Education News Roundup: Jan. 27, 2016

Gov. Gary Herbert/education news roundup

Gov. Gary Herbert/education news roundup

Education News Roundup

Today’s Top Picks:

 

If you can manage to skip tonight’s “Partridge Family” rerun at 6:30 on KBYU, the Governor will be offering his State of the State address. AP reports that education funding will be a focus.

http://go.uen.org/5RO (PDH)

and http://go.uen.org/5RR (KUTV)

and http://go.uen.org/5Sc (KSL)

and http://go.uen.org/5RT (MUR)

and http://go.uen.org/5Se (Ed Week)

 

Rep. Briscoe also is seeking education funding.

http://go.uen.org/5S4 (UP) video

 

Public Education Appropriations looks to shore up charter school funding.

http://go.uen.org/5Rv (DN)

and http://go.uen.org/5S3 (KSL)

 

However, the latest report released today still shows Utah at the bottom of the pack in per-pupil funding.

http://go.uen.org/5RB (WaPo)

and http://go.uen.org/5S6 (Politico)

or a copy of the report

http://go.uen.org/5RC (NCES)

 

Sen. Millner is quick out of the gate with a couple of education bills this session.

http://go.uen.org/5Rx (SLT)

and http://go.uen.org/5S8 (BYU Universe)

 

New Education Next study gives high praise to Utah on its standards reflecting actual student proficiency. “In 2015, the following 24 states earned an “A” grade: Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, Colorado, Connecticut, District of Columbia, Georgia, Idaho, Illinois, Kansas, Maine, Maryland, Mississippi, Montana, New Jersey, New York, New Hampshire, New Mexico, North Dakota, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Dakota, Utah, and Vermont. In 2013, nine states earned an “A,” but of these, only New York, Pennsylvania, and Utah remain in the elite group in 2015.”

http://go.uen.org/5RI (Ed Next)

and http://go.uen.org/5Sf (USN&WR)

 

 

 

 

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TODAY’S HEADLINES

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UTAH

 

Governor expected to call for school funds in State of State

 

Briscoe: ‘If We Don’t Put Education at the Top of the List, There Will Be Trouble’

 

The plan: $36 million for charter schools, among other things

 

Lawmaker hopes creating ‘teacher leaders’ will boost Utah’s retention rates

 

SB67: Bill that would give $5 million to help low-income students passes committee

 

Workforce development, education funding top business community’s legislative priorities

 

Teacher Evaluation Committee members approved; Volunteers, educators honored

 

School board discusses changes for Cedar North Elementary

 

Interviews scheduled for 4 superintendent candidates

 

Sundance Films Take on Mass Shootings and Guns in America

 

Source of threatening rumor at Ogden High found, police say

 

Kaysville teen without limbs wows on the dance floor

 

St. Joseph Catholic High bringing “The Music Man” to the stage in February

 

Teachers Win ‘Curious Classroom’ Competition With Innovative Resources and Lessons

 

Utah Valley Educator of the Week: BJ Roberts

 

Utah Valley Student of the Week: Kenzie Ford

 


 

 

OPINION & COMMENTARY

 

Use time, money wisely legislators

 

Utah’s Pay for Success pre-K model is a worthy innovation

 

As this teacher can attest: Kids do say darnedest things

 

The Man Who Tried to Kill Math in America One educator’s reform efforts in the early 20th century say a lot about current attacks on the Common Core.

 

After Common Core, States Set Rigorous Standards Forty-five states raise the student proficiency bar

 

Opt-Outs: What is Lost When Students Do Not Test

 


 

 

NATION

 

Spending in nation’s schools falls again, with wide variation across states

 

Fact-checking Trump’s new anti-Common Core video

 

Despite Growth, AP Pool Is Not Diluted, Studies Say But debate continues over why race gaps in participation persist

 

Researchers Say U.S. Schools Could Learn From Other Countries on Teacher PD

 

Obama’s plan to give free lunches to millions more kids

 

U.S. court hears arguments on transgender student using boys’ bathroom

 

Should more kids skip college for workforce training?

 

Few US Neighborhoods Affordable, Walkable with Good Schools

 

Indiana school principal killed, two children hurt when hit by bus

 

Challenger Disaster: McAuliffe’s Students Go on to Teach

 

 

 

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UTAH NEWS

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Governor expected to call for school funds in State of State

 

SALT LAKE CITY — Gov. Gary Herbert is expected to ask Utah lawmakers to increase public education funding and strip away earmarks in the state budget when he gives his annual State of the State speech Wednesday night.

Both were priorities that the Republican governor asked lawmakers to consider in his speech last year and in his latest budget proposal released in December.

Herbert and legislators cite public education funding as one of their biggest priorities, but they sometimes disagree on how much to send to schools.

http://go.uen.org/5RO (PDH)

 

http://go.uen.org/5RR (KUTV)

 

http://go.uen.org/5Sc (KSL)

 

http://go.uen.org/5RT (MUR)

 

http://go.uen.org/5Se (Ed Week)

 


 

 

Briscoe: ‘If We Don’t Put Education at the Top of the List, There Will Be Trouble’

 

Utah lawmakers have another big budget surplus to play with this year. Rep. Joel Briscoe (D-Salt Lake City) says that means they should be considering another big boost in funding for public schools.

“It’s a good litmus test,” says Briscoe. “Legislators always say it’s important to fund public education. We will see how important public ed is to them. If they don’t put education at the top of the list, there will be trouble.”

Briscoe says that, when you adjust for inflation, the state is still spending about the same amount of money per school child as they did in 2008.

http://go.uen.org/5S4 (UP) video

 


 

 

The plan: $36 million for charter schools, among other things

 

SALT LAKE CITY — State lawmakers hope to give Utah students a better chance for quality learning and academic achievement through a more equitable distribution of funding next year.

That is the goal for members of the Public Education Appropriations Subcommittee, which began the process of setting the budget for Utah’s public school system Tuesday.

Equity was also a focus in the Senate Education Committee, which voted unanimously to support a bill that would increase funding for charter schools by $36 million in order to more closely resemble the funding distribution model used for district schools.

http://go.uen.org/5Rv (DN)

 

http://go.uen.org/5S3 (KSL)

 


 

 

Lawmaker hopes creating ‘teacher leaders’ will boost Utah’s retention rates

 

A proposal to create the role of “teacher leader” in Utah schools was approved by a committee of lawmakers on Tuesday.

The bill, sponsored by Ogden Republican Sen. Ann Millner, directs the state school board to determine the criteria and qualifications of a teacher leaders, who would mentor and coach their co-workers on top of their classroom work.

“It seems really clear that we need someone in the school who is a master teacher,” Millner said.

No additional funding is included in the bill.

But once a teacher leader is defined, Millner said, the state school board would be expected to report to lawmakers on the resources or policy changes needed in the future to support the new role for educators.

http://go.uen.org/5Rx (SLT)

 


 

 

SB67: Bill that would give $5 million to help low-income students passes committee

 

SALT LAKE CITY — A bill that would create local student success partnerships passed the  Senate Education Committee 7-0 Tuesday, Jan. 26, and will go to the full Senate for consideration.

Sen. Ann Millner, R-Ogden, presented SB67, a bill that would create The Partnerships for Student Success Grant Program, which would focus on improving education for low-income students at a local level rather than the state level. The proposal includes a grant for $5 million that would be distributed to 10 feeder systems in rural northern Utah communities.

“These partnerships are really focused on outcomes and making sure we are making a difference for these kids. They do require for people to be in constant communication, to share accountability, and to work together for the shared goal of our children,” Senator Millner said.

http://go.uen.org/5S8 (BYU Universe)

 


 

Workforce development, education funding top business community’s legislative priorities

 

SALT LAKE CITY — Making sure the state has an adequately educated workforce, low taxes, effective regulation and a well-maintained infrastructure rank among the most important issues lawmakers will face in the 2016 Legislature, according to Utah business leaders.

The Salt Lake Chamber on Tuesday released its annual public policy guide to Gov. Gary Herbert, top lawmakers and civic leaders during a morning briefing at the chamber’s downtown offices.

The “ingredients” for economic success also include competitive energy prices implemented through well-managed, limited government, according to the state’s largest business association.

To maintain the state’s robust, expanding economy, legislators must continue to govern methodically and with a vision toward strengthening Utah’s long-term economic future, explained Lane Beattie, president and CEO of the Salt Lake Chamber.

Developing a focused, inventive plan for investment in education also is one of the most important tasks for the Legislature this session, Beattie said.

“In the 21st century, a dynamic economy requires an educated population,” Herbert said. “Education drives innovation, attracts employers looking to fill high-skilled jobs and provides for a higher quality of life.”

Touting a mantra of “prosperity through education,” Keith Buswell, vice president of corporate relations at Wadman Corp. and co-chairman of Prosperity 2020, said the state’s future economic opportunities will come through a foundation based in strong education policy.

“We support innovative, accountable, targeted strategies,” Buswell said. “This will elevate the educational outcomes that will help us compete globally.”

http://go.uen.org/5Ry (DN)

 

http://go.uen.org/5S9 (UP)

 


 

 

Teacher Evaluation Committee members approved; Volunteers, educators honored

 

CEDAR CITY — The Iron County School Board appointed and approved a director and nine committee members to oversee yearly administrator and teacher evaluations as part of a newly created panel called the Educator Evaluation Program Joint Committee.

The new committee is in keeping with a Utah law that requires every educator and administrator be evaluated yearly, school board Vice President Harold Haynie said.

http://go.uen.org/5S5 (SGN)

 


 

School board discusses changes for Cedar North Elementary

 

It may not only be the old Cedar North Elementary building that’s going to come down with the rise of the new structure.

Its name, too, may change. However, there seems to be some reluctance on the part of the Iron County School District Board of Education, members of whom appear to support retaining the “North” name.

http://go.uen.org/5RQ (SGS)

 


 

 

Interviews scheduled for 4 superintendent candidates

 

The four candidates vying for Rapid City Area Schools superintendent will have to field a barrage of questions from many different groups during interviews scheduled in the coming days.

The four will appear in this order: on Thursday, Daniel Frazier, superintendent of the Litchfield public school district in Minnesota; on Friday, Lori Simon, executive director of academics and elementary schools of Robbinsdale Area Schools in Minnesota; on Feb. 9, Darci Mohr, superintendent of South Routt School District in Colorado; and on Feb. 10, David Doty, former superintendent of Canyons School District in Sandy, Utah, and now an education policy consultant with a Salt Lake City consulting firm.

http://go.uen.org/5S7 (Rapid City [SD] Journal)

 


 

Sundance Films Take on Mass Shootings and Guns in America

 

PARK CITY, Utah — Gun violence was on the minds of more than a few filmmakers this year.

The ongoing issue was the main subject of four new films at the Sundance Film Festival – two feature documentaries (“Newtown,” ”Under the Gun”) one short documentary, “Speaking is Difficult,” and one feature, “Dark Night.”

The wave of films dealing with essentially the same subject – mass shootings in America – is both a coincidence and an indicator that the filmmaking community is engaging with the national consciousness.

http://go.uen.org/5RN (AP)

 


 

 

Source of threatening rumor at Ogden High found, police say

 

OGDEN — Police and school officials say they’ve traced a threatening rumor at Ogden High School back to the student they believe started it.

Police officers responded to Ogden High School on Tuesday, Jan. 26, after threatening rumors circulated through the building. “There were rumors among the kids (Monday) along the lines of, ’Don’t come to school tomorrow, something bad is going to happen,’” Ogden School District spokesman Zac Williams said Tuesday.

The enhanced police presence was a precaution and did not involve any lockdowns or lockouts during the school day, Williams said. Ogden High also alerted parents to the situation with an audio message that went out at 1:15 p.m.

Ogden Police Department Lt. Danielle Croyle said the school resource officer and other police at the school found that the rumor was attributed to a single student.

“The threat was not found to be credible or specific,” Croyle said.

http://go.uen.org/5RK (OSE)

 


 

Kaysville teen without limbs wows on the dance floor

 

KAYSVILLE — Not having arms or legs does not stop 17-year-old Gabe Adams from putting on incredible dance performance.

The former Davis High School student began dancing several years ago when he performed a contemporary hip hop dance in his seventh grade talent show.

“I got into dancing because I wanted to prove to myself and other people around me that there was more to me than the kid that was in the wheelchair or the kid who didn’t have an extra activity to do and stuff like that,” Adams said.

http://go.uen.org/5RS (KSL)

 


 

 

St. Joseph Catholic High bringing “The Music Man” to the stage in February

 

OGDEN — A few high schools are kicking off the spring performing season a little bit early with shows this weekend and next weekend.

St. Joseph Catholic High School’s upcoming showing of “The Music Man” is unique in that the cast includes not only students from the high school, but also kids from the elementary school as well.

http://go.uen.org/5RL (OSE)

 


 

 

Teachers Win ‘Curious Classroom’ Competition With Innovative Resources and Lessons

 

Houghton Mifflin Harcourt (HMH) has announced the winners of its national ‘Curious Classroom” competition, where it rewards educators for having innovative classroom practices.

Winners were submitted after submitting a three-minute inspirational video “featuring an innovative resource, tool or lesson they created to engage and motivate students.”

“The HMH Curious Classroom first place honor goes to Heather Francis, an eighth grade mathematics teacher at Granite Park Junior High School in Salt Lake City, Utah. Francis submitted two dance activity resources – Dance Dance Evolution and The Distributive Choreography Project – that help students explore core mathematic principles like rounding and distributive properties. Both resources teach students about key math concepts through dance and challenge them to think outside of the box,” said HMH in a statement.

http://go.uen.org/5Sd (Education World)

 

 


 

Utah Valley Educator of the Week: BJ Roberts

 

BJ Roberts is a math teacher, student council advisor and driver’s ed instructor at Westlake High School. He was chosen as the Daily Herald’s Utah Valley Educator of the Week.

http://go.uen.org/5Sb (PDH)

 


 

 

Utah Valley Student of the Week: Kenzie Ford

 

Kenzie Ford, 17, is a student at Westlake High School. She was chosen as the Daily Herald’s Utah Valley Student of the Week.

http://go.uen.org/5Sa (PDH)

 

 


 

 

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OPINION & COMMENTARY

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Use time, money wisely legislators

(Ogden) Standard-Examiner editorial

 

The Legislature’s under way, the 45-day sprint began Monday. There are no shortage of critical issues that we need legislators to tackle. Education, clean air, water projects, and upgrading Utah’s colleges and universities are priorities that deserve to be addressed first. If there’s one inevitability that stands next to taxes and death, it’s that Utah’s population is going to grow, perhaps double over the next two generations.

Legislators must be tasked to make sure children have a well-funded quality public education, from pre-school to 12th grade.

http://go.uen.org/5Rz

 


 

 

Utah’s Pay for Success pre-K model is a worthy innovation Salt Lake Tribune op-ed by Libby Doggett, deputy assistant secretary of Policy and Early Learning in the U.S. Department of Education, and David Wilkinson, director of the White House Office of Social Innovation

 

Pre-K works. Too few kids get it. Something must change.

Utah’s innovative Pay for Success project is a recognition that, indeed, something must change, as the country has not equipped all our children with real opportunity. As a result of Utah’s successful innovations, experts and policy leaders are gathering in Salt Lake for the 2016 Innovation Summit to learn first-hand about how Utah is expanding access to education and other important services.

Pay for Success is exactly what it sounds like: Government only pays when a service provider achieves certain measurable outcomes. Because there are upfront costs in tackling a social problem like a lack of educational opportunity, philanthropy and mission-driven investors often fund programs upfront, and are paid back only when the program — preschool in this case — has measurably improved lives based on mutually agreed-upon targets. Unlike traditional mechanisms, taxpayers don’t foot the bill for failed programs, and policymakers get hard data on whether programs are working.

Because of Utah’s project, thousands of children have been and will be enrolled in public and nonprofit preschool programs. The agreement is that the state will repay the investors for success in preventing these children from needing special education services after preschool, which would both improve lives and save the state money. In the first group of students (which didn’t include children already in special education), only one at-risk child now qualifies for special education after preschool.

http://go.uen.org/5Rw

 

 


 

 

As this teacher can attest: Kids do say darnedest things

(Logan) Herald Journal commentary by columnist Chad Hawkes

 

One of my favorite TV shows of all time was the program “Kids Say the Darnedest Things,” hosted by Art Linkletter. The responses from the kids on his show were sincere, heartfelt, classic and most of all hilarious. One of the benefits of spending time with children every day in a classroom setting (among many others) is getting to witness their innocence, honesty and humor.

Early on in my career as a teacher, I created a file labeled (appropriately) “The Funny File.” When I have a humorous exchange or an assignment turned in that tickles my funny bone, I save it, copy it and place it in my file. If and when I ever retire, I plan to publish parts of my file along with my experiences in education and title it “Repeating Fifth Grade.” In the meantime, here are a few unabridged examples from my collection in the “Funny File.”

http://go.uen.org/5RP

 


 

The Man Who Tried to Kill Math in America One educator’s reform efforts in the early 20th century say a lot about current attacks on the Common Core.

Atlantic commentary by columnist A.K. WHITNEY

 

The Common Core math standards have been contentious since they were launched several years ago, with many parents taking to social media to complain about their kids getting incomprehensible homework. Kids are now expected, for example, to explain how multiplication works using the “box” and “lattice” methods. These methods take longer, and are harder to master at first, but have been shown by some research to be more effective than the multiply-and-carry method, particularly for kids who have trouble memorizing things. And while they may be new for this generation of parents, they have been around since at least the 13th century.

The research and philosophy behind the new math standards aren’t new either: They mirror the ideas espoused by the Mathematical Association of America’s National Committee on Mathematical Requirements, which formed in 1916 and put together a plan to reform math education in the United States. Until then, math education consisted of few attempts at helping students reach a deeper understanding. One impetus for reform was that, while the country had become a leader in technological and industrial innovation in the early 20th century, and while more students were taking algebra and geometry than before, many of its schools had yet to be as sophisticated or academically rigorous as those in Europe.

The suggestions contained in the committee’s 600-page-plus report, “The Reorganization of Mathematics in Secondary Education,” should be familiar to anyone who has pored over the Common Core standards. They encouraged the teaching of algebra concepts as early as the sixth grade. They promoted understanding over rote memorization using practical math applications. They stressed the importance of a solid math education—including in areas like geometry and even trigonometry—for all students, whether they go into engineering or philosophy, college or the workforce.

One of the primary purposes of math education, the authors stated, was “to develop those habits of thought and of action which will make these powers effective in the life of the individual.” But no matter how exhaustive, the report did not bring about the changes for which the committee had hoped.

That initiative gave way to the increasingly popular progressive education-reform movement, which preached that a deeper understanding of math wasn’t practical for most Americans—that the way it was taught didn’t take into account their interests and thus squashed their will to learn. Less math is more, the thinking went. Because this movement won, instead of raising the numeracy of the general public and ensuring it was better equipped to navigate the increasingly sophisticated technology and global economy, American schools allowed an entire generation of students to fall behind mathematically. Because it usually only takes one generation to erase the gains of the previous one, Baby Boomers, Xers, and older Millennials are still nowhere near as numerate as they should be.

And while many helped make this happen, a lot of the blame lies with one well-meaning, extremely influential educator: William Heard Kilpatrick, Columbia University Teachers College’s “million-dollar professor.”

http://go.uen.org/5S1

 


 

 

After Common Core, States Set Rigorous Standards Forty-five states raise the student proficiency bar Education Next analysis by Paul E. Peterson, professor of government and director of the Program on Education Policy and Governance at the Harvard Kennedy School, Samuel Barrows and Thomas Gift (both postdoctoral fellows)

 

In spite of Tea Party criticism, union skepticism, and anti-testing outcries, the campaign to implement Common Core State Standards (otherwise known as Common Core) has achieved phenomenal success in statehouses across the country. Since 2011, 45 states have raised their standards for student proficiency in reading and math, with the greatest gains occurring between 2013 and 2015. Most states set only mediocre expectations for students for nearly 10 years after the passage of the federal No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB). Now, in the wake of the Common Core campaign, a majority of states have made a dramatic move forward.

In 2015, the following 24 states earned an “A” grade: Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, Colorado, Connecticut, District of Columbia, Georgia, Idaho, Illinois, Kansas, Maine, Maryland, Mississippi, Montana, New Jersey, New York, New Hampshire, New Mexico, North Dakota, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Dakota, Utah, and Vermont. In 2013, nine states earned an “A,” but of these, only New York, Pennsylvania, and Utah remain in the elite group in 2015.

http://go.uen.org/5RI

 

http://go.uen.org/5Sf (USN&WR)

 


 

 

Opt-Outs: What is Lost When Students Do Not Test ACT analysis by Michelle Croft, research associate in the Office of Policy, Advocacy, and Government Relations

 

Scores on annual statewide achievement tests can provide parents, students, educators, and policymakers with valuable information — but only if students participate. This issue brief provides background about recent increases in (and efforts to expand) the number of students opting out of statewide assessments, describes the information and data quality lost when the students do not participate in statewide annual testing, and offers recommendations for reducing opt-outs and their negative effects.

http://go.uen.org/5RJ

 

 

 

 

 

 

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NATIONAL NEWS

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Spending in nation’s schools falls again, with wide variation across states Washington Post

 

The nation’s per-pupil spending on K-12 public schools dropped in 2013 for the third year in a row, reversing more than a decade of funding increases, according to federal data released Wednesday.

Spending continued to vary widely across the country, from a low of $6,432 per student in Utah to a high of $20,530 per student in the District of Columbia. The biggest spenders were largely clustered in the Northeast, while the lowest were in the West and Southeast.

The national average was $10,763, down 0.6 percent compared with 2012, adjusting for inflation.

That decline was less dramatic than the 3 percent drop the year before, but it shows that, in many places, funding for public education has not rebounded as the economy recovered from the Great Recession.

http://go.uen.org/5RB

 

http://go.uen.org/5S6 (Politico)

 

A copy of the report

http://go.uen.org/5RC (NCES)

 


 

 

Fact-checking Trump’s new anti-Common Core video Washington Post

 

In the race for the GOP presidential nomination, Donald Trump has said little about education except to occasionally bash Common Core, the new academic standards that have been adopted by more than 40 states.

Now Trump has released a new 45-second video that reiterates his disgust with Common Core, a favorite target for many conservative politicians, but sheds little additional light on his ideas for how to improve American public schools.

“I’m a tremendous believer in education, but education has to be at the local level. We cannot have the bureaucrats in Washington telling you how to manage your child’s education,” Trump says in the video. “Common Core is a disaster. We can’t let it continue.”

Trump goes on to offer the nation’s high per-pupil spending and poor performance on international tests as proof of Common Core’s disastrous nature. His message is obviously resonating: The video has more than 1.7 million views. But is he right? Let’s take a look.

http://go.uen.org/5RA

 


 

 

Despite Growth, AP Pool Is Not Diluted, Studies Say But debate continues over why race gaps in participation persist Education Week

 

While public school students’ participation in the Advanced Placement program has shot up over the past two decades, the academic caliber of the course-takers does not appear to have been “watered down,” according to new research from the American Enterprise Institute, a right-leaning think tank in Washington.

“If you look at the overall achievement of students over time, you’d expect it to be falling,” said Nat Malkus, a senior research fellow for the AEI who wrote the two recent reports on the subject. But during the years for which he could compare data, overall performance levels for students who took an AP class “didn’t show any reduction.”

The findings counter an oft-cited criticism of the College Board’s program: That it has expanded too quickly to maintain its reputation for being rigorous and college-level.

http://go.uen.org/5RD

 

A copy of the report

http://go.uen.org/5RE (American Enterprise Institute)

 


 

 

Researchers Say U.S. Schools Could Learn From Other Countries on Teacher PD Education Week

 

Washington – A new pair of reports use international comparisons to show that any school accountability system that fails to take teacher professional development into consideration might be fighting a losing battle.

The studies, commissioned by the National Center on Education and the Economy, a nonprofit that studies education systems around the world, were led by researchers Ben Jensen and Minxuan Zhang. Both researchers presented on their work at a forum hosted by the NCEE here earlier this month. They said their findings boiled down to a single point: School accountability needs to factor in the quality of teacher professional development.

“School improvement equals professional learning,” said Jensen, the president of the Australia-based think tank Learning First.

The Jensen-led report, titled “Beyond PD,” looked at teacher professional-learning models in British Columbia, Hong Kong, Shanghai, and Singapore, all high-performing school systems as measured by student achievement on international-comparison tests. In “Developing Shanghai’s Teachers,” Zhang, a professor at Shanghai University and director of its Institute of International Comparative Education, focused exclusively on Shanghai.

http://go.uen.org/5RG

 

Copies of the reports

http://go.uen.org/5RH (Center on International Education Benchmarking)

 


 

 

Obama’s plan to give free lunches to millions more kids Washington Post

 

The Obama administration will announce new plans Wednesday to launch a pilot program aimed at increasing poor children’s access to food through the National School Lunch Program.

The pilot program will allow participating states to use Medicaid data to automatically certify students for free and reduced-price school lunches. Currently, families have to submit an application — a laborious process for parents and a costly one for schools — even when they have already proven that they are income-eligible through their participation in other government assistance programs.

“We know that the program works, and we want to expand it,” said Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack. “Many children who are eligible for free and reduced lunch meals aren’t enrolled in the program — this is going to help ensure that they receive the benefits, too.”

The initiative will be formally introduced at an event Wednesday morning, organized to raise awareness about the importance of the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program and other federally funded nutrition programs.

http://go.uen.org/5S0

 


 

 

U.S. court hears arguments on transgender student using boys’ bathroom Reuters

 

RICHMOND, VA. | A U.S. appeals court heard arguments on Wednesday over whether a high school in Virginia should be ordered to allow a transgendered student to use the boys’ bathroom, even though he was born a biological female.

The student, Gavin Grimm, a 16-year-old junior at Gloucester High School, is suing the Gloucester County School Board over its restroom policy. His lawyers want the U.S. Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals to issue an order letting him use the boys’ bathroom.

Joshua Block, the lead attorney for the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU), which brought the case, told the three-judge panel the policy violated constitutional guarantees of equal protection, and Title IX, the federal law that bars sexual discrimination.

But school board lawyer David Corrigan contended that “transgender” is not a protected class under the Constitution.

http://go.uen.org/5RU

 


 

 

Should more kids skip college for workforce training?

NewsHour

 

Of all the U.S. high school students who graduate high school and go on to college, a large proportion will never earn their degree. How can educators better train those who may struggle in trying to pick a course of study? One solution may lie in putting greater emphasis on high school vocational training, but critics disagree.

http://go.uen.org/5RF

 


 

 

Few US Neighborhoods Affordable, Walkable with Good Schools Associated Press

 

WASHINGTON — Few neighborhoods can match the perks of Adams Morgan in Washington, D.C. – a reality that reflects a broader problem for the U.S. housing market.

Residents of Adams Morgan enjoy a bevy of bars, restaurants, exercise studios and shopping, just steps from their row houses and condo buildings. Home values are reasonable relative to neighborhood incomes. And in general, the area schools rate as better than average nationally.

Across the country, just 14 percent of neighborhoods manage to be at once affordably priced, walkable and near decent schools. And many of those neighborhoods exist in only two cities: Washington and Seattle, according to a new analysis released Wednesday by the real estate brokerage Redfin.

The findings suggest a substantial mismatch between the neighborhoods where people say they want to live and the homes actually available to them.

http://go.uen.org/5RW

 

A copy of the report

http://go.uen.org/5RX (Redfin)

 


 

 

Indiana school principal killed, two children hurt when hit by bus Reuters

 

An Indianapolis school principal was killed on Tuesday, and two children were injured, when a school bus jumped a curb, officials said.

The incident occurred at about 2:45 p.m. (1945 GMT) outside Amy Beverland Elementary School in the city’s northeast, said Richard Riddle, a spokesman for the Indianapolis Metropolitan Police.

The woman bus driver told authorities she was not sure what caused the vehicle to accelerate and jump the curb, the Indianapolis Fire Department said in a statement.

She told investigators she saw the principal, Susan Jordan, push several students out of the way as the bus careened over the curb.

Jordan, who was outside the bus on the passenger side when hit, was pronounced dead at the scene, the fire department said, adding that two 10-year-old students suffered non-life threatening injuries.

