Education News Roundup: March 17, 2016

busEducation News Roundup

Today’s Top Picks:

 

Good luck to the T.H. Bell Jr. High team at the National Academic League finals.

http://go.uen.org/6pj (OSE)

 

Utah State Board of Education Member Jefferson Moss announces a run for the Utah House.

http://go.uen.org/6pl (PDH)

 

You can check out all of the candidate filings here: http://go.uen.org/6pC (Utah)

 

Trib editorial board gives a half-hearted embrace to the proposed fix to the Utah State Board of Education election process.

http://go.uen.org/6p1 (SLT)

 

Does “throwing money at the problem” work in education?

http://go.uen.org/6pz (Washington Center for Equitable Growth) or a copy of the report http://go.uen.org/6pA (Washington Center for Equitable Growth)

 

U.S. schools cope with an influx of migrant students.

http://go.uen.org/6py (Ed Week)

 

 

 

 

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TODAY’S HEADLINES

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UTAH

 

T.H. Bell Junior High academic team to compete for national championship

 

Coffins and competitions: Building unity, attendance at West High

 

Republican candidate announces run for Utah House District 2

 

‘Dark secrets’ assignment at Lone Peak High stirs controversy

 

Utah school districts struggling to find school bus drivers

 

Father of sexually abused girl sues imprisoned bus driver, school district

 

FFA convention — helping to plant the seeds of knowledge

 

Provo School District makes changes to gifted programs

 

Hillcrest High School Students Tackle Greek Myths in “Argonautika”

 

Southern Utah students kick tobacco

 


 

 

OPINION & COMMENTARY

 

A step forward for school board choices

 

Future college student worried about tuition increases at Utah schools

 

How Trump Can Make Education Great Again He wants Americans to be more competitive internationally. Here’s how to do it.

 

How The Language Of Special Education Is Evolving

 

“Throwing money at the problem” may actually work in education

 


 

 

NATION

 

Immigrant Influxes Put U.S. Schools to the Test Minn. district grapples with Somali language, cultural differences

 

Lead taints drinking water in hundreds of schools, day cares across USA Some 350 Water Systems That Failed Led Tests in Recent Years Provide Drinking Water to School and Child-care Centers

 

Charters Suspend Blacks, Students With Disabilities More Than Peers

 

Groups Urge Congress to Boost Funding for Disadvantaged Students in Budget

 

Parents can’t sue Pa. school district over supposed bullying by students, teacher, court says

 

Mpls. school board changes deadline, process for picking new superintendent Selection committee will see trimmed list of applicants, with final choice due in June.

 

Douglas County narrowly OKs new school voucher program New program excludes religious schools but still raises ire of voucher opponents

 

The great FLOTUS food fight

For the first time, the inside story of how Michelle Obama changed American nutrition.

 

Kids who eat two breakfasts are less likely to be overweight than those who eat none

 

Safety Inspections System for Indian School Facilities Flawed, Report Finds

 

Hillary Clinton Releases New Ad Targeting Arizona’s Abysmal Education Record

 

 

 

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UTAH NEWS

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T.H. Bell Junior High academic team to compete for national championship

 

WASHINGTON TERRACE — A Weber County junior high academic team will compete for a national championship Friday, March. 18.

T.H. Bell Junior High’s National Academic League (NAL) team has advanced to the championship match after defeating a team from Baltimore, Maryland in the semifinals.

The Minutemen NAL team will face Hanes Magnet School of Winston-Salem, North Carolina — the defending national champs — in a match to be held at noon Friday, according to a statement from Weber School District.

http://go.uen.org/6pj (OSE)

 


 

 

Coffins and competitions: Building unity, attendance at West High

 

SALT LAKE CITY — Dangling from the walls and ceiling of West High School’s fourth floor, handmade zombies, mummies, werewolves and vampire coffins inscribed with teachers’ last names exude an atmosphere akin to the Halloween season.

Meanwhile, a voice over the school PA system gives a daily recap of points earned by each class in contests of dodge ball, lip-syncing, dress and dance.

But student leaders and teachers this week have two somewhat unexpected purposes in mind for the eerie props and raucous activities: school spirit and classroom attendance.

http://go.uen.org/6pg (DN)

 


 

 

Republican candidate announces run for Utah House District 2

 

Jefferson Moss is hoping to represent the Cedar Valley area and the city of Saratoga Springs by becoming a Republican candidate for the Utah House District 2 seat.

Moss has to be selected as a nominee on Tuesday first to get his name on the ballot this fall.

