Education News Roundup: Feb. 11, 2016

Scholar Academy Choir/Education News Roundup

Scholar Academy Choir/Education News Roundup

Education News Roundup

Today’s Top Picks:

 

Sen. Escamilla’s bill on after-school programs advances.

http://go.uen.org/620 (DN)

 

Is a primary election in the future for the Utah State Board of Education?

http://go.uen.org/61Z (SLT)

 

The economy ekes out education as the top issue for Utahns in latest poll.

http://go.uen.org/61X (UP)

 

Rapid City, SD, school board interviews former Canyons Supt. Doty.

http://go.uen.org/62z (Rapid City [SD] Journal) and http://go.uen.org/62E ([Rapid City, SD] KEVN) or sidebar: What happens next?

http://go.uen.org/62D (Rapid City [SD] Journal)

 

Nolan Karras & Richard Kendell discuss a tax increase for education.

http://go.uen.org/628 (DN)

 

L.A. teachers agree to a dues hike.

http://go.uen.org/623 (LAT)

 

 

 

 

————————————————————

TODAY’S HEADLINES

————————————————————

 

 

UTAH

 

After-school programs a ‘comprehensive’ way to help kids, lawmakers say

 

Bill creating a primary election for state school board heads to the House

 

Utah bill proposes online courses for parents who exempt kids from vaccinations

 

Utah Bill Would Raise Salaries for Teachers of Native Students

 

Bill to teach students to avoid picking up guns advances

 

Poll: What Issues are Most Important to Utahns?

 

Education first proposes tax increase to fund schools

 

High school students weigh in on Utah’s bad air

 

Holocaust survivor asks Utah County residents to promise, “Never Again”

 

Rapid City School Superintendent candidate confronts controversial legacy

 

Utah education business and operations official takes federal job

 

Low vaccination rates put Utah schools at risk of outbreaks

 

Teens get hands-on understanding of police use of force

 

Cheerleading coach remembers deceased missionary Sadie Wells as fun, uplifting

 

International exchange students present at St. George Children’s Museum

 

Utah student artists to exhibit work at Utah Capitol

 

Moody’s assigns Aa3 to Wasatch County School District, UT’s GO bonds; Aaa enhanced also assigned

 


 

 

OPINION & COMMENTARY

 

Utah teacher shortage reflects lack of respect

 

Many stakeholders working together to achieve success

 

Taxes, surplus and the Utah Legislature

 

For teachers’ sake, voters must take responsibility for legislators

 

Expel civics test from Utah schools

 

Idahoans ready for change in education

 

Evaluating the Content and Quality of Next Generation Assessments

 


 

 

NATION

 

L.A. teachers union wins dues increase, vows to battle foes of traditional public education

 

Testing “opt-out” movement forces two separate grades on state report cards

 

Education advocates urge N.J. not to base graduation standards on controversial test

 

ICE agents won’t be going onto Los Angeles public school campuses

 

Kansas Supreme Court Invalidates School Funding Law

 

How the Department of Defense schools are teaching their version of Common Core math “New math” taking hold for students on U.S. military installations

 

Dulce girls basketball team forced to take down traditional Navajo buns; NMAA says refs were wrong

 

Ellen DeGeneres plans $500K in gifts for Detroit school

 

Hundreds of schools attacked, destroyed in Ukraine war: rights activists

 

 

 

————————————————————

UTAH NEWS

————————————————————

 

After-school programs a ‘comprehensive’ way to help kids, lawmakers say

 

SALT LAKE CITY — A Utah senator is hoping to improve academic achievement for some of Utah’s most at-risk students by increasing funding for after-school programs.

Sen. Luz Escamilla, D-Salt Lake City, said it’s a “comprehensive” way of teaching and meeting the needs of children, many of whom spend the hours after school by themselves while their parents work.

“I’m running this bill because it is an issue in my district,” she said. “Those children are having issues of graduation rates and assessment scores.”

SB125 would provide an ongoing appropriation of $500,000 from the education fund to create after-school programs in areas where school attendance, graduation rates or student test scores are suffering. The bill also directs education leaders to establish standards that characterize high-quality after-school programs.

The Senate Education Committee unanimously endorsed the proposal Wednesday.

http://go.uen.org/620 (DN)

 


 

 

Bill creating a primary election for state school board heads to the House

 

A House committee on Wednesday voted unanimously in favor of a bill creating a primary election for state school board candidates.

