Education News Roundup: Feb. 23, 2016

Students from Beehive Science & Technology Academy/Education News Roundup

Students from Beehive Science & Technology Academy/Education News Roundup

Education News Roundup

Today’s Top Picks:

 

The revenue news is pretty good for the education fund; not so much for the general fund.

http://go.uen.org/69z (UP)

and http://go.uen.org/69E (SLT)

and http://go.uen.org/69A (DN)

and http://go.uen.org/6ax (KUER)

or http://go.uen.org/69B (SenateSite)

 

A Utah State Board of Education primary election bill passes the House.

http://go.uen.org/69C (SLT)

 

Legislature considers allowing 4-year-olds in kindergarten.

http://go.uen.org/6ay (OSE)

 

Rep. Love discusses ESSA with the Legislature.

http://go.uen.org/69Y (UPC)

and http://go.uen.org/69Z (DN)

 

Rep. Chaffetz won’t tolerate misconduct at ED.

http://go.uen.org/6ao ([Washington, DC] Daily Caller)

or a copy of the letter

http://go.uen.org/6ap (Committee on Oversight and Government Reform)

 

Those of you with time on your hands — and ENR does mean a lot of time on your hands — can read the Outside magazine piece on the Rep. Bishop’s Public Lands Initiative.

http://go.uen.org/6ar (Outside magazine)

 

Chair of the Senate education committee predicts approval for President Obama’s nominee for Education Secretary.

http://go.uen.org/69O (WPLN)

 

 

 

 

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TODAY’S HEADLINES

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UTAH

 

Lawmakers Catch a Break With New Revenue Numbers

 

Fight expands over half-billion dollars from transportation fund

 

Primary election for Utah school board could find opposition in Senate

 

Bill Proposes Rehiring Retired Teachers

Lawmaker sees “unretirement” as a remedy to teacher shortages.

 

Reaction mixed to bill that would let 4-year-olds enter kindergarten

 

Utah governor to testify before Congress on education law

 

Mia Love Addresses Utah House of Reps

 

Chaffetz Not Tolerating Department Of Education Misconduct

 

OPM, Education Department CIOs resign under fire from Congress

OPM CIO faced grilling over hack; Education CIO was under ethics investigation.

 

The Massive Land Deal That Could Change the West Forever

Utah congressman Rob Bishop, a conservative Republican who has long opposed federal management of western lands, has emerged as the unlikely architect of a grand compromise, one that would involve massive horse trading to preserve millions of acres of wilderness while opening millions more to resource extraction. Is this a trick, or the best way to solve ancient disputes that too often go nowhere?

 

Emery County lands council welcomes new member

 

Too much testing? How high-stakes testing impacts our children

 

School districts implement “late start” snow day policy

 

Logan High surpasses goal for 6-year-old’s wish

 

Richfield student honors school’s biggest fan with special needs in unique way

 

Highland High students raise money to send 7-year-old cancer patient to Disney World

 

School board meets in Green River hears GRHS/Book Cliff report

 


 

 

OPINION & COMMENTARY

 

State preparing a pro-fossil fuels agenda for public schools

 

Girls and STEM: Why So Much Chatter?

 

SB 45 and truancy

 

School lunches illustrate problem

 

Not impressed with Madsen

 

Trump Says He’d Kill Common Core. No, He Couldn’t.

 

Eight Things to Know About the Next Generation Science Standards

 

Freedom of Education is Coming Under Attack Worldwide

 

The Secret to School Integration

 

Why U.S. states earn poor marks on public ed support

A look at new legislation, and the report that shows there are no ‘silver bullets’ to improve schools

 

Bunkum Award 2015

 


 

 

NATION

 

Alexander Expects Speedy Approval For Obama’s Next Education Secretary

 

Rule for Identifying Racial Bias in Special Education Proposed by Ed. Department

 

Bridging a Digital Divide That Leaves Schoolchildren Behind

 

Online Charter Schools Tested by Setbacks and Self-Inflicted Blows

 

Louisiana voucher students did worse at new schools, study says

 

Ed. Groups Urge ‘Whole-Child’ Approach to Counteract Poverty

Aim is to address barriers to success

 

The names in the schoolhouse door: UA students question building names

 

This Marine vet was banned from his kid’s school after objecting to Islam lessons

 

Building Social-Emotional Skills May Be Key to Classroom Management, Study Says

 

Why the U.S. Gets a Failing Grade at Financial Education

 

Education opt-out bill advances in Arizona Senate

 

Courts Push Lawmakers to the Wall on Funding

Kansas, Washington face hard deadlines

 

Study In Your PJs? What A High School ‘Work From Home Day’ Looks Like

 

Red spaghetti straps kept a girl out of school and now there’s a review of L.A.’s dress codes

 

Bill and Melinda Gates Ask Teens to Work on Global Clean Energy, Women’s Liberation

In annual letter, philanthropists look to tomorrow’s scientists to help fix development problems

 

Pearson Business Strategy Assailed by Investors, Including Chicago Teacher’s Pension Fund

Coalition Worries About Pearson’s Poor Financial Performance Impacting Pensions

 

 

 

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UTAH NEWS

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Lawmakers Catch a Break With New Revenue Numbers

 

New state revenue estimates show only $10 million less than the estimates made last December, a big break for Republican lawmakers as the struggle to balance out the budgets they are working on now.

GOP legislative leaders announced the new number Monday afternoon.

And considering how worried they were last week, the $10 million less in a $14 billion budget is peanuts.

House Budget Chairman Dean Sanpei told colleagues that there is $53 million LESS than estimated in the state’s General Fund than there was in December – when GOP Gov. Gary Herbert built his budget recommendations.

In the Education Fund, there is $43 million MORE, the difference being the net $10 million less.

Because the General Fund – fueled mostly by the state’s 4.75 percent sales tax – is down by $53 million, lawmakers may have to shift money between higher education budgets and other state programs.

http://go.uen.org/69z (UP)

 

http://go.uen.org/69E (SLT)

 

http://go.uen.org/69A (DN)

 

http://go.uen.org/6ax (KUER)

 

http://go.uen.org/69B (SenateSite)

 


 

 

Fight expands over half-billion dollars from transportation fund

 

A two-way fight over possibly transferring nearly a half-billion dollars from transportation funds to either education or water projects over the next 11 years turned into a three-way battle on Monday.

The House Transportation Committee voted 6-2 to endorse a bill, HB296, that would put that money instead into the state general fund, where it could go to any purpose that lawmakers decide each year.

