Education News Roundup: Jan. 21, 2016

Education News Roundup/ SafeUT poster

Education News Roundup

Education News Roundup

Today’s Top Picks:

 

Reps. Bishop and Chaffetz put out a discussion draft of a public lands initiative. It includes provisions dealing with SITLA.

http://go.uen.org/5MZ (SLT)

Sidebar: Basics of the plan http://go.uen.org/5Nb (SLT)

TribTalk at 12:15 p.m.: http://go.uen.org/5Ns (SLT)

and http://go.uen.org/5N0 (DN)

Sidebar: Why it matters http://go.uen.org/5Nd (DN)

And http://go.uen.org/5N1 (UP)

And http://go.uen.org/5NJ (UPC)

And http://go.uen.org/5Ne (OSE)

And http://go.uen.org/5NA (PDH)

And http://go.uen.org/5NE (CVD)

And http://go.uen.org/5NG (SGS)

And http://go.uen.org/5Ol (Moab Sun News)

And http://go.uen.org/5N3 (KUTV)

And http://go.uen.org/5N4 (KTVX)

And http://go.uen.org/5NR (KSL)

And http://go.uen.org/5N5 (KSTU)

And http://go.uen.org/5N6 (KUER)

And http://go.uen.org/5NW (MUR)

Or a copy of the discussion draft

http://go.uen.org/5N2 (UPLI)

 

Democrats in the Legislature are lining up to end the public ed/higher ed sharing of income tax funds and revert it all back to public ed.

http://go.uen.org/5N7 (DN)

and http://go.uen.org/5N8 (UP)

and http://go.uen.org/5NO (KSL)

and http://go.uen.org/5N9 (KUER)

 

Utah launches the SafeUT mobile app, which puts students in contact with trained counselors at the tap of a smartphone screen.

http://go.uen.org/5Nc (SLT)

and http://go.uen.org/5Nv (DN)

and http://go.uen.org/5Ny (OSE)

and http://go.uen.org/5NI (SGN)

and http://go.uen.org/5NK (KUTV)

and http://go.uen.org/5NN (KTVX)

and http://go.uen.org/5On (KSL)

and http://go.uen.org/5NS (KSTU)

and http://go.uen.org/5NU (MUR)

and http://go.uen.org/5Om (Ed Week)

 

Today’s is the last day to comment on ESSA rules.

http://go.uen.org/5Nn (Ed Week)

or comment on the proposed rules

http://go.uen.org/5No (regulations.gov)

 

Pork: It’s what on the school lunch menu in Randers, Denmark. And it’s on the menu by law.

http://go.uen.org/5O6 (AP)

 

 

 

 

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TODAY’S HEADLINES

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UTAH

 

Conservationists decry Utah’s Public Lands Initiative, say draft hides ‘poison pills’

Bishop, Chaffetz unveil “discussion draft” of a bill that would designate certain areas in Utah for conservation while others would be set aside for energy development.

 

Democratic lawmakers favor taking from higher ed to give to public schools

 

Utah lawmaker substitutes as U.S. government teacher in Riverton

Education » Rep. Dan McCay delivers unique civics lesson.

 

Ogden preschool pilot program is readying children for kindergarten

 

New charter school breaks ground in Vineyard

 

New statewide crisis line puts help in the palm of Utah students’ hands

 

Study suggests paving road through Book Cliffs would benefit energy development, tourism

 

Could Utah Middle School Students Start Learning About Gun Safety?

 

All You Need to Know About AP Classes and Tests

 

Bank of Utah Names Three Prestigious New Board Members

 

Women charged with inciting a riot at Pine View High School

 

Fourth-grader faces discipline over pepper spray release at WVC school

 

Cache School District to officially decide name of new North Logan high school

 

Registration opened for SheTech Explorer Day at UVU

 

Multicultural conference celebrates diversity

 

Weather School at Bacchus Elementary

 

Educator of the Week: Nikki Sanford

 

Utah Valley Student of the Week: Lindy Winward

 

Jeb Bush hopes to gain political traction by returning to education policy roots

 


 

 

OPINION & COMMENTARY

 

Bishop/Chaffetz lands bill is still a work in progress

 

Hot topic on the Hill: early education

 

More schools should have ‘Watchdog Dads’

 

Next Steps in Closing the Gaps in Arts Education in Our Schools

 

Wasted money, chaos predicted if New York repeals Common Core

Business and advocacy groups’ report says state should learn from education-standards reform that backfired in Indiana, Oklahoma

 

Don’t blame Common Core for publishers’ lousy textbooks

 

Surprise! White People Don’t Really Care About School Diversity

They’re just fine with doing nothing to desegregate America’s classrooms.

 

The coming avalanche of autistic adults

Autistic children never really grow up. How are we going to take care of them?

 

Professional Learning Environments in Top Performing Systems:

Policies That Drive Achievement and Equity

 


 

 

NATION

 

John King: ESSA Has Risks, Opportunities for Poor and Minority Students

 

Education Department Gets Feedback on Preparing ESSA Rules

 

Revenue Woes in Oil, Coal States Squeeze K-12

 

Science Teachers Need More Training to Get Ready for Next Generation Standards

 

Supreme Court Seeks Input On Special Education Matter

 

Tennessee school voucher plan passes key hurdle

 

New proposal would cut Kansas school districts by half

 

Rauner on CPS takeover attempt: ‘The mayor has failed’

 

Denver Public Schools to cut central office staff, dropping 157 positions

Cut DPS positions will be funded through June

 

College apps should emphasize passion not accomplishments, says Harvard report

 

U.S. illegal immigrant population falls below 11 million, continuing nearly decade-long decline, report says

 

Lawmaker Seeks to Make High School Athletics Group More Open

 

New Book Urges Parents to Reorder Life for the Sake of Kids

 

The Art of Teaching

One half of the entertainment duo Penn & Teller explains how performance and discomfort make education come alive.

 

Connecticut high school calls police after teen ‘ISIS’ pledge: media

 

Charges Stick Against School Officials in Players Rape Case

 

Pakistan attack raises tough question: should teachers shoot back?

