Education News Roundup: Feb. 5, 2016

Charter School Day at the Capitol/Education News Roundup
Charter School Day at the Capitol/Education News Roundup

Education News Roundup

Today’s Top Picks:

 

State revenue picture not as rosy as it once was.

http://go.uen.org/5Yb (DN)

 

Senate OKs more funding for charter schools.

http://go.uen.org/5Yc (SLT)

 

Senate committee OKs more funding for pre-K.

http://go.uen.org/5Ye (SLT)

and http://go.uen.org/5Yn (DN)

 

Kent, CT, considers arming teachers.

http://go.uen.org/5Yf (AP)

 

Okay, Okla., schools post signs saying “Please be aware that certain staff members at Okay Public Schools can be legally armed and may use whatever force is necessary to protect our students.”

http://go.uen.org/5YG (CSM)

and http://go.uen.org/5YM (Fox)

 

 

 

 

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TODAY’S HEADLINES

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UTAH

 

State revenues may fall short of projections, lawmakers warned

 

Senate gives early approval to funding bump for Utah charter schools

 

Senate committee OKs $11M expansion of public preschool in Utah

 

Utah Constitutional amendment could triple school trust payments, benefiting students

 

‘Young lungs matter’: Students march to Capitol to battle pollution ‘monster’

 

Charter school students get a lesson in politics

 

Provo student surprised as winner of Doodle 4 Google competition in Utah

 

ICSD will not have to make up snow day

 

Former BYU star Vai Sikahema urges education, honors family and heritage at Polynesian Football Hall of Fame ceremony

 

Pigs for 4-H, FFA purposes receive strong support from Wellsville

 

Fashion show will help fund STEM camp for area girls

 

1-word program unifies northern Utah high school

 

Inside our schools

 


 

 

OPINION & COMMENTARY

 

Utah’s current sex-ed rules made by people who were never teenagers

 

Not everyone needs quadratic equations

 

Jeb Bush and Education: Five Facts to Know Before the New Hampshire Primary

 

Fighting “corporate control of education”: A millennial education wonk goes to war against neoliberal reform Refuting reformers is not enough. The left must also offer an alternative, activist/author Nikhil Goyal tells Salon

 

What Are Students Learning on the Football Field?

 

Overparenting and homework: The student’s task, but everyone’s responsibility

 


 

 

NATION

 

Conn. Governor Critical of Town Considering Arming Teachers

 

Rural Oklahoma school posts warning of armed staff The Okay, Okla., district put up signs on campus this week alerting visitors that school employees can be armed and ‘may use whatever force is necessary to protect our students.’ Do such policies promote a sense of security or unease?

 

Jindal Lawsuit Against Common Core Scrapped by New Governor

 

Thousands rally downtown for Chicago Teachers Union

 

Enrollment plunges at UNC teacher prep programs The trend may be accelerating teacher shortages in North Carolina

 

Computer Science Education Groups Looking for Feedback on Draft Framework

 

Arizona’s public students could get state money for private schools The program would allow parents to take the tax money destined for public schools and direct it to private schools

 

Virginia teen’s murder feeds parents’ social media fears. How to respond The murder of teenager Nicole Madison Lovell raises many parents’ worries about teen safety online. But some experts say social media can actually help kids develop the self-control that protects them.

 

Why School Location Matters

Many students who wish they could attend college don’t have workable options close to home.

 

Why some US districts are adding Muslim holidays to the school calendar Maryland’s Howard County will soon keep schools closed in observance of the Muslim holiday Eid al-Adha.

 

Help Wanted: Jobs Aplenty at Stores, Restaurants, Hospitals

 

 

 

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UTAH NEWS

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State revenues may fall short of projections, lawmakers warned

 

SALT LAKE CITY — Tax revenues may be falling short of projections, leaving less money to spend this session, members of the House GOP caucus were warned Thursday.

“There is a hell of a lot less money than we think there is. So whatever you think you’re going to get, you’re not,” House Majority Assistant Whip Brad Wilson, R-Kaysville, announced.

While the latest budget projections won’t be ready until Feb. 19, they may well be below the estimates agreed to by legislative leaders and Gov. Gary Herbert late last year, House Budget Chairman Dean Sanpei, R-Provo, said.

http://go.uen.org/5Yb (DN)

 


 

 

Senate gives early approval to funding bump for Utah charter schools

 

A bill to expand the pool of funds that school districts share with charter schools received preliminary approval from the Utah Senate on Thursday.

