Education News Roundup: Feb. 4, 2016

Utah State Board of Education/ Education News Roundup

Utah State Board of Education/ Education News Roundup

Education News Roundup

Today’s Top Picks:

 

The Senate takes a look at the Utah State Board of Education election process.

http://go.uen.org/5Xb (SLT)

and http://go.uen.org/5XF (UPC)

and http://go.uen.org/5XL (KUER)

 

Trib takes a look at charter school transparency following Charter School Day on the Hill.

http://go.uen.org/5Xd (SLT)

 

Utah State Board of Education may be getting more options for tracking district and charter school contracts.

http://go.uen.org/5Y3 (UP)

 

New estimates show charter schools aren’t growing as fast as once thought nationally, but still growing fast.

http://go.uen.org/5Xv (WaPo)

or a copy of the report

http://go.uen.org/5Xw (National Alliance of Public Charter Schools)

 

Kansas considers a bill that would allow teachers and school administrators to be prosecuted for presenting material perceived as harmful to minors.

http://go.uen.org/5Xl (Wichita Eagle)

 

LA Times looks at a teacher who had every single one of his students pass the AP Calculus exam in each of the past three years.

http://go.uen.org/5Xs (LAT)

 

 

 

 

————————————————————

TODAY’S HEADLINES

————————————————————

 

 

UTAH

 

Senate gives first OK to reinstating school board election committee; Dabakis calls it ‘punting’

 

Lawmakers debate need for transparency into how Utah taxpayer money is used by charter-school-hired companies

 

Proposal Adds More Accountability for Funds Issued by State School Board

 

Incentivizing school partnerships in Utah

 

Bill advances to require computer techs to report child porn Responsibility » Computer techs would incur misdemeanor charges for failure to turn in users.

 

Conservative Utah Eagle Forum vows to fight sex education bill

 

School Kids Protest For Clean Air

Mayor Biskupski and Utah students protest poor air quality at the capitol

 

Education Standards Are Rising Nationwide, Report Claims

 

Lehi’s young business leaders are ramping up a successful practice

 

Symposium encourages educators, students to be leaders

 

Addressing the ‘School To Prison Pipeline’ on Thursday’s Access Utah

 

Former Cedar Middle School counselor sentenced for sexual battery, porn on campus

 

Lockdown lifted at Granger High School after nearby robbery

 

The one-room schoolhouse model is back, but this time with a tech focus

 


 

 

OPINION & COMMENTARY

 

Racing Utah’s Education to the Top Ten

 

Testimony in opposition to SB 78 (State Board of Education Candidate Selection)

 

How about real elections for school board?

 

Time to Talk Education As Dust Settles in Iowa

 

Poverty Isn’t Destiny

When it comes to education, district level reforms can make a big difference in low-income settings.

 

Charter School Surge

 

What Happens When Each State Is Renamed According to Its Education Level

 

2015 ACT National and State Scores

Students from Low-Income Families

 

West Virginia’s Steady Course on Student Data Privacy

 


 

 

NATION

 

Study: Vermont schools could spend 10 percent less

 

Nation’s charter schools aren’t growing as fast as once thought (but here’s where they’re growing fastest)

 

Charter school report rejected as too negative gets revamp

 

Kansas lawmakers push bill to enable prosecution of teachers

 

Ed. Dept. Kicks Off Process for Writing Every Student Succeeds Act Rules

 

Mobile-Only Internet Access Presents Hurdles for Families, Survey Finds

 

Education chief Douglas says bill would remove many of her duties

 

How a Lincoln High teacher gets all his students to pass the AP Calculus exam

 

Denver Gets High Marks for School Choice in Brookings Report

 

Bentley proposes moving $181 million from education to General Fund

 

Illegal Border Crossings by Families Drop Sharply

 

Bills target athletic events and religious expression on uniforms

 

New York High School Wrestlers Break Stereotypes in Coed Division

 

To Prevent Teen Dating Violence, Some States Push Education

 

Parents’ depression may affect kids’ school performance

 

 

 

————————————————————

UTAH NEWS

————————————————————

 

Senate gives first OK to reinstating school board election committee; Dabakis calls it ‘punting’

 

Members of the Utah Senate gave preliminary approval to a one-year fix for the state’s embattled state school board election law on Wednesday.

The bill, sponsored by Ogden Republican Sen. Ann Millner, would reinstate a nominating committee that had previously been found unconstitutional by a federal district court judge.

Under the bill, committee members would not be allowed to factor a candidate’s ideology or educational philosophies into their decision of what names to forward to the governor for ballot placement.

In 2014, Judge Clark Waddoups wrote in a ruling that the “unfettered discretion” of the committee to disqualify candidates violates free speech rights.

Millner’s bill includes an automatic repeal date of Jan. 1, 2017. She said the “stop gap” measure would allow this year’s election to continue, with candidates screened only for their experience and qualifications.