 

Catholic Church’s Hold on Schools at Issue in Changing Ireland

 

Danish City Makes Pork Mandatory but Allows Other Food

 

 

 

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UTAH NEWS

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Conservationists decry Utah’s Public Lands Initiative, say draft hides ‘poison pills’

Bishop, Chaffetz unveil “discussion draft” of a bill that would designate certain areas in Utah for conservation while others would be set aside for energy development.

 

In what they characterized as a sweeping gesture of compromise, Reps. Rob Bishop and Jason Chaffetz unveiled their plan to resolve decades of deadlock over how eastern Utah’s public lands are managed even as environmental and tribal groups declared the proposal “dead on arrival” and a shameless giveaway to oil and gas interests.

On Wednesday at the state’s Capitol, the Republican congressmen released a “discussion draft” of a bill that would set aside special landscapes like Cedar Mesa, San Rafael Swell and Labyrinth Canyon, while expediting mineral development in areas deemed less worthy of protection.

“There is something here for everyone to like and something for everyone to hate,” Bishop said, “but if you look at the totality of what we are doing, it is moving us so far forward, there is value in it.”

The Utah Public Lands Initiative Act, or PLI, crafted after 1,200 meetings hosted by Bishop and Chaffetz over the past three years, “is rooted in the belief that conservation and economic development can coexist and make Utah a better place to live, work, and visit,” their offices wrote in a summary of the bill that would affect 18 million acres of public land in seven counties.

Bishop said the bill rests on four pillars: certainty, recreation, economic development and conservation.

“It will be one of the largest conservation bills in the lower 48 states that has ever been proposed, but in addition to that we want areas open for economic development,” Bishop said. “They will be guaranteed for economic development so that we can pay for our schools and provide good paying jobs for Utah citizens. Recreation is no longer just allowed it is guaranteed.”

Bishop also envisions a series of land swaps and conveyances for local development projects and to consolidate state trust lands in areas with mineral potential in the Uinta Basin. In the deal, the School and Institutional Trust Lands Administration (SITLA) would trade about 36,000 roadless acres in the Book Cliffs that are cherished by sportsmen for big game hunting.

But the Ute Tribe blasted the provision that would cede to SITLA mineral-rich lands within the historic boundaries of its Uncompahgre Reservation.

http://go.uen.org/5MZ (SLT)

 

Sidebar: Basics of the plan http://go.uen.org/5Nb (SLT)

 

TribTalk at 12:15 p.m.: http://go.uen.org/5Ns (SLT)

 

http://go.uen.org/5N0 (DN)

 

Sidebar: Why it matters http://go.uen.org/5Nd (DN)

 

http://go.uen.org/5N1 (UP)

 

http://go.uen.org/5NJ (UPC)

 

http://go.uen.org/5Ne (OSE)

 

http://go.uen.org/5NA (PDH)

 

http://go.uen.org/5NE (CVD)

 

http://go.uen.org/5NG (SGS)

 

http://go.uen.org/5Ol (Moab Sun News)

 

http://go.uen.org/5N3 (KUTV)

 

http://go.uen.org/5N4 (KTVX)

 

http://go.uen.org/5NR (KSL)

 

http://go.uen.org/5N5 (KSTU)

 

http://go.uen.org/5N6 (KUER)

 

http://go.uen.org/5NW (MUR)

 

A copy of the discussion draft

http://go.uen.org/5N2 (UPLI)

 


 

 

Democratic lawmakers favor taking from higher ed to give to public schools

 

SALT LAKE CITY — Education again tops Utah Democratic lawmakers’ list of priorities for the upcoming legislative session, including a new idea to get more money into public schools.

Instead of sharing income tax revenue with higher education as state law requires, the proposal would direct all of that money to public education only. The change would require voters to amend the Utah Constitution.

House Minority Leader Brian King, D-Salt Lake City, said funding both education systems from income tax has “turned out to be a mistake.”

“Our education is underfunded. That is a simple truth. Everyone knows it, but few people are willing to take a hard look at what we are doing wrong and what we could be doing right,” King said.

House Democrats on Tuesday rolled out their agenda for the 2016 Legislature that opens Monday. They are a decided minority in the Republican-controlled House and Senate.

http://go.uen.org/5N7 (DN)

 

http://go.uen.org/5N8 (UP)

 

http://go.uen.org/5NO (KSL)

 

http://go.uen.org/5N9 (KUER)

 


 

 

Utah lawmaker substitutes as U.S. government teacher in Riverton

Education » Rep. Dan McCay delivers unique civics lesson.

 

Riverton • Students in Cliff Streiby’s U.S. government class at Riverton High support mandatory safety inspections for Utah car owners.

Or they did, before they were lobbied Wednesday by Riverton Republican Rep. Dan McCay.

McCay taught two U.S. government classes at the high school this week, during which he talked about Utah’s legislative process and polled students attitudes on various topics. While Wednesday’s students maintained their support for DUI checkpoints, divorce-orientation classes and concealed-carry permits, McCay’s arguments about the inefficacy of safety inspections swung the majority on a second vote.

http://go.uen.org/5Na (SLT)

 


 

 

Ogden preschool pilot program is readying children for kindergarten

 

OGDEN — Ogden School District and the YMCA of Northern Utah are part of a preschool pilot program designed to prepare children for kindergarten, with an emphasis on helping those with learning delays or disabilities in a mainstream classroom.

The Utah State Office of Education on Jan. 15 announced six demonstration sites for the program: Ogden School District, the YMCA of Northern Utah in Ogden, Jordan School District, Sevier School District, Washington County School District and the Jewish Community Center in Salt Lake City.

USOE is supporting the program in partnership with the national Early Childhood Technical Assistance Center, and data is being collected to assess the program and make decisions about expanding it to other school districts.

Teachers and administrators are receiving training in an approach known as “Reaching Potentials through Recommended Practices” or “RP2.”

“This is a very rigorous and excellent curriculum, and it produces results,” said Ann Nelson, the YMCA’s regional director in Weber County.

http://go.uen.org/5Nz (OSE)

 

http://go.uen.org/5NT (KCSG)

 

http://go.uen.org/5Os (UP)

 


 

 

New charter school breaks ground in Vineyard

 

At the small town intersection of Gammon and Holdaway Road in Vineyard a big thing happened Saturday.

