the Common Core standards, policymakers are grappling with what role, if any, parents should have in tweaking those standards.  Can teams of educators in states like Louisiana improve standards that were years in the making? And can the revision process serve both an educational and a political purpose — generating more buy-in for the standards while simultaneously improving them?

http://go.uen.org/5Lv

 


 

 

Colorado school staff missed red flags in deadly 2013 shooting: report

Reuters

 

DENVER | Administrators and teachers at a Colorado high school failed to act on warnings signs that a student was acting in a threatening and violent way before he shot to death a classmate in 2013, an independent review of the rampage said on Monday.

The Center for the Study and Prevention of Violence at the University of Colorado faulted administrators at Arapahoe High School in the Denver suburb of Centennial for not having shared information among staff and law enforcement about 18-year-old shooter Karl Pierson.

The report said some students knew Pierson had firearms while certain staff members knew he had made threats, at one point saying he wanted to kill a coach who had kicked him off the debate team. But they failed to connect the dots or call a hotline set up to prevent violence at schools.

“If just one student or teacher had called … this tragedy might have been averted,” the report stated.

Armed with a 12-gauge pump-action shotgun, a machete and three Molotov cocktails, Pierson stormed the school on Dec. 13, 2013, in search for the debate coach.

After firing at his intended target and missing, Pierson shot dead 17-year-old Claire Davis before committing suicide.

The parents of the slain girl, in an arbitration agreement with Littleton Public Schools, took the unusual step of agreeing not to sue the district if administrators cooperated with the report and released it.

http://go.uen.org/5LY

 

http://go.uen.org/5M0 (Denver Post)

 

http://go.uen.org/5M5 (AP)

 

A copy of the report

http://go.uen.org/5LZ (Center for the Study and Prevention of Violence)

 


 

 

Jeb Bush says education plan promotes choice

USA Today

 

Jeb Bush marked the Martin Luther King Jr. holiday Monday by releasing a plan on what he called the modern-day civil rights challenge of education.

“Dr. King’s vision for America was based on equality of opportunity,” Bush said in a video announcing the plan. “Without a quality education there is no equality of opportunity. It is the civil rights issue of our time.”

In the video and a post for the website Medium, Bush said his plan is based on school choice (including charter schools), accountability for student achievement, an emphasis on early childhood education, and moving authority from the federal government to local officials, teachers, and parents.

Bush wrote in his Medium post that improving schools “doesn’t require additional money or programs designed by Washington,” and “that’s why my plan is budget neutral and returns power to states, local school districts and parents.”

The former Florida governor calls for converting federal tax-free college savings accounts to overall “Education Savings Accounts” that parents could use to finance any level of schooling, including charter schools pre-K programs. Bush also calls for consolidating a variety of federal assistance programs into funds that states can use to finance scholarships for low-income students.

http://go.uen.org/5Lp

 

http://go.uen.org/5Lr (Reuters)

 

http://go.uen.org/5Lu (Politico)

 

http://go.uen.org/5Ma (Ed Week)

 

A copy of the editorial

http://go.uen.org/5Lq (Medium)

 


 

 

Case Could Widen Free­Speech Gap Between Unions and Corporations

New York Times

 

WASHINGTON — The Citizens United decision, which amplified the role of money in American politics, also promised something like a level playing field. Both corporations and unions, it said, could spend what they liked to support their favored candidates.

But last week’s arguments in a major challenge to public unions illuminated a gap in the Supreme Court’s treatment of capital and labor. The court has long allowed workers to refuse to finance unions’ political activities. But shareholders have no comparable right to refuse to pay for corporate political speech.

At the arguments in the case, Friedrichs v. California Teachers Association, No. 14­915, the justices seemed poised to widen that gap by allowing government workers to refuse to support unions’ collective bargaining activities, too.

The case should prompt a new look at whether the differing treatment of unions and corporations is justified, said Benjamin I. Sachs, a law professor at Harvard.

“If we’re going to make this opt­out right for workers more and more muscular, which is what is going to happen with Friedrichs,” he said, “the question of symmetrical treatment of shareholders just becomes that much more important.”

