Education News Roundup: Jan. 22, 2016

 

Artwork by students at Maeser Elementary/ Education News Roundup.

Artwork by students at Maeser Elementary/ Education News Roundup.

Education News Roundup

Today’s Top Picks:

 

Trib poll finds support weak for a 1:1 initiative in schools.

http://go.uen.org/5OE (SLT)

 

Utah is the sixth fastest growing state, with the lion’s share of growth coming from births, not in-migration.

http://go.uen.org/5Pj (Wall Street 24/7)

 

Zions Bank CEO Scott Anderson calls for more education funding.

http://go.uen.org/5Ow (DN)

 

Albert Shanker Institute attempts to answer the question: Does money matter in education?

http://go.uen.org/5Pe (ASI)

 

Acting Education Secretary King reaches out to teachers.

http://go.uen.org/5P2 (USN&WR)

 

Ed Week looks at some of the comments on ESSA rules.

http://go.uen.org/5P3 (Ed Week)

 

Philanthropy Outlook predicts a good year for school foundations.

http://go.uen.org/5P8 (Inside Higher Ed) or a copy of the report

http://go.uen.org/5P9 (Philanthropy Outlook)

 

Washington Post tracks the pre-blizzard blizzard. That is, they look at the Twitter deluge from teens seeking to have school canceled ahead of the storm.

http://go.uen.org/5OV (WaPo)

 

 

 

 

 

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TODAY’S HEADLINES

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UTAH

 

Poll: Most Utahns uninterested in buying classroom computers for every student Only about 1 in 3 of those surveyed believe the state should provide individual digital devices.

 

Democrat relies on outsider status, business success in bid for Utah governor Challenge » Businessman says it’s time to end Utah’s “one-party system.”

 

The Fastest Growing (and Shrinking) States

 

Before the council: high schooler’s budget overview, water contract, city cell phone restrictions

 

SLC School District proposes later high school start times

 

“Green Canyon” approved as name for new CCSD high school

 

BYU’s sports heroes are inspiring Utah youth

 

Two teens seriously injured after school bus, SUV collision near West Haven

 

Five Gunnison students plead guilty to bullying

 

Veteran Educator Trenton Goble Unveils New Education Book: Reclaiming the Classroom Book Details the Demise of Teacher Autonomy in the Classroom and How It Can Be Re-Won

 

National FFA officers visit Perham High School

 

Gala honors Cedar City’s best in 12 categories

 

School free throw contest; Project Read’s new tour; American Fork student receives $22K scholarship

 

2016 STEM Fest is Feb. 2-4 at South Towne Expo Center

 

Kindergarten Registration Checklist

 

JL Bowler Elementary presents Good Citizenship awards

 

Beehive Students to Celebrate Public School Choice

 

Inside our schools

 


 

 

OPINION & COMMENTARY

 

Our legislators should address education funding, hunger and poverty and providing access to health care

 

How public concern on education this year compares to 2000-2012

 

Does Money Matter in Education?

 


 

 

NATION

 

New Education Secretary to Teachers: Our Bad John King on Thursday said federal officials are partially responsible for the contentious climate surrounding education reform.

 

Here’s How the Education World Thinks the Feds Should Regulate Under ESSA

 

Special Education Graduation Disparities Highlighted in New Report

 

Lawmakers vote to cut $45 million from K-12

 

California teacher shortage could get worse, report warns

 

High Court Hearing in Fees Case Has Unions on Defensive

 

Effort to overhaul Idaho’s school funding formula begins; interim committee sought

 

Sen. Cruz Introduces Educational Freedom Accounts Act Bill creates educational choice program in D.C. for every public school student

 

State school board OKs tweaks to academic standards

 

Teach Like a Champion Author Tackles Reading in New Book Common-core frame could prove divisive

 

Schools Turn to Digital Tools for Personalizing Career Searches Digital platforms identify student interests

 

Indigenous Leader: Save Native Languages from Extinction

 

Learning Empathy Through Dance

Schools are increasingly using movement and expression as vehicles for teaching kids social-emotional skills.

 

Parents: Students Ridiculed During Anti-bullying Workshop

 

LGBTQ Posters in Toronto Schools Send Messages of Love in the Flash of a Camera Phone JWT changes the conversation around gender

 

Snow brings school closings, and Twitter war, for students

 

Charitable Giving to Education Expected to Grow

 

Education Behemoth Pearson to Cut 4,000 Employees, 10 Percent of Workforce

 

Qatar school pulls Snow White book for being ‘inappropriate’

 

 

 

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UTAH NEWS

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Poll: Most Utahns uninterested in buying classroom computers for every student Only about 1 in 3 of those surveyed believe the state should provide individual digital devices.

 

When the Utah Legislature convenes next week, lawmakers will face a $100 million request from state education managers to beef up classroom technology.

But most Utahns don’t think the state should be in the digital learning business, according to a new statewide poll of registered voters.