With the eyes of more than 150 people turned to a pile of dirt, area children put on hard hats, grabbed shovels and broke ground for the new Franklin Discovery Academy charter school.

The groundbreaking initiates a flurry of building activity as the Boyer Company and Sahara Construction start the new 45,000-square-foot school. The academy sits on six acres of land and is scheduled to open Aug. 20.

http://go.uen.org/5NB (PDH)

 


 

 

New statewide crisis line puts help in the palm of Utah students’ hands

 

Utah Sen. Daniel Thatcher said his first experience with suicide came at age 11, when a classmate ended their life.

By age 16, the West Valley Republican said, one of his best friends was dead as well.

“This is the single greatest crisis facing the youth of Utah,” he said.

In 2014 and 2015, Thatcher sponsored consecutive bills to study the feasibility and then create a statewide tip line for school safety and students in crisis.

And on Wednesday, that tip line became a reality with the launch of the SafeUT mobile app, which puts students in contact with trained counselors at the tap of a smartphone screen.

http://go.uen.org/5Nc (SLT)

 

http://go.uen.org/5Nv (DN)

 

http://go.uen.org/5Ny (OSE)

 

http://go.uen.org/5NI (SGN)

 

http://go.uen.org/5NK (KUTV)

 

http://go.uen.org/5NN (KTVX)

 

http://go.uen.org/5On (KSL)

 

http://go.uen.org/5NS (KSTU)

 

http://go.uen.org/5NU (MUR)

 

http://go.uen.org/5Om (Ed Week)

 


 

 

Study suggests paving road through Book Cliffs would benefit energy development, tourism

 

Members of the Six County Infrastructure Coalition (SCIC) will ask the Utah Legislature to provide funding for an estimated $5 million environmental impact statement (EIS) analyzing the possible effects of constructing a paved road linking Seep Ridge Road in the Book Cliffs of southern Uintah County to Interstate 70 in Grand County. The coalition, which is made up of representatives from Carbon, Daggett, Duchesne, Emery, San Juan and Uintah counties, voted Jan. 8 to move forward with the EIS following the December publication of the Book Cliffs Transportation Corridor Study, which looks at the corridor’s potential effects on energy and tourism.

“This study is part of a process to ensure that future decisions about the potential transportation corridor in the Book Cliffs area have been fully researched and evaluated so that future decisions about the roadway will be in the best interests of all stakeholders,” said Diego Carroll, project manager for WSP Parsons Brinkerhoff, the engineering consulting firm that completed the Book Cliffs corridor study.

According to the study, the corridor could facilitate the extraction of 1.1 million barrels of oil by 2040, with Uintah County seeing $85 million in energy-related production and taxable sales. Grand County would see an estimated $10 million, and only if some energy activity occurs on lands owned by the state School and Institutional Trust Lands Administration (SITLA) in the northern part of the county.

http://go.uen.org/5Ot (Moab Times-Independent)

 


 

Could Utah Middle School Students Start Learning About Gun Safety?

 

Utah middle schools could be adding firearms safety to their curriculum as a voluntary course for eighth-grade students.kid reaching for gun small pic

The measure was proposed by Utah Senator Todd Weiler and is aimed at teaching young kids how to properly address the situation should they come across a firearm.  There will also be a crash course in violence prevention.

http://go.uen.org/5Ok (Lake Powell Life)

 


 

All You Need to Know About AP Classes and Tests

 

Cindy Hanson, Assistant Principal at Brighton, and  Cher McDonald, at teacher at the school, joined GMU to talk about the importance of Advanced Placement classes.

http://go.uen.org/5NM (KTVX)

 


 

 

Bank of Utah Names Three Prestigious New Board Members

 

Bank of Utah President Douglas L. DeFries announced the appointment of three well-known banking industry and community leaders to its Board of Directors: Steven M. Petersen, Benjamin F. Browning and Marlin K. Jensen.

New board member, Marlin Jensen, is a well-known attorney who served the Ogden community from 1970 to 1989. He served for 24 years in the First Quorum of Seventy of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. He returned to his law practice in Ogden, when made an Emeritus LDS Church General Authority in 2012. His community service has included being a member of the Weber County Library Board, and chairman of: the Weber County Board of Education, the State Fair Board and the Utah State Liquor Control Commission. He currently serves as a member of the Utah State Board of Regents. Jensen graduated from BYU in German and earned a Juris Doctorate from the University of Utah College of Law.

http://go.uen.org/5Oo (Utah Pulse)

 


 

 

Women charged with inciting a riot at Pine View High School

 

Two St. George women are facing several charges, including rioting, in connection with a fight police say happened at Pine View High School Jan. 6.

Sofia Campos-Guereschi, 19, and Jennifer Alvarado, 18, were booked into Purgatory Correctional Facility charged with assault, trespassing on school grounds, contributing to the delinquency of a minor and on a felony charge of causing a riot.

Both were released on bail, jail records indicated.

According a probable cause statement filed in the case, Campos-Guereschi, Alvarado and a juvenile suspect entered the Pine View High School campus on Jan. 6 without checking into the office and with no legitimate reason. They then waited in the parking lot for school to end at which time they confronted several students.

The juvenile suspect “initiated physical violence” by throwing a punch to the face of another juvenile, according to the statement.

http://go.uen.org/5NH (SGS)

 


 

 

Fourth-grader faces discipline over pepper spray release at WVC school

 

A fourth-grade student is facing disciplinary action after exposing students and staff to pepper spray at West Valley City’s Granger Elementary School.

Granite School District spokesman Ben Horsley said Thursday that the measure of punishment district officials mete out to the boy will depend in part on whether they determine he deliberately or accidentally released the eye-, nasal- and lung-irritating chemical spray.

The student brought the can of pepper spray to the school’s lunchroom during the meal break on Wednesday. Several students and staff members ended up being treated at the scene by paramedics and the school nurse for exposure.

http://go.uen.org/5Nr (SLT)

 

http://go.uen.org/5Nx (DN)

 

http://go.uen.org/5NC (PDH)

 

http://go.uen.org/5NP (KSL)

 

http://go.uen.org/5NV (MUR)

 


 

 

Cache School District to officially decide name of new North Logan high school

 

Thursday at 5:30 p.m. the Cache County School Board will have an opportunity to approve or change the requested name, colors and mascot of the new high school currently under construction in North Logan.