Of course, a fourth possibility is to keep that money in transportation — which one appropriations committee already has endorsed, and others warned on Monday that may be wise for a state with still-big projected transportation shortfalls.

Gov. Gary Herbert proposed to do the same, but he proposed to give the money to education (a plan that appropriators rejected). Anderson would simply put it in the general fund.

http://go.uen.org/69D (SLT)

 


 

 

Primary election for Utah school board could find opposition in Senate

 

A bill creating a primary election for the State Board of Education skated through the Utah House on Monday with a 65-8 vote.

Described as a sort of safety net by its sponsor, West Valley City Republican Rep. Craig Hall, HB110 would take effect only if the House and Senate are again unsuccessful at creating a new election method for the school board.

“We all have our favorite way to select school board members — that’s not what this is about,” Hall said. “If we cannot agree, all this bill would do is add a primary election so we don’t have five, 10, 15 people on the general election ballot.”

State law currently calls for an appointed nominating committee to screen candidates before forwarding names to the governor, who then places two names per seat on the ballot.

But that method was ruled unconstitutional in 2014 by a federal judge, who wrote that the “unfettered discretion” of the governor and nominating committee to accept or reject candidates based on ideology and philosophy violates candidates’ free-speech rights.

The judge ordered the names of three rejected candidates be restored to the 2014 ballot, and Gov. Gary Herbert responded by declining to convene a nominating committee for the 2016 election.

http://go.uen.org/69C (SLT)

 


 

 

Bill Proposes Rehiring Retired Teachers

Lawmaker sees “unretirement” as a remedy to teacher shortages.

 

While class sizes in Utah are ever on the rise, school districts are having a harder time finding qualified teachers willing to work in the Beehive State. Several districts are reporting severe shortages, and many have been forced to hire non-credentialed teachers before they even finish their education. Now, one Utah lawmaker thinks he’s found a stop-gap measure to slow the bleeding.

Less than one week before the 2015-16 school year began, Salt Lake City School District reported that it was still trying to hire four full-time teachers, and Jordan School District was short 22. Granite School District said that in some years it has desperately sought as many as 80 teachers with less than a month before schools open. When those positions can’t be filled, districts are forced to turn to temporary substitute teachers on a semi-permanent basis, or even hire non-credentialed teachers who are still working on their teaching credentials—Jordan School District reports it currently has 167 non-credentialed teachers working on an emergency basis.

“It’s a problem that we face,” says Rep. Rich Cunningham, R-South Jordan, “and there are a lot of reasons for it. We hear about low teacher pay [or] inadequate benefit packages, or other things.” Cunningham is presenting a series of bills which would allow some state workers—like teachers and police officers—to be rehired after they’ve retired. Cunningham hopes this approach will encourage the most well-qualified teachers to return to the classroom while lawmakers consider other efforts to get more college students to choose education degrees.

http://go.uen.org/6as (Salt Lake City Weekly)

 


 

 

Reaction mixed to bill that would let 4-year-olds enter kindergarten

 

SALT LAKE CITY — Utah legislators are considering a bill to let 4-year-olds enter kindergarten. While some question whether a child that young is ready, others are excited about the possibilities.

“I love the idea,” said Loretta Porter, of Clearfield. “Two of my three kids missed the cutoff date by a couple of weeks, and both were ready.”

Under current state code, children must turn 5 before Sept. 2 in order to enter kindergarten in the fall. Senate Bill 163, sponsored by Howard A. Stephenson, R-Salt Lake and Utah counties, would allow parents to enroll children who are going to turn 5 by Dec. 31 — if they’re ready. Readiness would be based on an assessment score, and other factors to be determined by local district and charter school boards.

“I hope the assessment would cover emotional readiness, and not just academic,” Porter said.

Parents and educators have mixed feelings about allowing 4-year-olds into kindergarten.

http://go.uen.org/6ay (OSE)

 


 

 

Utah governor to testify before Congress on education law

 

SALT LAKE CITY — Utah Gov. Gary Herbert will testify before Congress on Tuesday about how states will comply with a sweeping overhaul of the No Child Left Behind education law.

Herbert is scheduled to appear before the Health, Educations, Labor and Pensions Committee as part of his duties as chair of the National Governors Association.

http://go.uen.org/69U (PDH)

 

http://go.uen.org/6az (KSL)

 

http://go.uen.org/6aB (Ed Week)

 


 

 

Mia Love Addresses Utah House of Reps

 

After explaining that Congresswoman Mia Love was feeling “under the weather,” Utah House Speaker Greg Hughes introduced the congressional freshman as “a soldier for the cause,” and she took just under seven minutes to speak to the elected body of the lower chamber on subjects she said she’d carried from Utah to Washington. “So many times I take your piece of legislation to Washington,” Love claimed. “The bills that I support, all of them come from Utah. The bills that I introduce are examples of what Utah has done.”

Love said that it’s the effort that she is most proud of because “you had people from both sides of the aisle, as far left and as far right, supporting that and making sure that we are protecting our youth from being victims [specifically] with this ‘revolving door’ for criminal activity instead of getting them back on their feet.”

At the end of her acknowledgments, the congresswoman was asked about the status of education funding originating at the federal level and what she was doing to work with the current administration. Representative Marie Poulson (Democrat – Cottonwood Heights), a retired educator, inquired as to why the congresswoman had not voted for the successor bill to the No Child Left Behind Act, known as the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA). That bill, recently signed into law by President Obama, gathered wide, bi-partisan support.

Poulson added that the federal action would give Utah “more control over the public schools.”

Love responded by saying that she had supported the first draft of the ESSA education measure and that while she would not want to have “the perfect be the enemy of the good,” her opposition to the ESSA education bill came after the final bill ended up to be a 2,000+ page document where 48 hours were allowed for evaluation and vote.

The bill ultimately passed and was signed into law by President Obama in December of last year.

The congresswoman took a moment to emphasize her efforts with “Title 1 funding exchanges,” which had been endorsed by the Utah Education Association. Under the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) opens up areas of the nation with a high number of underprivileged students to receive funding in a manner similar to “targeted grants” that Love had supported.

http://go.uen.org/69Y (UPC)

 

http://go.uen.org/69Z (DN)

 


 

 

Chaffetz Not Tolerating Department Of Education Misconduct

 

House Committee on Government Reform Chairman Rep. Jason Chaffetz hammered Department of Education (DOE) leaders late Monday for “turning a blind eye” to “serious” misconduct by senior officials.

The Utah Republican wrote in a letter to Acting Secretary of Education John King, criticizing him for imposing token disciplinary actions against senior officials the DOE Office of Inspector General found sexually harassed employees, violated federal law and committed perjury.

Chaffetz urged King to take investigators’ findings more seriously and reconsider punishment for GS-15 and Senior Executive Service-level (SES) employees, although he didn’t suggest anything specific. President Barack Obama has nominated King to be the permanent Secretary of Education.

“Setting a strong example that these types of behavior will not be tolerated at the department is important, now more than ever before,” Chaffetz said in his letter to King. “… As current Acting Secretary and the president’s nominee for Secretary of Education, you have the responsibility to set the tone for the department.”

http://go.uen.org/6ao ([Washington, DC] Daily Caller)

 

A copy of the letter

http://go.uen.org/6ap (Committee on Oversight and Government Reform)

 


 

 

OPM, Education Department CIOs resign under fire from Congress

OPM CIO faced grilling over hack; Education CIO was under ethics investigation.

Ars Technica

 

The Office of Personnel Management’s chief information officer, Donna Seymour, resigned Monday, two days before she was scheduled to face a House Oversight and Government Reform Committee hearing on the theft of data from the OPM’s network discovered last year. A spokesperson for the OPM confirmed to Ars that Seymour had resigned, saying “she has retired.”

Seymour told colleagues at the OPM in an e-mail message that she was departing to make sure that her presence at the office “does not distract from the great work this team does every single day for this agency and the American people,” according to a report by USA Today’s Erin Kelly.

House Oversight Committee chairman Jason Chaffetz (R-Utah) cancelled the planned hearing for Wednesday on the OPM hack. “Ms. Seymour’s retirement is good news and an important turning point for OPM,” he commented in a prepared statement. “While I am disappointed Ms. Seymour will no longer appear before our Committee this week to answer to the American people, her retirement is necessary and long overdue. On her watch, whether through negligence or incompetence, millions of Americans lost their privacy and personal data. The national security implications of this entirely foreseeable breach are far-reaching and long-lasting. OPM now needs a qualified CIO at the helm to right the ship and restore confidence in the agency.”

Seymour’s departure came on the same day that it was announced that the Department of Education’s CIO, Danny Harris, would be leaving by the end of the month. Harris was under fire on multiple fronts, facing not just criticism of Education’s cybersecurity footing but investigations of misconduct by Congress. According to a statement from Education’s press secretary Dorie Turner Nolt, Harris was “becoming a distraction to the department’s critical ongoing cybersecurity work.”

Earlier this month, immediately following testimony before Rep. Chaffetz’s House Oversight Committee, Harris collapsed and was taken to the hospital. Rep. Chaffetz had called out Harris for Education’s failure to meet security goals set in the “cyber sprint” mandated by the Obama administration following the OPM breach. Chaffetz had said that “by virtually every metric,” Harris was “failing to adequately secure the department’s systems.”

http://go.uen.org/6aw (Ars Technica magazine)

 


 

 

The Massive Land Deal That Could Change the West Forever

Utah congressman Rob Bishop, a conservative Republican who has long opposed federal management of western lands, has emerged as the unlikely architect of a grand compromise, one that would involve massive horse trading to preserve millions of acres of wilderness while opening millions more to resource extraction. Is this a trick, or the best way to solve ancient disputes that too often go nowhere?

 

The American West is our handsome conundrum—too beautiful to use, too useful to be left alone, as a Colorado journalist once put it. In the past, the landscape seemed so enormous that conflicting dreams could find room in its whistling emptiness. Now there’s not much left that we haven’t touched, and we argue about how to manage what remains—a quarrel over whose dreams should come first.

Nowhere is the argument louder than in the creased country of eastern Utah, a place you know even if you’ve never been there: stone arch and sunburnt canyon, perfect desert sky. The area is home to marquee national parks like Arches and Canyonlands, but much more of it exists as sprawls of federal land that, taken together, are larger than many eastern states. Some people look at the region’s deep slots, peaks, and antelope flats and are inspired to protect them from development. Others hunger for what lies beneath: natural gas, oil, and potash.

It might be hard to find enough common ground to facilitate any huge deals simply by swapping lands. But Utah has something else to grease the bargaining wheels. During the statehood processes that occurred when the West was settled, the federal government gave new states land, arranged in a checkerboard pattern, most of it to be logged, mined, or grazed, with the proceeds largely helping to fund state schools. In Utah today, these trust lands make up 6.5 percent of the entire state—millions of acres. But since they are still arranged in checkerboard patterns, many sit inside federal lands that are now wilderness study areas; they’re like holes in a doughnut. Critics, including Bishop, say this effectively makes the land undevelopable, leading to underfunded schools. (The real cause of that problem, many believe, has been Utah’s tax-averse citizenry.) However, these state lands can be legally mined and drilled, and the federal government has to allow access to them, even through potential wilderness. That’s why Groene calls them “a ticking bomb.”

http://go.uen.org/6ar (Outside magazine)

 


 

 

Emery County lands council welcomes new member

 

The Emery County public lands council welcomed Kim McFarlane as their newest member. He is from Green River. He works at the Green River Medical Center. They see people there from all around the United States and from outside the country as well. He is an avid horsemen who grew up in Price. His father was born and raised in Cleveland and he spends a lot of time riding horses in Huntington Canyon.

Bryan Torgersen from SITLA asked the BLM to make sure SITLA has access to their lands as the BLM works through the travel plan. SITLA has been working to extend the lease on the Industrial Park in Green River. SITLA is reviewing the Public Lands Initiative. SITLA has asked Elmo if they would like the Victor cemetery. The Elmo council will discuss it in their meeting.

SITLA is leasing their land to the BLM for the bouldering. The lease fee will be paid by the American Alpine Club. Torgersen said it is SITLA’s concern that is not the highest and best use for state land. The highest use is for oil and gas. They will have signage at the spot there to highlight SITLA’s purpose.

Player asked if SITLA would be interested in trading that land out. Torgersen said there is a huge resource there for oil and gas and they aren’t excited to give it up, but they could look into it. The grazing rules have been approved by the SITLA board.

Johnson asked everyone to be aware of a Margaret Dayton bill that wants to change the Utah constitution to limit the money that can go into the schools, to cap it. Torgersen said the interest from the permanent fund is the only discretionary funds the schools have to use. He would be surprised if the bill goes anywhere.

http://go.uen.org/6au (Emery County Progress)

 


 

 

Too much testing? How high-stakes testing impacts our children

 

SALT LAKE CITY — Students in Jennifer Boehme’s sixth-grade class have taken several tests since Christmas break, and they’ve got several more to come.

“Right now, my kids, it’s like once a week they’re having a pretty major test and they get tired of it,” she said.

By the end of the year, they will have completed 40 hours of testing. By the time they graduate from high school, they will have taken 113 standardized tests, according to a nationwide study by the Great City Schools, which is aimed at addressing the test burden.

http://go.uen.org/6a2 (KSL)

 


 

 

School districts implement “late start” snow day policy

 

A new snow day policy is in place for the Cache County School District and Logan City School District.

Representatives from the two districts spoke a couple of months ago regarding the fact that many of the school districts in the Salt Lake City area and Utah County have put in place a “late start” policy for snow days rather than canceling school, according to Cache County School District Deputy Superintendent Mike Liechty.

“We can still count that as a legal school day,” Liechty said during the Feb. 18 Cache County School District Board of Education meeting.

He continued, “This is something we hopefully won’t have to use, but we just want to let the board know that we want to put in place a late-start condition rather than just saying school is canceled.”

Liechty said the latest school could start would be two hours after the regular time. The school day would still end the same as scheduled.

http://go.uen.org/69W (LHJ)

 


 

 

Logan High surpasses goal for 6-year-old’s wish

 

Logan High School reported success after last week’s fundraiser in which students helped raise money for children involved in Make-A-Wish Utah, including 6-year-old Aden Thomas, who has acute lymphocytic leukemia.

Aden, who attends Thomas Edison Charter School-South, will go to Disney World with his family in June with the funds raised by Logan High and the community in conjunction with Make-A-Wish Utah.

“I’m just really happy that we did it,” Studentbody President Matthew Fife said. “I’m also proud of our studentbody for doing something that we’ve never done before and overachieving at it.”

http://go.uen.org/69X (LHJ)

 


 

 

Richfield student honors school’s biggest fan with special needs in unique way

 

RICHFIELD — It’s been almost nine years since Garrison Thalman studied at Richfield High School, but the “true blue Wildcat” is still actively supporting the school’s sports programs, according to his mother, Ilene Thalman.

Garrison Thalman has pervasive developmental disorders with an IQ of about 50, Ilene Thalman said. While in high school, he was involved in track. Since graduation, he continually cheers on several of the sports teams.

“He has his own little pretend games when he’s home. … He knows who he’s going to beat, and so it’s just … a highlight of his life, the sports events,” she said.

Richfield High School softball coach Dave Clark has helped keep Garrison Thalman involved. Weekly, Clark takes him to lunch and spends time introducing him to the student athletes.

http://go.uen.org/6a0 (KSL)

 


 

 

Highland High students raise money to send 7-year-old cancer patient to Disney World

 

SALT LAKE CITY — Highland High is a large school, but it’s a close-knit community. Teens saved their lunch money, held fundraisers and did odd jobs — all to help Sam’s wish come true.

Students packed the school gymnasium wearing color-coded T-shirts to represent their grades, singing and dancing, with a little bald princess taking center stage. Seven-year-old Sam Boss bravely battles Ewing’s sarcoma, a rare malignant tumor that forms in the bone or soft tissue. She began chemotherapy in February 2015 and finished at the end of November 2015.

http://go.uen.org/6a1 (KSL)

 


 

 

School board meets in Green River hears GRHS/Book Cliff report

 

The Emery District school board met at Green River High for their February meeting. Superintendent Kirk Sitterud announced Sonia Torres was the apples for teacher winner for February. She will receive her award in her classroom from KUSA radio.

http://go.uen.org/6av (Emery County Progress)

 

 

 

 

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OPINION & COMMENTARY

————————————————————

 

State preparing a pro-fossil fuels agenda for public schools

Salt Lake Tribune commentary by columnist PAUL ROLLY

 

While environmental groups complain they are being ignored by legislators at the Utah State Capitol when trying to make comments on clean air initiatives, state officials are making sure the industries that critics cite as air polluters are getting their message out loud and clear.

The Utah Office of Energy Development is soliciting public school educators to help develop a science curricula promoting non-renewable energy — or fossil fuels.

An email to educators said the OED is working with the Consumer Energy Alliance to develop the curricula. CEA is a pro-fossil fuels organization that has endorsed offshore oil drilling in the Arctic and is opposed to the Clean Power Plan.

The educators have been invited to a series of meetings, beginning this week and lasting through April and possibly into May, according to the email.

The educators are being asked to brain storm ideas for a good curricula that teaches students all the good things about fossil fuels.

This isn’t the first time a state agency has tried to sway young minds toward a certain public policy position using school resources to do so.

http://go.uen.org/6aA

 


 

 

Girls and STEM: Why So Much Chatter?

KSTU commentary by IM Flash

 

STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math) is a big buzzword in education now, especially with girls.  Why?

According to the National Girls Collaborative Project, girls and boys have similar abilities in math and science, but males are three times more likely to be interested in STEM majors and careers.1  Women only earn 18% of engineering degrees compared to 82% of men.

We asked females working at the tech company IM Flash what advice they would give to girls who are trying to figure out what field to study. IM Flash, based in Lehi, Utah, makes memory and recruits engineers and technicians from all over the world to help make their chips.

http://go.uen.org/6aq

 


 

 

SB 45 and truancy

Deseret News letter from M. Donald Thomas

 

In my 40 years as an educator, I was confronted with a number of ideas to “fix” our schools. Not one of them, however, was as unreasonable as punishing parents for a child’s truancy. Therefore, the Utah Legislature should pass SB 45. Truancy is a major issue that affects the operation and success of a school. However, rather than punishing parents, concentration should be on identifying and resolving the causes of truancy.

Research in this area indicates that truancy is strongly related to the education level of parents, the economic conditions of the family (usually accompanied by health issues) and insufficient school support for troubled students.

http://go.uen.org/69T

 


 

 

School lunches illustrate problem

(Provo) Daily Herald letter form Melanie Ward

 

School lunches. I hear the complaints of this audacity every day. “Thanks, Michelle Obama!”

We want to have healthier lunches for kids so our lunches are of the highest quality, for sure. It is normal to only pay $2.25 for a greasy, small, piece of crust with some sauce slapped on it, some shreds of cheese, and some chunks of pepperoni, called “pizza.” As a side, there are always a few pieces of lettuce and shreds of carrot, that they call “salad.”

Now we are served a whole new style of applesauce! This “applesauce” comes in all colors and flavors, and I’m sure it has minimal sugar content!

I’m not one to be completely ungrateful, but this is how it is! Thanks, Michelle Obama! I am really seeing the effects of healthier food and happy children!

So what can be done? What ever happened to education being run by the state and not the federal government? Schools all over the U.S. need to stop accepting money from the federal government, or else the control will be in their hands.

http://go.uen.org/69V

 


 

 

Not impressed with Madsen

(Provo) Daily Herald letter from Matt Woolley

 

As a teacher in one of Utah’s public schools, I see great things happen in my school every day. Dedicated teachers and staff members expend incredible effort to enhance the learning of all students at my school.

That’s why it was so disappointing to meet my state senator, Mark Madsen, at a recent community event. It was clear to me that he was not there to hear the perspectives of those in attendance.

He criticized teachers for not being true professionals. He claimed that schools would not need to be micromanaged and would receive adequate funding if we would just do our job. When a question came up about class sizes, he stated that the UEA and the local district re-routed any funds to reduce class size into administrative costs.

This is not true. A little research would have shown that the district in which Sen. Madsen resides has some of the lowest administrative costs in the state.

http://go.uen.org/6at

 


 

 

Trump Says He’d Kill Common Core. No, He Couldn’t.

Slate commentary by Jessica Huseman, a fellow for the Teacher Project, and columnist Laura Moser

 

In his South Carolina victory speech Saturday night, Donald Trump spent an unusual amount of time outlining his vision, such as it is, for demolishing Common Core, which, to hear him tell it, has forced the educational bureaucracy of Washington, D.C., on unsuspecting classrooms all over America. Of his plans for winning America’s educational future, Trump said:

“Common Core is gone. We are getting rid of Common Core. We’re bringing education to a local level. The people in this community—every time I see them, they want education locally. The parents, the teachers. They want to do it—they don’t want bureaucrats in Washington telling them how to educate their children.”

There was nothing new in this light-on-facts rhetoric, which echoes that of other GOP candidates. Trump has made the same easily debunked claims, which seem to be the whole of his K–12 platform, in nearly identical language, before.

http://go.uen.org/69P

 


 

 

Eight Things to Know About the Next Generation Science Standards

Education Week commentary by columnist Liana Heitin

 

By now you may have heard that there’s a set of common science standards that some states are adopting called the Next Generation Science Standards. But if that’s about where your knowledge ends, don’t worry, you’re not alone.

The science standards have undoubtedly taken a backseat to the Common Core State Standards, which have been the subject of ongoing political and instructional controversy. But as of last week, 18 states and the District of Columbia have adopted the Next Generation Science Standards—meaning millions of students will soon be learning the new benchmarks in their classrooms. And many more individual school districts have jumped the gun on their states, and decided to bring the science standards to their schools ahead of statewide adoption.

So why haven’t the Next Generation standards, which outline what K-12 students need to know about physical, life, and earth and space sciences, gotten the same attention and backlash as the common core? First, they’ve been adopted much more slowly. While nearly every single state adopted the common-core standards within nine months of when they were published, we’re two years into having the common science standards, and just over a third of states have opted in. Second, the states that have adopted them are taking their time with implementation. In many places, the transition will take three or four years, or even longer. And third, there are currently no assessments attached to the science standards, so the stakes are much lower for teachers, schools, and students than they are with the common core.

http://go.uen.org/6ac

 


 

 

Freedom of Education is Coming Under Attack Worldwide

National Catholic Register commentary by columnist Benjamin Harnwell

 

Freedom of religion, freedom of speech, freedom of conscience — it is difficult to open a newspaper these days without seeing some freedom or other under attack.

Soon to be added to this list of household names of besieged liberties is another: Freedom of Education, thanks in part to the recently published Index of Freedom of Education 2015/16.

Ranking 136 countries, comprising 94% of the world’s population, according to the degree of educative freedom in primary education, the Index concentrates its analysis on ‘non-governmental schools’, which are “usually run by civil society” specifying that their definition also covers “other denominations such as ‘private school’, ‘charter school’, ‘free school’, ‘independent school’, etc.”

Each country’s ranking depends on four differently weighted factors: the legal possibility to create and manage a non-governmental school; whether it is publicly funded, and if so, which pre-specified costs that funding covers; the net enrollment rate of primary education; and finally, the enrollment rate in non-governmental schools as a percentage of total primary education.

“Were it not for the strong culture of home schooling, the United States would have ranked lower than its actual 17th place at around 20th place,” Michael Donnelly, director of global outreach at the Home School Legal Defense Association, told the Register.

http://go.uen.org/6al

 

A copy of the index

http://go.uen.org/6am (Fondazione Novae Terrae)

 


 

 

The Secret to School Integration

New York Times op-ed by HALLEY POTTER and KIMBERLY QUICK of the Century Foundation

 

BY most measures, America’s public schools are now more racially and socioeconomically segregated than they have been for decades.

In the Northeast, 51.4 percent of black students attend schools where 90 percent to 100 percent of their classmates are racial minorities, up from 42.7 percent in 1968. In the country’s 100 largest school districts, economic segregation rose roughly 30 percent from 1991 to 2010.

In some ways, it’s as if Brown v. Board of Education never happened. Increasing residential segregation and a string of unfavorable court cases are partly to blame. But too many local school officials are loath to admit the role that their enrollment policies play in perpetuating de facto segregation.

http://go.uen.org/69G

 


 

 

Why U.S. states earn poor marks on public ed support

A look at new legislation, and the report that shows there are no ‘silver bullets’ to improve schools

Hechinger Report commentary by CAROL BURRIS, Executive Director of the Network for Public Education

 

The recent passage of the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) can provide a new opportunity for states to engage in initiatives to strengthen their public schools.

After the passage of No Child Left Behind (NCLB), states assumed the role of supervisors of compliance, rather than initiators of change. ESSA will shift considerable responsibility for education policy and accountability from the federal government back to the states. Now states will have freedom to alter teacher evaluation systems as they see fit, and will have greater freedom in how they develop accountability systems and how they use the results of tests.

As we embark on this new era of state responsibility and reform, it is important to step back and evaluate the extent to which each state is already supporting (or undermining) its public schools.                               The Network for Public Education’s new report entitled “Valuing Public Education: A 50 State Report Card,” provides a window into what policies and practices we can expect from our states. It evaluates how well each of the fifty states and the District of Columbia are presently supporting their public schools, based on objective and measurable factors identified by the Network for Public Education and a research team at the University of Arizona.

The report card gives high grades to states for embracing policies that help make their public schools vibrant and strong — a well-trained, professional teaching force, adequate and equitable funding wisely spent, and social conditions that give all students a better opportunity for educational success. And it lowers the grades of states that have embraced privatization and rely on testing to set graduation standards, promotion standards and teacher accountability.

http://go.uen.org/6ae

 

A copy of the report

http://go.uen.org/6af (Googledocs)

 


 

 

Bunkum Award 2015

National Education Policy Center commentary

 

The National Education Policy Center is pleased to announce the winner of the 2015 Bunkum Award, recognizing the think tank whose reviewed work best captures the true spirit of bunk, starring in a feature report.

With the Oscar celebration next week, and the Emmys and Pulitzers on the way, the National Education Policy Center announces this year’s winner of its Bunkum Award. We invite you to enjoy our 10th annual tongue-in-cheek salute to the most egregiously shoddy think tank reports.

It’s not easy to laugh when data are manipulated and made to fit foregone conclusions or when the research literature is misrepresented or ignored and low-quality or dishonest “evidence” has real impact on policy and on children. As best we can tell, polar bears aren’t laughing at reports from the American Petroleum Institute.

Yet “humor is one of the best ingredients of survival,” according to Aung San Suu Kyi—whose travails have been far weightier than ours. So we will persevere in our commitment to having a bit of fun each year with the evidentiary farce-lympics.

The Think Twice Think Tank Review Project arose as a response to the often-outsized policy influence of glossy, well-publicized reports that have not been vetted by peer-review. These reports regularly wrap themselves in the veneer of research, but they are frequently little more than propaganda masquerading as social science.

http://go.uen.org/6a6

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

————————————————————-

NATIONAL NEWS

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Alexander Expects Speedy Approval For Obama’s Next Education Secretary

Nashville (TN) WPLN

 

While Tennessee Senator Lamar Alexander is one of the Republicans trying to slow-walk a new Supreme Court justice following the death of Antonin Scalia, he’s in a hurry to confirm a new education secretary.

He says John King wouldn’t be his choice. But Alexander says the country also needs someone in charge right now.

“Especially during this year when we’re going to be implementing the law that fixed No Child Left Behind, it’s important to have in place a secretary that is confirmed by the Senate and accountable to the Senate.”

That overhaul to No Child Left Behind was shepherded through congress by Alexander, himself a former Education Secretary.

Alexander now chairs the senate committee overseeing education. He’s scheduled a hearing for Thursday and hopes to have King confirmed before the Easter recess. King is already the acting secretary following the departure of Arne Duncan. King was Duncan’s deputy and the former education commissioner in New York state.

To fend off any accusations of inconsistency, Alexander says an education secretary will only last until President Obama leaves office in 11 months, whereas a Supreme Court term lasts a lifetime.

http://go.uen.org/69O

 


 

 

Rule for Identifying Racial Bias in Special Education Proposed by Ed. Department

Education Week

 

The U.S. Department of Education wants all states to start using a standard approach in measuring whether they are identifying minority students for special education services at higher rates than their peers.

In a proposed rule released Tuesday, officials said that the change would likely prompt many more districts to be classified as having “significant disproportionality,” which, under the Individuals with Disabilities Act, means they would have to set aside a portion of their federal funds to fix the problem. Significant disproportionality also applies to student discipline, and to student placement—for example, whether a student is moved outside of a regular classroom.

http://go.uen.org/6a4

 

http://go.uen.org/6a8 (AP)

 

A copy of the proposed rule

http://go.uen.org/6a5 (ED)

 


 

Bridging a Digital Divide That Leaves Schoolchildren Behind

New York Times

 

McALLEN, Tex. — At 7 p.m. on a recent Wednesday, Isabella and Tony Ruiz were standing in their usual homework spot, on a crumbling sidewalk across the street from the elementary school nearest to their home.

“I got it. I’m going to download,” Isabella said to her brother Tony as they connected to the school’s wireless hot spot and watched her teacher’s math guide slowly appear on the cracked screen of the family smartphone.

Isabella, 11, and Tony, 12, were outside the school because they have no Internet service at home — and connectivity is getting harder. With their mother, Maria, out of work for months and money coming only from their father, Isaias, who washes dishes, the family had cut back on almost everything, including their cellphone data plan.

So every weeknight, the siblings stood outside the low­slung school, sometimes for hours, to complete homework for the sixth grade.

“There’s just no funds left,” Maria Ruiz said later outside the family’s white clapboard rental home. “It worries me because it will become more important to have Internet when they have to do more homework.”

With many educators pushing for students to use resources on the Internet with class work, the federal government is now grappling with a stark disparity in access to technology, between students who have high­speed Internet at home and an estimated five million families who are without it and who are struggling to keep up.

The challenge is felt across the nation

http://go.uen.org/69F

 


 

 

Online Charter Schools Tested by Setbacks and Self-Inflicted Blows

NBC

 

Online charter schools have soared in popularity in recent years, based on a deceptively simple promise: delivering quality instruction — anytime and anywhere — to any student with an Internet connection.

But new questions about the quality of that education, and how the schools operate, are threatening to stifle that growth.

Supporters of traditional public school systems say the online schools lack accountability and are too dependent on for-profit school managers. High-profile scandals have added to the perception.

The criticism has sharpened since an October 2015 study of 200 online charter schools that serve approximately 200,000 students in 26 states. It found that charter students who received instruction exclusively via the Internet achieved “significantly weaker academic performance” in math and reading, suffered from larger class sizes and received far less attention from teachers than those in traditional schools.

The study — funded by the pro-charter Walton Family Foundation and comprised of three separate reports by Stanford’s Center for Research on Education Outcomes (CREDO), the Center for Reinventing Public Education (CRPE) at the University of Washington and Mathematica, a private policy research company — found the education deficit was “exacerbated by high student-teacher ratios and minimal student-teacher contact time.”

http://go.uen.org/69R

 


 

 

Louisiana voucher students did worse at new schools, study says

New Orleans Times-Picayune

 

Louisiana’s private school voucher program was billed as an exit hatch for students from bad public schools. But it was more like a trap door, according to a study released Monday (Feb. 22) by the University of Arkansas and the Education Research Alliance for New Orleans at Tulane University.

Vouchers were a signature achievement of Gov. Bobby Jindal’s administration. But at a time when Jindal’s successor, John Bel Edwards, and lawmakers are working to close a $2 billion budget gap, the study raises the question of whether this high-profile program did more harm than good in its first two years.

The initial results were devastating. Already behind academically, the students did even worse after one year at their new schools. Their state mathematics test scores fell 24 percentile points below those of their peers who were not awarded a voucher. Their English scores fell 8 percentile points below.

After the second year, the scholarship students hadn’t recovered even to where they began in mathematics. The researchers can’t rule out the possibility that they returned to baseline in English, but they think those scores remained lower as well. Meanwhile, their peers who stayed at public school did slightly better.

“The … students are learning less each year,” alliance director Doug Harris said Monday afternoon.

http://go.uen.org/6ai

 

Copies of the studies

http://go.uen.org/6aj (Education Research Alliance)

 

http://go.uen.org/6ak (Education Research Alliance)

 


 

 

Ed. Groups Urge ‘Whole-Child’ Approach to Counteract Poverty

Aim is to address barriers to success

Education Week

 

Two K-12 initiatives that are launching this week aim to capitalize on the mounting support for taking a more holistic approach to educating poor children, a shift away from the view that has heavily emphasized that schools alone can counteract the effects of poverty.

Expected to be unveiled this week, the first effort is a new project from Harvard University’s Education Redesign Lab that is helping local city and school leaders link agencies responsible for children’s services—such as mayor’s offices, school systems, and social services agencies—to work together to address both in-school and out-of-school factors that affect student learning.

In the six cities that are participating—Oakland, Calif.; Louisville, Ky; Providence, R.I.; and Salem, Somerville, and Newton, Mass.— mayors will set up children’s cabinets to coordinate the efforts.

The second initiative is a re-launch of a “Broader, Bolder Approach to Education,” a group which first started in 2008 and has pushed for more comprehensive, “whole-child” strategies for educating students in poverty that was meant to be a counter-force to the “no-excuses” strategy, which tended to focus on reforms related to the teaching profession. Leaders of the group say there is new momentum for their policy agenda, including passage of the Every Student Succeeds Act which requires states and districts to judge schools’ success on a broader set of metrics than test scores.

http://go.uen.org/6a9

 


 

 

The names in the schoolhouse door: UA students question building names

(University of Alabama) Crimson White

 

In the words of author Harper Lee, “Simply because we were licked a hundred years before we started is no reason for us not to try to win.”

After 105 years, University of Alabama students are banding together and petitioning to change the name of the English department building, demanding it be changed to a more appropriate name – specifically after “To Kill a Mockingbird” author Harper Lee. Feb. 19, the day that UA alumna Lee died, was the day a UA student saw an opportunity to take something tragic and turn it around. It was the day she launched a petition on change.org demanding President Stuart Bell change Morgan Hall to Lee Hall.

“It’s appalling to me that students of color have to walk around buildings named after people who wouldn’t have wanted them to get an education and might have even wanted to harm them,” said Jessica Hauger, a senior majoring in history and anthropology who started the petition. “We have so many amazing people who went to this University, why not name a building like Morgan Hall after Harper Lee instead of some KKK Dragon?”

http://go.uen.org/69H

 

http://go.uen.org/69J (WaPo)

 

http://go.uen.org/69I (NBC)

 


 

 

This Marine vet was banned from his kid’s school after objecting to Islam lessons

Washington Post

 

John Kevin Wood says his daughter’s school has banned him from campus for more than a year, illegally punishing him for raising objections to classroom lessons about Islam. Now he’s gone to court for help, asking a judge to remove the ban so he can watch his daughter graduate from high school.

“She’s in the final semester of her senior year, and as it stands right now, she’s going to have to go through that life experience without her dad there,” said Kate Oliveri, a lawyer from the Michigan-based Thomas More Law Center who is representing the Wood family.

The dispute dates to October 2014, when Wood’s daughter showed him several assignments for her 11th grade World History class at La Plata High in Charles County, Md.

http://go.uen.org/6a7

 


 

 

Building Social-Emotional Skills May Be Key to Classroom Management, Study Says

Education Week

 

Classroom management can take any number of approaches, but a metastudy published in late January finds that some types of interventions tend to have higher success than others.

Parsing through 54 studies of classroom-management programs at the primary school level, researchers from the University of Groningen, in the Netherlands, grouped interventions based on where those initiatives focused:

* Teacher behavior;

* Student behavior;

* Teacher-student relationships; or

* Students’ social-emotional development

Each of the programs was examined for its effect on a range of outcomes, including academic, behavioral, social-emotional, and motivational outcomes. While many of the interventions did show some effect, one of the more highly studied interventions, School-Wide Positive Behavior Supports, showed no effect in terms of improving all outcomes together.

http://go.uen.org/69L

 

A copy of the study

http://go.uen.org/69M (GION)

 


 

 

Why the U.S. Gets a Failing Grade at Financial Education

The Street

 

It’s seemingly in the headlines every other day — Americans not saving enough for retirement, college or even a rainy day.

Are Americans really bad at saving, or do they not really understand money?

A biennial study conducted by the Council for Economic Education that examines how the nation is educating young people on finance found the number of states that require high school students to take a course in economics has dropped to 20 — two fewer states than in 2014. There also has been no change in the number of states requiring standardized testing of economic concepts since 2014.

“Simply put, it is a lack of emphasis on financial education in the primary and secondary schools,” said Robert Johnson, president and CEO of The American College of Financial Services. Johnson said according to the council’s study, only 17 states require students to take a personal finance course as a high school requirement.

“This lack of financial literacy is a major factor in the burgeoning student loan debt crisis.” he added. “And, the lack of financial literacy contributed to the financial crisis of 2008-09, as many Americans didn’t understand how variable rate mortgage debt worked.”

http://go.uen.org/6an

 


 

 

Education opt-out bill advances in Arizona Senate

Cronkite News via (Tempe, AZ) East Valley Tribune

 

A Senate bill that would allow parents to opt their children out of the state standardized test and choose a different assessment passed in the Education Committee with a margin of 6-1 late last week.

Its next stop is before the full Senate.

Currently, AzMERIT is the test being used in Arizona schools, but opting out is difficult.

“Last spring when I opted my fifth-grade son out of the AzMERIT test, I was told by my child’s principal that he would have to sit and stare for hours in front of a computer until the majority of students were done taking the test,” parent Sophia Cogan testified Thursday.

The U.S. Department of Education is threatening to cut funding if enough students opt out.

Sen. Steve Smith, R-Maricopa, said he supports the bill anyway.

“I hope and pray one day we can actually take back our dollars that we send Washington and allocate them in our state, for our children, the way we want to,” Smith said.

http://go.uen.org/69N

 


 

 

Courts Push Lawmakers to the Wall on Funding

Kansas, Washington face hard deadlines

Education Week

 

Again and again, state supreme courts in Washington and Kansas have deemed their states’ school funding formulas unconstitutional, in various rulings spread over a number of years.

In response, state legislatures—in the view of the impatient justices—have either dragged their feet, backpedaled, or come up with inadequate solutions.