Only 34 percent of respondents said the state should pay for every student to have a computer in the classroom, compared with 53 percent who answered no.

The idea was less popular among Republicans, 26 percent of whom said the state should buy a computer for every student, compared with 48 percent of Democrats.

“We’re having trouble keeping teachers in classrooms. We’re having trouble with class size. There are bigger issues than whether or not we have technology,” said Sharon Gallagher-Fishbaugh, president of the Utah Education Association.

http://go.uen.org/5OE (SLT)

 


 

 

Democrat relies on outsider status, business success in bid for Utah governor Challenge » Businessman says it’s time to end Utah’s “one-party system.”

 

Positioning himself as a political outsider with a record of success in the business world, Michael Weinholtz, the former head of a physician staffing company, is aiming to be the first Democrat in 36 years to be elected as governor of Utah.

“I’ve never run for office, and I think, frankly, that will be part of the appeal,” Weinholtz said in a Tribune interview Thursday. “I think there’s a mood, both in America and Utah, where people are fed up with the political status quo. And I think an outsider, successful businessperson and problem solver might be someone who appeals to those folks.”

He becomes the third person to challenge Gov. Gary Herbert in his bid for re-election. Jonathan Johnson, the former CEO of Overstock.com is vying with Herbert for the Republican nomination, and Vaughn Cook, a former chairman of the Utah County Democratic Party, has filed to gather signatures to get on the party’s primary ballot.

Since moving to Utah, he has been involved in several community organizations, including serving on the boards of United Way of Salt Lake, the Salt Lake Chamber, Rowland Hall school and the Women’s Leadership Institute of Utah.

Weinholtz said his top issues will be improving education, the state’s air quality and reforming health care ­— an issue where he said he has unique insight and expertise. He will reveal detailed policy proposals on those issues in the coming weeks, he said.

http://go.uen.org/5Ov (SLT)

 


 

 

The Fastest Growing (and Shrinking) States

 

In the past year, the U.S. population grew by roughly 2.5 million people. International net migration accounted for approximately 46% of this growth. Natural growth — the number of births less the number of deaths — accounted for the roughly remaining 54%, or 1.36 million new Americans.

The incremental uptick in people living in the country was far from even. Job opportunities, immigration and migration patterns, and other factors led to some parts of the country growing at a much faster rate, while others contracted significantly. While the U.S. population as a whole grew by approximately 0.8%, states such as North Dakota and Colorado grew at well over double the rate. Meanwhile, the populations of seven states actually shrank last year, with the worst decline in West Virginia, which lost 0.3% of its population.

In most states, the one-year population trend was similar to the longer-term trend. The population of North Dakota, the fastest growing state over the past year, increased 18.9% over the past decade, more than double the national growth rate of 8.4% over that time. Four of the five fastest growing states the past year — including North Dakota — were the fastest growing over the past decade.

While natural growth accounted for 54.2% of the national population increase, states with the most rapidly expanding populations owe most of their growth to migration. In each of the fastest growing states apart from Utah — where the nation’s highest birth rate and lowest death rate are leading a rapid population increase — the majority of new residents moved to the state from within the country or abroad. Likewise, the states with shrinking populations owe their declines to people leaving the state.

http://go.uen.org/5Pj (Wall Street 24/7)

 


 

 

Before the council: high schooler’s budget overview, water contract, city cell phone restrictions

 

CEDAR CITY — Though Wednesday’s 4 p.m. Cedar City Council meeting was kept brief in anticipation of the “65th Annual Best of Cedar City Awards” to follow, it was jam-packed with important community issues and information for the general public.

City intern Katrina Arnell, a Cedar High School senior, kicked off the evening’s discussions by presenting an overview document of the 2015-2016 Annual Budget she had prepared at the mayor’s request. The document details each city department, their functions and budgetary requirements.

http://go.uen.org/5OO (SGN)

 

 


 

 

SLC School District proposes later high school start times

 

SALT LAKE CITY, Utah – How would you like to sleep in an extra 15 – 75 minutes each morning?  Thousands of local high school students may soon be doing just that.

It is all part of a Salt Lake City School District proposal to push back high school start times.  Officials are seeking community feedback and say the prospective change has huge potential to benefit students.

http://go.uen.org/5OQ (KTVX)

 


 

 

“Green Canyon” approved as name for new CCSD high school

 

The name, mascot and colors for the new high school in North Logan were confirmed Thursday night at the Cache County Board of Education meeting: Green Canyon High School with the Wolves as its mascot.

http://go.uen.org/5OL (LHJ)

 


 

 

BYU’s sports heroes are inspiring Utah youth

 

More than 1,000 excited sixth graders from around Utah County converged onto BYU’s campus Thursday to celebrate Sports Hero Day.