Sponsored by Draper Republican Sen. Howard Stephenson, the fully implemented bill would increase state funding for charters by roughly $40 million.

School districts would also see a corresponding increase in the local property tax revenue they are required to divert to the alternative schools.

Stephenson sponsored the proposal on behalf of the Charter School Funding Task Force, which met through the summer and fall to review the funding formulas for the state’s public education system.

While state per-pupil expenses are relatively equal, independent of the type of school, Stephenson said a disparity in property tax distribution translates to charter students being underfunded by roughly $1,400.

http://go.uen.org/5Yc (SLT)

 


 

 

Senate committee OKs $11M expansion of public preschool in Utah

 

Between 3,000 and 4,000 Utah children would have access to public preschool and early education programs if a bill approved unanimously by a Senate committee on Thursday becomes law.

The bill, SB101, would direct $11.5 million to expand public home-based and school preschool programs, as well as create an intergenerational poverty scholarship program to help low-income families enroll with private providers.

“We would like to see lots of different models tried out so we can find the best models,” said Ogden Republican Sen. Ann Millner, the bill’s sponsor.

Millner said there are roughly 4,400 preschool-age children affected by intergenerational poverty in the state, with an estimated 25,000 more at risk to enter kindergarten unprepared.

She said achieving grade-level literacy in elementary school is crucial; students who fall behind their peers are unlikely to catch up or excel in later grades.

http://go.uen.org/5Ye (SLT)

 

http://go.uen.org/5Yn (DN)

 


 

 

Utah Constitutional amendment could triple school trust payments, benefiting students

 

  1. GEORGE — School districts could receive three times more revenue from State Trust Lands within the next few years if a proposed constitutional amendment and bill are passed by the Utah Legislature and receive voter approval.

The proposed amendment to the Utah Constitution would increase and stabilize funds distributed to Utah schools from the permanent State School Fund.

“It would mean more money for schools, and it is a good policy shift,” Tim Donaldson, director of the School Children’s Trust Office for the Utah State Board of Education, said.

http://go.uen.org/5Yu (SGN)

 

 


 

‘Young lungs matter’: Students march to Capitol to battle pollution ‘monster’

 

SALT LAKE CITY — “Pollution is like a monster,” fifth-grader Elliott Mumm boldly declared to roughly 1,000 students gathered in the Capitol rotunda Thursday for a clean air rally.

The Madeleine Choir School student continued his speech by spouting off statistics and small suggestions for change. He concluded with a fist pump and a “woot,” and then walked back to sit among the 19 other fifth-grade student speakers.

http://go.uen.org/5Ym (DN)

 

http://go.uen.org/5Yv (BYU Universe)

 

http://go.uen.org/5Yx (KTVX)

 

http://go.uen.org/5Yy (KUER)

 


 

 

Charter school students get a lesson in politics

 

Legacy Preparatory Academy students Britain Barker, left, Emily Myrup and Paige Bishop laugh as their teacher photographs them at the Capitol in Salt Lake City on Wednesday. Charter school students and Utah legislative leaders gathered in the rotunda to celebrate school choice and discuss legislation pertinent to Utah’s charter schools.

http://go.uen.org/5Yo (DN)

 

http://go.uen.org/5Yw (KUTV)

 


 

 

Provo student surprised as winner of Doodle 4 Google competition in Utah

 

Seventh grader Kalo Jo didn’t have the best start to his Thursday. That morning, he told his principal he he had gotten up late, and Buddy Ivie gave him a few reassuring words.

“I said, ‘Don’t worry, your day is going to be amazing,’” he said. “That’s all I said to him. He didn’t believe me until now.”

Jo stayed sheepish as his classmates applauded, some giving standing ovations, as he was announced as Utah’s Doodle 4 Google contest winner during a surprise assembly Thursday afternoon at Freedom Preparatory Academy’s secondary campus. For the competition, students across the country designed a Google logo following the prompt, “What makes me…me.” The national winner’s doodle will be featured on the Google homepage for a day.

http://go.uen.org/5Yp (PDH)

 


 

 

ICSD will not have to make up snow day

 

Iron County School District students will not have to make up Monday’s snow day.

