Education News Roundup: May 16, 2016

STEM Action Center Logo/Education News Roundup

STEM Action Center Logo/Education News Roundup

Education News Roundup

Today’s Top Picks:

 

There’s plenty of follow up on the Utah State Board of Education’s move to conditionally review language arts and math standards and support of eliminating SAGE high school testing.

http://gousoe.uen.org/71R (UP)

and http://gousoe.uen.org/72f (OSE)

and http://gousoe.uen.org/72r (LHJ)

and http://gousoe.uen.org/72w (KUTV)

and http://gousoe.uen.org/72J (KSL)

and http://gousoe.uen.org/72y (KSTU)

and http://gousoe.uen.org/72A (KUER)

and http://gousoe.uen.org/72L (KNRS)

and http://gousoe.uen.org/733 (Ed Week)

and http://gousoe.uen.org/71X (USBE)

 

There’s also lots of follow up on the U.S. Department of Education’s guidance letter on transgender students.

http://gousoe.uen.org/71S (DN)

and http://gousoe.uen.org/71T (SLT)

and http://gousoe.uen.org/71U (UP)

and http://gousoe.uen.org/72z (PDH)

and http://gousoe.uen.org/72D (SGS)

and http://gousoe.uen.org/72v (KUTV)

and http://gousoe.uen.org/72B (KSL)

and http://gousoe.uen.org/71V (KSTU)

and http://gousoe.uen.org/72E (KCSG)

and http://gousoe.uen.org/72C (KUER)

or a copy of the guidance letter

http://gousoe.uen.org/71W (ED)

 

The Utah State Board of Education puts secondary social studies standards out for public review.

http://gousoe.uen.org/71Z (SLT)

or a copy of the draft standards

http://gousoe.uen.org/720 (USOE)

 

19 Utah schools earn the STEM designation.

http://gousoe.uen.org/71Y (UP)

and http://gousoe.uen.org/736 (Utah Business)

 

Huntsman award winners named

http://gousoe.uen.org/726 (SLT)

and http://gousoe.uen.org/72a (DN)

and http://gousoe.uen.org/72G (KSL)

 

 

 

 

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TODAY’S HEADLINES

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UTAH

 

K-12 Math and English Standards to Undergo Review

 

Logan, Cache educators reflect on value of discontinuing high school SAGE testing

 

Herbert slams Obama ‘bathroom’ directive as federal overreach

 

New Utah history education standards will be released for public review Curriculum » Critical thinking aspect would replace memorization.

 

Utah Schools Receive Official State STEM Designation

 

Honoring masters of reaching out beyond Utah classrooms Each Huntsman Award winner receives a $10,000 check, with explicit instructions not to put the money into their classroom.

 

Park City school violated diabetic student’s rights, report says Investigation » District failed to consistently provide proper care per agreement, feds say.

 

Students find fun in physics at Lagoon

 

Surprise winners take top prize in state stock competition

 

Hildale Students Settle In To New High School First Public High School in Community For Decade

 

Students achieve with the Special Olympics at Provo Peaks Elementary

 

Birch Creek Elementary students bring historical figures to life

 

Ogden junior high raises more than $7,000 for head-shaving cancer charity

 

Ogden Police fulfill dire need for playground equipment to Bonneville Elementary Students

 

Canyons School District: Device-free time during summer

 

Fitch Rates Alpine School District, UT’s Outstanding GOs ‘AAA’; Outlook Stable

 

 


 

 

OPINION & COMMENTARY

 

Seeking to provide context, a Utah history teacher goes too far

 

Who deserves praise and criticism this week in and around northern Utah?

 

No ‘Glory’ in South Ogden teacher using racial slur

 

A history class, a racial slur and an NAACP investigation: A reader conversation

 

Uncle Sam wants you … to conform, now

 

SAGE opt-out? Why not see what your kids can do?

 

Charter schools misrepresented

 

A change of heart on transgender bathrooms

 

Navy blue should not be an East High color

 

Better ways to measure school success are worth a try

 

The Pension Pac-Man

How Pension Debt Eats Away at Teacher Salaries

 

 


 

 

NATION

 

Obama says transgender rule is important aid to schools: BuzzFeed

 

Schools Offer Guidance on Transgender Issues

 

Groups seek immediate halt to N.C. law restricting transgender bathroom choice

 

Colleges Announced for Pell ‘Dual Enrollment’ Program

 

Career And Technical Education: Boom Or Bust?