Speakers from BYU’s various athletic teams addressed the students, including BYU’s starting quarterback Tanner Mangum. He asked some students what they wanted to be when they grow up, saying that setting goals early is the path to success.

http://go.uen.org/5OK (PDH)

 

 


 

Two teens seriously injured after school bus, SUV collision near West Haven

 

WEBER COUNTY — Two male teenagers from Fremont High School were seriously injured after their SUV collided with a school bus Thursday afternoon.

The crash happened at about 3:05 p.m. in the area of 3500 West and 1800 South. The school bus was carrying 34 students from Wahlquist Junior High School, and two — a 13-year-old boy and a 12-year-old girl — suffered minor injuries, the Weber County Sheriff’s Office said in a statement.

Though a medical helicopter was initially called for the two teenagers, it was ultimately canceled and they were transported to the hospital by ambulance, Weber County emergency dispatchers said.

The Weber County Sheriff’s Office identified the two teenagers about 6 p.m. as 16-year-old students from Hooper. The driver suffered a head injury and the passenger suffered a broken arm and internal injuries — both are being treated at a hospital.

http://go.uen.org/5OF (OSE)

 

http://go.uen.org/5OG (SLT)

 

http://go.uen.org/5OH (DN)

 

http://go.uen.org/5OP (KUTV)

 

http://go.uen.org/5OR (KTVX)

 

http://go.uen.org/5OS (KSL)

 

http://go.uen.org/5Pp (KSTU)

 


 

 

Five Gunnison students plead guilty to bullying

 

Five Gunnison Middle School students have pleaded guilty to bullying following an incident on a school bus in November. The five boys were caught on video and audio tape using vulgar language toward a girl on the bus. One boy pulled a backpack from an overhead compartment, causing the backpack to hit the girl in the head.

All five pleaded guilty in 6th District Juvenile Court to “assault with a gang enhancement.” Under a plea agreement, a count of disorderly conduct against each boy was dropped. Judge Paul Lyman also required each boy to write a letter of apology to the victim and perform community service. One boy was also sentenced to spend time in detention.

According to Deputy County Attorney Kevin Daniels, most of the boys are good students, and he felt any one of them, acting alone, would not have behaved as they did. School officials changed the schedules of the boys involved and changed locker assignments so they would have no further contact with the victim.

http://go.uen.org/5OU (MUR)

 


 

 

Veteran Educator Trenton Goble Unveils New Education Book: Reclaiming the Classroom Book Details the Demise of Teacher Autonomy in the Classroom and How It Can Be Re-Won

 

SALT LAKE CITY–Veteran educator Trenton Goble today announced the release of his book Reclaiming the Classroom: How America’s Teachers Lost Control of Education and How They Can Get It Back.

The book highlights public education’s shift from student learning to high-stakes testing, driven by a bureaucratic agenda, and how that pendulum can swing back with deliberate effort from teachers and administrators alike. Goble’s insights come from his seasoned and award-winning career in public education as both teacher and administrator, and demonstrate a nuanced and profound solution to restoring the classroom to a purely teacher-student interaction.

“In my 20 years as an educator, I know how vital and individual teaching is. It’s a series of complex human events that defy standardization,” said Goble. “Because of teaching’s complexities, teachers must have ownership of their students’ performance and progress in their classrooms. However, much of this autonomy has been diminished by legislative meddling and federal and state testing mandates. Reclaiming the Classroom addresses these problems by offering a path back to instruction conducted and championed by our educators.”

“Goble presents the case for teachers taking back their professional real estate — the classroom. He proposes actionable ideas for teachers to improve their own effectiveness and for principals to more fully support their work. If you’re an educator, this book is for you,” said Mary Bailey, the 2016 Utah High School Principal of the Year.

http://go.uen.org/5Pn (Business Wire)

 


 

 

National FFA officers visit Perham High School

 

National FFA officers were in Perham on Jan. 8 to hone their skills prior to spending a year on the road giving leadership presentations to high school FFA members across the nation.

The officers – Sarah Draper of Utah; Sydney Snider of Ohio; Nick Baker of Tennessee; Taylor McNeel of Arkansas; Abbey Gretsch of Georgia; and Abrah Meyer of Iowa – will travel more than 100,000 miles in the next year, bringing leadership workshops and inspirational talks to FFA high school students across the nation.

http://go.uen.org/5Pk (Perham [MN] Focus)

 


 

 

Gala honors Cedar City’s best in 12 categories

 

CEDAR CITY — The melodic sounds of the Roaring ‘20s lent to the nostalgia and accolades Wednesday night as Cedar City’s finest were honored at the “65th Annual Best of Cedar City Awards.”

The endless list of community work done by the youngest award recipient in the room, Cedar High School senior Kaliegh Bronson, painted the picture of an unstoppable young woman with all of the makings of a bright future.