West Valley Republican Rep. Craig Hall, the bill’s sponsor, said a primary election is necessary to narrow the candidate pool, which included 70 candidates — 18 of those for a single seat — during the most recent board elections in 2014.

Because a primary is not currently part of state code, Hall said, “We could possibly have someone win the general election in November with 10 percent of the vote or less.”

Hall said his bill is intended as a temporary solution for this year’s state school board election while lawmakers debate a long-term replacement for the election method deemed unconstitutional in 2014.

In the past, candidates were screened by a nominating committee, which forwarded names to the governor for final placement on the ballot.

But in 2014, a U.S. District Court Judge deemed that the “unfettered discretion” of the committee to accept or reject candidates based on ideology amounted to a restriction of free speech.

Lawmakers failed to agree on a replacement election system in 2015, prompting Utah Gov. Gary Herbert to announce that he would not form a nominating committee for 2016 in response to the judge’s ruling.

http://go.uen.org/61Z (SLT)

 


 

 

Utah bill proposes online courses for parents who exempt kids from vaccinations

 

SALT LAKE CITY — Polio, measles, whooping cough and chicken pox used to be widespread, but thanks to vaccines most U.S. children avoid these diseases.

“What people don’t see, they think is gone,” said Rich Lakin, immunization program manager at the Utah Department of Health. “If we just quit doing immunizations right now, we’d see all of those diseases coming back. We’d see what we saw in the 1800s — people dying from all kinds of diseases.”

Immunizations are required for school admission, but Utah parents can request exemptions for their children, for medical, religious or personal reasons.

If the Utah legislature passes House Bill 221, parents who want exemptions will be required to take an online educational course about communicable diseases to make sure they understand the risks.

http://go.uen.org/621 (OSE)

 


 

 

Utah Bill Would Raise Salaries for Teachers of Native Students

 

Teachers who work in schools with large populations of Native students would receive bonuses under a new bill that passed the Utah Senate Monday and will soon be brought up by the state’s House of Representatives, according to KUER.

The bill would provide $2 million to increase salaries for teachers who choose to teach in schools where at least 29 percent of students are Native American. Rep. Jack Draxler told KUER that a legislative commission studied Native education last year and found that schools on or near reservations have high teacher turnover rates and few Native American teachers.

“And yet Native American teachers are the ones who are most likely to come there and teach and stay and really be role models for Indian kids and make a real difference,” Draxler said. He added that the bill may encourage more Native teachers to enter the classroom as well.

http://go.uen.org/62B (Ed Week)

 


 

 

Bill to teach students to avoid picking up guns advances

 

SALT LAKE CITY— Utah’s Senate has given preliminary approval to a plan offering optional training to middle school students on what to do if they encounter a weapon or if a gunman enters their school. The Senate voted 18-7 Tuesday afternoon to advance the idea. The Senate must still vote to give final approval to the measure before it can be debated in the House of Representatives. That final vote could come this week. Republican Sen. Todd Weiler of Woods Cross sponsors the proposal and says not all parents may know how to talk to their kids about gun safety.

http://go.uen.org/62k (MUR)

 


 

 

Poll: What Issues are Most Important to Utahns?

 

Utah voters say the economy and education are most important to them in the 2016 election while the fight over public lands ranks near the bottom.

A new UtahPolicy.com survey by Dan Jones & Associates finds 18% of Utahns say the economy is the most important issue for them when they decide which candidates to support in this year’s election. 13% picked school and education while 6% said healthcare. No other issue got more than 4% support.

Control of public lands in the state of Utah was identified by just 3% of respondents as the #1 issue while 4% said government overreach was their top concern for picking a candidate.

More than 30% of Utahns chose some other issue or said they didn’t know.

http://go.uen.org/61X (UP)

 


 

 

Education first proposes tax increase to fund schools

 

SALT LAKE CITY—Education and taxes – two big topics that seem to come up every year in the legislature, and this year is no different. Utahns want more money to go to education but aren’t always willing to pay more taxes to do it.

A group called Education First hopes to mesh the two together with a proposal to the legislature that would allow Utahns to vote on a personal income tax increase of 7/8 of 1 percent that would go directly to the schools.

http://go.uen.org/62C (DCC)

 


 

 

High school students weigh in on Utah’s bad air

 

Salt Lake City — The Department of Environmental Quality declared Wednesday a “red air day” in Salt Lake County, meaning the pollution is high and there are restrictions in place for burning and industry.