“What the judge did ask them to do was to make it more objective,” she said.

Lawmakers failed to approve a replacement election method last year, with the House and Senate reaching an impasse on whether the school board should be partisan, nonpartisan or appointed by the governor.

Gov. Gary Herbert announced that he would not convene a nominating committee in response to Waddoups’ ruling.

And members of the state elections office have said that without a mechanism for narrowing the candidate field, anyone who files for the state school board election will be placed on the November ballot.

http://go.uen.org/5Xb (SLT)

 

http://go.uen.org/5XF (UPC)

 

http://go.uen.org/5XL (KUER)

 


 

 

Lawmakers debate need for transparency into how Utah taxpayer money is used by charter-school-hired companies

 

Moroni Alvarez attended traditional public school until fifth grade, when a move placed his family near Freedom Preparatory Academy in Provo.

Now seven years later, the high school senior said he appreciates the emphasis on technology, leadership and service at his charter school.

But he also acknowledged there are some drawbacks that stem from the school’s comparably small student body.

“In my class the ratio of boys to girls is like four-to-one,” he said. “No. Five-to-one.”

Alvarez was among hundreds of charter school students who visited the Utah Capitol on Wednesday in an annual event known as Charter Day on the Hill.

The state’s charter school community filled the Rotunda, allowing students, teachers and administrators to meet with their representatives and senators, who are poised to make an investment of more than $30 million in charter education through changes to school funding formulas.

One of every 10 Utah public education students now attends a charter school, and the growth of the alternative schools has driven a debate over how, and how much, charters should be funded.

That debate has included questions of transparency, as charters enjoy greater budget autonomy than their school district counterparts and are overseen by unelected governing boards.

http://go.uen.org/5Xd (SLT)

 


 

 

Proposal Adds More Accountability for Funds Issued by State School Board

 

Right now, if a local school board enters into an agreement with a group or program to use state funds, the state board of education has no way to audit if those funds are being used in the way they’re intended.

“The state board has no trail down to find out where that money is going,” says Sen. Lyle Hillyard, R-Logan. “The state board can go to that entity, but they’ll say their contract is with the local board, so they can’t disclose any information.”

Hillyard’s SB91 provides a way for the state board to see how the money is being spent. Plus it adds some teeth if the local boards don’t comply.

“If a local district doesn’t give their reports on time, then the state board can hold back the money. We need to be able to get those reports together so the state board can allocate money.”

http://go.uen.org/5Y3 (UP)

 


 

 

Incentivizing school partnerships in Utah

 

SALT LAKE CITY — Kearns Junior High School doesn’t just provide an education; it serves the community.

“We are right here,” said Belkis Villa, the family resource coordinator. “We refer local resources, provide clothing, computer classes, offer day care and after-school programs, support mobile clinics and more.”

Kearns Junior High is a community school, one that works to provide wraparound services to its students and their families.

Senate Bill 67, sponsored by Sen. Ann Millner and Rep. Rebecca Edwards, aims to create more community schools like Kearns Junior High.

http://go.uen.org/5XY (KSL)

 


 

 

Bill advances to require computer techs to report child porn Responsibility » Computer techs would incur misdemeanor charges for failure to turn in users.

 

Professional computer technicians who trip across child pornography may be required to report it — or face misdemeanor charges.

The House Law Enforcement and Criminal Justice Committee voted 9-1 Wednesday to advance HB155 to the full House.

“This will certainly help with our ongoing efforts to fight the horrendous crime of manufacturing and distributing child pornography,” said Rep. Craig Hall, R-West Valley City, the bill’s sponsor.

“It does not require the computer technician to search for any child pornography,” he said. Also it requires reporting only depictions of sexually explicit conduct, “so there’s going to be no concern that this will implicate images of a baby in a bathtub.”

The bill would provide immunity against civil lawsuits for technicians who report in good faith, but make a mistake.

http://go.uen.org/5Xe (SLT)

 

http://go.uen.org/5Xf (DN)

 

http://go.uen.org/5XJ (KSL)

 


 

 

Conservative Utah Eagle Forum vows to fight sex education bill

 

SALT LAKE CITY— A Democratic lawmaker is pushing a measure that would expand sex education in Utah schools, but the proposal is a longshot: conservative groups have already vowed to fight it.

http://go.uen.org/5XC (LHJ)

 

http://go.uen.org/5XG (KUTV)

 

http://go.uen.org/5Y0 (Ed Week)

 


 

 

School Kids Protest For Clean Air

Mayor Biskupski and Utah students protest poor air quality at the capitol

 

Several hundred grade school children braved the falling snow to gather at the state capitol with Salt Lake City Mayor Jackie Biskupsi on Thursday. As lawmakers and lobbyists looked on, the excited group of kids waived signs and demanding that lawmakers do more to clean up the air along the Wasatch Front.