A Sterling Scholar who participates as captain of her high school debate team and as a second-term mayor with Youth City Council, Hyde said, Bronson’s achievements are a firm indicator of her drive and willingness to help others when needed.

http://go.uen.org/5Pq (SGN)

 


 

 

School free throw contest; Project Read’s new tour; American Fork student receives $22K scholarship

 

http://go.uen.org/5Pr (PDH)

 

 


 

 

2016 STEM Fest is Feb. 2-4 at South Towne Expo Center

 

SANDY — The Utah STEM Fest is scheduled for Tuesday, Feb. 2, through Thursday, Feb. 4, at the South Towne Expo Center, 9575 S. State.

http://go.uen.org/5OI (DN)

 

 

 

Kindergarten Registration Checklist

 

Dawn Ramsey with Jordan School District tells us how to prepare your child for kindergarten.

http://go.uen.org/5OT (KSTU)

 


 

 

JL Bowler Elementary presents Good Citizenship awards

 

The J.L. Bowler Elementary School recognized its Good Citizens from each first through fifth grades for the month of December.

http://go.uen.org/5OM (SGS)

 


 

 

Beehive Students to Celebrate Public School Choice

 

SANDY, Utah–The community is invited to learn more about public school choice when Beehive Science and Technology Academy hosts a breakfast and speakers on January 25, 2016.

The event is planned to coincide with National School Choice Week 2016, the nation’s largest-ever celebration of excellent options in education. Signature National School Choice Week yellow scarves will also be handed out to runners, in celebration.

http://go.uen.org/5Pi (BusinessWire)

 


 

Inside our schools

 

Three Peaks Elementary

Canyon View Middle

Cedar Middle

Canyon View High

Arrowhead Elementary

Fossil Ridge Intermediate

Riverside Elementary

Utah Online High

Heritage Elementary

Millcreek High

Valley Academy Charter

http://go.uen.org/5ON (SGS)

 

 

 

 

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OPINION & COMMENTARY

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Our legislators should address education funding, hunger and poverty and providing access to health care Deseret News op-ed by A. Scott Anderson, CEO and president of Zions Bank

 

The Declaration of Independence states that all Americans have certain unalienable rights endowed by their Creator — “among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.”

In this age of prosperity, I believe other basic human needs exist that society should help with, including access to a good education, enough food to sustain life and low-cost, high-quality health care. While not rising to the level of the unalienable rights enumerated in the declaration, these basic needs must be addressed for a successful life.

Good education. The pro-education group Education First recently sent a letter to legislators, saying: “Across America, the most vibrant economies put education first. As a business community, we know that a person’s earning power and our community’s wealth are tied to educational achievement. Utah’s continued economic prosperity is driven by those with the knowledge and skills to compete globally.”

Utah has the highest percentage of school-age children in the nation, which is both a great asset and a costly responsibility. Over the past decade, a series of tax cuts have resulted in lost education funding amounting to almost $1 billion per year. The result, as Education First notes, is that “we are last in the country in per pupil spending, outcomes have declined, and as a result our student’s global competitiveness is also in serious decline.”

http://go.uen.org/5Ow

 


 

 

How public concern on education this year compares to 2000-2012 American Enterprise Institute commentary by Director of Education Policy Studies Frederick M. Hess

 

On Tuesday, I examined the polling data on which issues concern voters this year and noted that education tends to rank pretty far back. Over the past six months, just 3% to 4% of voters said that education is the nation’s most important problem. Compared to other issues, education didn’t often rank in the top ten problems voters said they were most concerned about. So, education doesn’t appear to be a big deal for voters this year.

That’s not actually as surprising or unusual as some in education might suppose. In truth, the public rarely rates education highly when ranking the nation’s most important problems. You can see for yourself. Since 2000, both Gallup and the New York Times/CBS have asked voters, “What do you think is the most important problem facing this country today?” Figure 1 shows the share of voters naming education this year and in each of the past four presidential election cycles.

http://go.uen.org/5P6

 


 

 

Does Money Matter in Education?

Albert Shanker Institute analysis by Bruce D. Baker, professor in the Graduate School of Education at Rutgers

 

This second edition policy brief revisits the long and storied literature on whether money matters in providing a quality education. It includes research released since the original brief in 2012 and covers a handful of additional topics. Increasingly, political rhetoric adheres to the unfounded certainty that money doesn’t make a difference in education, and that reduced funding is unlikely to harm educational quality. Such proclamations have even been used to justify large cuts to education budgets over the past few years. These positions, however, have little basis in the empirical research on the relationship between funding and school quality.

In the following brief, I discuss major studies on three specific topics: (a) whether how much money schools spend matters; (b) whether specific schooling resources that cost money matter; and (c) whether substantive and sustained state school finance reforms matter.

http://go.uen.org/5Pe

 

 

 

 

 

 

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NATIONAL NEWS

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New Education Secretary to Teachers: Our Bad John King on Thursday said federal officials are partially responsible for the contentious climate surrounding education reform.