The acting state Superintendent Sydnee Dickson informed ICSD Superintendent Shannon Dulaney Wednesday that the district would not have to make up the missed day.

“I sent the plan to the state office with a couple of options the school board had come up with on how to make up the day,” Dulaney said. “She (Dickson) just replied that she could approve one day without us having to make it up. She is exempting us from needing to have to add an extra day of school to make up for Monday.”

http://go.uen.org/5Ys (SGS)

 


 

 

Former BYU star Vai Sikahema urges education, honors family and heritage at Polynesian Football Hall of Fame ceremony

 

LAIE, Hawaii — The first Tongan to play in the National Football League — who was enshrined in the Polynesian Football Hall of Fame at the Polynesian Cultural Center on Jan. 30 — told fans that education is the goal young athletes should chase.

“If you didn’t figure out how important education is to them,” said Vai Sikahema, referring to the acceptance remarks of several other PFHOF Class of 2016 inductees before a sold-out crowd in the PCC’s Hawaiian Journey Theater, “then you missed the entire purpose for this event. I think you heard from them that education is vital to our people.

“The real key is not football. Football is the vehicle. I’ve always told kids, make football work for you, don’t work for it,” added Sikahema, who said he and some of the others “were able to leave football on our terms, because we had an education.”

http://go.uen.org/5YL (DN)

 


 

 

Pigs for 4-H, FFA purposes receive strong support from Wellsville

 

WELLSVILLE — In strong support of families that want to temporarily raise pigs in the city, the Wellsville City Council plans to write a resolution defining the rules and requirements associated with caring for pigs.

http://go.uen.org/5Yr (LHJ)

 


 

 

Fashion show will help fund STEM camp for area girls

 

ST GEORGE, Utah – A fashion show sponsored by the St. George Branch of AAUW will be held at The Ledges Fish Rock Grille on March 5 to help up to 80 eighth-grade area girls attend the “7th annual eSMART Camp that focuses on strengthening interest and skills in science, technology, engineering and math.

Clothes and accessories modeled by members and volunteers during the luncheon that starts at 11:30 am will be provided by Dillards and The Ledges Pro Shop. The program also includes silent and live auctions of items donated from AAUW members, local area businesses, and supporters of eSMART camp.

http://go.uen.org/5YN (KCSG)

 


 

 

1-word program unifies northern Utah high school

 

PROVO, Utah— Lone Peak High School in Highland recently launched a program to motivate and unify its student body. Using the hashtag, #lonepeakoneword, LPHS students, staff and faculty posted their one word to Instagram for the last two weeks in January.

The theme at LPHS this year is “Become One,” and the idea for the recent launch of the Lone Peak One Word program came from Camie Smith, president of the Lone Peak Parent Teacher Student Association (PTSA). To support the school’s theme, Smith browsed the internet. She found the idea of using just one word as a goal and knew it would fit well with the LPHS theme.

http://go.uen.org/5Yq (PDH)

 


 

 

Inside our schools

 

Gateway Preparatory Academy

Arrowhead Elementary

Utah Online School K-8

Millcreek High

Tuacahn High

Utah Online High

Heritage Elementary

Valley Academy Charter

Diamond Valley Elementary

Lava Ridge Intermediate

http://go.uen.org/5Yt (SGS)

 

 

 

 

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OPINION & COMMENTARY

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Utah’s current sex-ed rules made by people who were never teenagers Salt Lake Tribune editorial

 

Decisions on how Utah public schools should teach healthy human sexuality to teenagers should not be made by people who were never teenagers themselves.

That’s the only explanation, implausible as it might seem, for those who continue to pepper the Legislature with arguments that real sex ed would amount to giving young people permission to engage in premature, unwise and potentially harmful sexual activity.

The evolutionary electro-chemical make-up of healthy young people isn’t just telling them that sex is OK. It is telling them that it is mandatory. Luckily, there are enough counterweights offered by families, morals, shyness, fear, acne and good taste to reduce premature sexual behavior.

Real, comprehensive sex education, complete with factual information about contraception, would be another valuable tool in that kit. Sadly, Utah schools cannot offer that because state law insists on a thoroughly disproven (Bristol Palin) approach called abstinence-only.