Both courts seem to be fed up.

http://go.uen.org/6aa

 


 

 

Study In Your PJs? What A High School ‘Work From Home Day’ Looks Like

NPR

 

One cold Monday this month, all the students of Park Ridge High School stayed home: wearing their pj’s, munching on pretzels and Oreos, hanging out on the couch.

It wasn’t a snow day or measles epidemic. It was the school’s first Virtual Day, where in-person classes were replaced with written lessons and real-time video chats delivered online.

The idea arose because the school, just north of New York City in Park Ridge, N.J., issued every student a Mac laptop last year, says Tina Bacolas, the school’s head of instructional technology.

The school chose a software system called Schoology that allows students and teachers to communicate by text and video and post assignments.

“Once we had that up and running, the idea of a virtual school day was thrown out there,” as a way of testing those capabilities, Bacolas told NPR Ed.

http://go.uen.org/6a3

 

http://go.uen.org/6ab (Ed Week)

 


 

 

Red spaghetti straps kept a girl out of school and now there’s a review of L.A.’s dress codes

Los Angeles Times

 

About 160 schools in L.A. Unified’s central area will be asked to reexamine their dress codes to make sure students are not missing class time because of their clothes.

Roberto Martinez, the district’s central area superintendent, is leading the charge after questions raised about an October incident at the Ramon C. Cortines School of Visual and Performing Arts. All the schools in his area, which includes Downtown, will review their dress codes and make sure they align with the district’s policy by the end of the school year, according to Martinez.

On a hot fall day, a student named Mary “James” Salazar wore a red dress with thin shoulder straps to Grand Arts, the school’s informal name. She says she was told her clothes were too revealing and distracting, and she refused to wear a sweater from lost and found that was offered to her, or to ask her mother to bring clothes. As a result, James said she spent most of the day in the office instead of learning in class.

Administrators at the school in question either did not respond to multiple requests for comment or, through a district spokeswoman, declined to comment on the incident involving James’ dress code violation.

Martinez said he would ask all the schools in his area to revisit their dress codes after The Times asked him about a discrepancy between the district policy and that of Grand Arts.

“If the girl was actually kept out of class, that was a mistake,” Martinez said. “All school personnel need to know children are not to be kept from class or their instruction.”

http://go.uen.org/69Q

 


 

 

Bill and Melinda Gates Ask Teens to Work on Global Clean Energy, Women’s Liberation

In annual letter, philanthropists look to tomorrow’s scientists to help fix development problems

Wall Street Journal

 

Bill and Melinda Gates regularly challenge global leaders and policy makers to help them solve the world’s biggest development problems.

Now they’re out to mobilize the next generation, too.

In their latest annual letter, the billionaire philanthropists call on high-school students to embrace two of their most recent and ambitious goals: clean energy for the entire globe, and liberating women in developing countries from unpaid labor.

Mr. Gates exhorts tomorrow’s scientists to create an “energy miracle” that will light up Africa and other impoverished regions with cheap, clean electricity. More than one billion people today live without access to energy; a photo in the annual letter shows swaths of the African continent in complete darkness at night. He predicts a breakthrough in clean-energy technology in the next 15 years.

“There are many paths we can explore,” he said in an interview, citing solar fuels and tapping wind power from the jet stream. “As we go down these dozens of paths, we need lots of companies in each one. And only a few really need to fully solve the problem and then get deployed so that by 2050 we have a very different energy makeup.”

Last year, the Microsoft Corp. co-founder pledged to invest $1 billion in clean-energy technology over five years and launched an energy research initiative backed by more than two dozen private donors.

Mrs. Gates urges teens to find new ways to liberate women in developing countries from the backbreaking, unpaid work that eats up time and prevents them from advancing in their own lives—hauling buckets of water long distances, washing clothes by hand and cooking over an open flame. Globally, women spend twice as much time on unpaid work as men, and they do less paid work, she wrote.

http://go.uen.org/6ag

 

A copy of the letter

http://go.uen.org/6ah (Gates Foundation)

 


 

 

Pearson Business Strategy Assailed by Investors, Including Chicago Teacher’s Pension Fund

Coalition Worries About Pearson’s Poor Financial Performance Impacting Pensions

Education Week

 

Teachers’ union pension funds that invest in Pearson PLC joined with other public sector investors today in petitioning the education giant to “urgently review its business strategy,” citing the company’s “tumbling revenue and plunging stock prices.”

The coalition that submitted a shareholder resolution represents 40,000 of Pearson’s voting shares and hails from the United Kingdom and United States.

The Chicago Teachers’ Pension Fund and the Trade Union Fund Managers–which counts Great Britain’s National Union of Teachers among its members–are among the groups represented.

Other parties to the resolution are the UNISON Staff Pension Fund, which is based in the U.K., and 130 individual shareholders.

The concern is that “without a clear recovery plan, their [the investors’] multimillion-dollar investment in Pearson stock will continue to fall, jeopardizing pension payments to current and future retirees, and increasing the chance hedge funds will be attracted to the stock,” according to a statement released by the coalition.

The unions and other investors are taking Pearson to task for its reliance on the “high-stakes testing market” and they want the company to halt its plans to establish for-profit private schools in the developing world.

http://go.uen.org/6ad

 

 

 

 

 

————————————————————

CALENDAR

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USOE Calendar

http://www.schools.utah.gov/main/CALENDAR.aspx

 

 

UEN News

http://www.uen.org

 

 

February 23:

Senate Education Committee meeting

8 a.m., 215 Senate Building

http://le.utah.gov/~2016/agenda/SEDU0223.ag.htm

 

House Government Operations Committee meeting

8 a.m., 30 House Building

http://le.utah.gov/~2016/agenda/HGOC0223.ag.htm

 

Senate Business and Labor Committee meeting

8 a.m., 215 Senate Building

http://le.utah.gov/~2016/agenda/SBUS0223.ag.htm

 

House Education Committee meeting

4:10 p.m., 30 House Building

http://le.utah.gov/~2016/agenda/HEDU0223.ag.htm

 

 

February 24:

Senate Revenue and Taxation Committee meeting

8 a.m., 250 Senate Building

http://le.utah.gov/~2016/agenda/SREV0224.ag.htm

 

 

February 25:

Utah State Board of Education legislative meeting

Noon, 210 Senate Building

http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspx

 

 

March 10:

Utah State Charter School Board meeting

250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://go.uen.org/62M

 

 

March 17:

Utah State Board of Education study session and committee meetings

250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspx

 

 

March 18:

Utah State Board of Education meeting

250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/M

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