Last week, the future principal of that school, Dave Swenson, presented his committee’s recommendation to the school board that it should be named the Green Canyon Wolves with a forest green and silver color scheme.

http://go.uen.org/5ND (CVD)

 


 

 

Registration opened for SheTech Explorer Day at UVU

 

OREM — Over 1,000 high school girls will gather at the UCCU Events Center on the Utah Valley University campus in March for the third annual SheTech Explorer Day.

http://go.uen.org/5Nw (DN)

 

 


 

Multicultural conference celebrates diversity

 

Polynesian dancers from Northridge High School performed at this year’s Multicultural Conference at Weber State University. The annual event, now in its 21st year, offers students in ninth through 12th grades information on topics from cultural diversity awareness to preparing for and accessing higher education. This year, 500 students from northern Utah attended the conference.

http://go.uen.org/5Or (DCC)

 


 

 

Weather School at Bacchus Elementary

 

Weather School was live at Bacchus Elementary in Salt Lake City with Dan Pope

http://go.uen.org/5NL (KTVX)

 


 

 

Educator of the Week: Nikki Sanford

 

Nikki Sanford is a sixth grade teacher at Salem Elementary. She was chosen as the Daily Herald’s Utah Valley Educator of the Week.

http://go.uen.org/5Oq (PDH)

 


 

Utah Valley Student of the Week: Lindy Winward

 

Lindy Winward is a sixth grade student at Sage Creek Elementary School in Springville. She was chosen as the Daily Herald’s Utah Valley Student of the Week.

http://go.uen.org/5Op (PDH)

 


 

 

Jeb Bush hopes to gain political traction by returning to education policy roots

 

Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush, who is still struggling to get traction in a weird year for GOP nominating politics, has laid out an ambitious education plan that includes some truly innovative proposals, especially as to how college is paid for.

http://go.uen.org/5Nu (DN)

 

 

 

 

 

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OPINION & COMMENTARY

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Bishop/Chaffetz lands bill is still a work in progress

Salt Lake Tribune editorial

 

Reps. Rob Bishop and Jason Chaffetz are to be commended for their long effort to bring forth the most comprehensive public lands bill ever crafted for Utah, but if they think they’re done now, they probably won’t succeed.

The long awaited “Public Lands Initiative” bill attempts to define future uses for 18 million acres of federal lands in seven eastern Utah counties, and it reflects an effort to address diverse issues from economic development to recreation to wilderness protection. It has been a process driven in large degree by elected leaders in those counties, and the result skews toward their desires.

The highlights include:

  • Trading federal lands with the state School and Institutional Trust Lands Administration to bring more income to Utah schools. Some of those lands are within the historic boundaries of the Ute Tribe’s Uncompahgre Reservation, which brought a swift rebuke from tribal officials who weren’t consulted.

http://go.uen.org/5Nt

 


 

 

Hot topic on the Hill: early education

Sutherland Institute commentary by Education Policy Analyst Christine Cooke

 

Utah’s legislative session starts in less than a week, and early education will be a hot topic. In fact, in November, the Interim Education Committee endorsed bills regarding extended day kindergarten and discussed expanding school readiness programs. School readiness programs are better known as “preschool.”

The interim committee heard comments about preschool programs at Granite School District and the Park City School District and reviewed research on the impacts of preschool.

Most importantly, the committee provided input on a draft proposal for a preschool bill likely to be seen this legislative session—it’s currently known as High Quality School Readiness Expansion.

http://go.uen.org/5NX

 


 

 

More schools should have ‘Watchdog Dads’

(Logan) Herald Journal letter from Colton Duce

 

Hello, my name is Colton. I am a fifth-grade student at Summit Elementary in Smithfield. In my school we have a program that allows kids to bring their dad to school. Now we call this terrific program the Watchdog Dads. They help out the teachers of the school. They also get to go out to recess and lunch with their student.

I propose that all schools should have this program in their schools.

http://go.uen.org/5NF

 

 


 

Next Steps in Closing the Gaps in Arts Education in Our Schools

Huffington Post commentary by Jesse Rosen, President & CEO, League of American Orchestras

 

Orchestras across the U.S. were thrilled when their advocacy efforts paid off as a new education law — called the Every Student Succeeds Act — received bi-partisan support from the House and Senate and was signed into law on December 10, 2015 by President Obama. On the long load to rewriting what is currently known as the No Child Left Behind Act, the nation’s orchestras — in partnership with arts advocates nationwide — made contact thousands of times with Congress, calling on policymakers to close gaps in access to arts education in our nation’s public schools.

Here are some highlights of why as a parent, nonprofit leader and arts advocate, I am so pleased with the direction of the new law, but also concerned about next steps:

The new Every Student Succeeds Act firmly establishes that every child deserves access to a “well-rounded education,” including music and the arts right alongside reading and math in the list of subjects that comprise a complete education. It dials back the No Child Left Behind Act’s high-stakes approach to testing in math and reading, prompting renewed hope that the time and resources for the arts — and other subjects that were often “squeezed out” of the school day — may find their way back into the classroom.

States now have flexibility to incorporate other critical measures of student success, such as student engagement.

http://go.uen.org/5Nl

 


 

 

Wasted money, chaos predicted if New York repeals Common Core

Business and advocacy groups’ report says state should learn from education-standards reform that backfired in Indiana, Oklahoma

Crain’s New York Business commentary by columnist Erik Engquist

 

Fix it, don’t nix it—unless wasting money and accomplishing nothing is the goal.

That’s the message of a new report about Common Core from a coalition led by New York business groups supporting the education standards, which have drawn the ire of some parents and politicians.

The coalition of business interests and education advocates, with funding from the Gates Foundation and Helmsley Charitable Trust, argue that other states’ experiences show repealing Common Core is pointless at best.

“It’s very clear that repealing Common Core wasted a lot of money and ended up with virtually the same standards,” said a spokesman for the coalition, called High Achievement New York.

http://go.uen.org/5Np

 


 

 

Don’t blame Common Core for publishers’ lousy textbooks

Fordham Institute commentary by editorial associate Kevin Mahnken

 

If you’ve been keeping up with the Common Core scandal pages, you may be wondering who Dianne Barrow is.