The Legislature has before it a bill from Rep. Brian King, D-Salt Lake City, that would put real sex education — on an opt-in basis — in the public schools. It is needed, he said, because even though the state’s abortion rate is low, the number of cases of sexually transmitted diseases is increasing.

And even if it weren’t, offering young people the real facts about such an important part of being human is the least we can do.

http://go.uen.org/5Yd

 


 

 

Not everyone needs quadratic equations

Salt Lake Tribune letter from Sam Fenwick

 

As a current high school student, I think it is safe to say that our school and education system are not on par with other countries because we aren’t learning useful skills.

Many high school students, including myself, have no idea how to pay taxes or what a mortgage is, but, never fear, our school will teach quadratic equations.

By high school, and for some even by middle school age, kids have an idea for what field of work they would like to go into. So instead of going over classes for next year and what is required, why don’t we change the system so the kids take classes useful to their future jobs.

http://go.uen.org/5Yl

 


 

 

Jeb Bush and Education: Five Facts to Know Before the New Hampshire Primary Education Week commentary by columnist Alyson Klein

 

A year ago, many folks were betting former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush would be the frontrunner for the Republican presidential nomination at this point in the race. That probably would have put education front-and-center as a campaign issue—Bush has one of the longest records on K-12 of any politician in the country, never mind the GOP field.

He’s helped set the national K-12 agenda—and generated plenty of controversy in the process.

But the race hasn’t turned out the way many expected. In fact, it’s unlikely Bush will even finish in second place in the New Hampshire primary next Tuesday. Still, his poll numbers are within striking distance of those of fellow GOP candidate Ohio Gov. John Kasich, who we profiled earlier. So, we couldn’t resist giving you some Jeb highlights, if only because of his outsized profile on the isssue— there’s so much territory to mine.

Here we go:

http://go.uen.org/5YF

 


 

 

Fighting “corporate control of education”: A millennial education wonk goes to war against neoliberal reform Refuting reformers is not enough. The left must also offer an alternative, activist/author Nikhil Goyal tells Salon Salon.com commentary by columnist ELIAS ISQUITH

 

When it comes to the world of elite education reform — the land dominated by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, the Broad Foundation; your Arne Duncans and Michelle Rhees — there is no shortage of young and optimistic millennials, eager to explain why the brave new future of standardized testing, pay-for-performance, “grit” and Common Core will help public (and pseudo-public) education fix many of our society and economy’s ills. They’re often called thinkfluencers, or something equivalently silly; and the scene is lousy with ’em.

Nikhil Goyal, a young education activist and author, comes from an entirely different angle — which is why his upcoming book, “Schools on Trial: How Freedom and Creativity Can Fix Our Educational Malpractice,” which will be released on Feb. 16, makes for bracing reading. In the book, Goyal rejects some of the most foundational aspects of not only the reform movement, but the public education system that preceded it. And he argues that “progressive education” is not only a better alternative in the abstract, but a better match for the 21st century economy.

Recently, Salon spoke over the phone with Goyal about his book, as well as his views on how education policy factors into the 2016 presidential campaign. Our conversation can be found below and has been edited for clarity and length.

http://go.uen.org/5YK

 


 

 

What Are Students Learning on the Football Field?

Education Week op-ed by John R. Gerdy, author of Ball or Bands: Football vs. Music as an Educational and Community Investment

 

There has been much discussion around an incident last fall in Texas in which two high school football players targeted and deliberately blindsided a referee. But much more significant is that the players’ secondary coach encouraged them to do it.

This incident has drawn attention not only to the lessons being taught to young people through football, but also to who is teaching those lessons.