The differing treatment is warranted, the Supreme Court has said, because it is hard to change jobs and easy to sell shares, and because shareholders can influence what corporations say.

http://go.uen.org/5Lo

 


 

 

In Omaha, and Much of US, Debate Over Sex Education Rages On

Associated Press

 

OMAHA, Nebraska — Rival factions yelling at one another amid angry pushing. Tirades about condoms, and claims of misinformation. A parent declaring that children are being force-fed course material “straight from the pits of hell.”

Such has been the tenor of recent school board meetings in Omaha as board members contemplate the first update in three decades of the school district’s sex education curriculum.

A public meeting in October ended in chaos after shouting and shoving broke out between supporters and opponents of the update who had packed by the hundreds into an auditorium. This month, as board members sat in stoic silence, activists from both sides vented their feelings during three hours of public comment – reflecting divisions that have bedeviled school boards nationwide, as well as state legislatures and even Congress.

http://go.uen.org/5M1

 


 

 

HIV Testing Uncommon in Teens Despite Recommendations: CDC

Associated Press

 

CHICAGO — Fewer than 1 in 4 high school students who’ve had sex have ever been tested for HIV, a troubling low rate that didn’t budge over eight years, government researchers say. Young adults fared slightly better, although testing rates have declined in black women, a high-risk group.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and an influential preventive health panel recommend routine HIV testing at least once for teens and adults. They also advise at least yearly screening for high-risk patients including those with multiple sex partners, gay or bisexual boys and men and injection drug users. The American Academy of Pediatrics has similar advice targeting teens only.

Nearly half of U.S. high school students have had sex, often without using condoms, which can help prevent the spread of HIV, which causes AIDS. About 15 percent report having had at least four sex partners.

http://go.uen.org/5M2

 

A copy of the report

http://go.uen.org/5M3 (CDC)

 


 

 

First Lady, School Meal Directors May be Headed for Truce

Associated Press

 

WASHINGTON — A bipartisan Senate agreement would revise healthier meal standards put into place over the last few years to give schools more flexibility in what they serve the nation’s schoolchildren, easing requirements on whole grains and delaying an upcoming deadline to cut sodium levels on the lunch line.

While legislation released by the Senate Agriculture Committee on Monday would placate some schools that have complained the rules are burdensome, it is greatly scaled back from an unsuccessful 2014 House Republican effort to allow some schools to opt out of the rules entirely. The panel is scheduled to vote on the measure on Wednesday.

After more than two years of public quarreling, the bill signals a possible truce for a group of school nutrition directors and first lady Michelle Obama, an outspoken proponent of healthier eating during her husband’s seven years in office.

http://go.uen.org/5Lw

 

http://go.uen.org/5Mb (Ed Week)

 


 

 

Transgender student who fought District 211 gets locker room access

Chicago Tribune

 

The transgender student whose fight to use the girls’ locker room at her suburban high school sparked a national debate on equity vs. privacy was granted access Friday.

School officials in Palatine-based Township High School District 211 this week prepared for the shift, reaching out to parents and holding staff training on gender identity issues.

Friday marked the deadline to provide the student locker room access under a controversial agreement adopted by the school board last month. After a lengthy battle with federal authorities, tense negotiations and rancorous board meetings attended by hundreds, the board agreed to the settlement to put an end to the student’s discrimination claim.

The complaint, filed with the U.S. Department of Education’s Office for Civil Rights, triggered an investigation and an unprecedented decision in November that the district had violated Title IX, the federal law that bans discrimination on the basis of sex. The district risked losing millions of federal dollars and a possible lawsuit if it failed to reach a resolution.

“As agreed with the OCR, the District will soon provide a transgender student access to the locker room consistent with the student’s gender identity based on the student’s request to change in private changing stations within the locker room,” the principal of the student’s high school said in an email to parents this week. “The physical education locker room provides accommodating means to ensure privacy for any student when changing clothes.”