Until this month, the answer would have been, “An anonymous functionary scuttling about the publishing behemoth known as Houghton Mifflin Harcourt.” That was before Barrow, who now finds herself a cog without a machine, was featured in an eight-minute video produced by Project Veritas and its merry prankster front man James O’Keefe. In it, she explains how entities like HMH and Pearson view Common Core as a chance to sell second-rate books to schools suddenly required to teach from standards-aligned materials. (She also mouths off about home-schoolers, but that’s basically included as bonus content.) “You don’t think that educational publishing companies are in it for the kids, do you? No, they’re in it for the money,” she says.

Take a coffee break and check out the video. Not because it contains any footage of journalistic merit, or because its makers are especially credible. In fact, the opposite is true. O’Keefe is one of those charming types whose mugshot pops up if you google him, a memento of his arrest and guilty plea following a bungled attempt to break into a U.S. senator’s office and tamper with phones. He owes his reputation to a 2009 sting operation in which he donned a bizarre pimp costume to discredit the community organizing group ACORN—a lark for which he later paid $100,000 in damages to one of the employees he secretly recorded. Since then, his operation has excelled at releasing heavily edited exposés that haltingly revive his notoriety and stir up some two-minute hate for organizations like NPR—often at the cost of some unfortunate staffer’s scalp. That’s the game.

We can’t credit O’Keefe’s claim that “Common Core isn’t really about education; it’s really about selling books,” since he offers no evidence of that statement other than the big talk of a small fry. But the story still holds interest as a perspective on huge textbook cartels and the disillusionment they’ve sown, even among their own employees.

http://go.uen.org/5Of

 


 

 

Surprise! White People Don’t Really Care About School Diversity

They’re just fine with doing nothing to desegregate America’s classrooms.

Huffington Post commentary by columnist Rebecca Klein

 

Last century, white parents from Arkansas to Boston vigorously opposed the integration of local schools. Today, most white Americans still do not support interventions that would put more of their children in classrooms with black students, a new poll reveals.

A HuffPost/YouGov poll asked Americans if they think “the government should or should not try to make sure public schools include a balance of children from different races.” Nearly half opposed government intervention to diversify schools. Most said kids should go to their neighborhood schools even if they’re not racially diverse — which they’re usually not.

Responses varied drastically along racial lines.

Some 61 percent of black Americans and 55 percent of Hispanic Americans said they think the government should take steps to increase school diversity. Only 28 percent of white Americans said the same.

http://go.uen.org/5Oh

 


 

 

The coming avalanche of autistic adults

Autistic children never really grow up. How are we going to take care of them?

USA Today op-ed by Cindy Godwin, a retired marketing executive in Tucson

 

She’s sitting on the sofa playing video games. Dirty dishes are everywhere in the kitchen, pizza boxes and empty liter soda bottles cover the countertops, the trash is overflowing and stinks, the patio is littered with cigarette butts, laundry needing to be done is stuffed into black garbage bags. The notice of a certified letter announcing that she has been dropped from her therapeutic art program for non-attendance sits on top of a stack of unopened mail and unread handouts from her counselor.

This was the scene I walked in on recently. “She” is my 29-year-old daughter. Her latest diagnoses are pervasive developmental disorder (now included as an autism spectrum disorder) and fibromyalgia. The place is the townhome my husband and I bought for her to live in, thinking it would be an affordable “group home for one.” But her former helper/roommate moved out, and while our daughter doesn’t want to live at home or in a typical group home, the reality is she can’t take care of herself.

We are not alone. Hundreds of thousands of parents are suffering combat level stress daily as we care for children with autism. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that one in 45 children ages 3 to 17 have autism — that’s roughly 1.5 million kids.

As the number of autistic children grows, so does the number of autistic adults. Their needs remain much the same as they age, yet the support they once received fades. Though families like mine are feeling it most acutely, this is an issue for everyone to consider. The tsunami of adults with autism is coming.

http://go.uen.org/5NZ

 


 

 

Professional Learning Environments in Top Performing Systems:

Policies That Drive Achievement and Equity

Center on International Education Benchmarking analysis

 

The National Center on Education and the Economy’s (NCEE) Center on International Education Benchmarking has released two major reports on professional learning environments in top performing systems and the implications for school leaders, policymakers and the education profession in the United States:

* Beyond PD: Teacher Professional Learning in High-Performing Systems

* Developing Shanghai’s Teachers

Following the release of the 2015 National Assessment of Educational Progress scores, the conversation surrounding how to improve teaching and learning in the U.S. has gained traction. The findings detailed in Jensen and Zhang’s reports provide essential information on how the U.S. can learn from the top performing education systems by adapting those lessons for the U.S.’s context and culture.

http://go.uen.org/5Nf

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

————————————————————-

NATIONAL NEWS

————————————————————-

 

John King: ESSA Has Risks, Opportunities for Poor and Minority Students

Education Week

 

Washington – The new Every Student Succeeds Act gives states and districts that want to push towards equity more flexibility to realize their vision—but there are also potential soft spots that could stall efforts to close the achievement gap if communities aren’t careful, acting U.S. Secretary of Education John King told a roomful of mayors.

ESSA, King said in a speech to the U.S. Conference of Mayors Wednesday, “provides schools with new tools, but it also presents risks.”

On the “tools” side of the ledger, King touted two programs in the law that are aimed at ensuring students are ready to learn: Preschool Development Grants (which help states expand early-childhood programs) and a program similar to Promise Neighborhoods (an Obama administration program that helps schools pair academics with wraparound services, such as health).

Getting further into the policy weeds, King said he’s heartened that ESSA, the latest edition of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, requires states to look beyond test scores and incorporate other measures of student achievement. That means states can consider access to advanced coursework for low-income students, access to arts and music education, and chronic absenteeism when rating their schools.

But the law also allows states to come up with their own set of indicators—opening the door, some civil rights advocates fear, to metrics that could make nearly every school look good, or obscure gaps between low-income and minority students and their more-advantaged peers.

http://go.uen.org/5Nm

 


 

 

Education Department Gets Feedback on Preparing ESSA Rules

Education Week

 

The Every Student Succeeds Act may be the law of the land, but there are plenty of pieces of the latest edition of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act that will need to be clarified through regulation.