Recently, football has been embroiled in a number of other controversies surrounding the sport’s inherent violence, risk of brain injury, and distraction from academics. An NFL-funded report in 2013, carried out by the Institute of Medicine, found that high school football players suffered 11.2 concussions for every 10,000 games and practices, nearly twice as many as college football players. Despite these deterrents, many young adults still participate in interscholastic football, during which, many educators argue, they learn valuable life lessons in discipline, teamwork, and personal responsibility.

http://go.uen.org/5YB

 


 

 

Overparenting and homework: The student’s task, but everyone’s responsibility Australian Journal of Psychologists and Counsellors in Schools analysis by Judith Y. Locke, David J. Kavanagh, and Marilyn A. Campbell

 

A high level of parental involvement is widely considered to be essential for optimal child and adolescent development and wellbeing, including academic success. However, recent consideration has been given to the idea that extremely high levels of parental involvement (often called ‘overparenting’ or ‘helicopter parenting’) might not be beneficial. This study used a newly created overparenting measure, the Locke Parenting Scale (LPS), to investigate the association of overparenting and children’s homework. Eight hundred and sixty-six parents completed online questionnaires about their parenting beliefs and intentions, and their attitudes associated with their child’s homework. Parents with higher LPS scores tended to take more personal responsibility for the completion of their child’s homework than did other parents, and ascribed greater responsibility for homework completion to their child’s teacher. However, increased perceived responsibility by parents and teachers was not accompanied by a commensurate reduction in what they perceived was the child’s responsibility. Future research should examine whether extreme parental attitudes and reported behaviours translate to validated changes in actual homework support.

http://go.uen.org/5YE

 

 

 

 

 

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NATIONAL NEWS

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Conn. Governor Critical of Town Considering Arming Teachers Associated Press

 

KENT, Conn. — A Connecticut town is considering a program that trains teachers to use guns in the event of an active shooter, and Gov. Dannel P. Malloy has come down hard on the idea.

Kent selectmen voted 2-1 on Wednesday to present information about the “FASTER Saves Lives” program to the Board of Education. The board will ultimately decide whether to implement the program at the pre-K through eighth-grade Kent Center School.

The nonprofit Faculty/Administrator Safety Training and Emergency Response program would provide trauma kits and firearms training to school personnel in the event of a hostile act or intrusion.

http://go.uen.org/5Yf

 


 

 

Rural Oklahoma school posts warning of armed staff The Okay, Okla., district put up signs on campus this week alerting visitors that school employees can be armed and ‘may use whatever force is necessary to protect our students.’ Do such policies promote a sense of security or unease?

Christian Science Monitor

 

A rural school district in Oklahoma put up signs this week alerting visitors that some staff members have access to guns, in what it says is an effort aimed at deterring school violence.

Schools in Okay, Okla., about 48 miles southeast of Tulsa put up signs that read, “Please be aware that certain staff members at Okay Public Schools can be legally armed and may use whatever force is necessary to protect our students,” the Tulsa World reports.

The signs follow up on a gun policy in the district’s schools – which serve 420 students – approved by the school board in August that says staff members may bring a gun to campus concealed on their person or kept in a locked box.

“Having a sign in your front yard saying ‘this is a gun-free zone’ just tells the idiots, “Come on in,” because we can’t defend ourselves,” Superintendent Charles McMahan told the World on Wednesday.

“[Okay’s] sign might be enough to send somebody down the road looking for some other soft target. If that’s what it does, it’s helping our school district out,” he added.

http://go.uen.org/5YG

 

http://go.uen.org/5YM (Fox)

 


 

 

Jindal Lawsuit Against Common Core Scrapped by New Governor Associated Press

 

BATON ROUGE, La. — Gov. John Bel Edwards announced Thursday that he is ending Louisiana’s lawsuit against President Barack Obama’s administration over the Common Core education standards.

Edwards’ predecessor, Republican Bobby Jindal, filed the federal lawsuit in 2014, as he was readying his failed bid for the GOP presidential nomination and as the multistate math and English standards drew increasing ire from conservatives.

Jindal lost the first round of the litigation. Edwards’ office said the Democratic governor won’t continue with an appeal, instead directing his executive counsel to drop the lawsuit and scrap the contract for the outside lawyer handling the case.

http://go.uen.org/5Yg

 


 

 

Thousands rally downtown for Chicago Teachers Union Chicago Tribune

 

Throngs of protesters organized by the Chicago Teachers Union clogged Loop streets during Thursday’s evening rush hour to voice opposition to the district’s move to slash budgets and stop paying much of teachers’ pension contributions.

The show of force by the union’s rank and file comes three days after a 40-person bargaining team unanimously voted down a four-year contract offer from Chicago Public Schools.

Christa Lohman, a member of the CTU’s “Big Bargaining Team,” said the district’s offer was vague and included language teachers thought was aimed at forcing them into accepting a deal.