While the Wasatch Front was experiencing perhaps the worst air of the year, students at Highland High School were learning about the inversion, air pollution and what they can do about it.

Representatives from Breathe Utah were holding the event. They say young people are becoming increasingly aware of the problem and more worried about the air we breathe.

http://go.uen.org/62f (KUTV)

 

http://go.uen.org/62h (KTVX)

 


 

 

Holocaust survivor asks Utah County residents to promise, “Never Again”

 

With a slight Hungarian accent, and a stooped, but firm stance, Stephen “Pista” Nasser, has been encouraging audiences young and old this week to stand up to the bullies of the world.

Nasser was a 13-year-old Hungarian during WWII when his family was taken to Auschwitz. Of his 21 family members taken during the Holocaust, Nasser was the only one to survive. He saw his aunt and cousin brutally killed just steps away from him, and never got to say goodbye to his mother before she was gassed. His older brother, Andras Nasser, died in his arms at Muhldorf, a slave labor camp, just a short time before it was liberated by the Allied forces.

Nasser spoke to a packed house at the Orem Senior Friendship Center Tuesday night, and is presenting his story, “Family Values: Appreciation of Freedom — Lessons Learned as a Survivor of the Holocaust,” to seven local schools in Orem, American Fork and Lehi.

http://go.uen.org/62x (PDH)

 


 

 

Rapid City School Superintendent candidate confronts controversial legacy

 

In 2007, the residents of five municipalities in Salt Lake County, Utah, voted to divide their 80,000 students between the existing Jordan School District and a new one dubbed the Canyons School District. It was, according to the Salt Lake Tribune, the first time in 100 years a new school district had been created in Utah.

Tracy Cowdell, who became Canyons’ first school board president, remembered the humble beginnings, when Canyons had only one employee who was tasked with building the district from the ground up.

That one employee was Superintendent David Doty.

“Imagine the herculean task of having to hire everyone, from the senior staff to the bus drivers,” Cowdell said in a phone interview. “And there was no curricula to speak of, all that had to be done in the first year. … Doty got us through that. It was really extraordinary.”

On Wednesday, Doty was the fourth and final candidate to interview for the job of superintendent of Rapid City Area Schools.

“The guy’s a rock star,” Cowdell said. “The Rapid City School Board should hire Dr. Doty. In his short time with us, he dramatically moved the needle and raised the bar for all students.”

Doty’s interview Wednesday afternoon with a panel of local residents included discussion of his sometimes controversial tenure as superintendent in Canyons.

http://go.uen.org/62z (Rapid City [SD] Journal)

 

http://go.uen.org/62E ([Rapid City, SD] KEVN)

 

Sidebar: What happens next?

http://go.uen.org/62D (Rapid City [SD] Journal)

 


 

 

Utah education business and operations official takes federal job

 

SALT LAKE CITY — Scott Jones, associate superintendent for business and operations at the Utah State Office of Education, has resigned.

Jones, who is also with the Army Reserve, is leaving the office of education to work for the National Nuclear Security Administration. The state Board of Education announced his resignation on Tuesday, Feb. 9.

“The only reason for this resignation is to take a position with a federal agency that promotes our national security interests,” said Jones, through a press release issued by the Board of Education.

Jones was finance director for the Utah Schools for the Deaf and the Blind until March 2015, when the state Board of Education made him interim director of the Utah State Office of Rehabilitation. He was charged with resolving USOR’s financial situation, after an audit found the agency to have a deficit $6.3 million.

http://go.uen.org/62a (OSE)

 

http://go.uen.org/62j (KCSG)

 


 

 

Low vaccination rates put Utah schools at risk of outbreaks

 

SALT LAKE CITY — Experts say Utah’s schools are at risk of losing herd immunity, the protection a community gains when most members are vaccinated against an infectious disease.

The Deseret News reports that Utah Department of Health immunization program manager Rich Lakin says that in most cases, about 90 percent of a community must be vaccinated to prevent serious outbreaks.