“I grew up in a family that was very passionate about public service and my dad at a young age had a law degree from Stanford, very intelligent guy, rather than going out pursuing fame and riches, actually went and worked for the LDS Church and was committed to that,” Moss said.

Moss’ father later became involved in the state legislature and was state superintendent of schools.

“So he had a life as a public servant. My mother always was on several different boards,” Moss said. “In my family that is just what you do. You get involved. You have gifts and talents. How do you put those to work?”

Not only did he grow up surrounded in an environment of service and political responsibility, Moss has experienced political governing at the local level as a Saratoga Springs councilman and at the state level on the Utah State Board of Education.

http://go.uen.org/6pl (PDH)

 


 

 

‘Dark secrets’ assignment at Lone Peak High stirs controversy

 

HIGHLAND, Utah — Students at Lone Peak High School are upset with their English teacher after they say she forced them to talk about their deepest secrets in class.

It all began with the book “Speak,” about a teenager with a deep secret. Later in the book it turned out the secret was she had been raped.

Teachers decided to branch out and ask their students to write down their own secrets but some students say these secrets are too serious to be discussed in class.

“They attempted suicide, that their dad had been in jail for five years, they were addicted to drugs,” said sophomore Cody Collins.

These are just a few of the secrets that Collins said his classmates were forced to talk about in their 10th grade English class on Monday. He said it was uncomfortable because it was so real.

http://go.uen.org/6ps (KSTU)

 


 

Utah school districts struggling to find school bus drivers

 

For the last few years, many Utah public schools have seen a serious shortage in bus drivers and it has officials concerned for their students.

In Southern Utah, the Washington county school district currently has about 100 drivers on staff. Transportation Director, Launi Schmutz-Harden, says it’s not enough. Schmutz-Harden said the district could use 30 more drivers to be comfortable, but that continues to be difficult.

A school bus driver has different hours than most jobs. Two hours in the morning to pick up kids and take them to school and three in the afternoon to drop them off at home.

http://go.uen.org/6po (KUTV)

 


 

 

Father of sexually abused girl sues imprisoned bus driver, school district

 

SALT LAKE CITY — The father of a 5-year-old special needs girl who was sexually abused on her school bus is now suing the incarcerated bus driver and the school district that employed him.

The civil rights lawsuit filed in 3rd District Court on Monday by Thomas Brown claims Canyons School District did not protect his young daughter and another girl who was abused on the bus, and that the driver, John Martin Carrell, violated the young girl’s civil rights.

The lawsuit alleges the school district failed to regularly review security footage on the bus that had been recording the abuse between March 12 and April 3, 2014. On the day Brown called the district to report a troubling statement from his daugher, Carrell was still sent to pick the girl up for school, according to the complaint.

http://go.uen.org/6ph (DN)

 

http://go.uen.org/6pp (KUTV)

 

http://go.uen.org/6pr (KSL)

 


 

 

FFA convention — helping to plant the seeds of knowledge

 

More than 1,500 members of the Utah FFA Association gathered for a statewide convention last Thursday, Friday and Saturday on the campus of Snow College Richfield.

The Utah FFA’s 88th annual state convention marks the third time the event has been hosted in Richfield.

http://go.uen.org/6pB (Richfield Reaper)

 

 


 

Provo School District makes changes to gifted programs

 

PROVO — After spending several months studying the Provo School District’s programs for gifted students, district leaders are announcing changes and expansion of the programs.

http://go.uen.org/6pi (DN)

 


 

 

Hillcrest High School Students Tackle Greek Myths in “Argonautika”

 

MIDVALE, Utah – Students at Hillcrest High School have been working hard on a brand new production.

It’s called “Argonautika: The Voyage of Jason and the Argonauts”.

It opens Thursday night and runs Friday and Saturday.

http://go.uen.org/6pq (KTVX)

 


 

 

Southern Utah students kick tobacco

 

Students in Southern Utah spent Wednesday standing up to big tobacco companies.

Utah students joined thousands of others nationwide for Kick Butts Day, which is sponsored by the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids.

The event is intended to provide students with an “opportunity to demand that tobacco companies stop marketing deadly products to them and encourage elected officials to help reduce tobacco use,” according to a news release from the organization.

Both Iron County and Washington County youth spent the afternoon playing kickball, said Kaysha Price, health educator for the Southwest Public Health Department.

http://go.uen.org/6pm (SGS)

 

http://go.uen.org/6pn (SGN)

 

 

 

 

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OPINION & COMMENTARY

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A step forward for school board choices

Salt Lake Tribune editorial

 

Before considering the major flaw in the bill that seeks to restructure the way members of the Utah State Board of Education are chosen, note the positive.