Neither the student’s name nor high school has been identified publicly.

http://go.uen.org/5Lt

 


 

 

U.S. Supreme Court to Weigh Church-State Aid Case With Potentially Broad Impact

Education Week

 

The U.S. Supreme Court has granted review of a church-state case that could hold major implications for government aid to religious schools.

The justices on Friday agreed to hear the appeal of a Lutheran church and preschool in Missouri that was denied a grant from a state program to use recycled tires to build safer playgrounds.

The denial, by a federal district court and the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 8th Circuit, in St. Louis, was based on the Missouri constitution’s prohibition against providing any money, “directly or indirectly, in aid of any church, sect, or denomination of religion.”

But the case, Trinity Lutheran Church of Columbia v. Pauley (No. 15-577), has significance well beyond scrap tire remnants and preschool playgrounds.

“The rule adopted by the Eighth Circuit—and numerous other courts—threatens to marginalize religious schools, churches, and other faith-based entities from public life in the United States by licensing religious discrimination against them in the administration of public benefits,” says a friend-of-the-court brief filed on the Lutheran church’s side by the Association of Christian Schools International, a Colorado Springs, Colo.-based group whose membership includes more than 3,000 schools in the United States (and more than 20,000 outside this country).

http://go.uen.org/5Mc

 


 

 

Police investigate threats against schools in five states

Washington Post

 

Three Delaware schools have been evacuated due to unspecified threats of violence, according to the Delaware State Police, and schools in Maryland, Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Massachusetts also received threats Tuesday morning. It is unclear whether the threats are related.

State and local police in Delaware are investigating with the help of K-9 units, according to a post on the state police Facebook page. It offered little information about the threats except to say that “incidents occurred around 9:30 a.m.” on Tuesday “and are in the early stages.”

The schools are Long Neck Elementary School in Millsboro, Woodbridge High in Greenwood and Silverlake Elementary in Middletown.

At least two schools on Maryland’s Eastern Shore also received threats on Tuesday. Both have since been cleared. Threats of violence forced several schools in the same region to evacuate students and staff last week.

http://go.uen.org/5LV

 

http://go.uen.org/5LW (Reuters)

 

http://go.uen.org/5M4 (AP)

 


 

 

Toshiba Launches Surveillance Education Program

T.H.E. Journal

 

Toshiba’s security division has unveiled a new bundle of services for schools that use its surveillance equipment. The program, which is intended for both K-12 and higher education, includes education discounts, alerts and post-warranty support, among other features, on its IP-based security gear.

The Toshiba Surveillance Education Program offers:

* An on-site inspection and best-practices consulting by a Toshiba-trained technician;

* A camera and recorder check;

* Tuning of the video management system;

* Connection and configuration of mobile applications;

* Training for users on “live” view, search, playback and video exporting;

* Set up of MySurveillix, a cloud-based service intended to manage the “health” of the surveillance system; and

* Set up of mapping, which designates the locations on one or multiple school sites to enable users to drill down on a location for viewing.

http://go.uen.org/5Mi

 


 

Water Contamination Raises Health Concerns for Mich. Students

Education Week

 

Educators in Flint, Mich., have long taught students buffeted by the pressures of poverty and urban blight.

Now, they’re facing a new crisis: toxic tap water.

City and school officials are dealing with the fallout of a contaminated-water crisis, after it was discovered several months ago that hundreds of children in the financially strapped city have high levels of lead in their blood, in part because of the state’s decision to switch Flint’s water supply.

This school year, water from faucets and drinking fountains at four city schools have tested above the federal limits for lead content. One of those schools tested at more than six times the federal limit.

http://go.uen.org/5M9

 


 

 

Solving The Special Ed Teacher Shortage: Quality, Not Quantity

NPR Weekend Edition Saturday

 

All over the United States, schools are scrambling to find qualified special education teachers. There just aren’t enough of them to fill every open position.

That means schools must often settle for people who are under-certified and inexperienced. Special ed is tough, and those who aren’t ready for the challenge may not make it past the first year or two.

Really good teacher preparation might be the difference. At least, that’s what the Lee Pesky Learning Center believes.