U.S. News & World Report

 

Acting Education Secretary John King offered teachers an olive branch of sorts Thursday, acknowledging his department’s role in creating a politicized education environment that sometimes led to them being painted as villains.

“As everyone in this room knows, the education policy discussions of the last few years have often been characterized by more heat than light,” he said to a room of teachers at the School of the Future in Philadelphia, a public school formed through a partnership between the city school district and Microsoft that focuses on digital learning.

“And despite the best of intentions, teachers and principals have felt attacked and unfairly blamed for the challenges our nation faces as we strive to improve outcomes for all students,” King said.

He continued: “All of us – at the local, state and federal level, the Education Department included – have to take responsibility for the climate that exists. There is no question that the contentious tone has made it harder to have productive conversations.”

http://go.uen.org/5P2

 


 

 

Here’s How the Education World Thinks the Feds Should Regulate Under ESSA Education Week

 

How should the U.S. Department of Education regulate under the Every Student Succeeds Act? People got a chance to share their thoughts with the department face-to-face during two hearings this month. But the public also got a chance to submit public comments on the Internet. The comment period for those submissions just closed Thursday. And as of about 6 p.m. that day, there were more than 200 comments filed.

So what were some of the highlights? You probably won’t be surprised to learn that accountability took up a lot of the oxygen in the comments. And testing issues like how to handle opt-outs were also expounded upon. Plus, school turnaround issues and funding got some attention.

We’ve tried to organize the highlighted comments into several categories where there was a lot of input. Confession: We haven’t been through all 200-plus comments. But don’t worry, this isn’t the last time we’ll take a look at what folks want to see in ESSA regs.

http://go.uen.org/5P3

 


 

 

Special Education Graduation Disparities Highlighted in New Report Education Week

 

The nation’s overall graduation rate may have reached a new high of 82 percent, but many states are still doing a dismal job in getting students with disabilities across the high school finish line on time with a standard diploma.

Fewer than half of the students with disabilities in Alaska, the District of Columbia, Georgia, Louisiana, Nevada, Mississippi, and South Carolina graduated with a regular diploma in the 2013-14 school year, the most current year for which statistics are available. In all, 33 states graduated fewer than 70 percent of their students with disabilities. That calculuation comes from the “adjusted cohort graduation rate,” a common measure that allows states, districts and schools to be more easily compared to one another. The chart below shows the gaps between students with disabilities and students without disabilities http://go.uen.org/5Ox

 

A copy of the report

http://go.uen.org/5Oy (GradNation)

 


 

 

Lawmakers vote to cut $45 million from K-12 Casper (WY) Star-Tribune

 

State lawmakers voted Thursday to slash $45 million from K-12 funding, despite Gov. Matt Mead’s recommendation to insulate schools from cuts made necessary by Wyoming’s massive budget shortfall.

The cuts, which must still be approved by the full Legislature, would come from the School Foundation Account, the block grant that guarantees a certain level of funding to all school districts based on enrollment numbers.

The Joint Appropriations Committee voted for the cuts while reviewing the state’s two-year budget. Its proposal would eliminate $15 million in funding in the first year and $30 million in the second. School budgets would take a sizable hit.

http://go.uen.org/5Oz

 


 

 

California teacher shortage could get worse, report warns Monterey (CA) Herald

 

MONTEREY – The teacher shortage in the K-12 system has become so critical that a local school district is offering a $10,000 signing bonus for its next math and science teachers.

But the shortage, which began to show its effects in 2014 in Monterey County, is likely to get worse statewide if it’s not addressed, according to a report released Tuesday.

“Our analysis shows California on a trajectory that, if left unchecked, will likely result in increased teacher shortages and greater inequities among students in different communities,” said Linda Darling-Hammond, lead author of the report “Addressing California’s Emerging Teacher Shortage: An Analysis of Sources and Solutions.”

The report traces the shortage to an increased demand for teachers after school districts received new, post-recession money. California has the highest student-teacher ratio in the nation, and the gap became wider during the budget cuts.

By 2013, the state’s student-teacher ratio had reached 24-to-1, compared with the national average of 16-to-1.

http://go.uen.org/5OB

 

A copy of the report

http://go.uen.org/5OC (Learning Policy Institute)

 


 

 

High Court Hearing in Fees Case Has Unions on Defensive Education Week

 

Teachers’ unions were on the defensive in the U.S. Supreme Court last week as conservative justices appeared open to overruling a key precedent that authorizes public-employee unions to collect fees from non-members for collective bargaining.

“The union basically is making these teachers compelled riders for issues on which they strongly disagree,” said Justice Anthony M. Kennedy, putting a twist on the idea that non-union members are “free riders” unless they are required to pay for the union’s representation efforts.

“Many teachers think that they are devoted to the future of America, to the future of our young people, and that the union is equally devoted to that, but that the union is absolutely wrong in some of its positions,” Kennedy added during the Jan. 11 oral arguments in Friedrichs v. California Teachers Association (Case No. 14-915). “And agency fees … require that employees and teachers who disagree with those positions must nevertheless subsidize the union on those very points.”

Justice Antonin Scalia, who has expressed concerns about free riders and thus was perhaps the unions’ best hope for the crucial fifth vote to join the court’s four liberals to preserve the 1977 precedent, Abood v. Detroit Board of Education, did not give the unions much reason for optimism.

http://go.uen.org/5OZ

 


 

 

Effort to overhaul Idaho’s school funding formula begins; interim committee sought Spokane (WA) Spokesman-Review

 

An “informal working group” of lawmakers has been convened by House Speaker Scott Bedke and Senate President Pro-Tem Brent Hill to consider an overhaul to the state’s public school funding formula. The group doesn’t plan to propose legislation this year; instead, it will seek legislative approval for an interim committee and start planning the effort. According to a news release from the state Board of Education, the group is co-chaired by Sen. Chuck Winder, R-Boise, and Rep. Wendy Horman, R-Idaho Falls.

Horman said, “The education landscape has changed, and our formula needs to be updated to fund new elements such as virtual education, the increasing mobility of our students, and the state’s move toward mastery-based education.” Winder said, “If we keep making amendments to the current public schools funding formula, it becomes more and more difficult to maintain a state funding formula that provides the predictability and equity our districts need to budget and educate students.”

http://go.uen.org/5OA

 


 

 

Sen. Cruz Introduces Educational Freedom Accounts Act Bill creates educational choice program in D.C. for every public school student Texas Insider

 

WASHINGTON, D.C. — This week, U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Texas) introduced the Educational Freedom Accounts Act (S. 2455), creating a unique educational choice program in Washington, D.C. that would provide opportunity to every public school student in the nation’s capital, including those enrolled in public charter schools.

Sen. Cruz’s bill, modeled after Nevada’s recently passed Education Savings Account (ESA) law, would allow every student enrolled in District of Columbia Public Schools (DCPS) to receive the amount that DCPS would normally spend per pupil in a parent-controlled account. Parents would then be able to completely customize their child’s education by spending those dollars on any combination of education needs.

http://go.uen.org/5Pa

 

A copy of the bill

http://go.uen.org/5Pc (Congress.gov)

 


 

State school board OKs tweaks to academic standards Associated Press via Hattiesburg (MS) American

 

CLINTON – Mississippi’s state Board of Education unanimously adopted a series of minor changes to the state’s academic standards Thursday, in what could be a quiet end to a controversy over the Common Core-linked guidance over what students should learn.

Officials said teachers and students should notice few major changes when the revisions take effect this August.

“It’s tweaking,” said state Superintendent Carey Wright, a strong supporter of what are officially called the Mississippi College- and Career-Readiness Standards. She launched a review of the guidelines this summer after criticism by Gov. Phil Bryant and some lawmakers.

The changes are mostly small. For example, the revisions add requirements that first grade students learn coin denominations, how to count using money and how to use a calendar. The revisions also make clear that Mississippi students should learn cursive writing starting in third grade. But there would be few changes to kindergarten standards, despite concerns that too much academic work has been crammed into that grade.

http://go.uen.org/5OD

 


 

 

Teach Like a Champion Author Tackles Reading in New Book Common-core frame could prove divisive Education Week

 

About five years ago, the chief executive officer of the Uncommon Schools charter network offered up a lofty charge during a routine staff meeting: “Figure out” reading instruction.

Doug Lemov, a managing director for the network of 44 urban schools, was quickly gaining fame nationally as an instructional guru, having recently published a popular, practical teaching guide called Teach Like a Champion. So he and two colleagues—the chief academic officer of the charter network’s professional development arm, Erica Woolway, and its director of professional development, Colleen Driggs—set out to determine what the best reading teachers in their schools were doing.

As the project got going, the rubber also hit the road on a major education policy change. The Common Core State Standards were officially released, and nearly all states rapidly adopted them. The standards, which the three educators support wholeheartedly, became a frame for Reading Reconsidered, the book that would come out of their half-decade of work.

Scheduled for a February release by publisher Jossey-Bass, the book is aimed mainly at middle and high school English teachers and reading specialists, though the authors emphasize there’s something in there for anyone teaching literacy. The nearly 500-page manuscript is divided into eight major reading topics, including text selection, close reading, nonfiction, and vocabulary.

http://go.uen.org/5OY

 


 

 

Schools Turn to Digital Tools for Personalizing Career Searches Digital platforms identify student interests Education Week

 

What factors point students toward a particular career?

Maybe it’s a chance conversation with an adult in the working world—a mechanic, a nurse, or an architect. Or it’s the love of an academic subject and the possibility of making a living immersed in it. Or it’s a piece of guidance offered by a teacher or school counselor, while going over a lesson or a transcript.