But with so many parents choosing not to vaccinate their children, Utah’s kindergarten classrooms may be losing herd immunity. According to the latest state data, about 91 percent of Utah’s kindergarteners were adequately immunized when they started the 2014-15 school year, and exemptions are rising.

http://go.uen.org/62c (PDH)

 

http://go.uen.org/62l (MUR)

 


 

Teens get hands-on understanding of police use of force

 

PLEASANT GROVE — A group of Utah County high school students got a hands-on lesson Wednesday night in police use of force.

Participants in the Pleasant Grove Police Department’s Youth Citizen’s Academy experienced two different live scenarios involving a trespassing call and a traffic stop that ended up being anything but routine.

Lt. Britt Smith said the hope was to give the next generation a better idea of the day-to-day risks and split-second choices officers have to make on the job.

http://go.uen.org/62I (KSL)

 


 

Cheerleading coach remembers deceased missionary Sadie Wells as fun, uplifting

 

KAYSVILLE — A missionary serving in Pennsylvania who was killed Tuesday, Feb. 9, is being remembered as the girl who always could put a smile on anyone’s face.

Sadie D. Wells, 20, was killed when a bus ran a stop sign and hit into the passenger side of the car she was riding in, reports said. A family member said Wells had been in Pennsylvania for nine months.

Her former cheerleading coach, Brooke Painter, said Wells was “adorable,” the kind of person who would show up to practice wearing an old-man tourist costume with a fake mustache just to get laughs from her fellow cheerleaders.

And she always wore a crazy pair of socks featuring tacos or leopard prints.

“She loved life,” said Painter, cheerleading coach at Davis High School. “She loved people. She was hilariously funny, Every girl adored her. … She made it fun to be on the cheer team.”

http://go.uen.org/629 (OSE)

 

http://go.uen.org/62b (PDH)

 

http://go.uen.org/62g (KUTV)

 

http://go.uen.org/62i (KTVX)

 

http://go.uen.org/62H (KSTU)

 

http://go.uen.org/62G (Carlisle [PA] Sentinel)

 


 

 

International exchange students present at St. George Children’s Museum

 

  1. GEORGE — St. George Children’s Museum is pleased to announce a special presentation by international exchange students hosted through the Zion International Program. The event will take place in the museum’s theatre room on Friday at 3:15 p.m.

The public is invited to join these ambassadors as they present on insightful experiences, cultural differences and similarities, and what impressed them about their time in St. George at this special program.

Zion International Program annually hosts up to 450 students, ages 12 to 18, as part of an international student exchange. Exchange programs are a way to explore exciting new customs, lifestyles and social values, all while living with a friendly host family.

http://go.uen.org/62e (SGN)

 


 

 

Utah student artists to exhibit work at Utah Capitol

 

SALT LAKE CITY– Twenty-one high school students were given scholarship awards to celebrate their participation in the Utah Senate Visual Arts Scholarship Competition on the floor of the Senate Feb. 9. Each student was presented their awards by their state senator.

Honorable Mention went to Taylor Lee, North Sanpete High School. The presentation is in conjunction with Arts Day on the Hill.

http://go.uen.org/62y (PDH)

 


 

 

Moody’s assigns Aa3 to Wasatch County School District, UT’s GO bonds; Aaa enhanced also assigned

 

Moody’s Investors Service has assigned a Aa3 underlying rating to Wasatch County School District, Utah’s Unlimited Tax General Obligation Bonds, Series 2016, expected to be issued in the amount of $57 million. The bonds will also receive the Aaa enhancement rating of the Utah School District Bond Guaranty Program. Concurrently, Moody’s affirms the Aa3 rating on the district’s parity general obligation bonds outstanding in the amount of $52.2M.

http://go.uen.org/62A (Moody’s)

 

 

 

 

————————————————————

OPINION & COMMENTARY

————————————————————

 

Utah teacher shortage reflects lack of respect Salt Lake Tribune editorial

 

“The beatings will continue until morale improves.”

— William Bligh, captain of HMS Bounty

You might want to ask a teacher if the above quotation is accurately attributed. The circumstances under which it was supposedly uttered. Who Capt. Bligh was. Whether the statement is sarcasm or irony. And how it applies to the state of education in America.

If, that is, you can find a teacher to ask.