“Pollution is like a monster, it breaks things down,” one student told the assembled crowd of preteens. Other students chanted “young lungs matter,” and “clean air now!” The rally was organized by the students at the Madeliene Choir School, and they were joined by students from the Salt Lake Arts Academy, Bonneville Elementary, and others.

“These students created this rally to push legislators to run legislation to help clean up our air,” Biskupsi told City Weekly. “The kids here are all very excited, they marched up the hill on State Street to make their point, even in bad weather, that we’ve got to do something more than what we’re doing today. Our bad air days effect our kids more than they effect adults, so it is critical that we hear their voices.”

http://go.uen.org/5Y2 (SLCW)

 


 

 

Education Standards Are Rising Nationwide, Report Claims

 

A new report recently released by Education Next has discovered that since 2011, 45 states have raised their education standards for student proficiency in reading and math, with the greatest gains being seen between 2013 and 2015.

While in 2005 only six states earned an “A” and only three states received this grade in 2011, 24 out of the 49 states observed in the study scored an “A” in 2015.

“Two years ago we saw a little improvement and we made a big deal out of it, but basically we’ve been putting out this very pessimistic picture year after year,” says Paul Peterson, co-author of the report and director of the Program on Education Policy and Governance at Harvard University. “And then all of a sudden, bang-o! I did not anticipate this at all.”

While the results appear good, digging deeper shows a different story.  Of the nine states to earn an “A” in 2013, only New York, Pennsylvania, and Utah received this grade again in 2015.

http://go.uen.org/5Y4 (Education News)

 

A copy of the report

http://go.uen.org/5Y6 (Education Next)

 


 

 

Lehi’s young business leaders are ramping up a successful practice

 

Lehi is a booming tech hub for business, and even the younger residents are getting in on the action.

Teens in Lehi Junior High School’s Future Business Leaders of America (FBLA) club are already planning their future business and entrepreneurial ventures. But in addition to starting their ascent on the corporate ladder, they are also discovering that community service is a crucial quality of good business.

“As an adviser for the student FBLA organization, I want to educate the students on the importance of giving back,” said Tiffany Quintero, Lehi Junior High teacher and FBLA adviser. “As the future business leaders in our country, the act of giving back to our community is very important.”

http://go.uen.org/5XB (PDH)

 


 

 

Symposium encourages educators, students to be leaders

 

For three days, Southern Utah educators gathered in St. George to learn how they and their students could become better leaders.

The Leader in Me Symposium, held at the Dixie Convention Center from Feb. 1-3, gave local faculty and staff an opportunity to collaborate with teachers from across the country and become better educated on implementing the Leader in Me program.

The Leader in Me is currently implemented into four Washington County schools: Riverside Elementary, LaVerkin Elementary, Coral Cliffs Elementary and Heritage Elementary.

Schools use the program’s 7 Habits as a foundation to create projects and other activities to promote growth among the students.

http://go.uen.org/5XE (SGS)

 


 

 

Addressing the ‘School To Prison Pipeline’ on Thursday’s Access Utah

 

A 2014 report titled Finger Paint to Fingerprints: The School-to-Prison Pipeline in Utah from the Public Policy Clinic at the S.J. Quinney College of Law at University of Utah found that discipline handed down to some students was diverting them out of public schools and into the criminal justice system “through a combination of overly harsh zero-tolerance school policies and the increased involvement of law enforcement in schools.”

According to the Deseret News, the report noted that suspension and expulsion rates are closely correlated with dropout and delinquency rates, and found that students who were suspended even once were more likely to drop out of school, and that nearly 70% of the U.S. prison population consisted of high school dropouts. The report concluded that nonwhite students and students with mental disabilities received a disproportionate share of the discipline handed out.

On Thursday’s Access Utah we’ll examine this School-to-Prison Pipeline. Our guests include Rep. Sandra Hollins, D-Salt Lake City, who is planning to introduce a bill to address the problem in this legislative session; University of Utah law school student Vanessa Walsh, who is one of the authors of the Public Policy Clinic’s report; Luis Garza, Executive Director of Communities United;  Nubia Pena, Coordinator for Racially Just Utah; and Leah Farrell, Staff Attorney at ACLU Utah.

http://go.uen.org/5XZ (UPR audio)

 


 

Former Cedar Middle School counselor sentenced for sexual battery, porn on campus

 

A former Cedar Middle School counselor accused of accessing porn, among other things, on Iron County School District property, will spend some time in jail for the crimes.

Samuel Naim El-Halta, 40, was sentenced Jan. 29 to 24 months probation and 30 days in jail for seven counts of sexual battery and two counts of accessing pornographic materials on the grounds of the middle school, charges he pleaded guilty to on Jan. 18.