Senate Bill 78 does Utah the great favor of removing the process that filtered candidates for the state board, first through a committee made up of a who’s who of special interest groups, then through the office of the governor, before the poor peons, er, voters had any say in the matter at all.

A federal judge ruled that arrangement inconsistent with the First Amendment, holding that the principle of free speech is violated when candidates know they have to say the things that will please the nominating committee in order to even hope for a spot on the ballot.

SB78, which has passed the Legislature and awaits the governor’s signature, would replace that anti-democratic system with something Utah has far too little of: Open elections. If the bill becomes law, anyone who fancies one of the 14 seats on the body that sets policy for the state’s system of public education can file for office and answer to no one but the electorate of their individual districts.

If there are more than two hopefuls for any board seat, the state’s normal June primary election will winnow the field to two. The winner will be chosen in November.

That, anyway, is the way it would work this year. But unless something changes, the bill would change the system again for the 2018 election. Then, and thereafter, the state school board race would become a partisan affair, with most candidates first seeking the Republican, Democratic or other party nomination.

That would be too bad.

http://go.uen.org/6p1

 


 

 

Future college student worried about tuition increases at Utah schools

(Ogden) Standard-Examiner letter from Grant R. Minchey

 

I am worried about the fast tuition increases at our public universities. I am a future college student and do not want to pay a lot or go into heavy debt for my education. I hope the public universities in the state will do more to keep costs low.

http://go.uen.org/6pk

 


 

 

How Trump Can Make Education Great Again He wants Americans to be more competitive internationally. Here’s how to do it.

U.S. News & World Report op-ed by Nina Rees, president and chief executive officer of the National Alliance for Public Charter Schools

 

Donald Trump’s campaign rhetoric is heavily focused on improving America’s ability to compete. He promises a better deal for American workers in trade agreements, and a more restrictive border policy in part to prevent competition from immigrants for low-wage jobs. These positions are well-known, but another area of interest for Trump also plays into concerns about competition: education.

While much of the GOP education discussion dwells on eliminating Common Core (even though there’s not much Washington can do to eliminate these state-based standards), Trump has also talked about improving the results of U.S. students on international tests – making our students more competitive with students from around the world. He’s produced a short video on the topic, and he regularly mentions it in his primary-night stem-winders.

The main theme: expressing dismay at America’s poor standing on international tests despite spending more than other countries. His solution: sending power and control back to school districts.

http://go.uen.org/6p6

 


 

 

How The Language Of Special Education Is Evolving NPR commentary by columnist Steve Drummond

 

When we’re reporting on special education, we inevitably run up against questions of how we should refer to students with disabilities and to the disabilities themselves.

It’s a minefield, comparable to the tensions and complexity of writing about race and ethnicity.

It’s important to get it right. As journalists, of course, we want to be accurate. And clear. And we want to avoid perpetuating stereotypes or giving offense.

There are broader issues as well — not just for reporters but for teachers, parents, administrators, even the United States Supreme Court. The words we use and the ways we refer to people mirror — and shape — our perceptions, our attitudes, our behavior.

So where to begin? The “r” word has fallen out of use and good riddance. “Handicapped,” too, for the most part. Generally we don’t refer to people as “disabled,” as in “he’s a disabled student.” One good rule of thumb: avoid adjectives. They too easily become labels. Instead, try “students with disabilities.”

From there, though, the rules get more complicated. And so, for help, I called up Kristin Gilger. She’s an associate dean at the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism at Arizona State University. And she’s the director there of the National Center on Disabilities and Journalism.

Where they’ve put together a style guide to help all of us navigate this minefield.

http://go.uen.org/6pt

 

 


 

“Throwing money at the problem” may actually work in education Washington Center for Equitable Growth analysis

 

When it comes to tackling the United States’ large and growing achievement gap between high- and low-income children, today’s education policy entrepreneurs have increasingly adopted an accountability-and-evaluation mindset. Well-known policies including No Child Left Behind, Common Core standards, Race to the Top, and charter schools all stem from the conventional wisdom that we can’t just “throw money at the problem.”

But in the case of our national education policy, does this conventional wisdom hold true? Maybe not. New research by Julien Lafortune and Jesse Rothstein of the University of California, Berkeley, and Diane Whitmore Schanzenbach of Northwestern University finds that an increase in relative funding for low-income school districts actually has a profound effect on the achievement of students in those districts.

The researchers look at the impact of “adequacy”-based finance reforms, enacted by 27 states over the past 20 years. These reforms sought to ensure that low-income school districts had enough money to provide their students with a high-quality education, even if that meant that their costs exceeded that of high-income school districts—a focus on “adequacy” rather than “equity.” Within states that implemented the reforms, the funding gap between low-income and high-income districts was eradicated without cutting funds for wealthier school districts. Rather, across-the-board spending increases meant that by 2011, these states spent an average of $1,150 more per pupil in low-income districts compared to high-income districts. States that did not enact the reforms, however, maintained an $800 gap in favor of wealthier schools.

But did these increased funds for low-income districts reduce educational inequality? By comparing outcomes in the states that implemented these school finance reforms and those that did not, LaFortune, Rothstein, and Schanzenbach find that the reforms had a considerable impact on the achievement gap between high- and low-income school districts. They found that increasing funding per pupil by about $1,000 raises test scores by 0.16 standard deviations—roughly twice the impact as investing the same amount in reduced class sizes (according to data from Project STAR, a highly acclaimed study of Tennessee schools in the 1980s).

http://go.uen.org/6pz

 

A copy of the report

http://go.uen.org/6pA (Washington Center for Equitable Growth)

 

 

 

 

 

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NATIONAL NEWS

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Immigrant Influxes Put U.S. Schools to the Test Minn. district grapples with Somali language, cultural differences Education Week

 

St. Cloud, Minn. — Bishar Hassan spends his days navigating the halls and classrooms of Talahi Elementary School, working to embrace and empower the dozens of Somali students who have arrived since the start of the year.

Across town, his brother, Ahmed Hassan, fills a similar role at Discovery Community School, another campus that has experienced a recent surge in enrollment of Somali students.

The Hassan brothers are part of a growing community of Somali residents in this central Minnesota city of 65,000. The recent influx of immigrant students is nothing new in the St. Cloud school district, where English-language-learner enrollment has spiked by 350 percent in the past 15 years.

Today, roughly 20 percent of the district’s 10,000 students are English-language learners, many of them with ties to the East African nation of Somalia.

Similar situations are developing in districts around the country.

The United States is now home to the largest number of foreign-born black people in its history—and many are K-12 students enrolled in public schools. The English-learners among them are overwhelmingly native Spanish, French, or Hatian Creole speakers, but districts have had to adjust on the fly to meet the needs of students who arrive communicating in less frequently spoken languages such as Amharic, Haitan Creole, and Somali.

http://go.uen.org/6py

 


 

 

Lead taints drinking water in hundreds of schools, day cares across USA Some 350 Water Systems That Failed Led Tests in Recent Years Provide Drinking Water to School and Child-care Centers USA Today

 

Whenever Jamison Rich got thirsty after gym or recess, he took a drink from the nearest water fountain at his elementary school.

Only last month did his family learn that the water bubbling out of some fountains contained high levels of lead, a notorious toxin that can silently damage developing brains and slow growth in little bodies like his.

Recently, a blood test on the 7-year-old found more than twice the average level of lead for young children, even though as far as anyone knows he’s never come in contact with lead paint or tainted soil.

Jamison’s school, Caroline Elementary in Ithaca, N.Y., is one of hundreds across the nation where children were exposed to water containing excessive amounts of an element doctors agree is unsafe at any level, a USA TODAY NETWORK investigation found. An analysis of U.S. Environmental Protection Agency data showed about 350 schools and day-care centers failed lead tests a total of about 470 times from 2012 through 2015.

That represents nearly 20% of the water systems nationally testing above the agency’s “action level” of 15 parts per billion.

http://go.uen.org/6pw

 


 

 

Charters Suspend Blacks, Students With Disabilities More Than Peers Education Week

 

Charter schools suspend students of color and students with disabilities at higher rates than their peers, a new analysis finds. That trend mirrors disparate discipline rates in traditional public schools, although the report finds suspensions rates at charters are slightly higher on the whole.

The first-of-its kind analysis of charter school discipline data, completed by the Center for Civil Rights Remedies at the University of California Los Angeles, adds new insight to a debate that’s accelerated in recent years as traditional public schools face more scrutiny for how often they remove students from the classroom and whether their suspension policies are applied fairly across racial, ethnic, and other demographic groups such as students with disabilities.

Civil rights advocates have said charter schools have often been left out of those discussions and that some charters rely too heavily on zero-tolerance discipline policies that lead to higher suspension rates.

Analyzing the most recent federal data, which was collected by the U.S. Department of Education’s office for civil rights during the 2011-12 school year, the authors found suspension rates at about 5,000 charter schools are slightly higher than those at traditional public schools in most categories. On the whole, charter schools suspended about 7.8 percent of students that year at least once, compared to 6.7 percent of students at traditional public schools.

http://go.uen.org/6p2

 

http://go.uen.org/6p5 (NYT)

 

A copy of the study

http://go.uen.org/6p4 (Civil Rights Project at UCLA)

 


 

 

Groups Urge Congress to Boost Funding for Disadvantaged Students in Budget Education Week

 

Several education advocacy groups are asking Congress to add more money to Title I, the formula-grant program earmarked for students from low-income backgrounds, than the amount included in President Barack Obama’s proposed fiscal 2017 budget.

The groups, including the AASA (the School Administrators Association), the American Federation of Teachers, and the National Rural Education Association, say lawmakers should fund Title I at $450 million above the president’s budget. That funding increase for the program will ensure that no school district gets less funding as districts implement the first year of the Every Student Succeeds Act, the reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act signed by Obama in December, according to a letter sent by the groups on Tuesday.

http://go.uen.org/6p7

 


 

 

Parents can’t sue Pa. school district over supposed bullying by students, teacher, court says Harrisburg (PA) Patriot-News

 

Although it expressed sympathy for their arguments, a federal appeals court panel has refused to revive a lawsuit filed by two parents who claim their son was the victim of racially-motivated bullying in a Pennsylvania school district.

Sharelle and Anthony Bridges simply have no constitutional grounds to sue the Scranton School District over alleged bullying by her son’s classmates and one of his teachers, the judges on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit concluded in an opinion issued this week.

That ruling upholds a decision by U.S. Middle District Judge A. Richard Caputo to honor a school district request to dismiss the Bridges suit.

http://go.uen.org/6p9

 

A copy of the ruling

http://go.uen.org/6pa (Third Circuit Court of Appeals)

 


 

 

Mpls. school board changes deadline, process for picking new superintendent

Selection committee will see trimmed list of applicants, with final choice due in June.

Minneapolis Star Tribune

 

The Minneapolis school board now intends to have a new superintendent in place by the end of June, not May.

A selection committee the board will establish is not going to see the full slate of candidates applying. Only the chair of that committee, board member Nelson Inz, and a search firm will have that right.

And the group of people vetting the candidates has grown from nine to 11, with an extra community member and the board’s newly hired community engagement facilitator sitting at the table.

At a meeting Tuesday, the board was presented with a recommended timeline, a process for selecting who will serve on the search committee, and the roles and responsibilities of everyone involved.

Some of the recommendations were so different from what the board originally said it wanted that board members spent hours discussing and making changes to the proposed procedures.

http://go.uen.org/6p8

 


 

 

Douglas County narrowly OKs new school voucher program

New program excludes religious schools but still raises ire of voucher opponents

Denver Post

 

The Douglas County School Board on Tuesday night narrowly passed a resolution that re-launches a controversial voucher program exactly five years after it was originally put in place, but significantly excludes religious schools from the mix.

The late-night 4-3 vote came after a contentious discussion between ideologically divided members of the board.

Members elected to their seats last November argued that shifting taxpayer money to private schools is unconstitutional.

“Private school is not a right, it’s a privilege,” said board member Anne-Marie Lemieux.

Doug Benevento , the board member who brought the measure forward Tuesday, countered that if the district can help just one kid get into a school that is unreachable to them right now, then the program is worth it.

http://go.uen.org/6pe

 


 

 

The great FLOTUS food fight

For the first time, the inside story of how Michelle Obama changed American nutrition.

Politico

 

Miriam Nelson got the call while she was rock climbing in Canada: It was the White House assistant chef, of all people, summoning her to a closed-door meeting with the new first lady of the United States. It was 2009, Nelson was one of the nation’s top experts on nutrition and exercise, a Tufts University professor at the time, and she wasn’t the only one: a half-dozen more got the same surprise invitation.