In partnership with Boise State University, this nonprofit is working to overcome the shortage in Idaho, not just by filling vacancies, but by creating special education teachers fully prepared for the demands — and the rewards — of working with special-needs students.

http://go.uen.org/5LS

 


 

 

Microsoft Expands Its Minecraft Empire to Your Kid’s School

 

The hit game Minecraft has been used to teach everything from history to microbiology to teach the principles of quantum computing, thanks in large part to MinecraftEdu, a version of the game designed specifically for educators.

Microsoft acquired Mojang, the makers of Minecraft, for $2.5 billion in 2014, but MinecraftEdu was developed by a separate company, TeacherGaming, which licensed Minecraft from Mojang. Now, both the entertainment and education versions of the game will finally be under one roof. Microsoft announced today that it has acquired MinecraftEdu from TeacherGaming for an undisclosed sum and will release a new version of the game called Minecraft: Education Edition.

According to the official Minecraft website, Microsoft hopes to sell Minecraft: Education Edition for $5 per student per year. The New York Times, which first reported the acquisition, notes that this is a departure from MinecraftEdu’s pricing, which was previously sold for a one-time fee based on the number of students who would be using the game at one time.

The good news for schools that have already purchased MinecraftEdu is that they’ll still be able to use the software indefinitely and will also receive a free year of Minecraft: Education Edition once it is released. According to the MinecraftEdu site, Microsoft will continue to develop and support MinecraftEdu “for now.”

http://go.uen.org/5Mj (Wired)

 

http://go.uen.org/5Me (Bloomberg)

 

http://go.uen.org/5Mf (BBC)

 

http://go.uen.org/5Mg (TechCrunch)

 


 

 

Students recite ‘I Have a Dream’ speech at the Lincoln Memorial

Dozens of children gathered on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial Friday to deliver the “I Have A Dream Speech” of civil rights leader Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

(Washington, DC) WTOP

 

WASHINGTON — Dozens of children gathered on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial Friday to deliver the “I Have A Dream Speech” of civil rights leader Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

“This is a wonderful opportunity the Park Service gives us every year,” says teacher Amy Wertheimer, who organizes the effort with students from Watkins Elementary in Southeast. “We are the only school in the entire country that’s been asked to do this.”

In addition to remembering and reciting their individual lines the children learn what Dr. King was trying to accomplish. “In 2015-16 language – what he actually meant,”  Wertheimer explains.

The recitation always happens on the Friday before the Martin Luther King Jr. federal holiday. This year, that happens to correspond with the King’s actual birthday. “Which makes it even more exciting,” Wertheimer said with a grin.

http://go.uen.org/5LR

 

 

 

 

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CALENDAR

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USOE Calendar

http://www.schools.utah.gov/main/CALENDAR.aspx

 

 

UEN News

http://www.uen.org

 

 

January 22:

Administrative Rules Review Committee meeting

9 a.m., 445 State Capitol

http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2016&com=SPEADM

 

 

January 25:

Utah Legislature

First day of the 2016 general session

http://le.utah.gov/

 

 

January 26:

Public Education Appropriations Subcommittee meeting

8 a.m., 445 State Capitol

http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?Year=2016&Com=APPPED

 

Senate Education Committee meeting

2 p.m.,  210 Senate Building

http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?Year=2016&Com=SSTEDU

 

 

January 27:

House Education Committee meeting

2 p.m., 30 House Building

http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?Year=2016&Com=HSTEDU

 

 

January 28:

Public Education Appropriations Subcommittee meeting

8 a.m., 445 State Capitol

http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?Year=2016&Com=APPPED

 

Utah State Board of Education legislative meeting

Noon, 210 Senate Building

http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspx

 

Executive Appropriations Committee meeting

5 p.m., 445 State Capitol

http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?Year=2016&Com=APPEXE

 

 

February 4:

Utah State Board of Education study session and committee meetings

250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspx

 

 

February 5:

Utah State Board of Education meeting

250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspx

 

 

February 11:

Utah State Charter School Board meeting

250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://go.uen.org/1pn

 

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