To kick that process off, the U.S. Department of Education is seeking input from a broad range of advocates, educators, associations, and the general public. It’s asking for written comments by Jan. 21, and also using a pair of public meetings to get in-person opinions.

Unsurprisingly, advocates at the first meeting—held Jan. 11 in Washington—offered conflicting advice on the direction the department should take on regulations under the newly revised law. The second hearing was scheduled for Jan. 19 in Los Angeles.

Representatives of state and district officials, such as the Council of Chief State School Officers and AASA, the School Superintendents Association, reminded the Obama administration of restrictions on its power in ESSA and suggested a light touch.

But civil rights and business groups want to see the Education Department hold states’ feet to the fire, including on such parts of the law as the requirement that 95 percent of students take part in state assessments. (Under ESSA, as under the previous version of the law, the No Child Left Behind Act, 95 percent of students are supposed to take assessments. But it’s up to states to decide what happens to schools that miss targets.)

http://go.uen.org/5Nn

 

Comment on the proposed rules

http://go.uen.org/5No (regulations.gov)

 


 

 

Revenue Woes in Oil, Coal States Squeeze K-12

Education Week

 

Reeling from drastic midyear cuts after they grossly miscalculated expected revenues amid falling oil prices and troubles in the coal industry, legislators in several mineral-dependent states, including Alaska and Oklahoma, are set to debate alternative revenue sources for state school aid.

Those could include revisions to their school funding formulas or even constitutional changes to allow educators to pull more money from rainy-day funds in response to revenue shortfalls specifically tied to energy prices.

During the energy boom of the last decade, when a barrel of oil cost close to $100, school administrators in energy-producing states built football fields and gleaming new schools. They also gave teachers big bonuses as incentives to move to rural areas with surging enrollments.

But with oil now costing barely $35 a barrel, the situation has changed. The current decline has gone on much longer than economists predicted, and some projections say it could last until 2020.

“It’s not just tax revenue from oil and gas companies that’s hurting these states,” said Richard C. Auxier, a research associate at the Urban-Brookings Tax Policy Center at the Urban Institute. “It’s that oil and gas have become such a big part of their economy. The drop is affecting the state’s income and property tax, too. People aren’t making as much, and so they’re not spending as much. So much in these states is tied to that industry.”

Governors in at least eight states are expected to propose a series of cuts in the coming weeks that would more than likely alter the education debate in state capitals this legislative season. How painful those cuts will be will mostly depend on how state legislatures assembled their tax systems when oil companies first start drilling in their backyards.

http://go.uen.org/5O8

 


 

 

Science Teachers Need More Training to Get Ready for Next Generation Standards

Education Week

 

Very few K-12 science teachers have the experience needed to teach the science and engineering practices described in the Next Generation Science Standards, according to a new report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. And that’s especially true among elementary teachers and those working in schools serving low-income students.

The nearly 250-page study looks at what K-12 science teachers know, what they need to know, and the ways to strengthen teacher learning, mainly through reviews of existing research.  The National Academies also published the 2011 report A Framework for K-12 Science Education: Practices, Crosscutting Concepts, and Core Ideas, which the new science standards are largely based on.

Overall, the authors write, teachers “will need new knowledge of the ideas and practices in the disciplines of science, an understanding of instructional strategies that are consistent with the NGSS vision, and the skill to implement those strategies in their classrooms,” in order to meet the new standards, which more than a third of states have adopted so far. Professional development will need to adapt, too.

As of now, science teachers lack time and opportunities to collaborate with each other, which is an important source of teacher learning, they write.

http://go.uen.org/5O9

 

A copy of the report

http://go.uen.org/5Oa (National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine)

 


 

 

Supreme Court Seeks Input On Special Education Matter

Disability Scoop

 

The U.S. Supreme Court is asking the Obama administration to weigh in as it considers whether to take up a case brought by the family of a girl with cerebral palsy who sought to bring her service dog to school.

The family of Ehlena Fry petitioned the Supreme Court to take their case last fall. Rather than accept or decline the case outright, however, the high court this week asked the U.S. solicitor general to provide the federal government’s viewpoint before the court decides whether to hear the matter.

At issue is whether families must exhaust their options under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act in special education disputes with schools before pursuing legal options under the Americans with Disabilities Act. Lower courts have issued conflicting opinions on this point and the distinction is significant since the ADA allows individuals to seek damages, but the IDEA does not.

http://go.uen.org/5Oi

 


 

 

Tennessee school voucher plan passes key hurdle

Nashville Tennessean

 

A school voucher plan for Tennessee passed a key legislative hurdle Wednesday, but opponents said there’s still a fight to come.

House Bill 1049 made its way out of a House budget subcommittee, signaling a first for this type of voucher program and helping clear a major obstacle for the legislation. The bill passed on a voice vote, and it was unclear who voted for the bill.

Voucher programs offer government-funded scholarships that can be used for private school tuition. Gov. Bill Haslam has supported a limited voucher program for low-income students at struggling schools, and other conservative groups hailed the vote as a move forward.

http://go.uen.org/5Ng

 


 

 

New proposal would cut Kansas school districts by half

Associated Press via Shawnee (KS) Dispatch

 

TOPEKA — Kansas would have fewer than half of the local school districts it now has under a reorganization that a conservative Republican lawmaker proposed Wednesday because he said it would trim administrative costs.

Rep. John Bradford said his measure would decrease the number of local school districts to 132 from the current 286 and leave 99 of the state’s 105 counties with only one district each. Bradford presented his plan to the House Federal and State Affairs Committee, which agreed to sponsor it as a bill.

Several other Republican lawmakers said they’re interested in finding ways to have local school districts operate more efficiently. The GOP-dominated Legislature must close a projected $190 million budget deficit for the fiscal year beginning in July, and the state expects to spend more than $4 billion on aid to its public schools.

http://go.uen.org/5Nh

 


 

 

Rauner on CPS takeover attempt: ‘The mayor has failed’

Chicago Tribune

 

Republican Gov. Bruce Rauner on Wednesday launched a years-in-the-making all-out assault on the Chicago Teachers Union, pushing a state takeover of the city’s public school system while contending his onetime ally Mayor Rahm Emanuel had “failed” to get the job done.