The United States in general, and Utah in particular, are facing an acute shortage of classroom teachers. And, while there has never been a time when a dearth of teachers would be acceptable, the next generation of students is going to be at a huge disadvantage if the number of bright people willing to take on a career in education fails to meet the demand.

http://go.uen.org/61Y

 


 

 

Many stakeholders working together to achieve success Deseret News op-ed by Nolan Karras, Co-Chair, Education First, & Richard Kendell, Education Advisor, Education First

 

Business leaders are proud to play a role in making our state the nation’s leader in economic growth. It takes a tremendous effort by many stakeholders working together to achieve and maintain our current success. However, as we assemble the pieces to a future economic puzzle, it is increasingly clear that one piece is missing — education funding.

Business leaders are not the only ones with this concern. Both the Governor and the Legislature have acknowledged the need to make changes. In a recent meeting with a small group of Legislators, we began sharing the need for a more qualified future workforce and we were stopped, mid-sentence, by one Legislator who said, “The problem is not in the future — the problem is happening right now. The crisis is today. I can’t find qualified workers for my own business and it is the number one issue holding my business back.”

To solve this issue, hundreds of business and community leaders from across the state are proposing that we as citizens be given the choice to vote on increasing the personal income tax by 7/8 of one percent for a targeted, transparent investment in education. This voter-approved measure would generate an estimated $518.5 million annually for local-school investments that will improve student performance.

We recommend that these funds be distributed with district oversight and community coordination.

http://go.uen.org/628

 


 

 

Taxes, surplus and the Utah Legislature

Deseret News op-ed by Fred Ash of Sandy

 

Up front, I clearly acknowledge that no one loves paying taxes, myself included. But for years Utah’s economic advisers have either been misled or have been deliberately misleading the citizens of our state in relationship of the building of a flourishing economy and the need to raise taxes. They have been telling us that bringing new businesses to the state will bring in enough new tax revenue to allow the state to increase funding for education and other services, and to reduce taxes.

The reality is that a flourishing economy with its increased population creates the need for more taxes for road construction and maintenance, health care, public safety, infrastructure for water/sewer/power, public education, public transportation, social services, etc. Benjamin Franklin knew that over 200 years ago when he said, “‘Tis easier to build two chimneys than to keep one in fuel.”

The misleading got into high gear in the mid-90s, when the Taxpayers Association started wielding its influence in the Legislature and in the state, complaining about how all of the income tax money was going into public ed, and higher ed needed more help. At that time, the financial market was booming, which they knew wouldn’t last forever. They didn’t mention that the real reason for their wanting income taxes to help support higher ed was because health care and other social services, roads, public safety, etc., were getting more expensive, and moving higher ed into the income tax pot would avoid raising taxes for those other services.

And now our state’s effort to fund public ed has dropped down to about 35 in the nation, and we can’t afford to expand Medicaid for about 100,000 working citizens who make too much money to qualify for Medicaid, but not enough to afford other medical insurance. Higher ed tuition is too high, K-12 schools are having problems finding enough qualified applicants for teaching positions because of low pay and poor teaching conditions, police departments are understaffed, our roads are in need of repair, needed social services have been cut, etc.

http://go.uen.org/62F

 


 

 

For teachers’ sake, voters must take responsibility for legislators Salt Lake Tribune letter from Jim Rosenbury

 

My wife, Cathy, is in her 39th year teaching in the Salt Lake City School District. She is certified to teach resource and kindergarten through 6th grade. Her education consists of a bachelor’s degree, a teaching certificate, a masters degree, an ESL certification and an ESL reading certification. Other certifications fill an office cabinet drawer in our basement, and this is not special when compared to her workmates and to countless other teachers throughout the state.

Yet, when compared to other professions, with the same amount of education and time on job, Utah educators’ salary steps at all levels lag far behind what is normal and reasonable. In the last four decades, Cathy has seen a steady climb in the number of new and experienced teachers who have left the classroom for other pursuits.

Unfortunately it is doubtful that our state legislators will ever adapt educational funding to address the noncompetitive nature of the salary steps.

http://go.uen.org/627

 


 

 

Expel civics test from Utah schools

(Logan) Herald Journal letter from Joe Tennant

 

We can understand the desire of Utah’s legislators to improve the citizenship of students in Utah’s public schools; however, the civics test that Utah’s legislators have mandated as a high school graduation requirement doesn’t improve the civics know-how of students because Utah’s civic test is cognitively one-dimensional, and its one-dimensionality detracts from a robust education for Utah’s students.