Jordan worked at the school for 22 years, officials said.

http://go.uen.org/5RV

 

http://go.uen.org/5S2 (Indianapolis Star)

 


 

 

Challenger Disaster: McAuliffe’s Students Go on to Teach Associated Press

 

CONCORD, N.H. — Thirty years after the Concord High School class of ’86 watched social studies teacher Christa McAuliffe and six astronauts perish when the space shuttle Challenger broke apart on live TV, a number of them have gone into teaching – and some wonder if, indirectly, the tragedy affected them enough that they wanted to make a difference, as she did.

One of them, Tammy Hickey, didn’t like social studies at all, but she enjoyed McAuliffe’s law class.

McAuliffe took Hickey and fellow students to courtrooms and conducted mock trials in class. Hickey remembers how personable she was, and how she shared her enthusiasm and experiences when she was in the running to be the first teacher in space. Hickey, now a junior high physical education teacher in Bradenton, Florida, just knew McAuliffe would be picked from more than 11,000 applicants.

“As a teacher now, I know that I want to show respect and show my students that I care,” Hickey says. “I can say to emulate how she was, would be a service to these kids for sure.”

Hickey joins a number of members of the class of ’86 in Concord who became teachers and guidance counselors in the 30 years since they and other students of all ages nationwide watched with disbelief and horror as the shuttle broke apart 73 seconds after liftoff on Jan. 28, 1986, becoming a generational touchstone.

http://go.uen.org/5RM

 

http://go.uen.org/5RZ (CSM)

 

http://go.uen.org/5RY (NewsHour)

 

 

 

 

 

————————————————————

CALENDAR

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USOE Calendar

http://www.schools.utah.gov/main/CALENDAR.aspx

 

 

UEN News

http://www.uen.org

 

 

January 26:

Public Education Appropriations Subcommittee meeting

8 a.m., 445 State Capitol

http://le.utah.gov/Interim/2016/html/00000358.htm

 

Senate Education Committee meeting

2 p.m.,  210 Senate Building

http://le.utah.gov/~2016/agenda/SEDU0126.ag.htm

 

Senate Business & Labor Committee meeting

2 p.m., 215 Senate Building

http://le.utah.gov/~2016/agenda/SBUS0126.ag.htm

 

Retirement and Independent Entities Appropriations Subcommittee meeting

5 p.m., 20 House Building

http://le.utah.gov/Interim/2016/html/00000273.htm

 

 

January 27:

Social Services Appropriations Subcommittee meeting

7:59 a.m., 30 House Building

http://le.utah.gov/Interim/2016/html/00000147.htm

 

House Education Committee meeting

2 p.m., 30 House Building

http://le.utah.gov/~2016/agenda/HEDU0127.ag.htm

 

House Business and Labor Committee meeting

2 p.m., 445 State Capitol

http://le.utah.gov/~2016/agenda/HBUS0127.ag.htm

 

Senate Judiciary, Law Enforcement, and Criminal Justice Committee meeting

2 p.m., 250 State Capitol

http://le.utah.gov/~2016/agenda/SJLC0127.ag.htm

 

Senate National Resources, Agriculture, and Environment Committee meeting

2 p.m., 415 State Capitol

http://le.utah.gov/~2016/agenda/SNAE0127.ag.htm

 

 

 

January 28:

Public Education Appropriations Subcommittee meeting

8 a.m., 445 State Capitol

http://le.utah.gov/Interim/2016/html/00000359.htm

 

Utah State Board of Education legislative meeting

Noon, 210 Senate Building

http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda/January28LegislativeAgenda.aspx

 

Senate Economic Development and Workforce Services Committee meeting

2 p.m., 215 Senate Building

http://le.utah.gov/~2016/agenda/SEDW0128.ag.htm

 

Senate Government Operations and Political Subdivisions Committee meeting

2:09 p.m., 415 State Capitol

http://le.utah.gov/~2016/agenda/SGOP0128.ag.htm

 

Executive Appropriations Committee meeting

5 p.m., 445 State Capitol

http://le.utah.gov/Interim/2016/html/00000378.htm

 

 

February 4:

Utah State Board of Education study session and committee meetings

5 p.m., 250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspx

 

 

February 5:

Utah State Board of Education meeting

8 a.m., 250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspx

 

 

February 11:

Utah State Charter School Board meeting

250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://go.uen.org/1pn

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