Democrats, including House Speaker Michael Madigan and Senate President John Cullerton, quickly decried the plan, which also would allow the district to declare bankruptcy. They each accused Rauner of using Chicago Public Schools’ financial crisis as a new avenue to push his efforts to curb union power while diverting attention from the lack of a state budget.

And so the political dynamic surrounding CPS quickly mirrored the impasse in state government: Both sides are digging in over deep-seated ideological differences and playing the blame game over who’s responsible for the mess. Meanwhile, a solution remains elusive as rhetoric passes for progress in dealing with CPS finances, leaving thousands of schoolchildren, their parents, teachers and administrators in distress.

http://go.uen.org/5Ni

 

http://go.uen.org/5Nj (Chicago Sun-Times)

 

http://go.uen.org/5Nk (Politico)

 


 

 

Denver Public Schools to cut central office staff, dropping 157 positions

Cut DPS positions will be funded through June

Denver Post

 

Denver Public Schools officials told the board at a meeting Tuesday they are cutting 157 positions from the central office in preparation for looming budget cuts.

Of those positions — none of which are teaching ones — 115 are employees who already were notified, and 42 positions currently are vacant. It’s a 6 percent budget cut for the central office.

At the same time, DPS is adding 49 positions for teacher leaders or deans at the school level, focusing on higher-needs schools.

“This is a big impact to a lot of people within the district,” DPS chief financial officer Mark Ferrandino told the board.

Factoring the investment of new school-level positions, DPS expects to save between $8 million and $10 million, Ferrandino said.

http://go.uen.org/5Nq

 


 

 

College apps should emphasize passion not accomplishments, says Harvard report

NewsHour

 

Do colleges put too much pressure on students to impress admissions committees with achievements and accolades? A new report from the Harvard Graduate School of Education recommends limiting the number of advanced placement classes and extracurricular activities that students can list on applications.

http://go.uen.org/5Ob

 

A copy of the report

http://go.uen.org/5Oc (Harvard Graduate School of Education)

 


 

 

U.S. illegal immigrant population falls below 11 million, continuing nearly decade-long decline, report says

Washington Post

 

The illegal immigrant population in the United States has fallen below 11 million, continuing a nearly decade-long decline that has the potential to reshape the debate over reforming the nation’s immigration system, according to a study released Wednesday.

The total undocumented immigrant population of 10.9 million is the lowest since 2003, says the report from the Center for Migration Studies, a New York think tank. The number of undocumented immigrants has fallen each year since 2008, the report says, driven primarily by a steady decline in illegal migrants from Mexico. Sharper declines from South America and Europe have contributed to the overall numbers, the report says, even as illegal immigration from Central America — where families with children have flocked across the southwest border in recent months — is on the rise.

With its release as voting nears in the 2016 presidential primaries, the 15-page document could impact the fiery debate over immigration unfolding on the campaign trail. Republican candidates, led by Donald Trump, have portrayed the border as overwhelmed by illegal immigrants who must be kept out by a massive wall the New York developer proposes to build. President Obama and Democratic candidates say the border has never been more secure and call for comprehensive immigration reform to naturalize immigrants already here.

While the report — written by Robert Warren, a former longtime U.S. government demographer — is an estimate based on 2014 U.S. census data and doesn’t take a position on immigration, officials from the center took issue with the characterizations of Republican candidates. “The facts of the report tell a different story than what you might hear on the campaign trail or in the halls of Congress, where many send a message that we’re being overrun by undocumented immigrants,” Kevin Appleby, the center’s senior director of international migration policy, said on a press call after the report’s release. “The facts and the data show that’s just not true. Hopefully, political discourse will be more fact-based going forward.”

http://go.uen.org/5Od

 

A copy of the report

http://go.uen.org/5Oe (Journal on Migration and Human Security)

 


 

 

Lawmaker Seeks to Make High School Athletics Group More Open

Associated Press

 

MILWAUKEE — A state lawmaker wants to make the Wisconsin high school athletics association subject to open records and meetings laws after the group drew ridicule for instructing administrators to step in if fans boo or jeer rivals with common chants such as “air ball” or “season’s over.”

Marinette Republican state Rep. John Nygren and Wisconsin Interscholastic Athletic Association Executive Director Dave Anderson said they hope to chat face to face Thursday. Nygren said he will discuss a bill he plans to introduce that would open the association to public records and meetings laws.

The organization is a private entity and isn’t currently subject to such rules, but Nygren says the group is funded through public schools and should therefore be open to public scrutiny.

http://go.uen.org/5O7

 


 

 

New Book Urges Parents to Reorder Life for the Sake of Kids

Associated Press

 

NEW YORK — Dr. Leonard Sax has been a family physician and psychologist for 27 years, conducting workshops around the world for parents, teachers, social workers, counselors, school psychologists and juvenile justice professionals.

He’s also a dad, and it’s from all those perspectives that he took on his fourth book, an alarm bell of sorts titled, “The Collapse of Parenting,” out recently from Basic Books.

Sax, who lives in Exton, Pennsylvania, argues that American families are facing a crisis of authority, where the kids are in charge, out of shape emotionally and physically, and suffering because of it. He calls for a reordering of family life in response.

A conversation with Dr. Leonard Sax:

http://go.uen.org/5O3

 


 

 

The Art of Teaching

One half of the entertainment duo Penn & Teller explains how performance and discomfort make education come alive.

Atlantic

 

Education, at its most engaging, is performance art. From the moment a teacher steps into the classroom, students look to him or her to set the tone and course of study for everyone, from the most enthusiastic to the most apathetic students. Even teachers who have moved away from the traditional lecture format, toward more learner autonomy-supportive approaches such as project-based and peer-to-peer learning, still need to engage students in the process, and serve as a vital conduit between learner and subject matter.

Teachers are seldom trained in the performance aspect of teaching, however, and given that every American classroom contains at least one bored, reluctant, or frustrated student, engagement through performance may just be the most important skill in a teacher’s bag of tricks.