According to court documents, El-Halta was ordered to complete his prison sentence in “48-hour increments” at the Juab County Jail in Nephi beginning each Friday through Sunday until his sentence has been completed.

http://go.uen.org/5XD (SGS)

 


 

 

Lockdown lifted at Granger High School after nearby robbery

 

School officials briefly placed Granger High School on hard lockdown after a home invasion robbery occurred nearby, police confirm.

http://go.uen.org/5XH (KUTV)

 

http://go.uen.org/5XI (KSL)

 

http://go.uen.org/5XK (KSTU)

 


 

 

The one-room schoolhouse model is back, but this time with a tech focus

 

The newest upstart in the changing American education landscape is a small one. In fact, it’s called the micro-school, usually tech-centric small schools of fewer than 150 students with students of all ages sharing a classroom.

http://go.uen.org/5XA (DN)

 

 

 

 

————————————————————

OPINION & COMMENTARY

————————————————————

 

Racing Utah’s Education to the Top Ten

Utah Policy commentary by Salt Lake Chamber

 

Education funding is one of the biggest topics at this year’s legislative session. In this episode, we discuss the challenges faced by students and the state in regards to Utah’s education policy. Dr. Richard Kendall is a seasoned veteran in the education debate and offers his opinion on how to bring about positive change.

http://go.uen.org/5Xc (audio)

 


 

 

Testimony in opposition to SB 78 (State Board of Education Candidate Selection) Sutherland Institute commentary by Stan Rasmussen, director of public affairs

 

Thank you, Mr. Chair, and good afternoon, senators. Stan Rasmussen representing Sutherland Institute.

Sutherland appreciates the intent of the bill sponsor, Senator Millner, to find a way to accommodate the judge’s ruling and possibly prevent future lawsuits against Utah’s current system of nominating state school board candidates, assuming other efforts to reform the nomination process are unsuccessful. However, for as long as we are under the current system, we believe good public policy requires that the nominating and recruitment committee and the governor be able to thoroughly and properly vet state school board candidates.

We believe that the philosophy and views of a candidate for elective office are critical elements upon which they should be vetted. Further, banning a candidate’s educational philosophies and viewpoints from consideration effectively makes it illegal for the committee and the governor to properly vet candidates. And while we believe that avoiding lawsuits and other legal complications where possible is a legitimate policy concern, it is insufficient reason for adopting a nominating system for state school board candidates that is barred by law from thoroughly and properly vetting those candidates.

For these reasons, we encourage you to oppose SB 78.

http://go.uen.org/5XM

 


 

 

How about real elections for school board?

Salt Lake Tribune letter from Breck England

 

This week the Utah Legislature is deciding whether to perpetuate an injustice.

In Utah, you can’t just run for the State Board of Education the way you run for any other office. If you file as a candidate, you must be “vetted” by a committee of political appointees. If they don’t like you for any reason at all, they can cut you off the ballot.

That’s what happened to me. In 2014, I filed as a candidate for the board, but the committee rejected me without explanation. So I sued them in federal court. My argument was simple: This is America. A citizen should have the right to run for office without getting the permission of some unelected committee.

The judge agreed with me. He threw out the process as unconstitutional on the face of it.

But now certain legislators are proposing a bill to keep this unjust system in place. The committee will continue, but can’t take into account a candidate’s “political or educational philosophies, viewpoints, or affiliations.”

This bill is unenforceable.

http://go.uen.org/5Xz

 


 

 

Time to Talk Education As Dust Settles in Iowa NBC commentary by CHRIS STEWART, Director of Outreach and External Affairs Education Post

 

You may have missed it, but we are in the smack dab in the middle of a presidential election cycle, and the real countdown started this week with the Iowa Caucus and the New Hampshire Primary. One one side, Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders continue to battle for the Democratic nod while a dwindling army of GOP hopefuls all aspire to be next to sit in the oval office.

Our newsfeeds and timelines are flooded daily with the latest gaffes, poll results, and detailed plans from each of the candidates who intend to lead America for at least the next four years. But one very important issue has been strikingly missing from the discourse up until now: education. Strangely enough, the only issue that seems to be of lower concern for the presidential candidates than law enforcement abuses and the #blacklivesmatter movement is a conversation on addressing the gaps in our education system.

I won’t speculate as to why education is low priority in the current discussion, but the facts are clear: the waning interest with addressing the challenges of K-12 education in America is harmful for communities of color. Black and Latino students are the ones hurt most by a system of public schools that aren’t working and that has a serious ripple effect on their high school graduation, college readiness, and their ability to find work in mainstream America. The marginalizing impacts of that systemic failure is evident for communities of color.

http://go.uen.org/5XX

 


 

 

Poverty Isn’t Destiny

When it comes to education, district level reforms can make a big difference in low-income settings.