 

Judge orders Mississippi school district to desegregate, 62 years after Brown v. Board of Education

 

State education chief hopes to lead Minneapolis schools

 

How to help principals do a better job? Train their bosses More districts training top officials to better coach, support school leaders

 

Your Stadium Here: Public schools cash in with naming rights

 

‘McDonald’s Diet’ brand ambassador dropped from schools: company

 

 

 

 

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UTAH NEWS

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K-12 Math and English Standards to Undergo Review

 

The Utah State Board of Education voted Friday to begin a review of English language arts and mathematics standards and move toward discontinuing SAGE testing in high schools.

With a 13-2 vote, State Board members will begin a “comprehensive review and update” of English language arts and mathematics standards at the elementary and secondary levels – contingent on receiving a one-time supplement from the Utah Legislature to cover the costs.

“Board Members look forward to working with teachers, parents, and administrators as we review our standards and hope to move beyond the controversy that surrounds the Common Core standards,” said Board Chair David Crandall.

The Standards and Assessment Committee was assigned the issue and will return to the full State Board will recommendations on timing and funding estimates.

The State Board also voted 11-4 to support the elimination of administering the SAGE test in ninth and 10th grades and replace it with the ACT. The ACT has been paid for and administered to all high school juniors in Utah for the past three years. SAGE was made optional for 11th-graders through a bill passed in this year’s legislative session. Further changes require legislative approval.

http://gousoe.uen.org/71R (UP)

 

http://gousoe.uen.org/72f (OSE)

 

http://gousoe.uen.org/72r (LHJ)

 

http://gousoe.uen.org/72w (KUTV)

 

http://gousoe.uen.org/72J (KSL)

 

http://gousoe.uen.org/72y (KSTU)

 

http://gousoe.uen.org/72A (KUER)

 

http://gousoe.uen.org/72L (KNRS)

 

http://gousoe.uen.org/733 (Ed Week)

 

http://gousoe.uen.org/71X (USBE)

 

 


 

 

Logan, Cache educators reflect on value of discontinuing high school SAGE testing

 

Some local educators feel there still needs to be an assessment tool with similar volume to measure district-wide success, in light of the Utah State Board of Education’s Friday decision to move toward discontinuing end-of-level SAGE testing.

“I think the primary concern is we want to have some sort of system-wide assessment tool that allows us to get some sort of picture on how our students are doing,” said Frank Schofield, the superintendent of the Logan City School District. “Whether that’s SAGE or another tool, I think the important thing is that we have some sort of tool that allows us to measure how we’re doing as a high school system.”

The Utah State Board of Education voted Friday to eliminate the requirement to take SAGE — which stands for Student Assessment of Growth and Excellence — for ninth- and 10th-graders. It would, instead, be replaced with the ACT. A bill passed in this year’s legislative session made SAGE optional for 11th-graders, who already take the ACT on the state’s dime. Eliminating SAGE would require action by the Legislature.

http://gousoe.uen.org/72t (LHJ)

 


 

 

Herbert slams Obama ‘bathroom’ directive as federal overreach

 

SALT LAKE CITY — Gov. Gary Herbert, in a statement released Friday, challenged a directive from the Obama administration telling public schools to allow transgender students to use bathrooms that match their gender identity.

The sweeping declaration — which also said that school districts must integrate transgender students into locker rooms, athletic teams and other facilities consistent with their gender identity — was celebrated as a civil rights victory by some and criticized as an unjustifiable federal incursion into local matters by others.

Herbert made his position clear Friday, calling the directive “one of the most egregious examples of federal overreach I have ever witnessed.”

“Unfortunately, this is exactly what I have come to expect from the Obama administration,” Herbert said in his statement. “If we have to fight this order, we will not hesitate to do so.”

The guidance from the Education and Justice departments is not legally binding, but schools that do not comply may face lawsuits and risk losing federal funding.

Federal funds currently make up 11 percent — or $482.4 million — of the state’s nearly $4.3 billion education budget.

Stan Lockhart, a state school board member, said he hopes to find a compromise but would be willing to forgo federal funds “if we can’t find any other way to create a safe environment for our kids.”

http://gousoe.uen.org/71S (DN)

 

http://gousoe.uen.org/71T (SLT)

 

http://gousoe.uen.org/71U (UP)

 

http://gousoe.uen.org/72z (PDH)

 

http://gousoe.uen.org/72D (SGS)

 

http://gousoe.uen.org/72v (KUTV)

 

http://gousoe.uen.org/72B (KSL)

 

http://gousoe.uen.org/71V (KSTU)

 

http://gousoe.uen.org/72E (KCSG)

 

http://gousoe.uen.org/72C (KUER)

 

A copy of the guidance letter

http://gousoe.uen.org/71W (ED)

 


 

 

New Utah history education standards will be released for public review Curriculum » Critical thinking aspect would replace memorization.

