Education News Roundup: April 15, 2016

Flower Collage by Draper Elementary's kindergarten students

Flower Collage by kindergarten students at Draper Elementary.

Education News Roundup

Today’s Top Picks:

 

Governor and Legislature are still discussing a special session on the Governor’s line-item vetoes.

http://gousoe.uen.org/6Gl (DN)

and http://gousoe.uen.org/6Gx (KSL)

 

Overnight trips for schools could get more expensive if each student is to have a bed of her/his own.

http://gousoe.uen.org/6Gu (KUTV)

 

Ruling out of California strengthens teacher unions.

http://gousoe.uen.org/6Gz (LAT)

and http://gousoe.uen.org/6GA (NYT)

and http://gousoe.uen.org/6GB (Bloomberg) and http://gousoe.uen.org/6GL (CSM) and http://gousoe.uen.org/6GD (WaPo) and http://gousoe.uen.org/6GJ (Ed Week) and http://gousoe.uen.org/6GF (Reuters) and http://gousoe.uen.org/6GI (AP) or a copy of the ruling http://gousoe.uen.org/6GC (California Court of Appeals)

 

 

 

 

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TODAY’S HEADLINES

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UTAH

 

Governor, lawmakers close to agreement on special session to deal with vetoes

 

Gubernatorial candidates talk positions on Common Core

 

Provo School District considers banning bed sharing among students on trips

 

Poll: Would Utahns Be More Likely to Support a Candidate Who Signs a No New Taxes Pledge

 

States Enact New Student Data Privacy Laws

 

U Grad Student Develops “DREAMer’s RoadMap” App To Help Undocumented Students

 

Little Rock Nine member shares memories and civil rights history with students

 

Young women aspiring toward STEM careers earn national awards in computing

 

Piute County School District celebrates art, raises funds for art supplies

 

One student hospitalized after truck hits Spanish Fork school bus, police say

 

Head Start registration begins in Davis, Morgan and Summit counties

 

Summer camps and classes keep kids busy and learning

 

People on the Move

 

Copperview students look sharp for school photos

 

Inside our schools

 


 

 

 

OPINION & COMMENTARY

 

Crossroads of the West stands strong

 

The reviews are in for the new SAT — and they’re mixed

 

Straight From High School to a Career

 

Americans’ Unwillingness to Accept Evolution En Masse Is a Failure of Science Education

 

How Much Can High-Quality Universal Pre-K Reduce Achievement Gaps?

 


 

 

 

NATION

 

What the Vergara ruling means for the future of teacher tenure in the U.S.

 

Gov. Scott signs education bill that allows transfers to any school

 

Judge Denies Gun Manufacturer’s Motion To Dismiss Sandy Hook Families’ Lawsuit

 

What happens when teachers spend more time in a classroom — before teaching?

Can teacher residency programs lead to better-prepared, life-long teachers?

 

U.S. teens getting less formal sex education since 2006

 

New AP Art History Curriculum Opens Doors to World

 

Teacher resigns over ‘privilege’ assignment seeking personal info

 

 

 

 

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UTAH NEWS

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Governor, lawmakers close to agreement on special session to deal with vetoes

 

SALT LAKE CITY — Gov. Gary Herbert and GOP legislative leaders may be close to an agreement that would avoid an override vote on his veto of nearly $4.8 million in funding for early education programs and a televised teen chef competition.

“We’ve met with leadership. We’re working on some different issues. I think we’re reconciling some of the different points of view, so I think we’ll probably have some reconciliation and approach going forward,” the governor said Wednesday.

Herbert said he hopes to have the issue of whether he would face a veto override session settled by Thursday. But both the House and Senate are continuing to poll members through Monday about whether they want to call an override session.

http://gousoe.uen.org/6Gl (DN)

 

http://gousoe.uen.org/6Gx (KSL)

 


 

 

Gubernatorial candidates talk positions on Common Core

 

Where do the gubernatorial stand on Common Core?