For an example of the cognitive limitations of Utah’s civics test, let’s look at question 14, “What stops one branch of government from becoming too powerful?” and its answer, “checks and balances” or “separation of powers.” (The instructions for the federal government’s naturalization test, the basis of Utah’s test, encourage examinees to limit their answers to those published with the test’s questions.) Students don’t need to read the Constitution of the United States to answer the question correctly. Students don’t need to know details about the branches of government, their respective powers or “checks and balances” to answer the question correctly. Students input question 14 and its answer into their minds, and then students spit out the answer during the test — mechanized memorization is the only cognitive skill necessary to answer any question correctly on Utah’s civics test.

http://go.uen.org/62d

 


 

 

Idahoans ready for change in education

(Boise) Idaho Statesman op-ed by ROGER QUARLES, executive director of the J.A. and Kathryn Albertson Family Foundation

 

In my experience as an Idaho educator, district superintendent, the state’s deputy superintendent, a parent and now the executive director of the J.A. and Kathryn Albertson Family Foundation, I have always embraced the crucial ingredient that drives lasting change in our education system in Idaho: the voice and energy of the public and parents. That’s why we commissioned a survey, The People’s Review of Education in Idaho 2016, which asked 1,000 randomly chosen Idahoans from every corner of the state about what they value in their K-12 public education system.

The Albertson Family Foundation is a data-driven organization. Data is a measuring stick by which we can all compare our performance against others. We have exhaustively explored and published the best available data about student achievement, school funding, workforce needs, the economic returns associated with education in Idaho and more. But we felt we were missing something important. What do everyday Idahoans — citizens and taxpayers — value most in their public education system? Do they have confidence that their local schools are providing the best education possible? What are the essential subjects students should be learning? Are Idaho’s children getting what they need from our public schools to help them succeed in life? And as we work toward improving education, are those improvements aligned with what Idahoans value?

To help us find out, we enlisted the services of the nonpartisan FDR Group, led by expert analysts Steve Farkas and Ann Duffett, who have a combined 45 years of experience in opinion research and social policy.

We are grateful to the many Idahoans who participated in a series of in-person conversations in late summer of 2015 to help Farkas and Duffett develop the survey and learn about education in Idaho.

The final report, Idaho//Ready For Change: What Idahoans Really Think About Education In Idaho, reveals that the majority of Idahoans believe education is the single most important issue facing our state. This makes us unique: the majority of Americans believe the economy is the leading issue.

http://go.uen.org/62v

 


 

 

Evaluating the Content and Quality of Next Generation Assessments Fordham Institute analysis

 

Evaluating the Content and Quality of Next Generation Assessments examines previously unreleased items from three multi-state tests (ACT Aspire, PARCC, and Smarter Balanced) and one best-in-class state assessment, Massachusetts’ state exam (MCAS), to answer policymakers’ most pressing questions: Do these tests reflect strong content? Are they rigorous? What are their strengths and areas for improvement? No one has ever gotten under the hood of these tests and published an objective third-party review of their content, quality, and rigor. Until now.

Over the last two years, the Thomas B. Fordham Institute, along with two rock-star principal investigators and almost forty equally stellar reviewers used a new methodology designed to answer policymakers’ most pressing questions: Do these tests reflect strong content? Are they rigorous? What are their strengths and areas for improvement?

http://go.uen.org/622

 

 

 

 

 

 

————————————————————-

NATIONAL NEWS

————————————————————-

 

L.A. teachers union wins dues increase, vows to battle foes of traditional public education Los Angeles Times

 

The rallying cry went out from the leaders of Los Angeles teachers’ union: We need more money to fight the rich and powerful forces that want to take over public schools.

Members have responded by agreeing to raise their annual dues by about a third, to $1,000 a year.

The increase was approved by 82% of those who cast ballots, according to United Teachers Los Angeles, which tallied the votes Wednesday.

Union President Alex Caputo-Pearl said the additional money is needed to fight well-funded opponents, including foundations and wealthy donors who have sought to reduce teacher job protections, limit union fundraising and spur the growth of nonunion charter schools.