 

After several months of delays, the Utah Board of Education voted Friday to release a proposed update to social studies and history education standards for public review.

The new standards would affect grades seven through 12, encompassing courses on Utah, U.S. and world history.

Members of the public are encouraged to review the standards, which are available on the state school board website, and submit feedback and suggestions.

Following the 90-day review, the board is expected to either adopt the standards or refer them back to the board’s teams for additional revisions.

http://gousoe.uen.org/71Z (SLT)

 

A copy of the draft standards

http://gousoe.uen.org/720 (USOE)

 


 

 

Utah Schools Receive Official State STEM Designation

 

The Utah State Board of Education approved 19 public schools for the Utah STEM School Designation. These schools, representing multiple locations statewide, are the first to receive the new designation.

USBE, in partnership with the Utah STEM Action Center, developed the Utah STEM Schools Designation program to better define the elements necessary to create a comprehensive STEM learning environment for students. The program provides schools the opportunity to engage in STEM-related discussions with faculty and community partners to develop strong instruction for students and prepare them for college and careers. The designation also serves as an indicator for members of the public who are looking for quality STEM school experiences in Utah K-12 education.

“Utah schools are creating outstanding learning communities that involve students, teachers, parents and industry partners,” said Dr. Sydnee Dickson, interim state superintendent of Public Instruction. “It is wonderful to see these STEM schools recognized for their commitment to college and career readiness for all students.”

http://gousoe.uen.org/71Y (UP)

 

http://gousoe.uen.org/736 (Utah Business)

 


 

 

Honoring masters of reaching out beyond Utah classrooms Each Huntsman Award winner receives a $10,000 check, with explicit instructions not to put the money into their classroom.

 

It takes a village of educators — from volunteers to teachers to administrators — to raise a child through Utah’s school system.

The 11 winners of the 2016 Huntsman Award for Excellence in Education take their duties beyond classrooms and offices, reaching out to parents and students at home, in their own languages and even on YouTube.

Selected from about 100 nominees, the six men and five women — three administrators, seven teachers and one volunteer — were schduled to be honored Friday evening at the Little America Hotel by philanthropists Jon and Karen Huntsman. This is the 24th year of the awards.

The honorees each receive a $10,000 prize. Here’s a glance at this year’s winners:

http://gousoe.uen.org/726 (SLT)

 

http://gousoe.uen.org/72a (DN)

 

http://gousoe.uen.org/72G (KSL)

 


 

 

Park City school violated diabetic student’s rights, report says Investigation » District failed to consistently provide proper care per agreement, feds say.

 

Park City • Park City School District discriminated against a diabetic kindergartner for not ensuring a nurse was available to give her insulin, federal education officials concluded in a recent report.

The civil rights office at the U.S. Department of Education began investigating in November after parent Bridget Llewellyn filed several complaints over the care her 6-year-old daughter received at Parley’s Park Elementary School.

Llewellyn said the school district showed several times it was unable or unwilling to ensure there was proper care for her daughter, so she filed the complaints not only on her child’s behalf but with the hope that other students with medical conditions receive proper care.

Park City School District Superintendent Ember Conley said the district changed policies and added staff to address the complaints before the U.S. Department of Education was involved.

http://gousoe.uen.org/727 (SLT)

 


 

 

Students find fun in physics at Lagoon

 

FARMINGTON ­— Katherine Russell peeked inside a plastic-wrapped wooden box filled with packing peanuts, trying to look at the raw egg inside.

The sixth-grader at John Hancock Charter School in Pleasant Grove crafted the box with her dad as a physics project for school.

“It’s a little egg house,” she explained.

But the egg didn’t fall from a school rooftop.

Katherine had dropped her project from Lagoon’s Sky Ride, and the egg survived the fall intact.

Lagoon doesn’t normally allow riders to drop things from its transport ski lift ride, but Friday was an exception.

http://gousoe.uen.org/72b (DN)

 

http://gousoe.uen.org/72F (KSL)

 


 

 

Surprise winners take top prize in state stock competition

 

SALT LAKE CITY — Achieving high returns in the stock market can reap big financial rewards. But for a team of Utah County high school students, the benefits they received from a statewide investment contest may be something even more valuable than money.

Seven male students who are currently wards of the state at Slate Canyon Youth Center in Provo won first place in a competition called The Stock Market Game, which pitted the group against thousands of other students across Utah.

http://gousoe.uen.org/72c (DN)

 


 

 

Hildale Students Settle In To New High School First Public High School in Community For Decade

 

HILDALE, Utah — High School students in Hildale are settling into a new multi-million dollar building.