U.S. News & World Report commentary by Ulrich Boser, senior fellow at the Center for American Progress

 

At least for me, it’s always hard releasing a brief or a report. There’s always something that I wish that I could have included in the final document but for whatever reason never made into the final draft.

Our recent brief titled “A Look at the Education Crisis” was not any different. Perpetual Baffour, Steph Vella and I analyzed a lot of recent federal assessment data for the document, and we argued that reform-oriented districts and states have shown some clear successes, but student achievement still lags dramatically in many areas.

The Center for American Progress released the brief last week – and it landed some nice press. But there was one bit of data analysis that didn’t make it into the document’s final pages. Specifically, we did not discuss that districts with similar rates of poverty don’t always yield similar results on the Trial Urban District Assessment exams. In fact, some districts dramatically outperform their peers.

This point is important because it suggests that when it comes to educational outcomes, poverty is far from destiny, and some districts do much better than other districts serving the same population of students.

http://go.uen.org/5XV

 

A copy of the study

http://go.uen.org/5XW (Center for American Progress)

 


 

 

Charter School Surge

Wall Street Journal commentary

 

National Alliance for Public Charter Schools Senior Director Susan Pendergrass on why states are scrambling to expand school choice.

http://go.uen.org/5Xg (video)

 


 

 

What Happens When Each State Is Renamed According to Its Education Level

attn: commentary by columnist Taylor Bell

 

Americans like to think they are #1 in everything, but when it comes to education, the U.S. quickly loses boasting rights. Math and science are particularly rough: U.S. ranks 28th in the world for those subjects. Although we may be a developed nation, when education is broken down by state, we aren’t all that different from countries that are more economically challenged.

HomeSnacks.com used information from the U.S. high school graduation rates from the U.S. Census and compared them against the education index of each country from the United Nations Development Program.

The result? A map of the U.S. with each state renamed as the country that resembles their level of education.

http://go.uen.org/5XU

 


 

 

2015 ACT National and State Scores

Students from Low-Income Families

ACT analysis

 

This report, developed in collaboration with the National Council for Community and Education Partnerships (NCCEP), is designed to help inform the following questions regarding students from low-income families:

* Are students from low-income families prepared for college and career?

* Are enough students from low-income families taking core courses?

* Are core courses rigorous enough?

* What other dimensions of college and career readiness should we track?

* Are students from low-income families who are ready for college and career actually succeeding?

http://go.uen.org/5Xh

 


 

 

West Virginia’s Steady Course on Student Data Privacy National Association of State Boards of Education analysis

 

Among the 33 states with data privacy laws on the books, West Virginia stands out as a model for ensuring that student data is protected without hampering innovative uses to help students. This NASBE State Innovation profiles the West Virginia Board of Education’s experience reviewing and adopting its data privacy policies and offers lessons for other states, and breaks down key elements of the state’s exemplary Student DATA Act.

http://go.uen.org/5Xk

 

 

 

 

 

————————————————————-

NATIONAL NEWS

————————————————————-

 

Study: Vermont schools could spend 10 percent less Burlington (VT) Free Press

 

Vermont could spend $164 million less and still provide good educational opportunities for students, according to a new study.

The research adds fodder to the debate over school spending in the Green Mountain State and could be used by school officials who want to ensure they’re getting maximum bang for their education buck.

Vermont paid national education finance analysts Picus Odden and Associates up to $288,475 for what’s known as an adequacy study, which adds up the costs of everything schools would need to meet Vermont’s education standards.

The final number came last week. Researchers believe schools need to spend $1.56 billion, or about 10 percent below what Vermont’s schools spent last academic year.

http://go.uen.org/5Xo

 

A copy of the study

http://go.uen.org/5Xp (Scribd)

 


 

 

Nation’s charter schools aren’t growing as fast as once thought (but here’s where they’re growing fastest) Washington Post

 

The National Alliance of Public Charter Schools estimates in a new report that 2.9 million children now attend U.S. charter schools, up 9 percent from the last school year.

Take that with a grain of salt: The same organization estimated a year ago that enrollment had already reached 2.9 million, a figure that turned out to be off by a couple-hundred-thousand students. So in 2015, charter school enrollment didn’t grow by 14 percent, as the National Alliance (and The Washington Post) reported, but by closer to 7 percent.

A spokeswoman attributed the mis-estimation in part to a quirk in Arizona policy that encouraged traditional schools to convert to charter schools, and that didn’t result in as many conversions as it initially appeared. The organization also changed its estimation method, going school by school to better pick up on unreasonable growth rates.

The 7 and 9 percent increases over the past two years were lower than the average 11 percent annual enrollment growth over the past eight years, according to the National Alliance.

http://go.uen.org/5Xv

 

A copy of the report

http://go.uen.org/5Xw (National Alliance of Public Charter Schools)

 


 

 

Charter school report rejected as too negative gets revamp Associated Press via Ashville (NC) Citizen-Times

 

RALEIGH – A month after Lt. Gov. Dan Forest complained an annual status report on public charter schools wasn’t sufficiently upbeat, North Carolina’s statewide school board is reviewing revisions to the report.