I asked Teller, a former Latin teacher and the silent half of the magical partnership known as Penn & Teller, about his years as an educator, and the role performance played in his teaching. Teller taught high school Latin for six years before he left to pursue a career in magic with Penn, and in the forty years since, the duo have won Emmys, Obies, and Writer’s Guild Awards, as well as a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. As our conversation meandered through Catullus, Vergil, Shakespeare, and education theory, he explained why he believes performance is an essential, elemental aspect of effective teaching.

http://go.uen.org/5Og

 


 

 

Connecticut high school calls police after teen ‘ISIS’ pledge: media

Reuters

 

Officials at a Connecticut high school called police after a teenaged student referenced the Islamic State group during a morning recitation of the U.S. Pledge of Allegiance, local media reported on Thursday.

The police department in Ansonia, Connecticut in turn handed the matter over to the federal Department of Homeland Security, the Connecticut Post reported, citing local police officials and records of a school board meeting in Ansonia where the incident occurred in October.

The 15-year-old boy, who was not identified due to his age, was not charged but was removed from classes at the school after substituting “ISIS,” an acronym commonly used for Islamic State, for the words “the United States of America” during the pledge.

“We are no longer investigating this matter. The allegation is that the male was allegedly making pro ISIS statements during the Pledge of Allegiance,” Ansonia police said in a statement provided to the newspaper.

An attorney for the city’s board of education told the newspaper that school officials had acted “out of an abundance of caution.”

http://go.uen.org/5O0

 

http://go.uen.org/5O2 (AP)

 


 

 

Charges Stick Against School Officials in Players Rape Case

Associated Press

 

CHATTANOOGA, Tenn. — A judge on Thursday denied motions to dismiss charges against three Tennessee high school officials facing allegations that they failed to report the sexual abuse of school basketball players by teammates.

Hamilton County Juvenile Court Judge Robert Philyaw ruled after hearing arguments from lawyers representing Ooltewah High basketball coach Andre Montgomery, assistant coach Karl Williams and athletic director Allard Nayadley.

A preliminary hearing is set for Feb. 15.

http://go.uen.org/5O4

 

http://go.uen.org/5O5 (Chattanooga [TN] Times Free Press)

 


 

 

Pakistan attack raises tough question: should teachers shoot back?

Reuters

 

CHARSADDA, PAKISTAN/ISLAMABAD | Stuck with 15 of his students on a third floor balcony of a campus building as gunmen came up the stairs, university director Mohammad Shakil urged Pakistani police arriving at the scene to toss him up a gun so he could shoot back.

“We were hiding … but were unarmed,” Shakil told Reuters, speaking after four Islamist militants attacked Bacha Khan University in Pakistan’s troubled northwest on Wednesday, killing more than 20 people.

“I was worried about the students, and then one of the militants came after us,” Shakil added. “After repeated requests, the police threw me a pistol and I fired some shots at the terrorists.”

As more details of Wednesday’s assault emerged, attention focused on at least two members of staff who took up arms to resist attackers bent on killing them and their students.

Some hailed them as heroes, as the country digested an attack which bore similarities to the massacre, in late 2014, of 134 pupils at an army-run school in Peshawar, about 30 km (19 miles) from where this week’s violence occurred.

Others questioned whether teachers should be armed, as many are, because it goes against the ideals of the profession.

http://go.uen.org/5O1

 


 

 

 

Catholic Church’s Hold on Schools at Issue in Changing Ireland

New York Times

 

DUBLIN — The Roman Catholic Church has lost the battles over divorce, contraception and gay marriage in Ireland. But it still wields what some parents call the “baptism barrier”: influencing admission to public schools.

Almost all state­funded primary schools — nearly 97 percent — are under church control, and Irish law allows them to consider religion the main factor in admissions. As a practical matter, that means local schools, already oversubscribed, often choose to admit Catholics over non­Catholics.

That has left increasing numbers of non­Catholic families, especially in the fast­growing Dublin area, scrambling to find alternatives for their children and resentful about what they see as discrimination based on religion.

Now that issue is emerging as the latest flash point in the debate over how far Ireland should go in becoming a more secular society.

http://go.uen.org/5Oj

 


 

 

Danish City Makes Pork Mandatory but Allows Other Food

Associated Press

 

COPENHAGEN, Denmark — A Danish city has ordered pork to be mandatory on municipal menus, including for schools and daycare centers, with politicians insisting the move is necessary for preserving the country’s food traditions and is not an attack on Muslims.

Frank Noergaard, a member of the council in Randers that narrowly approved the decision earlier this week, says it was made to ensure that pork remains “a central part of Denmark’s food culture.”

Denmark is a major pork producer and it is the most popular meat, but it is forbidden to Muslims and Jews. Most of the asylum-seekers who have arrived in the country in the past months are Muslim.

http://go.uen.org/5O6

 

 

 

————————————————————

CALENDAR

————————————————————

 

USOE Calendar

http://www.schools.utah.gov/main/CALENDAR.aspx

 

 

UEN News

http://www.uen.org

 

 

January 22:

Administrative Rules Review Committee meeting

9 a.m., 445 State Capitol

http://le.utah.gov/Interim/2016/html/00000219.htm

 

House Rules Committee meeting

10:30 a.m., 415 State Capitol

http://le.utah.gov/~2016/agenda/HRUL0122.ag.htm

 

 

January 25:

Utah Legislature

First day of the 2016 general session

http://le.utah.gov/

 

 

January 26:

Public Education Appropriations Subcommittee meeting

8 a.m., 445 State Capitol

http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?Year=2016&Com=APPPED

 

Senate Education Committee meeting

2 p.m.,  210 Senate Building

http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?Year=2016&Com=SSTEDU

 

 

January 27:

House Education Committee meeting

2 p.m., 30 House Building

http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?Year=2016&Com=HSTEDU

 

 

January 28:

Public Education Appropriations Subcommittee meeting

8 a.m., 445 State Capitol

http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?Year=2016&Com=APPPED

 

Utah State Board of Education legislative meeting

Noon, 210 Senate Building

http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspx

 

Executive Appropriations Committee meeting

5 p.m., 445 State Capitol

http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?Year=2016&Com=APPEXE

 

 

February 4:

Utah State Board of Education study session and committee meetings

250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspx

 

 

February 5:

Utah State Board of Education meeting

250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspx

 

 

February 11:

Utah State Charter School Board meeting

250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://go.uen.org/1pn

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