The Obamas had been in the White House for six months, and Michelle had begun to signal that she might use her bully pulpit to encourage healthy eating. She had already filmed some typical first lady TV spots on Oprah and Sesame Street. But what Nelson found when she arrived at the White House didn’t look like a team built for feel-good PR. It was stacked with Washington power: the first lady’s staff from the East Wing, the president’s people from the West Wing, and top officials from the Centers for Disease Control and the departments of Agriculture and Health and Human Services. Obama’s Domestic Policy Council Director, Melody Barnes, was there; so was the first lady’s top policy adviser, Jocelyn Frye. Presiding over the meeting was Michelle Obama herself, in a trademark sleeveless dress, and holding a notebook.

With Democrats holding control of Congress, Nelson and the others realized, the East Wing was formulating a big policy push that would use all available levers of the federal government to improve how Americans eat. They wanted a new law to make school lunches healthier; they saw ways to deploy federal stimulus dollars on new cooking equipment in public school cafeterias and to use government financing to get grocery stores into poor communities where fresh food wasn’t readily available. They wanted to overhaul the federal nutrition label so it confronted shoppers more directly with calorie counts. Even the more symbolic side of American food policy was coming under the microscope: A reboot of the decades-old “food pyramid” that told families how to balance a meal.

“You really got the sense that this is something that she was likely to take on,” recalled Nelson, who was asked for advice on nutrition and exercise programs that worked. “It was very exciting.”

In the six-plus years since that meeting, Michelle Obama’s sophisticated and strategic campaign has transformed the American food landscape in ways considerably deeper than the public appreciates, even now.

http://go.uen.org/6pb

 


 

 

Kids who eat two breakfasts are less likely to be overweight than those who eat none

Washington Post

 

A growing number of children are eating free breakfasts at school, but the push to provide morning meals for all children in low-income communities has long been accompanied by a concern that it might mean more kids end up eating a double breakfast, one at home and one at school, increasing their risk of obesity.

A new study suggests that it is not children who indulge twice, but those who skip breakfast altogether, who are more likely to be overweight. In other words, two breakfasts appear to be better than none, said Marlene Schwartz, of the University of Connecticut’s Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity.

“Our study does add to the argument that it’s really important to make sure that as many kids as possible are getting a healthy breakfast,” said Schwartz, one of a team of researchers who conducted the study, which appears in the journal Pediatric Obesity. “Especially in low-income communities, having universal access to healthy breakfasts is helpful.”

http://go.uen.org/6pu

 

A copy of the study

http://go.uen.org/6pv (Pediatric Obesity $)

 


 

 

Safety Inspections System for Indian School Facilities Flawed, Report Finds

Education Week

 

The U.S. Interior Department’s flawed inspections system for Bureau of Indian Education schools poses a serious safety threat to students and staff, the Government Accountability Office has found.

Inspectors for the congressional watchdog agency found that critical violations, such as missing fire extinguishers and elevated levels of carbon monoxide caused by aging boilers, identified in inspection reports were not immediately addressed.

According to the report, the fire extinguishers were still not in place a year after the initial inspection and the boilers, which also leaked natural gas, were not repaired until eight months later.

Overall, the GAO found that more 69 out of the 180 BIE schools, or nearly 40 percent, were not inspected for safety and health violations in fiscal year 2015. The schools serve more than 47,000 students.

http://go.uen.org/6pc

 

http://go.uen.org/6px (AP)

 

A copy of the report

http://go.uen.org/6pd (GAO)

 


 

 

Hillary Clinton Releases New Ad Targeting Arizona’s Abysmal Education Record

Phoenix (AZ) New Times

 

One day after Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton won primary elections in five states, she’s turning some attention to Arizona, which holds its presidential preference vote Tuesday.

New Times got an exclusive look at a new ad set to air later today that draws attention to the abysmal state of Arizona’s public-education system:

“Arizona’s schools rank 45th in the nation. Dead last in funding per student,” the ad begins, the narrator speaking in the requisite ominous voice of political ads, of course. “Hillary knows our kids deserve better.”

Then cue the uplifting music and a montage of Clinton posing with children and diploma-waving high school graduates.

After that,  the 30-second video quickly launches into an overview of her education platform: universal pre-kindergarten education, empowering teachers, and helping students graduate from college “without crushing debt.”

http://go.uen.org/6pf

 

 

 

 

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CALENDAR

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USOE Calendar

http://www.schools.utah.gov/main/CALENDAR.aspx

 

 

UEN News

http://www.uen.org

 

 

March 17:

Utah State Board of Education study session and committee meetings

4 p.m., 250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspx

 

 

March 18:

Utah State Board of Education meeting

8 a.m., 250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspx

 

 

April 14:

Utah State Charter School Board meeting

250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://go.uen.org/62M

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