“I think we need to get rid of [it],” candidate Jonathan Johnson said.

Common Core is the result of states getting together and setting standards for English and math in school.

“It was originally by the states, but it was hijacked by the federal government,” Johnson said.

As for Gov. Herbert, he says, “If we don’t like the standards, we need to have them changed.”

Gov. Herbert attributed the changes to choices made by elected officials.

“Our outcomes are great. Graduation is up, we’re 11th in math and 6th in science,” he said.

http://gousoe.uen.org/6Gw (KUTV)

 


 

 

Provo School District considers banning bed sharing among students on trips

 

Should students on trips share beds?

That’s a question the Provo School District is weighing after hearing concerns from parents.

“The policy has not been voted on, it is not official,” said Caleb Price, Provo School District spokesman. “There’s a lot of discussion still to happen.”

he state says bed sharing by students of the same gender is not the best idea. Still, school districts across Utah allow it when students travel out of town and stay in hotels.

“I think that they have been doing this for a lot of years just to curb costs,” said Marilee Richins, spokesperson for the Utah Department of Administrative Services. Her department includes the Division of Risk Management, which acts as an insurer for school districts.

When Provo School District came to the state asking advice, Richins said, the state was unequivocal.

“We’re talking about best practices,” Richins said, “and best practices is just to have one kid to a bed.”

http://gousoe.uen.org/6Gu (KUTV)

 


 

 

Poll: Would Utahns Be More Likely to Support a Candidate Who Signs a No New Taxes Pledge

 

GOP gubernatorial candidate Jonathan Johnson may be on to something.

A new UtahPolicy poll shows that 48 percent Utah Republicans are more likely to vote for someone if the candidate has signed a no-new-taxes pledge.

Only 20 percent of Republicans say they are less likely to vote for someone who has signed such a no-tax-hike pledge, 27 percent said signing such a pledge would not affect their vote, and 5 percent didn’t know.

http://gousoe.uen.org/6GP (UP)

 


 

 

States Enact New Student Data Privacy Laws

 

Recently the governors of New Hampshire, Utah, Virginia, and West Virginia approved the first student data privacy laws of 2016. Each has legislative approaches similar to those we have seen in years past. They focus on data governance, transparency, and leadership—a hopeful sign that states are learning from each other.

* New Hampshire passed a law (HB 301) that establishes a committee to study the state’s statewide longitudinal data system (SLDS), create a dictionary of data elements currently being collected and maintained, and study the security of school district databases and privacy policies.

* Utah’s “Student Data Protection Act” (HB 358) establishes data governance (processes for managing and making decisions about student data collection and use) and creates new ways for the state to get feedback about its data policies from various stakeholders. The law describes how state and local education entities and third-party contractors use and communicate about student data. This law has a notable focus on local data use: in addition to establishing a governance plan and student data officer at the state level, it requires districts to develop their own data governance policies and designate a student data privacy manager. It also establishes a “data users advisory group” composed of individuals who use student data in districts and schools, which will provide feedback on the practicality of proposed state data use policies.

http://gousoe.uen.org/6Gc (Data Quality Campaign)

 


 

 

U Grad Student Develops “DREAMer’s RoadMap” App To Help Undocumented Students

 

For undocumented students, just walking into the Student Services Building and asking a question can be a terrifying experience.

In order to help these students navigate college, a former undocumented student created the DREAMer’s RoadMap app.

Based out of California, the app was launched on Thursday, April 14. It helps undocumented students find college scholarships and is part of a national attempt to solve a problem Alonso Reyna Rivarola, a U graduate student in educational leadership and policy, has been trying to solve for eight years.

http://gousoe.uen.org/6GR (DUC)

 


 

 

Little Rock Nine member shares memories and civil rights history with students

 

KAYSVILLE — Carlotta Walls LaNier says she experienced the first day of high school three times. The first time she headed toward the building she felt like a typical teen anxious to attend her new school.

But she wasn’t a typical teen on that day — she was one of the nine African-American students who first attended Central High School in Little Rock, Ark., after the city was ordered to end school segregation.

LaNier shared her story with students from Davis High School in Kaysville, and Two Rivers High in Ogden, on April 14, in the Davis High School auditorium. Those students say they now have an increased appreciation for the opportunity to attend school, and for what LaNier did to open doors for others.

http://gousoe.uen.org/6Gp (OSE)

 


 

 

Young women aspiring toward STEM careers earn national awards in computing

 

CEDAR CITY — An award ceremony Saturday at Southern Utah University will honor high school girls from Southern Utah who are active and interested in computing and technology, showing noteworthy initiative in light of national statistics that indicate a low percentage of female undergraduates progress in STEM careers.

More than 57 percent of college undergrads are women, but only 18 percent of those progress into science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, as a career, according to the National Center for Education Statistics.

With the support of parents and educators, 142 high school-aged girls from Southern Utah competed in the “Aspirations in Computing” program of the National Center for Women in Information Technology. The multitiered competition is a platform for aspiring young women to showcase unique software coding, Web design and information technology skills.

http://gousoe.uen.org/6Gt (SGN)

 


 

 

Piute County School District celebrates art, raises funds for art supplies

 

CIRCLEVILLE — The Circleville Community Center, 300 S. Center Street in Circleville, was packed with teachers, students and parents Wednesday night as the Piute County School District celebrated its “First Annual District Art Event.”

The evening showcased the artistic, music and performing arts talents of the students and raised funds for needed art supplies, including musical instruments in the district.

The two elementary schools in the Piute County School District — Circleville Elementary and Oscarson Elementary — are part of the Beverly Taylor Sorenson Arts Learning Program, said Jo Whittaker, the visual arts specialist for Circleville Elementary.

http://gousoe.uen.org/6Gs (SGN)

 


 

 

One student hospitalized after truck hits Spanish Fork school bus, police say

 

SPANISH FORK — A pickup truck collided with a school bus Thursday, causing minor injuries to students, police said.

The crash occurred after the driver of the truck ran a red light at the intersection of 2550 East and U.S. 6 around 3 p.m., according to Spanish Fork Police Lt. Matt Johnson.

Three ambulances responded to the crash. A “couple” of elementary school-aged students were “assessed … on scene” by emergency responders and one was taken to a hospital for minor injuries, Johnson said.

Multiple students were upset and shaken from the crash, the lieutenant said. He didn’t know the specifics of the transported student’s injuries.

http://gousoe.uen.org/6Gm (DN)

 

http://gousoe.uen.org/6Gq (PDH)

 

http://gousoe.uen.org/6Gv (KUTV)

 

http://gousoe.uen.org/6Gy (KSTU)

 


 

 

Head Start registration begins in Davis, Morgan and Summit counties

 

KAYSVILLE — Registration for Head Start and Early Head Start programs for children in Davis, Morgan and Summit counties begins Friday, April 15.

http://gousoe.uen.org/6Gn (OSE)

 


 

 

Summer camps and classes keep kids busy and learning

 

It’s springtime, but parents are already looking for ways to keep kids from uttering the dreaded summer break phrase, “I’m bored.”

School districts and community organizations offer a variety of learning opportunities to keep children, tweens and teens learning throughout the summer — and having fun at the same time. Of course, there are also a few courses for students who need to make up credit at summer school.

Most districts are still finalizing lists of courses to be offered, but a few early announcements have been made. More information will be posted as it becomes available.

http://gousoe.uen.org/6Go (OSE)

 


 

 

People on the Move

 

Woods Cross—Utah Connections Academy (UCA), a tuition-free, online public school serving students in grades kindergarten through 12, has hired Jeffrey Herr as its new principal. Herr, an educator of more than 24 years, joins the school as enrollment opens for the 2016-2017 school year. Herr brings with him extensive experience educating students throughout the state of Utah as well as internationally. In 2006, he served as a Fulbright Scholar studying education in the Czech Republic and, in his last assignment, he served as the senior director of a company based in Dubai, United Arab Emirates that managed private, fully accredited, virtual and blended international schools.  He has served as a teacher in the Weber School District and as an administrator for the Salt Lake City School District, and was the founding director of two charter schools, including another online school. Herr earned his bachelor’s  degree in European history from Weber State University and his  master’s degree in education administration from the University of Utah.

http://gousoe.uen.org/6GO (Utah Business)

 


 

 

Copperview students look sharp for school photos

 

Kindergartner Steven Hudson gets his hair cut at Copperview Elementary School in Midvale on Thursday. Principal Chanci Loran arranged for students from the Paul Mitchell Beauty School to give the free haircuts at the Title I school just in time for school photos, which will be taken Friday. While school photos are typically a back-to-school event, Canyons District school holds photo sessions twice a year due to a 33 percent in student body turnover.

http://gousoe.uen.org/6Gk (DN)

 


 

 

Inside our schools

 

East Elementary

Enoch Elementary

Fiddlers Elementary

North Elementary

Parowan Elementary

Three Peaks Elementary

Canyon View Middle

Cedar Middle

Valley Academy Charter

Utah Online High

Utah Online K-8

http://gousoe.uen.org/6Gr (SGS)

 

 

 

 

 

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OPINION & COMMENTARY

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Crossroads of the West stands strong

Deseret News commentary by Natalie Gochnour, associate dean in the David Eccles School of Business at the University of Utah

 

About 1,400 small-business owners, entrepreneurs, business executives and community leaders will gather at the Grand America Hotel on Friday for the 10th annual Governor’s Economic Summit. It will be a celebration of sorts, as the Utah economy continues to impress. The Beehive State created nearly 45,000 jobs over the past year and is in its sixth year of solid economic growth. The Crossroads of the West stands strong.

A hallmark of the governor’s economic summit is a mindset toward the future. As a speaker at the summit I will present several trends for attendees to contemplate as we plan for a prosperous future. Three of these trends are worthy of a broader discussion.

Declining fertility

Utah’s fertility rate stands at a historic low. While still the highest in the nation, Utah’s total fertility rate has fallen from 4.30 in 1960 to 2.33 today. Many factors have likely contributed to this drop, including female participation in the labor force, educational attainment of women, and, recently, the lingering effects of the Great Recession. The change in the missionary age for members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (particularly for women) may also be a factor.

The question to grapple with is this: “Will the fertility rate remain this low and what does it portend for Utah’s future?” Utah’s high fertility rate has given our state economic advantages such as a growing, healthy, tech-savvy and inexpensive labor force. At the same time, an abundance of children has challenged the state to make adequate investment in education. Utah will do well to understand this demographic phenomenon and evaluate how it may affect our future.

http://gousoe.uen.org/6GQ

 


 

 

The reviews are in for the new SAT — and they’re mixed Deseret News commentary by columnist Menachem Wecker

 

When she took the SAT in March, Karissa Cloutier, a high school junior in New Hampshire, was one of the first students to take the newest iteration of the test, originally the Scholastic Aptitude Test, which has been administered since 1926. It went pretty well, she says, although she would have hoped for more time on the reading sections.

http://gousoe.uen.org/6Gj

 


 

 

Straight From High School to a Career

New York Times op-ed by KATHERINE S. NEWMAN, provost of the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, and HELLA WINSTON, senior fellow at the Schuster Institute for Investigative Journalism at Brandeis University

 

CANDIDATES from both parties have been talking a lot about the loss of American jobs, declining wages and the skyrocketing cost of college.

But missing from the debate is the fact that there are hundreds of thousands of “middle skill” jobs in the United States that are — or soon will be — going unfilled because of a dearth of qualified workers. Employers complain that electricians, pipe fitters, advanced manufacturing machinists, brick masons and radiology technicians are scarce. More than 600,000 jobs remain open in the manufacturing sector alone. These are jobs that provide a middleclass wage without a traditional four­year college degree.

American high schools once offered top­notch vocational and apprenticeship training, preparing young people for jobs like these. But over the last 70 years, our commitment to such education has waxed and waned, reflecting the country’s ambivalence about the role of school in preparing young people for employment and the value of blue­collar work itself. Progressives have argued that technical education tracks low­income and minority youths toward second­class citizenship; hence they often advocate “college for all.”

Over the past decade or so, however, there has been a move among educators and policy makers to reinvigorate vocational education, now rebranded as career and technical education. Some schools have been extraordinarily effective; others are struggling. If we are to offer young Americans options that are readily available to their counterparts in countries like Germany, we need to figure out what makes for success.

http://gousoe.uen.org/6Gb

 


 

 

Americans’ Unwillingness to Accept Evolution En Masse Is a Failure of Science Education Huffington Post commentary by Joseph T. Spadafino, Epidemiologist

 

For those of us passionate about science education and scientific literacy, it has become an almost yearly ritual to place our foreheads into our palms in despair upon reading the latest public opinion polls regarding the acceptance of biological evolution by natural selection.

Where most developed counties’ citizens accept the theory of evolution as scientifically valid, Americans remain reluctant. Even among those of us who accept evolution by common decent, only half recognize strictly natural processes as being entirely responsible for bringing about the diversity in life forms we see today.

The reluctance of the American public to accept the theory of evolution en masse has become evidence of continued failure on the part of science education in this country. True, the opinions of many Americans have been shaped in large part by religiously-motivated attitudes towards evolution. However, any science curriculum worth its salt should be able to convincingly demonstrate the veracity of a scientific claim regardless of what biases a student may enter with. It’s this demonstrability and repeatability that makes science unique: it requires no indoctrination to accept. As astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson famously said, “The good thing about science is that it’s true whether or not you believe in it.”

So what can be done to improve the teaching of evolution in our schools? In short, research into the teaching of evolution has identified two prominent issues. First, teachers’ content knowledge of evolution and the specific mechanisms of natural selection can be problematic. Second, teachers’ personal acceptance of evolution and willingness to teach it can often interfere with an accurate and enlightening instruction of the subject.

http://gousoe.uen.org/6GN

 


 

 

How Much Can High-Quality Universal Pre-K Reduce Achievement Gaps?

Center for American Progress/National Institute for Early Education Research analysis

 

Many children of color and children from low-income families enter kindergarten without the academic skills they need to succeed. Compared to their white peers, African American and Hispanic children are anywhere from 9 to 10 months behind in math and 7 to 12 months behind in reading when they enter kindergarten. These achievement gaps are concerning: Math and reading abilities at kindergarten entry are powerful predictors of later school success, and children who enter kindergarten already behind are unlikely to catch up. Moreover, in the past 50 years, minimal progress has been made toward reducing these achievement gaps.

Ensuring that all children are entering kindergarten with the foundational academic skills they need to succeed is a major priority for researchers, policymakers, and practitioners alike. Early childhood education programs show promise toward this goal.

http://gousoe.uen.org/6Gd

 

 

 

 

 

 

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NATIONAL NEWS

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What the Vergara ruling means for the future of teacher tenure in the U.S.

Los Angeles Times

 

California will be able to keep its teacher tenure and seniority laws, at least for now, because they’re constitutional. That’s what a California appellate court said in its ruling Thursday, overturning a lower court’s decision in the case Vergara vs. California.

So what is this case, and what does it mean for teachers in California and across the country?

http://gousoe.uen.org/6Gz

 

http://gousoe.uen.org/6GA (NYT)

 

http://gousoe.uen.org/6GB (Bloomberg)

 

http://gousoe.uen.org/6GL (CSM)

 

http://gousoe.uen.org/6GD (WaPo)

 

http://gousoe.uen.org/6GJ (Ed Week)

 

http://gousoe.uen.org/6GF (Reuters)

 

http://gousoe.uen.org/6GI (AP)

 

A copy of the ruling

http://gousoe.uen.org/6GC (California Court of Appeals)

 


 

 

Gov. Scott signs education bill that allows transfers to any school Orlando (FL) Sentinel

 

Florida parents can pick any public school in the state for their children, hop scotching over traditional attendance lines and county boundaries, starting in the 2017-18 school year.

Gov. Rick Scott on Thursday signed a sweeping education bill (HB 7029) that pumps up school choice in Florida. It allows parents in Lake County, for example, to seek a spot for their child in an Orange County school.

There are caveats to the open enrollment option, however. The new school must have room, parents must provide transportation and the student must not be under an expulsion or suspension order.

Scott did not comment after signing the bill. But lawmakers and education advocates who pushed it say it gives parents more opportunities to pick the best school for their child.

http://gousoe.uen.org/6Gf

 


 

 

Judge Denies Gun Manufacturer’s Motion To Dismiss Sandy Hook Families’ Lawsuit Hartford (CT) Courant

 

A Superior Court judge has denied a motion to dismiss a lawsuit accusing gun makers and sellers of liability in the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting, saying the broad immunity granted to the firearms industry does not strip the court of jurisdiction to hear the claim.

While the Protection of Lawful Commerce in Arms Act generally insulates gun companies from liability, Judge Barbara Bellis said the law could be used to attack the legal sufficiency of the plaintiffs’ claims, but not to have the case thrown out at this early stage.

Attorneys for the plaintiffs – nine victims’ families and an administrator who was shot and survived – declared the ruling a major win, as victories against firearms companies are extremely rare. But the ruling does not preclude the defendants from reasserting their claims of immunity under federal law in a future motion.

The lawsuit accuses the Remington Arms Co. and other defendants of negligently selling to civilians a weapon the plaintiffs claim is suitable only for the military and law enforcement. At a hearing in February, Bridgeport lawyer Josh Koskoff argued against dismissing the case, saying the lawsuit’s claim of “negligent entrustment” is an exception to the Protection of Lawful Commerce in Arms Act.

But Bellis ruled on a narrower issue, agreeing with the plaintiffs that she has jurisdiction to continue with the case, but not ruling on whether the federal law blocks the plaintiffs from pursuing their claim.

http://gousoe.uen.org/6Gg

 

http://gousoe.uen.org/6Gh (WSJ)

 

http://gousoe.uen.org/6Gi (Newsweek)

 


 

 

What happens when teachers spend more time in a classroom — before teaching?

Can teacher residency programs lead to better-prepared, life-long teachers?

Hechinger Report

 

WASHINGTON — In her large, bright, pre-K classroom, the teacher turned to the group of 4-year-olds learning how to give a baby a bath. She sat on the carpet and cradled a doll carefully as eager students strained their necks to watch.

“How am I holding the baby?” the teacher, Alina Kaye, asked, and then answered her own question: “Nice and calm.”  She held up a small, empty plastic bottle and mimed squirting shampoo onto the baby’s head.

The kids edged closer. Meghan Sanchez, a 23-year-old teacher in training, watched Kaye’s every move just as intently. Sanchez is in her first year of an immersive four-year training program via Urban Teachers, a nonprofit group that trains aspiring teachers in Washington and Baltimore.

“Dip, dip, dip,” Kaye said, pretending to move water over the top of the baby’s head on this sunny fall morning in the Shaw neighborhood of D.C. “Now I’m going to wrap the baby up.”

“Like a burrito!” a student called out.

Sanchez whispered to a little boy who had sat up on his knees to get a better view of the doll: “Legs crossed!’’ she commanded gently. He sat down quickly. “Thank you,” she said.

Sanchez then turned her attention back to Kaye, who was about to lead the students in song. She jumped in, singing “eyes, ears, mouth and nose,” while pointing emphatically to each body part.

As a first-year “resident” of Urban Teachers, which receives funding from the schools in which its residents work as well as from private donations, Sanchez shares a classroom with Kaye, an experienced teacher, learning the ins and outs of teaching while taking evening courses to earn a master’s degree.

http://gousoe.uen.org/6GM

 


 

 

U.S. teens getting less formal sex education since 2006 Reuters

 

Formal instruction about birth control and other aspects of sexual health in the U.S. is on the decline, according to an analysis of survey data from 2006 to 2013.

“The declines in formal sex education we observed since 2006 are distressing, but unfortunately are part of a longer term retreat from sex education, especially instruction about birth control methods,” said lead study author Laura Duberstein Lindberg of The Guttmacher Institute in New York.

“For example, in 1995 more than four out of five teens were taught about birth control—in the most recent data this is only about half,” she said.

The researchers used interviews taken from nationwide household surveys administered continuously between 2006 and 2010 and between 2011 and 2013, focusing on respondents aged 15 to 19 years. The analysis included responses from about 2,000 teen boys and 1,000 teen girls in each wave of surveys.

http://gousoe.uen.org/6GG

 

A copy of the study

http://gousoe.uen.org/6GH (Journal of Adolescent Health)

 


 

 

New AP Art History Curriculum Opens Doors to World

 

John Gunnin, a veteran high school teacher, greeted the newly enrolled students in his AP Art History with a challenging first assignment.

During the first few weeks of this school year at Corona Del Mar High, in California’s Orange County, Gunnin asked the students to dissect a contemporary piece made for the 500th anniversary of Columbus’ discovery of America.

Despite their limited experience formally analyzing sophisticated visual art, the teacher asked his students to respond to a digital display of a nine-foot-tall, HD-quality image of the mixed-media artwork, “Trade (Gifts for Trading Land With White People),” by a Native American artist, Jaune Quick-to-See Smith. The assignment was to study the piece from political, visual, cultural, historical, societal, and economic angles.

Works such as Smith’s are emblematic of a major overhaul of the AP Art History course that is designed to shift away from the rote memorization of a mostly Eurocentric selection of images to focus on the layers of meaning of a more global set of artworks.

Those changes were largely unnoticed when they went into effect at the beginning of the 2015-16 academic year—partly because they were overshadowed by major controversies that swirled around the recent redesign of the AP U.S. History curriculum.

http://gousoe.uen.org/6GK

 


 

 

Teacher resigns over ‘privilege’ assignment seeking personal info Tampa (FL) Tribune

 

TAMPA — A first-year Hillsborough County teacher who sparked an outcry over a class assignment regarding sexual identity and other personal information resigned Thursday in the midst of an investigation by the district.

Yoselis Ramos, 23, passed out an assignment titled, “How much privilege do you have?” to seventh- and eighth-grade students in her Spanish class at Monroe Middle School in South Tampa last week. The assignment probed for information such as sexual orientation, gender identity and mental illness.

Parents approached Monroe Principal Peter Megara, and Ramos was immediately suspended with pay. The Hillsborough school district’s Office of Professional Standards launched an investigation into the assignment, said Tanya Arja, school district spokeswoman.

“Ms. Ramos is no longer an employee of the district,” Arja said Thursday. “The district is working with the principal to provide lesson plans for the substitute and find a permanent replacement.”

The district’s investigation has ended because Ramos doesn’t work there any more.

http://gousoe.uen.org/6GE

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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CALENDAR

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USOE Calendar

http://www.schools.utah.gov/main/CALENDAR.aspx

 

 

UEN News

http://www.uen.org

 

 

April 15:

Utah State Board of Education meeting

8 a.m., 250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspx

 

 

April 22:

USBE Superintendent Selection Committee meeting

11 a.m., 250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspx

 

 

May 12:

Utah State Charter School Board meeting

250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://go.uen.org/62M

 

Utah State Board of Education study session and committee meetings

250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspx

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