“As billionaires are trying to cripple unions, our vote sends a national signal that educators are willing to invest more in our unions and in the fight for educational justice,” Caputo-Pearl said in an interview.

http://go.uen.org/623

 


 

 

Testing “opt-out” movement forces two separate grades on state report cards Cleveland Plain Dealer

 

COLUMBUS, Ohio – Students that chose to “opt-out” of Ohio’s state tests last spring will be counted – and not counted – against their school’s grades on state report cards coming out Feb. 25.

The Ohio Department of Education announced Tuesday that the main Performance Index grades for schools and district will take a hit from students that did not take the state tests. Those students will be counted as scores of zero, which will pull the grade down.

Performance Index is a composite of test scores across multiple grades and subjects and the state’s main measure of how much students know.

But the report cards will also list a “modified achievement measure” that will be calculated like the Performance Index grade, just counting only the students that took the tests.

http://go.uen.org/624

 


 

 

Education advocates urge N.J. not to base graduation standards on controversial test Bergen (NJ) Record

 

Parents, educators and activists lined up in Trenton Wednesday to send a message that New Jersey should not adopt graduation standards that would require students to pass controversial new state tests.

The state has proposed changing regulations to require students starting with the class of 2021 to pass tests known as PARCC in English 10 and Algebra I to earn their diploma. But critics say the exams are poor measures of student learning, even as the state touts them as tools to help raise accountability and standards.

About 100 people signed up to speak out against the proposal – so many that the state split them into four separate meeting rooms to testify before members of the state Board of Education, which must vote on the adoption of graduation requirements. During public testimony Wednesday, critics said that a single test in math and English language arts cannot provide a meaningful picture of whether a student is ready to graduate.

http://go.uen.org/625

 


 

 

ICE agents won’t be going onto Los Angeles public school campuses Los Angeles Times

 

Immigration agents won’t be allowed onto the campuses of the Los Angeles Unified School District to look for undocumented students, the school board promised with a unanimous vote Tuesday.

The new resolution directs school staff members not to let any federal Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents enter school campuses or to provide them with student data without clearance. ICE officials who have any reason to be on campus  — such as those evaluating schools that offer exchange programs for non-immigrant students — can visit schools only after their requests have been cleared by the superintendent and district lawyers.

Board members noted in the meeting that immigration agents haven’t come to schools looking for students.

Students are not actually in danger of being grabbed by ICE agents while at school; ICE considers schools and churches to be “sensitive” locations and does not carry out raids in schools, said spokeswoman Virginia Kice.

But families don’t trust the word of the immigration agency, and some were afraid to send their kids to school after ICE carried out a series of raids across the country last month targeting Central American immigrants, said board member Ref Rodriguez, who co-sponsored the resolution.

http://go.uen.org/62r

 

http://go.uen.org/62s (Fox)

 

http://go.uen.org/62t (Ed Week)

 


 

 

Kansas Supreme Court Invalidates School Funding Law Associated Press

 

TOPEKA, Kan. — The Kansas Supreme Court struck down a stopgap law for funding the state’s public schools on Thursday, saying it left poor districts $54 million short.

The justices unanimously ruled that the Republican-backed law doesn’t comply with the Kansas Constitution and gave lawmakers until the end of June to write a new law. The high court has yet to decide on the larger question of whether Kansas must boost its education spending by at least $548 million a year.

Lawmakers approved the 2015 law as temporary fix to replace a per-student formula for distributing more than $4 billion a year to school in favor of stable “block grants.” The law was meant to give lawmakers time to devise another system for distributing more $4 billion a year in aid to its 286 public school districts.

But the Supreme Court ruled that the temporary law, which was set to expire in July 2017, violates the Kansas Constitution’s requirement that the state finance a suitable education for every student.

http://go.uen.org/62o

 

http://go.uen.org/62w (Kansas City Star)

 

A copy of the ruling

http://go.uen.org/62p (Kansas Supreme Court)

 


 

 

How the Department of Defense schools are teaching their version of Common Core math “New math” taking hold for students on U.S. military installations Hechinger Report

 

FORT BRAGG, N.C. – Standing in front of a smartboard, 5-year-old Kaleb Eckerfield touches an icon of a storm cloud with raindrops. He drags it with his finger to the empty space under the day’s date, creating an instant weather report.

“What do we know about how many sunny and rainy days we’ve had this month?” asks Andrea Todd, the teacher of Kaleb’s kindergarten class at Hampton Primary School, one of the nine schools located on the Fort Bragg Army Post in North Carolina.