The required report to the Legislature, prepared by the charter school office of the state Department of Public Instruction, noted that while black and white children attend charter schools and traditional public schools in similar proportions overall, individual charter schools are more racially segmented. The State Board of Education is expected to approve the revised report on Thursday.

Charter schools operate under fewer rules than other public schools, and some parents believe they offer a better academic and social experience.

Forest, who supports charter schools and other options beyond traditional public schools, said last month he rarely heard state school officials cheering charter schools and wanted more positives highlighted in the annual report. The revised version hits the mark, he said.

“I think it’s exactly the type of thing that we need to present to the Legislature,” Forest said. “Ultimately they make decisions based on reports like that.”

Forest objected to a portion of the earlier version that cited a 2015 study by Duke University researchers who wrote that “the charter schools in North Carolina are increasingly serving the interests of relatively able white students in racially imbalanced schools.”

http://go.uen.org/5XN

 


 

 

Kansas lawmakers push bill to enable prosecution of teachers Wichita (KS) Eagle

 

Teachers and school administrators could be prosecuted for presenting material perceived as harmful to minors under a bill considered in a House committee Tuesday.

SB 56, which passed the Senate last year, stems from a 2014 controversy in the Shawnee Mission school district over a poster in a sex education classroom that listed oral sex and other acts under the heading: “How do people express their sexual feelings?”

Sen. Mary Pilcher-Cook, R-Shawnee, the bill’s sponsor, said children could have been irreparably harmed by viewing the poster “because it affects their brains.” She added that “state laws should protect parents’ rights to safeguard our children against harmful materials, especially in schools.”

Current law protects teachers and school administrators against the misdemeanor charge of presenting harmful material, a blanket term for material of a sexual nature, to minors if it is part of a lesson. The bill would remove that protection for teachers at public, private and parochial schools. Conviction on the charge could mean a fine or up to six months in jail.

Opponents say teachers would be vulnerable to prosecution for presenting controversial works of art and literature.

http://go.uen.org/5Xl

 


 

 

Ed. Dept. Kicks Off Process for Writing Every Student Succeeds Act Rules Education Week

 

Attention, teachers, principals, state chiefs, civil rights advocates, district superintendents, board members, and others who care about federal K-12 policy: The U.S. Department of Education wants your help in crafting regulations for the Every Student Succeeds Act.

Specifically, the Education Department wants nominations for a “negotiated rulemaking” committee, according to a notice slated to be published in the Federal Register Thursday.

http://go.uen.org/5Xt

 

A copy of the notice

http://go.uen.org/5Xu (Federal Register)

 


 

 

Mobile-Only Internet Access Presents Hurdles for Families, Survey Finds Education Week

 

Lower-income families in the United States have near-universal access to the Internet and some kind of digital device, but they are often at a disadvantage when it comes to the quality and consistency of their connections, especially when they are limited to mobile devices such as smartphones.

That’s among the key takeaways from “Opportunity for All? Technology and Learning in Lower-Income Families,” a research report released today by the Joan Ganz Cooney Center at Sesame Workshop, a nonprofit research organization focused on children and digital media.

“Not all connectivity is created equal, and not all devices provide the same kinds of online experiences,” the report reads. “Many families face limitations in the form of service cutoffs, slow service, older technology, or difficulty using equipment because too many people are sharing devices.”

The study, based primarily on a nationally representative phone survey of 1,191 families living below the national median household income for families with children, also found that parents are generally quite positive about the role of technology and the Internet in their children’s lives and schooling.

But nearly three-fourths of those polled still worry about exposure to inappropriate content online, and 63 percent believe the time their children spend with technology detracts from their involvement with other activities.

http://go.uen.org/5Xx

 

A copy of the report

http://go.uen.org/5Xy (Joan Ganz Cooney Center at Sesame Workshop)

 


 

 

Education chief Douglas says bill would remove many of her duties Capitol Media Services via (Tucson) Arizona Daily Star

 

PHOENIX — State schools chief Diane Douglas is lashing out at what she said is a “repulsive” plan by a Mesa Republican lawmaker she contends will strip her of many of her constitutional duties.

Douglas said Wednesday the proposal by Sen. Jeff Dial would give those duties to the state Board of Education. She said that would be a mistake as the board, most of whose members are appointed by the governor, meets only once a month.

But Douglas, who is enmeshed in two lawsuits with the board, sees a more sinister motive. She suggested this is all about those who want to preserve the Common Core standards that the board approved six years ago that she has tried repeatedly to kill.

More to the point, Douglas, a member of the board, said she campaigned on a platform of repealing Common Core.