It’s now the second school facility in the predominantly Fundamentalist LDS community that once rejected public education.

Faculty and staff moved into the building four weeks ago. It offers a formal education to the students who say they didn’t think it was possible in their hometown.

Concrete walls 12 inches thick still surround the building that was once a food storehouse for Fundamentalist LDS members. But at Water Canyon High, that’s the only difference from every other school in Utah.

http://gousoe.uen.org/72x (KTVX)

 

http://gousoe.uen.org/72I (KSL)

 

 


 

 

Students achieve with the Special Olympics at Provo Peaks Elementary

 

As Ruth Bradley crossed the finish line on her tricycle the crowd went wild. Her friends and teachers embraced her before she stepped onto the podium for her first-place title.

The Special Olympics at Provo Peaks Elementary on Friday was full of smiles and laughter as students challenged themselves and their peers in competitions such as running, bowling, hula hooping and scooter board races.

The event signals the end of disability awareness week at Provo Peaks Elementary.

http://gousoe.uen.org/72p (PDH)

 


 

 

Birch Creek Elementary students bring historical figures to life

 

SMITHFIELD — Standing in Birch Creek Elementary School’s gym on Friday were Betsy Ross, John D. Rockefeller and Annie Oakley, among many other historical figures brought to life by the school’s fifth-grade students as part of its sixth annual History Fair.

http://gousoe.uen.org/72q (LHJ)

 


 

 

Ogden junior high raises more than $7,000 for head-shaving cancer charity

 

OGDEN — The couple that shaves together, stays together. Hunter Jones and Raquel Juarez both have long, luxurious hair.

Make that “had.”

The two ninth graders at Highland Junior High School have been an item since January — a veritable golden wedding anniversary when measured in junior-high years. On Friday afternoon, the couple joined about a dozen other students and faculty at the school who shaved their heads for charity.

It was all part of the St. Baldrick’s Foundation head-shaving event at the school. Organized by first-year engineering teacher Cory Ortiz, the event is part of a national movement that raises money to fight childhood cancers.

http://gousoe.uen.org/72e (OSE)

 


 

 

Ogden Police fulfill dire need for playground equipment to Bonneville Elementary Students

 

OGDEN — With more than 500 students at Bonneville Elementary School, recess can be a challenge on many fronts. But the most basic playground amenities — basketballs, dodge balls, soccer balls — the students haven’t had the luxury to play with for months.

“Balls get popped, they go over the fence into the canal, they get stolen,” principal Janice Bukey said. “We have about 560 students and a handful of balls doesn’t go very far.”

On Thursday, a months-long effort by the Ogden City Police Department changed that. They made a generous donation of almost $2,000 worth of playground equipment for the children to enjoy. All of the supplies were donated by local businesses and officers.

http://gousoe.uen.org/72H (KSL)

 


 

 

Canyons School District: Device-free time during summer

 

Don’t let your kids stay glued to a screen this summer. Canyons School District visited the 2News studio with ideas.

http://gousoe.uen.org/72u (KUTV)

 


 

 

Fitch Rates Alpine School District, UT’s Outstanding GOs ‘AAA’; Outlook Stable

 

SAN FRANCISCO–Fitch Ratings has assigned an ‘AAA’ rating to the following Alpine School District, Utah (the district) general obligation (GO) bonds:

http://gousoe.uen.org/735 (Business Wire)

 

 

 

 

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OPINION & COMMENTARY

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Seeking to provide context, a Utah history teacher goes too far

(Ogden) Standard-Examiner editorial

 

When Douglas Barker used a racial slur in front of his eighth-grade history class, he crossed a line.

Barker, a teacher at South Ogden Junior High School, says he was trying to prepare his students to watch the 1989 Civil War epic “Glory.” He wanted to provide historical context for the word, which is a hallmark of good teaching.

But in the end, it doesn’t matter. The word he used is an epithet, and no one in authority is justified invoking it — especially a junior high school teacher in front of his students.

http://gousoe.uen.org/72h

 


 

 

Who deserves praise and criticism this week in and around northern Utah?

(Ogden) Standard-Examiner editorial

 

THUMBS UP: To Highland Junior High School in Ogden, where students, faculty, staff and administrators raised nearly $7,500 for children’s cancer research Friday, May 13.

How? By having their heads shaved.

The St. Baldrick’s Foundation, based in Monrovia, Calif., funds children’s cancer research. Since 2000, almost 400,000 people have shaved their heads to raise money for St. Baldrick’s, the charity reports.

http://gousoe.uen.org/72g

 


 

 

No ‘Glory’ in South Ogden teacher using racial slur

(Ogden) Standard-Examiner commentary by columnist Mark Saal

 

Here we go again.

Recently, Douglas Barker, a white teacher at South Ogden Junior High School, used the word “n—–” in preparing his students to view the Civil War movie “Glory.” Holly Frye, the black mother of one of Barker’s students, says as a result of that discussion her 14-year-old son doesn’t feel safe at school anymore. And faster than you can say “I have a dream,” everybody’s all wound up again.

It’s getting old. And sadly predictable.

Giving everyone the benefit of the doubt in this incident, I’d say what we have here is a well-meaning teacher who was making a good-faith effort to educate his students about a painful time in our country’s history, and a concerned mother who just wanted to make sure her son is treated with the dignity and respect we all deserve. Which, to me, sounds like a totally resolvable issue.

Still, that won’t stop folks with agendas from attempting to cast this news item as just another racist white man vs. an entitled black woman, with everyone choosing up sides in order to — as the lyrics to Paul Simon’s “Hearts and Bones” point out — “speculate who had been damaged the most.”

http://gousoe.uen.org/72i

 


 

 

A history class, a racial slur and an NAACP investigation: A reader conversation

(Ogden) Standard-Examiner commentary by columnist GREG HALLING

 

The Ogden Branch of the NAACP plans to investigate a teacher’s use of a racial slur during a history class at South Ogden Junior High School.

Stanley Ellington, president of the Ogden NAACP, announced the investigation in a May 9 letter to the Standard-Examiner.

Douglas Barker used the slur while preparing his eighth-graders to watch a PG version of “Glory,” a 1989 film about an African-American regiment that fought in the Civil War.

Holly Frye filed a complaint with the school district, saying her 14-year-old son felt unsafe after hearing Barker use the word.

http://gousoe.uen.org/72j

 


 

 

Uncle Sam wants you … to conform, now

Sutherland Institute commentary by President Stan Rasmussen

 

On Friday, May 13, in a move simultaneously appalling, consistent in pattern, and egregiously disrespectful and dismissive of active judicial proceedings,

The Obama administration told U.S. public school districts across the country on Friday to allow transgender students to use the bathrooms that match their gender identity, rather than their gender at birth.

Officials from the Education and Justice departments told schools that while the new guidance does not carry legal weight, they are obligated not to discriminate against students, including based on their gender identity.

The guidance contains an implicit threat that those not abiding by the Obama administration’s interpretation of the law could face lawsuits or a loss of federal aid. (Emphasis added)

Authoritarian. Intrusive. Usurping.

This gross executive overreach is just the latest instance of perilous social adventurism. Recent media commentaries have examined the expanding authoritarian specter.

http://gousoe.uen.org/72M

 


 

 

SAGE opt-out? Why not see what your kids can do?

Salt Lake Tribune letter from Susanne Reeves

 

Why would parents opt their child out of SAGE testing? Or any test that measures the knowledge and skills their child gained during the past year?

The uproar after the first SAGE test seemed to be focused on the poor scores of many students. That should have been a wake-up, not a rush to disparage the test itself.

My experience the last four years (as a middle school parent) is that education in Utah is centered on children in lockstep, following the rules, making no waves and asking no embarrassing or difficult questions. They do their homework, submit it on time, listen quietly to the lesson and get good grades. It appears from the outrage to the SAGE test, maybe they did not learn as much as they could have.

http://gousoe.uen.org/729

 


 

 

Charter schools misrepresented

Deseret News letter from Jeanne Allen

 

An article about charter schools (“Do charter schools work?” May 9) misrepresented the success and outcomes of these innovative public schools on students, schools and communities. Research has consistently shown that charters lift all boats and grow student learning across all populations. And not only that, but by law, charter schools must accept all students. If there are more applications than seats available, charter schools must hold lotteries to determine enrollment.

The beauty of charter schools is that there is no “one-size-fits-all” when it comes to what a charter school looks like. Charter schools are public schools that are independently run and held accountable for results, yet their methods, structure, curriculum and more vary based on the unique void the school seeks to fill in a community.

http://gousoe.uen.org/72d

 

 


 

 

A change of heart on transgender bathrooms

(Logan) Herald Journal letter from Erin Brewer

 

When North Carolina banned transgendered folks from using the bathroom of their choice, I was completely in support of the ban. One of the main arguments for the ban is that it protects women and children from sexual predators. North Carolina State Sen. Buck Newton stated that the ban was needed so wives, sisters, and children are not exposed to sexual predators in bathrooms.

Most of my friends spoke out against the ban. As public outcry against the ban grew, I tried to figure out why I was so supportive of it.

I realized my strong support of the ban was based on something that happened to me as a child.

http://gousoe.uen.org/72s

 


 

 

Navy blue should not be an East High color Salt Lake Tribune letter from Jennifer C. Kelsey

 

Being a third-generation East High Leopard and having a child currently at the school (who happens to be mortified that I am doing this), I was recently aghast to see that the school has recently introduced navy blue into the school color scheme.

It is not just being used as a neutral color. I’ve seen a navy blue ‘E’ sticker on a current student car, sweatshirts that have East High written in navy blue — no red or white to be found.

The history of red and white are well established in the East High community. I am a proud alumni of East High, and it is my opinion that the practice of using blue should cease. Tradition from 100-plus years should be left alone.

http://gousoe.uen.org/728

 


 

 

Better ways to measure school success are worth a try Washington Post commentary by columnist Jay Matthews

 

It’s hard to like the new, loosey-goosey Every Student Succeeds Act, the latest federal attempt to make schools better. Its predecessor, the No Child Left Behind Act, had problems, too, but at least it did not let our 50 states and the District — a mostly weak-willed bunch — decide how much our children should learn.

Even the American Federation of Teachers, which strongly supports the new act, admits that when they acquire control over “accountability, resources, interventions and teacher evaluation systems” in 2017, “some states will mess up.” Most of them probably will. Setting firm, challenging guidelines for teaching and learning is always politically perilous, as any resulting low scores make the state and its leaders look bad.

But there is no dependable way to instill courage in governors, legislators and state school-board members.

My wife calls me the “Pollyanna From Hell,” and I choose again to be optimistic. The new law has added an intriguing dimension to reporting school results. Each state must have at least one measure of its own choosing that is not tied to academic performance, such as safety, learning climate,or student and teacher engagement.

Those are subjective concepts, and they are vulnerable to states’ insatiable appetite for false positives.

http://gousoe.uen.org/725

 


 

 

The Pension Pac-Man

How Pension Debt Eats Away at Teacher Salaries Bellwether Education Partners analysis by Chad Aldeman

 

Why aren’t teacher salaries rising?

It’s not for lack of money. Even after adjusting for inflation and rising student enrollment, total school spending is up by about 29 percent over the last 20 years.

It’s not for lack of money spent on teachers, either. Instructional costs, including salaries, wages, and benefits for teachers, make up slightly more than 60 percent of all district spending today, just like it did 20 years ago.

So overall expenditures are up, but teacher salaries are actually down slightly over the same period. Today, the average public school teacher earns $56,689 annually, a couple hundred dollars less than the average teacher salary 20 years ago (in constant dollars).

Why is this happening? This puzzle can be explained by three trends eating into teachers’ take-home pay: rising health care costs, declining student/teacher ratios, and rising retirement costs.

http://gousoe.uen.org/722

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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NATIONAL NEWS

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Obama says transgender rule is important aid to schools: BuzzFeed Reuters

 

President Barack Obama said on Monday that his administration’s guidance on transgender issues is needed to help schools grapple with the sensitive topic and ensure that all children are treated fairly.

Obama, in an interview with BuzzFeed news website broadcast live on Facebook and YouTube, said schools had been asking the Department of Education how they should handle questions they were facing with transgender youths.

“We think it was important for schools who want to go ahead and, in a very practical way, try to deal with the school year – What are they going to be doing next year? How should we approach this? – that we give them our best judgment about how to approach it,” Obama said.

The Obama administration told U.S. public schools on Friday that transgender students must be allowed to use the bathroom of their choice, upsetting Republicans and raising the likelihood of fights over federal funding and legal authority.

http://gousoe.uen.org/72S

 

http://gousoe.uen.org/72T (Buzzfeed)

 

http://gousoe.uen.org/732 (Ed Week)

 


 

 

Schools Offer Guidance on Transgender Issues Associated Press

 

SAN FRANCISCO — From locker rooms and sex education classes to dress codes and overnight field trips, many U.S. public schools already are balancing the civil rights of transgender students with any concerns that classmates, parents and community members might have.

The Education Department is drawing on those practices to guide other schools as they work to comply with the Obama administration’s directive that transitioning children be treated consistent with their gender identity.

That has been the policy since 2013 of the Arcadia Unified School District in Southern California. As part of a settlement with the federal departments of Justice and Education that became the foundation for the national mandate issued Friday, students may use the bathroom, locker room or wilderness cabin that corresponds with their recognized gender outside school, Superintendent David Vannasdall said.

“This is absolutely not about a student on a day-to-day basis saying, ‘Today I’m a boy, tomorrow I’m a girl.’ That has never happened,” Vannasdall said. “By the time these students are at a point where they are asking for our help, they are presenting in all areas of their life as that gender.”

http://gousoe.uen.org/72X

 


 

 

Groups seek immediate halt to N.C. law restricting transgender bathroom choice Reuters

 

WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. | Groups supporting the rights of transgender people filed a motion on Monday asking a U.S. judge to block North Carolina from enforcing a law that mandates bathroom access according to birth sex while the measure is being challenged.

The preliminary injunction is needed to protect transgender people from suffering irreparable harm due to the law known as House Bill 2, said the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU), the ACLU of North Carolina, and Lambda Legal, a national advocacy group for lesbians, gays, bisexuals and transgender people.

The law, enacted in March, made North Carolina the first state to ban people from using multiple-occupancy restrooms or changing rooms in public buildings and schools consistent with their gender identity. It sparked a national debate about equality versus privacy rights and has resulted in boycotts of the Southern state by businesses, conventions and entertainers.

“H.B. 2 is causing ongoing and serious harm to transgender people in North Carolina and must be put on hold while it is reviewed by the court,” Chris Brook, legal director of the ACLU of North Carolina, said in a statement.

http://gousoe.uen.org/72V

 

http://gousoe.uen.org/72Y (AP)

 


 

 

Colleges Announced for Pell ‘Dual Enrollment’ Program Associated Press

 

WASHINGTON — Thousands of low-income students in nearly two dozen states will soon be able get federal grants to take college courses while still in high school, part of a program the Obama administration plans to begin this summer.

The experimental program allows high school kids to apply for federal Pell grant money to pay for college courses. The “dual enrollment” program is designed to help students from lower-income backgrounds.

The Education Department says the administration will invest about $20 million in the 2016-17 school year to help about 10,000 students.

On Monday, the administration is announcing 44 colleges that are expected to participate in the program.

http://gousoe.uen.org/721

 

http://gousoe.uen.org/72O (WaPo)

 

http://gousoe.uen.org/730 (CSM)

 

http://gousoe.uen.org/72Z (Ed Week)

 

http://gousoe.uen.org/72N (ED)

 


 

 

Career And Technical Education: Boom Or Bust?

NPR

 

Career and technical education in high schools has gotten lots of attention and lip service in recent years. Business and industry see it as a long overdue focus on preparing students for the world of work. Educators say CTE — once called vocational education — is an alternative path for high school graduates who don’t plan to go to college, at least not right away.

It has also come under scrutiny from researchers who say it’s just not working as well as it should. It’s poorly funded and often viewed as a “second rate” education.

Anthony Carnevale, director of the Center on Education and the Workforce at Georgetown University, has written extensively about this. He says people forget that at the turn of the last century, the booming manufacturing economy needed young people for entry level jobs.

http://gousoe.uen.org/72K

 


 

 

Judge orders Mississippi school district to desegregate, 62 years after Brown v. Board of Education Washington Post

 

A federal judge has ordered a school district in the Mississippi Delta to desegregate its middle and high schools, capping a legal battle that has dragged on for more than five decades.

The Cleveland School District is divided by railroad tracks that separate white families, who largely live west of the tracks, from black families, who largely live to the east. Its secondary schools reflect that division: There is one all-black middle school, for example, and one all-black high school. Just over a mile away are a historically white middle school and high school.

http://gousoe.uen.org/72P

 

http://gousoe.uen.org/72Q (USAT)

 

http://gousoe.uen.org/72R (Reuters)

 

http://gousoe.uen.org/734 (Jackson [MS] Clarion Ledger)

 


 

 

State education chief hopes to lead Minneapolis schools Associated Press  via Minneapolis Star Tribune

 

MINNEAPOLIS — The Minneapolis School Board will interview two finalists Tuesday in the protracted hunt for the district’s next superintendent. The hopefuls include Minnesota’s education commissioner and a superintendent of schools from Alaska.

An 11-member selection committee on Friday night named Education Commissioner Brenda Cassellius and Ed Graff, a Minnesota native who’s the superintendent of schools in Anchorage, as the finalists. The committee interviewed five semifinalists from a pool of about 20 candidates last week.