Today, many districts are encouraging students to think about career possibilities earlier in their K-12 journeys—and they’re relying on digital platforms to guide that career exploration. Schools are using those online systems to assess student interests and personalities, then feed students, parents, and counselors information about how those inclinations might mesh with potential jobs. The platforms can give students detailed information on everything from descriptions of those occupations to employment data to a map of the academic preparation necessary to reach different careers.

In some cases, the use of the online systems begins as early as middle school—though a very general introduction to careers can start at the elementary grades—and continues through the end of high school.

The demand for online tools like Naviance, Kuder, and Career Cruising has increased as states around the country have approved new laws requiring schools to encourage career planning among secondary students and mandating more detailed academic plans leading students toward graduation.

Whether those platforms and policies succeed in sharpening or broadening students’ career ambitions is unclear.

http://go.uen.org/5P0

 


 

 

Indigenous Leader: Save Native Languages from Extinction Associated Press

 

UNITED NATIONS — A Canadian tribal chief is calling for urgent efforts to revive indigenous languages, saying their extinction is going unnoticed while the world focuses on the preservation of cultural heritage sites.

Edward John, a member of the U.N. Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues, told a news conference that ancient wonders are important but indigenous languages are “the essential component of cultural heritage” and should get international attention and support to ensure their survival.

John spoke Thursday at the end of a three-day meeting of indigenous language experts at U.N. headquarters on revitalizing many of the estimated 6,000 to 7,000 languages spoken by native peoples around the world.

“The priority focus that I hear from all of the experts is, create fluent speakers,” he said. “That’s what you need to do. How do you do it? That’s the discussion taking place.”

“There’s been a large focus on literacy, developing books and calendars and dictionaries” in indigenous languages, John said, “but not as much of an effort in fluency.”

Amy Kalili, a native Hawaiian who heads an education organization promoting fluency in the Hawaiian language, said that in middle of the last century there were perhaps 30 speakers under the age of 18. But she said there was “a cultural renaissance” in the late 1970s and early 1980s, and now schools are educating 3,000 students a year in Hawaiian.

“People are passionate about not letting language die,” Kalili said, and not just in Hawaii.

http://go.uen.org/5OX

 


 

 

Learning Empathy Through Dance

Schools are increasingly using movement and expression as vehicles for teaching kids social-emotional skills.

Atlantic

 

“Ch-ch-tsss. Ch-ch-tsss.” On a chilly Wednesday morning, Baja Poindexter sounded out the steps of the rumba to a classroom of fifth-graders at West Athens Elementary School, located in one of Los Angeles’s most violent neighborhoods. She encouraged her class of mostly Latino students to do the same. They tenuously clasped each other’s hands in ballroom dance “frame,” or body position, and swayed to the music at “Miss Baja’s” command. “Side, together, to the lady! Side, together, to the gentleman!” she bellowed.

Toward the end of the hour, the students grew restless and squirmy, the volume of their chatter drowning out Poindexter’s voice. She paused. “You’ve got enough things against you in the outside world. When you come to school, it should be a safe space for you, but you have to make it that way by being respectful to each other.”

Poindexter is a teaching artist for Dancing Classrooms, a nonprofit based in New York City that brings ballroom dancing to schools primarily in underserved communities. Started by the dancer Pierre Dulaine in 1994, the 1-week program was featured in the 2005 documentary Mad Hot Ballroom and uses ballroom as a vehicle for teaching elementary- and middle-schoolers social-emotional skills like respect and teamwork and, by extension, empathy. For many underprivileged students, in-class time with programs like Dancing Classrooms is the only time they will have regular exposure to the arts.

http://go.uen.org/5P4

 


 

 

Parents: Students Ridiculed During Anti-bullying Workshop Associated Press

 

IMPERIAL, Pa. — Parents say students at a Pennsylvania school were asked personal questions that opened them up to ridicule during what was supposed to be an anti-bullying workshop.

School officials defended the superintendent after eighth-grade students at West Allegheny Middle School in Imperial were asked last week to step into a circle and answer questions including whether they were gay, what their religion was and about their family’s financial status.

http://go.uen.org/5OW

 

http://go.uen.org/5P1 (CSM)

 


 

 

LGBTQ Posters in Toronto Schools Send Messages of Love in the Flash of a Camera Phone JWT changes the conversation around gender AdWeek

 

The climate in which kids are growing up is changing dramatically, but schools remain some of the toughest environments to endure when you’re marked as different. Thankfully, there’s more support now than ever from adults and community members with authority.

New posters have gone up in Toronto District School Board schools, which include 76,000 middle school and high school students. Launched by LGBTQ advocacy group Toronto Pflag, the posters depict a rainbow that spells out the LGBTQ acronym: Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Trans, Straight, Queer and 2-Spirited.