“No economic layoffs sounds fabulous,” Lohman said during a march to City Hall as news helicopters hovered overhead. “But we’ve been around awhile. After 15 years, you start to think that never happens.”

As protesters surrounded Bank of America’s local headquarters and blocked traffic, CTU Vice President Jesse Sharkey said the bargaining team’s rejection of the city’s offer was “a sign we have a serious democratic process.”

http://go.uen.org/5Yh

 

http://go.uen.org/5YA (Ed Week)

 

http://go.uen.org/5YI ([Chicago] WTTW)

 


 

 

Enrollment plunges at UNC teacher prep programs The trend may be accelerating teacher shortages in North Carolina Charlotte News & Observer

 

Enrollment at the 15 UNC schools of education has plummeted 30 percent since 2010, a worry for a state where those programs are the biggest source of classroom teachers.

Fewer graduates from schools of education means local districts’ problems finding teachers will continue. Hiring math, science and special education teachers has been a challenge for years in some districts, but superintendents say this was the first year that some of them had trouble hiring elementary school teachers.

“The challenge in hiring teachers is going to increase,” Alisa Chapman, UNC system vice president for academic and university programs, told the State Board of Education on Wednesday. Getting specialty teachers into rural areas and hard-to-staff schools “will be even more challenging,” she said.

The decline in participation in teacher preparation programs mirrors drops in other states. And some of the other states where enrollments have fallen are places where North Carolina also finds teachers, Chapman said.

http://go.uen.org/5Yi

 


 

 

Computer Science Education Groups Looking for Feedback on Draft Framework Education Week

 

Several of the big K-12 computer science education groups have put out a draft “framework” for what should be taught in the subject, and they’re now looking for feedback from the public.

“The framework will provide guidance to states or districts to design their own standards, curriculum, assessments, or teacher preparation programs,” says the document, which was developed by Code.org, the Computer Science Teachers Association, and the Association for Computing Machinery, along with a group of advisors. “This effort is not about developing standards: Other organizations (CSTA/states/districts) will do that using this framework to inform their work.”

The first part of the draft, released yesterday, includes just the 9th through 12th grade concepts and practices. Reviewers have until Feb. 17 to fill out the feedback form. The groups will release the entire draft framework, for grades K-12, on March 14 and those reviews are due April 1.

http://go.uen.org/5YD

 

A copy of the draft framework

http://go.uen.org/5YC (Computer Science Teachers Association)

 


 

 

Arizona’s public students could get state money for private schools The program would allow parents to take the tax money destined for public schools and direct it to private schools

(Phoenix) Arizona Republic

 

Every Arizona public-school student could get state money to attend private schools by 2020 under a vast expansion of a school-voucher program lawmakers are attempting to fast-track.

The legislation would phase in expansion of the Empowerment Scholarship Account program, which currently serves about 2,200 schoolchildren, to allow within a few years all of the state’s 1.1 million public schoolchildren to qualify.

House Appropriations Chairman Justin Olson, R-Mesa, and other supporters say the expansion would allow more parents to tailor school choices to their children’s needs. But critics argue the program is already siphoning desperately needed funds from public schools and could decimate them if it’s expanded. The program would allow parents to take the tax money that would otherwise go to their area public schools and direct it to private schools, homeschooling, therapies or college savings.

http://go.uen.org/5Yj

 


 

 

Virginia teen’s murder feeds parents’ social media fears. How to respond The murder of teenager Nicole Madison Lovell raises many parents’ worries about teen safety online. But some experts say social media can actually help kids develop the self-control that protects them.

Christian Science Monitor

 

The murder of Nicole Madison Lovell, a 13 year-old girl from Blacksburg, Va., who police say connected with her alleged killer through social media, has triggered a storm of parental nightmares about cyberbullying, online predators, and a constantly-changing landscape of date-and-rate sites where kids seek affirmation not from friends and family, but strangers.

In their rush to shut down teens’ access to sites and services such as Facebook, Instagram, and Kik, however, some say well-meaning parents are blaming the messenger. Kids’ social media obsession may be relatively new, but their adolescent needs aren’t, say experts. And the keys to teen safety aren’t simply found in parental rules and site blockers.

http://go.uen.org/5Yk

 


 

 

Why School Location Matters

Many students who wish they could attend college don’t have workable options close to home.