“Having successfully faced a primary election, a general election, a pathetic recall effort and an ongoing lawsuit by the state Board of Education, I am stunned that a so-called conservative Republican would try to reverse the will of the people,” Douglas said in a prepared statement.

http://go.uen.org/5Xm

 

http://go.uen.org/5XT ([Phoenix] Arizona Republic)

 


 

 

How a Lincoln High teacher gets all his students to pass the AP Calculus exam Los Angeles Times

 

Yom, as the students call their Lincoln High calculus teacher, is at the blackboard with marker in hand.

He can’t be stopped.

Left to right he works, light on his feet, flicking out triangles, stacking towers of numbers, turning Room 754 into a gallery of cave art.

And here’s the really impressive part:

Every student is locked in. There’s no daydreaming or goofing.

Twenty-five youngsters watch and listen as a smiling Anthony Yom takes his pre-calculus class on a right-angle trigonometry thrill ride through a maze of sines and cosines, out to prove that three squared plus five squared is going to equal H squared, or the world is off its axis.

“I am done teaching,” Yom finally says before starting students on their own problem-solving missions. “You need to get to work now.”

As they dig pencils into paper, Alexis Pong, a sophomore, tells me it’s challenging work, but fun, too. And she has this to say about Yom’s way:

“He challenges us to the max, so we do better on tests.”

Yom is 35, has been teaching at Lincoln since he was 24, and still looks young enough to run for class president.

He worked in virtual obscurity, as do virtually all good teachers, until the news last week that one of his magnet students was among only 12 in the world to slay the Advanced Placement Calculus exam with a perfect score.

“It’s not just about me,” student Cedrick Argueta told The Times’ Hailey Branson-Potts after being invited to the White House by President Obama. Argueta, 17, noted that all 21 of Yom’s AP Calculus students had passed the grueling test. And that was the third year in a row that Yom’s entire class cleared that hurdle.

http://go.uen.org/5Xs

 


 

 

Denver Gets High Marks for School Choice in Brookings Report Education Week

 

Denver is the first large, traditional school system to receive an A rating from the Brookings Institution’s annual ranking of districts by levels of school choice.

The fifth annual Education Choice and Competition Index compares the country’s largest 100 school districts plus a few others of special interest, such as New Orleans’ Recovery School District.

Districts are graded and ranked based on how many types of schools they have—district, charter, magnet, virtual, and affordable private schools. They are also judged on whether there is a system to help families get into a school that’s a right fit for their children, whether there are policies to support the growth of popular schools (and shut down unpopular ones), and if there are supports to help low-income families access schools, such as money for transportation.

The ECCI only looks at school choice, it does not take into consideration the overall performance of the district. So even if a district earns an F grade for schools choice, it may still be a high-performing district in terms of student achievement.

Under those guidelines, New Orleans’ Recovery School District gets the highest ranking, but that is a small, unique state-run district made up of only charter schools.

Denver is a close second.

http://go.uen.org/5Xi

 

A copy of the report

http://go.uen.org/5Xj (Brookings)

 


 

 

Bentley proposes moving $181 million from education to General Fund Birmingham (AL) News

 

Gov. Robert Bentley today proposed taking $181 million from the Education Trust Fund to balance the state’s General Fund next year.

The Legislature would have to approve the move, and key lawmakers have said they oppose moving any more money from education to the General Fund after they resorted to that last year.

Bentley’s plan would offset the loss to the ETF next year by taking a one-time withdrawal from an education savings fund set up by the Legislature.

The governor’s plan does not address how to replace the revenues lost to the ETF in subsequent years.

http://go.uen.org/5Xn

 


 

 

Illegal Border Crossings by Families Drop Sharply New York Times

 

The number of women and children illegally crossing the southwest border into the United States dropped sharply in January, the Department of Homeland Security reported Tuesday, reversing a surge late last year that Obama administration officials feared could become a chaotic influx like the one in 2014.

A 65 percent drop from December to January in crossings by families — mostly women with their children from three violence­torn countries in Central America — came after widely publicized raids in the first days of this year in which 121 migrants were arrested for deportation http://go.uen.org/5XQ

 

A copy of the figures

http://go.uen.org/5XR (Department of Homeland Security)

 


 

 

Bills target athletic events and religious expression on uniforms Atlanta Journal Constitution

 

New legislation in the Georgia General Assembly takes aim at prohibitions on athletic competitions between public and private schools and at discrimination against religious symbols on sports uniforms — if personal expression ever is allowed on them.

Senate Bill 309 and House Bill 870 are only a few paragraphs long but cover a lot of ground. They would ban state-funded schools from participating in an athletic association that prohibits “religious expression on the clothing of student athletes.” The bills also address sporting events.

Sponsors say the legislation is aimed at the Georgia High School Association, and that the main issue is the lack of cross-competition between public and private schools. GHSA does not allow member schools to compete with non-member schools, including private schools, even in informal scrimmages.