When students use the flash on their camera phones to take a picture of the poster, the words are suddenly accompanied by nouns that illustrate LGBTQ folks are people they know, respect and love:

http://go.uen.org/5Ph

 


 

Snow brings school closings, and Twitter war, for students Washington Post

 

As news of a possibly historic blizzard whipped through Twitter this week, teenagers in the Washington region quickly mobilized. They began an intense online lobbying effort with a resolute mission: to close local schools.

And Thursday morning, they were rewarded (whether it had much to do with them, or not). After initially announcing a two-hour delay, Fairfax County administrators opted to close schools due to icy roads. Schools in Alexandria, Arlington, Prince George’s and Prince William followed suit.

By Thursday afternoon, most school districts in the Washington region announced that they would close Friday due to an impending storm expected to drop up to two feet of snow. Fairfax County schools was among numerous others that canceled classes before a snowflake from the monster storm had even touched the ground.

But before the official announcement from schools comes out, teenagers on Twitter often spread rumors and cause confusion about whether or not classes will be canceled.

http://go.uen.org/5OV

 

 


 

 

Charitable Giving to Education Expected to Grow Inside Higher Ed

 

Over the next two years, charitable giving to education is expected to grow, according to an annual prediction of growth rates in American philanthropy from Indiana University’s Lilly Family School of Philanthropy.

According to the Philanthropy Outlook 2016 & 2017, as the report is called, charitable giving to education is expected to increase by 6.3 percent in 2016 and an additional 6.1 percent next year. The report’s definition of education includes higher education and K-12 schools, as well as libraries and other types of educational organizations. Researchers expect education giving to outpace overall giving, which is predicted to grow 4.1 percent this year and an additional 4.3 percent next year.

Giving by foundations is expected to increase more than any other sources. Individuals and households will give more than in past years, but growth in that category will be smaller compared to other sources. Projected growth in the S&P 500 Index, personal income and the net worth of households and nonprofits will contribute the most to charitable giving in the next two years, the report predicts.

http://go.uen.org/5P8

 

A copy of the report

http://go.uen.org/5P9 (Philanthropy Outlook)

 


 

 

Education Behemoth Pearson to Cut 4,000 Employees, 10 Percent of Workforce Education Week

 

Pearson today announced that it is responding to rocky conditions and poor performance in international markets by laying off  4,000 workers and putting a greater focus on adaptive courseware and classroom products, as well as blended and online learning.

The massive cuts will reduce the giant education company’s workforce by about 10 percent, down from about 40,000 employees based not only in the United States and United Kingdom, but Asia and countries around the world.

A Pearson official told EdWeek Market Brief that that company is not yet revealing how many layoffs will be in the United States, or other Pearson markets. But the education provider said it has launched a “rigorous, bottom-up review of our markets, our operations, and our financial plans.”

http://go.uen.org/5Pd

 


 

 

Qatar school pulls Snow White book for being ‘inappropriate’

Doha News

 

A private school in Qatar has removed a copy of the children’s fairy tale Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs from its library after a parent complained that the illustrations in it were indecent.

Qatar’s Supreme Education Council ordered the move after investigating concerns made by an unnamed parent of a student at SEK International School in Dafna on social media.

The parent had said the Penguin edition of the classic Disney story contained culturally “inappropriate” images, the school told Doha News.

The head teacher of the privately-run Spanish school has apologized for what she said was an “unintended situation.”

http://go.uen.org/5P5

 

 

 

————————————————————

CALENDAR

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USOE Calendar

http://www.schools.utah.gov/main/CALENDAR.aspx

 

 

UEN News

http://www.uen.org

 

 

January 22:

Administrative Rules Review Committee meeting

9 a.m., 445 State Capitol

http://le.utah.gov/Interim/2016/html/00000219.htm

 

House Rules Committee meeting

10:30 a.m., 415 State Capitol

http://le.utah.gov/~2016/agenda/HRUL0122.ag.htm

 

 

January 25:

Utah Legislature

First day of the 2016 general session

http://le.utah.gov/

 

 

January 26:

Public Education Appropriations Subcommittee meeting

8 a.m., 445 State Capitol

http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?Year=2016&Com=APPPED

 

Senate Education Committee meeting

2 p.m.,  210 Senate Building

http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?Year=2016&Com=SSTEDU

 

 

January 27:

House Education Committee meeting

2 p.m., 30 House Building

http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?Year=2016&Com=HSTEDU

 

 

January 28:

Public Education Appropriations Subcommittee meeting

8 a.m., 445 State Capitol

http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?Year=2016&Com=APPPED

 

Utah State Board of Education legislative meeting

Noon, 210 Senate Building

http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspx

 

Executive Appropriations Committee meeting

5 p.m., 445 State Capitol

http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?Year=2016&Com=APPEXE

 

 

February 4:

Utah State Board of Education study session and committee meetings

250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspx

 

 

February 5:

Utah State Board of Education meeting

250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspx

 

 

February 11:

Utah State Charter School Board meeting

250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://go.uen.org/1pn

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