After school visits and a round of public comment, the board will meet May 27 to vote on filling a post that’s been vacant since Bernadeia Johnson resigned in December 2014. The job pays $190,000 a year.

http://gousoe.uen.org/723

 


 

 

How to help principals do a better job? Train their bosses More districts training top officials to better coach, support school leaders Hechinger Report

 

OAKLAND, Calif. — It was almost the end of first period at Bret Harte Middle School when the five superintendents descended on math class. Dressed in suits and armed with pens, notebooks, and laptops, the superintendents had one specific goal as they fanned out across the classroom, interacting with students: to look for evidence that a geometry lesson was aligned to the new state math standards.

“You’re all working together?” one superintendent asked a group.

“This was the warm up?” asked another.

“What’s the learning objective today?” inquired a third.

They examined work and eavesdropped on kids, then filed out to huddle in an empty hallway, where it was their turn to answer some questions.

“Alright. What were kids learning?” asked Jaime Aquino, chief program officer for the nonprofit New Leaders, who directed the conversation, as the administrators began poring through their notes.

“My group told me they were ‘flipping shapes around and seeing what we get,’” one superintendent responded.

“They got the concept,” said another. “But they didn’t really have the technical language to express it.”

It’s rare for school district big wigs to spend time in a classroom. But Oakland is one of a growing number of districts trying to reconnect top administrators to the kids they serve as a way to help the critical middleman in education: the school principal.

By observing lessons and spending more time with students, administrators may be better informed about challenges in schools, and better equipped to support principals.

http://gousoe.uen.org/731

 


 

 

Your Stadium Here: Public schools cash in with naming rights Chicago Tribune

 

In the last two years, a northern Indiana high school sold the naming rights to its football field to a bank for $400,000, its baseball field to an auto dealership, its softball field to a law firm, its tennis court to a philanthropic couple and its concession stands to a tire and auto care company and a restaurant.

Even music rooms in the district’s 11 elementary schools were named for a couple who donated more than $50,000 over 10 years. All told, the nonprofit Penn-Harris-Madison Education Foundation has signed agreements that will bring the district more than $600,000 in the coming years — and school officials are looking for more.

An idea that started with professional sports teams and worked its way through colleges and universities has taken root in public schools around the U.S. as funding for districts tightens for various reasons, including political fights, tax cuts and property tax caps.

“I see this as kind of a logical progression,” said Josh Boyd, an associate professor at Purdue University’s Brian Lamb School of Communication who has researched naming rights. “It’s not surprising we’re seeing the next level down in athletics doing the same thing. But I think it’s still in the early stages.”

http://gousoe.uen.org/724

 


 

 

‘McDonald’s Diet’ brand ambassador dropped from schools: company Reuters

 

LOS ANGELES | The former Iowa science teacher and McDonald’s Corp “brand ambassador,” who preached the virtues of walking and near-daily french fries in presentations to youth, is no longer visiting U.S. schools, the fast-food chain said on Friday.

The program presented by John Cisna, author of the book “My McDonald’s Diet: How I lost 37 pounds in 90 days and became a viral media sensation,” was sharply criticized by teachers, parents and public health advocates who accused McDonald’s of trying to hook youngsters on unhealthy food.

Cisna’s program included a documentary and discussion guide edited by McDonald’s, which hired him in 2015 and provides him with a stipend for time and travel related to his speaking engagements. His presentations came shortly after the new CEO of the 60-year-old chain had begun working to transform McDonald’s into a “modern, progressive burger company.”

“As our brand ambassador, John is focused on internal and local community events, and he is not appearing at schools,” McDonald’s said in a statement. A McDonald’s spokeswoman declined to elaborate.

http://gousoe.uen.org/72U

 

 

 

 

 

————————————————————

CALENDAR

————————————————————

 

USOE Calendar

http://www.schools.utah.gov/main/CALENDAR.aspx

 

 

UEN News

http://www.uen.org

 

 

May 17:

Executive Appropriations Committee meeting

2 p.m., 445 State Capitol

http://le.utah.gov/Interim/2016/html/00002170.htm

 

 

May 18:

Revenue and Taxation Interim Committee meeting

8:30 a.m., 445 State Capitol

http://le.utah.gov/Interim/2016/html/00002142.htm

 

Education Interim Committee meeting

1:15 p.m., 30 House Building

http://le.utah.gov/Interim/2016/html/00002099.htm

 

 

June 9:

Utah State Board of Education study session, USDB and committee meetings

250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspx

 

 

June 10:

Utah State Board of Education meeting

250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspx

 

 

July 14:

Utah State Charter School Board meeting

250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://go.uen.org/62M

 

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