The association also bars individual expression on uniforms, religious or otherwise.

http://go.uen.org/5XO

 


 

 

New York High School Wrestlers Break Stereotypes in Coed Division New York Times

 

At a typical high school wrestling match, boys compete on the mat while girls cheer them on in the stands alongside other fans.

But things were different at a New York City public high school match on Tuesday night, as the Bronx High School of Science took on the Seward Park Educational Campus, whose wrestlers had traveled to the Bronx by subway from the Lower East Side of Manhattan.

The wrestlers’ benches were crowded with boys and girls warming up and cheering on one another as competitors of both sexes took the mat to compete, making it hard to tell initially whether these were boys’ or girls’ teams.

In fact, they were both.

It was a playoff match for a new coed wrestling division of the city’s Public Schools Athletic League, in which boys and girls are part of the same teams, practicing together and competing in matches. Individual bouts are same­sex — boys wrestle boys and girls wrestle girls — but the matches contribute to a team’s overall score.

http://go.uen.org/5XS

 


 

 

To Prevent Teen Dating Violence, Some States Push Education Stateline

 

At a school in poverty-stricken East Oakland, California, Emilio Ortega asks the teenage boys he counsels how it would feel to see their mother, or sister, abused by a husband or boyfriend.

He knows they see people they admire on TV, in rap songs, and sometimes even at home channel their anger into aggression. Some of the boys, he said, have come to think that hitting or verbally abusing a romantic partner is normal — even funny.

“They don’t understand that it’s not funny, that it’s not real life,” said Ortega, who runs supportive programs at the K-10th grade Madison Park Business & Art Academy.

In middle and high schools across the country, counselors and teachers like Ortega are quickly becoming the front line of defense for state officials looking to prevent teen dating violence, and the cycle of violence that follows.

Research shows that teenagers who experience violence — either as victims or as abusers — are more likely to be involved in it later in their lives, which leads to more people in hospitals, behind bars and receiving welfare. States hope that investing in education programs now will help prevent those negative, and expensive, outcomes down the road.

http://go.uen.org/5XP

 


 

 

Parents’ depression may affect kids’ school performance Reuters

 

Children perform worse in school when their parents are diagnosed with depression, suggests a study from Sweden.

The study found a significant negative link between parents’ depression and kids’ school performance, said senior author Brian Lee, of the Drexel University School of Public Health in Philadelphia.

“We obviously know that depression is a bad thing like any other mental health outcome,” Lee said. “It’s less recognized that mental health outcomes affect other people than the people themselves. So for parents or guardians, a vulnerable population would be their children.”

Previous studies found children with depressed parents are more likely to have problems with brain development, behavior and emotions, along with other psychiatric problems, Lee and his colleagues write in JAMA Psychiatry. Few studies have looked at school performance, however.

http://go.uen.org/5Xq

 

A copy of the study

http://go.uen.org/5Xr (JAMA Psychiatry $)

 

 

 

 

 

————————————————————

CALENDAR

————————————————————

 

USOE Calendar

http://www.schools.utah.gov/main/CALENDAR.aspx

 

 

UEN News

http://www.uen.org

 

 

February 4:

Senate Education Committee meeting

2 p.m., 210 Senate Building

http://le.utah.gov/~2016/agenda/SEDU0204.ag.htm

 

House Government Operations Committee meeting

2 p.m., 30 House Building

http://le.utah.gov/~2016/agenda/HGOC0204.ag.htm

 

House Revenue and Taxation Committee meeting

2 p.m., 445 State Capitol

http://le.utah.gov/~2016/agenda/HREV0204.ag.htm

 

House Education Committee meeting

4 p.m., 30 House Building

http://le.utah.gov/~2016/agenda/HEDU0204.ag.htm

 

House Business and Labor Committee meeting

4 p.m., 445 State Capitol

http://le.utah.gov/~2016/agenda/HBUS0204.ag.htm

 

Utah State Board of Education study session and committee meetings

5 p.m., 250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspx

 

Executive Appropriations Committee meeting

6:10 p.m., 445 State Capitol

http://le.utah.gov/Interim/2016/html/00001000.htm

 

 

February 5:

Utah State Board of Education meeting

8 a.m., 250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspx

 

Public Education Appropriation Subcommittee meeting

8 a.m., 445 State Capitol

http://le.utah.gov/Interim/2016/html/00001042.htm

 

Executive Appropriations Committee meeting

12:20 p.m., 445 State Capitol

http://le.utah.gov/Interim/2016/html/00001051.htm

 

Senate Education Committee meeting

2 p.m., 210 Senate Building

http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?Year=2016&Com=SSTEDU

 

 

February 11:

Utah State Charter School Board meeting

9 a.m., 250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://go.uen.org/1pn

Related posts:

Comments are closed.