“They’re equal,” Kaleb says, pointing to the illustrations. “One, two. Two of each.”

The next task awaits: a math problem requiring him to add up a string of six black dots, and then subtract two more dots from that total.

Kaleb studies the equation, and then looks up on the wall at a poster of a notched line marked 1-40. He carefully writes “4” on the board.

“How did you decide to write that number here?” Todd asks, with nothing in her tone or body language to indicate whether Kaleb is right.

“I counted the dots and then I looked at the number line and then I jumped back,” Kaleb tells her, while several of his classmates, seated cross-legged on a multicolored carpet, nod vigorously in agreement.

“I like how you used that math tool, the number line, to figure out the correct answer,” Todd says.

This past fall, Hampton, along with dozens of other elementary schools that serve the children of military families — known collectively as the Department of Defense Education Activity (DoDEA) schools – began phasing in new grade-level expectations for math. Known as DoDEA’s College and Career-Ready Standards, they are essentially a mirror image of the Common Core – rebranded to avoid the political swampland that has embroiled the initiative in controversy elsewhere in the nation. Now experts are asking, can DoDEA’s new approach to teaching and learning yield valuable lessons for public schools more broadly?

http://go.uen.org/62u

 


 

 

Dulce girls basketball team forced to take down traditional Navajo buns; NMAA says refs were wrong (Albuquerque, NM) KOB

 

A New Mexico girls basketball team was told by referees Tuesday that the way they were wearing their hair was wrong, but those same referees are being told they made the mistake.

The girls from Dulce High School wore tsiiyeels – traditional Navajo buns – at their game in Santa Fe Tuesday. Referees made the girls undo them citing safety concerns.

The team was wearing the buns in the first place to support an Arizona team that recently made headlines for also being told to remove their hair wraps.

“Wearing the Navajo bun, it identifies our heritage. It identifies who we are…our identity that you can’t take away,” said a Dulce fan at the game.

The New Mexico Activities Association has apologized to the team, saying the wraps should have been allowed. NMAA added it will send a clarification to officials across the state.

http://go.uen.org/62q

 


 

 

Ellen DeGeneres plans $500K in gifts for Detroit school Detroit Free Press

 

The students, staff and faculty of Spain Elementary-Middle School in Midtown Detroit didn’t know exactly why they were attending an assembly Wednesday.

Then this happened:

Taping a segment for her show that will air today, Ellen DeGeneres announced more than $500,000 worth of donations to the school and its staff, with more on the way.

http://go.uen.org/62m

 


 

 

Hundreds of schools attacked, destroyed in Ukraine war: rights activists Reuters

 

LONDON – Hundreds of schools in eastern Ukraine have been attacked by both Ukrainian government forces and their Russian-backed militant opponents in the past two years, forcing many of them to close, Human Rights Watch (HRW) said on Thursday.

Schools on both sides of the line of contact which separates the combatants have been hit, and many, especially in rebel-controlled areas, remain too damaged to reopen, HRW said.

Both sides have deployed forces in and near schools, turning them into military targets. Even schools that were not being occupied have been attacked, the rights organization said.

http://go.uen.org/62n

 

 

 

 

————————————————————

CALENDAR

————————————————————

 

USOE Calendar

http://www.schools.utah.gov/main/CALENDAR.aspx

 

 

UEN News

http://www.uen.org

 

 

February 11:

Public Education Appropriations Subcommittee meeting

8 a.m., 445 State Capitol

http://le.utah.gov/Interim/2016/html/00001409.htm

 

Utah State Charter School Board meeting

9 a.m., 250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://go.uen.org/1pn

 

Utah State Board of Education legislative meeting

Noon, 210 Senate Building

http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspx

 

House Education Committee meeting

3:40 p.m., 30 House Building

http://le.utah.gov/~2016/agenda/HEDU0211.ag.htm

 

House Business and Labor Committee meeting

3:40 p.m., 445 State Capitol

http://le.utah.gov/~2016/agenda/HBUS0211.ag.htm

 

 

February 16:

House Health and Human Services Committee meeting

2 p.m., 20 House Building

http://le.utah.gov/~2016/agenda/HHHS0216.ag.htm

 

 

March 17:

Utah State Board of Education study session and committee meetings

250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspx

 

 

March 18:

Utah State Board of Education meeting

250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspx

Related posts:

Comments are closed.