Atlantic

 

The conversation about how to make college more accessible is not new, but a critical piece of the debate has been largely ignored.

The geography of where schools are located and the impact of so-called education deserts on students is the topic of a new paper by a pair of researchers from the University of Wisconsin at Madison.

“If higher education is to better serve students and expand educational opportunities,” the paper asserts, “then stakeholders must prioritize the importance of place and understand how it shapes college options.”

First-generation and low-income college students are disproportionately likely to attend schools close to home. Increasing numbers of college students are also parents and breadwinners, too, with community ties and jobs that are difficult to uproot. So even when these students are informed about schools far away that might be a good fit, or given scholarships to attend, many, for a variety of reasons both financial and cultural, choose to stay local.

And that can seriously limit their access to college.

http://go.uen.org/5YJ

 


 

 

Why some US districts are adding Muslim holidays to the school calendar Maryland’s Howard County will soon keep schools closed in observance of the Muslim holiday Eid al-Adha.

Christian Science Monitor

 

An affluent school district in suburban Maryland has become the latest district to recognize Muslim holidays on its calendar, a move that reflects a growing push for greater inclusiveness in schools across the United States.

Howard County, which is home to many of the wealthiest communities in the Baltimore-Washington metropolitan area, announced Thursday that it would expand its list of religious and cultural holidays.

The announcement followed a unanimous vote Thursday night by the Howard County Board of Education to give students days off on the Muslim holiday of Eid al-Adha, the eve of the Lunar New Year, and the Hindu holiday of Diwali, in addition to two Jewish holy days.

The decision comes after objections to a proposal to keep schools open on the Jewish holy days of Yom Kippur and Rosh Hashana for the first time in more than three decades. Maryland law already requires schools to be closed on days that include the Christian holidays of Christmas, Good Friday, and Easter Monday.

http://go.uen.org/5YH

 


 

 

Help Wanted: Jobs Aplenty at Stores, Restaurants, Hospitals Associated Press

 

WASHINGTON – The best places to look for work last month? Retail, restaurants and health care.

Those sectors alone accounted for more than 140,000 added jobs, helping offset losses in such areas as mining, education and transportation.

U.S. retailers added nearly 58,000 jobs in January. Stores selling clothing, furniture and electronics ramped up hiring. So did dealers selling cars and auto parts.

Restaurants and bars continued their hiring spree. Americans appear to be using some of the extra money they have from lower gas prices to eat out. The hiring momentum also remained strong at hospitals, physicians’ offices and home health services.

Manufacturers added a solid 29,000 workers, even though a strong dollar and a fragile global economy are squeezing exports of U.S. goods.

Other sectors didn’t fare so well. Education services shed 38,500 workers.

http://go.uen.org/5Yz

 

 

 

 

 

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CALENDAR

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USOE Calendar

http://www.schools.utah.gov/main/CALENDAR.aspx

 

 

UEN News

http://www.uen.org

 

 

February 5:

Social Services Appropriations Subcommittee meeting

7:59 a.m., 30 House Building

http://le.utah.gov/Interim/2016/html/00000699.htm

 

Utah State Board of Education meeting

8 a.m., 250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspx

 

Public Education Appropriation Subcommittee meeting

8 a.m., 445 State Capitol

http://le.utah.gov/Interim/2016/html/00001042.htm

 

Executive Appropriations Committee meeting

12:20 p.m., 445 State Capitol

http://le.utah.gov/Interim/2016/html/00001051.htm

 

Senate Revenue and Taxation Committee meeting

2 p.m., 250 Senate Building

http://le.utah.gov/~2016/agenda/SREV0205.ag.htm

 

 

February 8:

House Retirement and Independent Entities Committee meeting

7:59 a.m., 20 House Building

http://le.utah.gov/~2016/agenda/HRIE0208.ag.htm

 

House Education Committee meeting

3:40 p.m., 30 House Building

http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2016&com=HSTEDU

 

February 11:

Utah State Charter School Board meeting

9 a.m., 250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://go.uen.org/1pn

 

Utah State Board of Education legislative meeting

Noon, 210 Senate Building

http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspx

 

 

March 17:

Utah State Board of Education study session and committee meetings

250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspx