Education News Roundup: May 31, 2016

Summer Food Service ProgramToday’s Top Picks:

Sure, it’s summer, but schools will be the topic of political conversations in Utah.
http://gousoe.uen.org/7ds (DN)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/7eh (KSL)

Gov. Gary Herbert and his Republican challenger, Jonathan Johnson are already talking about schools.
http://gousoe.uen.org/7dq (DN)

Trib looks at charter school performance and outsourced administration.
http://gousoe.uen.org/7dp (SLT)

Spectrum looks at the summer food program.
http://gousoe.uen.org/7e8 (SGS)

2014 Utah Teacher of the Year Allison Riddle discusses end-of-year tests.
http://gousoe.uen.org/7eI (Ed Week)

Charter school growth comes at the expense of district schools in big cities, AP finds.
http://gousoe.uen.org/7dv (AP)
and sidebar http://gousoe.uen.org/7dw (AP)

The Atlantic looks at the benefits of dual immersion education.
http://gousoe.uen.org/7eA (Atlantic)

This week’s viral video is from a recent graduate of the Harvard Graduate School of Education.
http://gousoe.uen.org/7es (Boston Globe)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/7et (Ed Week)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/7ex (CSM)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/7eu (People)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/7ev (BET)

————————————————————
TODAY’S HEADLINES
————————————————————

UTAH

State, education leaders gear up for summer deliberation as school year ends

Herbert, Johnson present different visions for Utah education; both call for unity

Utah’s highest-scoring charter schools don’t outsource administration
Utah education » Highest-scoring charter schools rely on internal staffing for operations, say they prefer to “handle things in-house.”

Bear River Charter School’s founder moving to Cache District

Providence to get charter school

Transgender student on bathroom debate: Criminals aren’t waiting for a loophole

Box Elder district refuses to comply with Obama’s transgender bathroom order

Retired teacher writes letters to former students at graduation one last time

State policy can drive, sustain school dual-language programs

No summer vacation for hunger

Manti senior conquers classes and cancer

Layton senior overcomes great odds to finish top of her class

Cache High senior works, stays positive despite dad’s deportation

Carry on: Sky View senior graduates with new kidney

Beaver Dam graduates encouraged to ‘never give up’

Northern Utah class of 2016: High school graduates getting diplomas this year

Utah Online High School Graduation Ceremonies

Alpine School District bus driver is reigning champion at state competition

Utah elementary school principal arrested, accused of assault

Former Springville High student charged with threat of terrorism

Man stabbed at West Kearns Elementary upgraded to fair condition

Junior ROTC program honors fallen heroes through service

Park Elementary student’s cow drawing picked for State Fair butter sculpture design

Tiny, honor-system libraries trending in Cache County

Moms are most stressed when their children start middle school

OPINION & COMMENTARY

Joining bathroom lawsuit is pointless and painful

Have students become pawns for politicians?

Roy High senior graduates after six years living away from parents in Mexico

About Utah: Utah teacher taught 15 children from the same family, and they all came back to thank her

Every Brain Deserves a Break

Taxpayers weren’t asked if they wanted to sue

Herbert fights LGBT families

It’s Republican politicians who need their own bathrooms

‘Total disregard’

Racial slur would probably die out if black people didn’t use it, reader says

A Fresh Turn in the New Orleans Charter School Miracle
Oversight will revert to the city from the state, but with safeguards to ensure that gains remain intact.

The Colorado Department of Education’s revolving door

How I answer my students’ tough questions about military service

Four ways to make teacher evaluations meaningful
Refocusing on teacher growth: A path forward under ESSA

Schools Shouldn’t Approach Technology Like Businesses Once Did
Efficiencies should not be the objective of successful teaching.

Helping Teachers of Mathematics Integrate the Knowledge and Culture of Families Into Their Practice

NATION

ESSA Accountability Proposal a Departure From Punitive Past, Secretary King Says

New Education Law: Bipartisan No More
Republicans are fuming over what they perceive as complete disregard for the intent of the reform law.

As Charters Grow, Public Schools See Sharp Enrollment Drop

Teaching children to read: Portland, Beaverton reject mainstream series, forge own approaches

The Benefits of Teaching in Two Languages
Bilingual education facilitates connections beyond the confines of a classroom.

How a Libertarian Looks at Education: Where Gary Johnson Stands

Active-shooter Drills Help Schools Prepare for the Worst

Schools to Begin Monitoring Students from Military Families

Court Ruling Raises Possibility Kansas Schools Can’t Open

Disagreement abounds over how to fix state education department

Clash between state, Milwaukee voucher school moves to federal court

Chest Protectors Guard Against Deadly Blows to Chest

Rape Allegation, Race, Glare of National Media Divide Town

Mom threatens principal when child held from graduation, report says
Child kept from graduation ceremony because of disciplinary issues

This Harvard graduate’s inspirational commencement speech is going viral

————————————————————
UTAH NEWS
————————————————————

State, education leaders gear up for summer deliberation as school year ends

SALT LAKE CITY — School’s out for several school districts across the Wasatch Front, but much is happening for education in Utah during the summer months.
Education leaders and state lawmakers are planning to revisit issues and update education policies from the 2016 legislative session, such as testing and accountability.
Gov. Gary Herbert has also raised the possibility of another special legislative session to make changes to the student assessment of growth and excellence, Utah’s student testing system known as SAGE.
Some teachers will use the time out of class to prepare for next year and pursue educator coaching through their school or outside organizations.
http://gousoe.uen.org/7ds (DN)

http://gousoe.uen.org/7eh (KSL)

Herbert, Johnson present different visions for Utah education; both call for unity

SALT LAKE CITY — Gov. Gary Herbert and his Republican challenger, Jonathan Johnson, have both identified education as a key issue in their campaigns, committing to unifying lawmakers and educators in improving student outcomes.
It’s a topic that’s gained momentum this month in light of renewed debate over the Common Core State Standards and SAGE, the Utah-developed student assessment of growth and excellence used in third through 11th grades.
The powers of Utah’s governor are limited when it comes to setting education policy. But Herbert and Johnson have identified different priorities in guiding the Utah Legislature and education leaders as they deliberate over funding, academic standards and other issues.
http://gousoe.uen.org/7dq (DN)

Utah’s highest-scoring charter schools don’t outsource administration
Utah education » Highest-scoring charter schools rely on internal staffing for operations, say they prefer to “handle things in-house.”

Last spring, nine out of every 10 students at the Utah County Academy of Science (UCAS) met grade-level benchmarks on the science portion of SAGE, Utah’s year-end test for public-school students.
That success rate was the highest among Utah’s charter schools, followed by Success Academy, InTech Collegiate High School and the Northern Utah Academy for Math, Engineering and Science (NUAMES).
Those four schools share a number of similarities beyond their exemplary test scores. They’re part of a family of Utah early-college high schools that, while operating as independent charter schools, were created through partnerships with traditional school districts and Utah’s public universities to form a dual track to a high school diploma and an associate degree.
They also rely on internal staffing for school operations instead of outsourcing to private management companies — a practice that is common among Utah’s charter schools.
http://gousoe.uen.org/7dp (SLT)

Bear River Charter School’s founder moving to Cache District

Bear River Charter School’s founder is leaving the school to teach in the Cache County School District.
Anne Desjardins initially founded the school as a private school, the Cache Valley Learning Center, but it became difficult to attract families due to the high cost of private education, she said. She then applied to the Utah State Office of Education for a charter and launched Bear River Charter School in 2010.
Her time there has meant a lot to her, she said.
“A lot of the kids here went to kindergarten through ninth grade, and they’re about to graduate high school,” Desjardins said. “I think that’s the big reason, is just watching the kids succeed.”
She continued, “Bear River always had a strong special education program too, and children move around based on their ability. In a traditional school, you usually move around if you have problems, so there isn’t as much of a stigma associated with that here because you could be moving because you’re really good at what you do.”
http://gousoe.uen.org/7e2 (LHJ)

Providence to get charter school

Providence will get a charter school by next year, adding to several other schools of that type that are already in Cache Valley.
The Center for Creativity, Innovation and Discovery, or CCID, is expected to open August 2017, said Melissa Shunn-Mitchell, the CCID governing board chair, at a Providence City Council meeting earlier this week. Shunn-Mitchell said the State Board of Education signed off on the plans in February, but only now have construction plans began to firm up.
http://gousoe.uen.org/7e4 (LHJ)

Transgender student on bathroom debate: Criminals aren’t waiting for a loophole

Skylar Ostler found her answers in the back of a Narcotics Anonymous book.
“I had no idea there were people who had gone from one gender, that they were born as, but were actually the other gender, that they could live and be,” Ostler said. “When I read that, it made so much sense. A lot of experiences growing up and different questions and different desires growing up, just suddenly made sense.”
Ostler, a 20-year-old freshman and transgender woman who attends Utah Valley University, had picked up the book while she was in an inpatient treatment facility following a suicide attempt.
But once she came out publicly, going to a public restroom — a topic currently in the national spotlight and fiercely debated by both sides — was a source of anxiety and caused plenty of concern about being attacked.
“So for a long time, I would never go to the bathroom in public,” Ostler said. “I would go home and use the bathroom in my house and hold it.”
Utah is part of a multi-state lawsuit filed Wednesday against the White House in light of a letter released by the Obama administration stating students who are transgender should be able to use bathrooms that correspond with their gender identity. School districts that don’t comply, the letter warns, could lose federal funding.
Last week, three members of the Alpine School District Board of Education sent a letter to state leaders opposing the declaration. The letter, signed by members Paula Hill, Wendy Hart and Brian Halladay, calls the federal recommendations “morally reprehensible” and states that “the consequences of this social experiment would be disastrous, not only as an invasion of the rights of a majority, but also with the potential legal liability that could incur upon the school district and the state, if we were to adopt this egregious guidance.”
http://gousoe.uen.org/7e0 (PDH)

Box Elder district refuses to comply with Obama’s transgender bathroom order

BRIGHAM CITY— A northern Utah school district is refusing to comply with the Obama administration’s directive to let transgender students use bathrooms that match their gender identity.
Box Elder School Superintendent Ron Tolman sent a letter to parents explaining that schools in his district will instead continue to work with parents whose children have “unique requirements” on a case-by-case basis, Tolman said in a letter, KSL-TV reports.
“At no time do we intend to sacrifice the rights of the general population of students for political reasons,” Tolman wrote. “We do not believe that President Obama has the moral nor bureaucratic authority to issue such a far-reaching federal directive.”
http://gousoe.uen.org/7dS (OSE)

http://gousoe.uen.org/7dV (PDH)

http://gousoe.uen.org/7dU (CVD)

http://gousoe.uen.org/7dT (UPR)

http://gousoe.uen.org/7eJ (Ed Week)

State policy can drive, sustain school dual-language programs

* A new American Institutes for Research (AIR) report, “Dual Language Education Programs: Current State Policies and Practices,” has been released and offers policy recommendations about how states can help school districts create and maintain robust dual language instruction.
* The expansion of dual language programs should be a statewide priority, AIR recommends, pointing to the state of Utah, where a public-private partnership has helped 138 schools develop coursework.
* States can also create funding opportunities to incentivize dual language programming in schools, like offering start-up grants, offering specialized diplomas to bilingual or multilingual students, and prioritizing the training and hiring of language teachers.
http://gousoe.uen.org/7eG (Education Dive)

A copy of the report
http://gousoe.uen.org/7eH (AIR)

No summer vacation for hunger

With Utah schools closed for the summer, there are many children in Iron County whose parents are wondering how they are going to feed them.
Starting Tuesday, those parents can take their children to three locations for a daily sack lunch provided through a partnership with Southern Utah University, Community Presbyterian Church and AmeriCorps VISTA, according to a news release.
“The Summer Lunch Program is funded through the USDA Summer Food Service Program, which plans to serve more than 200 million free meals to children 18 or under across the country,” according to the release.
SUU students and church members volunteer to prepare the food and follow guidelines to ensure healthy meals are offered.
http://gousoe.uen.org/7e8 (SGS)

Retired teacher writes letters to former students at graduation one last time

PLEASANT GROVE — Any teacher can tell you what made each of their classes special.
Barbara Langford can tell you what made each of her students special.
“I just see all their cute little faces and they’re just amazing,” said Langford while looking through one of the many scrapbooks she has made of her classes. “I would just keep a little picture of the class.”
In her 17-year career spent mostly at Manila Elementary School in Pleasant Grove, Langford estimates she has taught more than 500 students in 4th and 5th grades.
“I’ve even went to visit every child. I’ve gone to every child’s home. I could always learn so much from those visits. Their habits, their interests, their families. I just learned a lot of things,” said Langford.
She felt, if she got to know her students home life, she could understand how they needed to learn at school.
“Teaching is just something that you really have to have your heart in,” said Langford. “I was committed to developing relationships.”
Langford even wrote letters to her students when they graduated.
Not from elementary school. But high school.
“This is the way I wanted to show that they’re great people. That they can do great things,” said Langford.
It’s also what makes this year’s Pleasant Grove High School graduating class the hardest of them all.
You see, Langford stopped teaching class eight years ago.
This year’s graduating class is the last class she had.
http://gousoe.uen.org/7ei (KSL)

Manti senior conquers classes and cancer

MANTI — Kelsie Albee learned more during her senior year than most of her classmates will in their lifetimes.
“The class of 2016, this motto (#albeestrong) has carried me through and has been an emblem through this year,” Albee said.
She got a lot of support through the hashtag, along with the Facebook page Keep Keepin’ On #albeestrong.
“I think I learned more from this battle than I would have being enrolled in school,” said Albee, who graduated Friday, “so I am grateful for an experience.”
http://gousoe.uen.org/7dN (DN)

http://gousoe.uen.org/7ek (KSL)

Layton senior overcomes great odds to finish top of her class

LAYTON — Madysen McCollum is one Layton High School senior who knows full well that college will be a cakewalk for her.
That’s because at 18, Madysen has already faced what likely will be the hardest trials of her life and she’s come through with flying colors.
Her mother could no longer care for her and her three younger siblings after a traumatic brain injury when Madysen was 10. Her mother died three years later in a care center. Madysen was left to provide much care for her siblings herself off-and-on for six years until her grandmother was granted custody through the juvenile courts due to challenges in the home.
Madysen was just named Tuesday, May 24, as the recipient of the Cleone Whitman scholarship. It’s a full-ride scholarship awarded from the Whitman family to the top Layton High student they choose each year following an extensive selection process.
http://gousoe.uen.org/7dW (OSE)

Cache High senior works, stays positive despite dad’s deportation

Cache High School senior Lorena Rosa had barely gotten off school one afternoon last February when she came home and saw big black vehicles and men dressed in black with guns raiding her house — a scene that repeats over and over in her mind like a nightmare.
It was U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, better known as ICE, coming to arrest her father and deport him to his home country of Guatemala.
“They have no respect for Hispanics. They took him like he had committed a big crime,” Rosa said. “They were holding me back. I asked, ‘What did he do?’”
With the reality of a father out of the house, Rosa was forced to do what not many of her peers would — get a full-time job to make ends meet while balancing school. Rosa, 18, got the 8-hour night shift cleaning the JBS Hyrum plant and went to school during the day. Now she will graduate from Cache High School on June 1 and begin the nursing program at Weber State University in the fall.
http://gousoe.uen.org/7e3 (LHJ)

Carry on: Sky View senior graduates with new kidney

SMITHFIELD — Everyone can boast at least one thing that makes them unique: Jackie Ochoa has at least three.
Three kidneys, to be exact.
The college-bound senior from Sky View High School will graduate this Wednesday with a high GPA, having kept up her schooling even with it being interrupted by kidney dialysis and a subsequent organ transplant. While already considering a career in the health field, Jackie now wants to be a pediatrician who specializes in kidneys and help other kids like her
http://gousoe.uen.org/7e6 (LHJ)

Beaver Dam graduates encouraged to ‘never give up’

The carousel is Kerry Noble’s favorite ride at Disneyland. It always brings her back to where she started. The most terrifying ride in her mind: Tower of Terror.
Noble spoke during the graduation ceremony for Beaver Dam High School on Friday night and compared the students’ futures to that terrifying ride they took on their senior trip to Disneyland.
http://gousoe.uen.org/7e7 (SGS)

Northern Utah class of 2016: High school graduates getting diplomas this year

As the school year comes to a close, it’s time for local graduates to celebrate their accomplishments, reflect on their high school years and find out what the future has in store for them.
In honor of the class of 2016, the Standard-Examiner is publishing lists of each high school’s graduates, which are linked below. A schedule of when the lists will appear in the newspaper can be found below the list of schools.
http://gousoe.uen.org/7dX (OSE)

Utah Online High School Graduation Ceremonies

http://gousoe.uen.org/7e9 (SGS)

Alpine School District bus driver is reigning champion at state competition

With some of the recent bad news of school bus driving incidents, it’s nice to know Alpine School District has the best bus driver in the state.
Orem resident and Alpine School District bus driver Roxann Harper has only been driving a school bus for three years, but she’s been winning district and state awards since she started. Just last weekend, she again was named the overall champion at the School Bus Rodeo and Utah State Safety Skills Competition in West Jordan. Skills included carefully maneuvering her full-size school bus through cones, hanging tennis balls and alleyways.
“She’s fantastic. She obviously cares a great deal about being a professional driver,” said Joe Hayes, director of transportation at Alpine District. “Roxann loves to drive, and takes a great deal of pride in what she does. She does things right. I really appreciate that about her. She does well at the competitions and out on the road.”
In her first year, she took third place at the district-level bus competition, and then third in the novice category at the state competition. Last year, she took first place in the district competition, and first in the intermediate category and first overall. Last summer, she went to the national bus rodeo competition in Minnesota and earned 20th out of 26 people in her category.
http://gousoe.uen.org/7e1 (PDH)

Utah elementary school principal arrested, accused of assault

An Davis School District principal was arrested Friday after allegedly assaulting and detaining a woman in his West Point home.
Donald Beatty, 53, held a woman against her will when she tried to leave a room before finishing a conversation, according to a probable cause statement. He allegedly closed the door when she tried to leave, tackled her to the floor and straddled her to prevent her from using a cellphone to call for help. She was attempting to call her son, whom Beatty allegedly threatened to kill if he came to the house, jail documents state.
The woman escaped and was outside when officers arrived.
Beatty is listed as the principal of Antelope Elementary on the Davis County School District website. He has been placed on paid administrative leave, according to district spokesman Chris Williams.
http://gousoe.uen.org/7dK (SLT)

http://gousoe.uen.org/7dO (DN)

http://gousoe.uen.org/7dR (OSE)

http://gousoe.uen.org/7ec (KUTV)

http://gousoe.uen.org/7ed (KTVX)

http://gousoe.uen.org/7ef (KSL)

http://gousoe.uen.org/7em (KSTU)

Former Springville High student charged with threat of terrorism

SPRINGVILLE — An 18-year-old Springville man was charged Friday for allegedly making online threats of a terrorism attack at Springville High School.
Court documents say Marcus Douglas Swendsen, a former Springville High student, “posted a threatening tweet on Twitter” May 19, stating his plans to appear at the school with his AK-47 the following day. “The … tweet also included an emoji picture of a skull,” charging documents state.
Police also allegedly found posts on Swendsen’s Twitter account that made references to Virginia Tech and Columbine High School.
Swendsen, who police say is currently enrolled in an alternative high school, was charged with threat of terrorism, a second-degree felony, and obstructing justice, a third-degree felony.
http://gousoe.uen.org/7dP (DN)

http://gousoe.uen.org/7ej (KSL)

http://gousoe.uen.org/7en (KSTU)

Man stabbed at West Kearns Elementary upgraded to fair condition

KEARNS — A 36-year-old man was stabbed Monday at West Kearns Elementary School after an attempt to intervene in an argument between another man and his girlfriend, police say.
Unified police say the two men had been arguing before they arrived at the school, 4900 S. 4620 West, about 10:45 a.m. While they were playing on the playground, the alleged attacker began arguing with his girlfriend, police say.
The man, who is in his late 20s or early 30s, then stabbed the 36-year-old victim in the back when he attempted to intervene in the argument, according to police.
http://gousoe.uen.org/7dL (DN)

http://gousoe.uen.org/7dM (SLT)

http://gousoe.uen.org/7dY (OSE)

http://gousoe.uen.org/7ee (KTVX)

http://gousoe.uen.org/7el (KSTU)

http://gousoe.uen.org/7eo (KNRS)

Junior ROTC program honors fallen heroes through service

ST. GEORGE — On May 30, 1868, thousands of people gathered at Arlington National Cemetery to decorate the graves of more than 20,000 Union and Confederate Soldiers buried there, ushering in the nation’s first Memorial Day, originally known as “Decoration Day.”
On May 30 of this year, many thousands more will gather at Arlington National Cemetery as flags are placed on more than 400,000 graves in remembrance of those who have died in the service of their country.
In April, veterans placed a flag at each white cross lining the grass at Dixie Center St. George, as cadets from Air Force junior ROTC were on hand to assist during a memorial at the Vietnam Veterans of America Convention.
The Dixie Wings Air Force junior ROTC program, now in its 10th year, serves cadets in Washington County School District’s high schools and middle schools, including Tuacahn High School.
http://gousoe.uen.org/7eb (SGN)

Park Elementary student’s cow drawing picked for State Fair butter sculpture design

RICHMOND — A Park Elementary student is going to have a picture of a cow he drew transformed into a 700-pound butter sculpture at the 2016 Utah State Fair.
Owen Jackson, 9, participated in the 2016 Butter Cow Design Contest after hearing many announcements from school personnel who were excited to get their students involved. He drew a skateboarding, basketball-playing, hula-hooping cow about to ride off a ramp into a slam dunk.
http://gousoe.uen.org/7e5 (LHJ)

Tiny, honor-system libraries trending in Cache County

LOGAN — The wooden post in the front yard of the Duncan family’s Boulevard home in Logan often gets mistaken for a mailbox. But take a closer look, and the neatly painted and designed box resembling a house is actually full of books.
Logan resident Jennifer Duncan, who is also associate dean at Utah State University’s Special Collections and Archives, maintains the library of books outside her home, filled with material for all ages — from kids fiction (“Infestation: Something Huge is on the March” by Timothy Bradley) to autobiography (“The Measure of a Man” by actor Sydney Poitier).
http://gousoe.uen.org/7eK (DN)

Moms are most stressed when their children start middle school

Raising an infant can be challenging, but raising an early adolescent may be even harder. According to a recent study from researchers at Arizona State University, mothers are the most stressed when their children start middle school.
http://gousoe.uen.org/7dJ (DN)

————————————————————
OPINION & COMMENTARY
————————————————————

Joining bathroom lawsuit is pointless and painful
Salt Lake Tribune editorial

The state of Utah has joined 10 other states in suing the Obama administration for what it sees as “federal overreach” with its memo on bathroom policies for transgender students.
Even if there is a reasonable constitutional question, where are we headed with this?
Those who have followed this spring’s “bathroom wars” saw the debate sharpen after North Carolina passed a law requiring that everyone use the bathroom of their birth gender rather than the gender they identify with. North Carolina is still addressing the backlash.
So why did North Carolina legislators decide that they had to act? Because the city of Charlotte had passed an ordinance that allowed people to choose the bathrooms of their gender identity.
Right now, Gov. Gary Herbert and Attorney General Sean Reyes can have lots of election-year fun with painting the feds as intrusive. It’s true that the members of Congress who passed the Civil Rights Act of 1964 probably didn’t have transgender people in mind.
But some Utah school districts have said they already have policies in place that are similar to the federal guidelines. Will we see the governor and Legislature swing into action and pass something like North Carolina’s law? Then, we too, can join in losing conventions and employers?
http://gousoe.uen.org/7dF

Have students become pawns for politicians?
Deseret News commentary by columnist John Florez

If parents knew their students might be used as pawns by politicians for political gain, they would demand change. Remember in November.
Gov. Gary Herbert and the state Legislature appear to use our K-12 students as pawns for what looks like political gain when they keep adding and changing laws and wasting tax dollars. And it’s been going on for years.
The tipping point came last week when Gov. Herbert said he wanted the state to stop using Common Core in public education, after he had strongly endorsed it in January 2012 saying, it is not a “socialistic program foisted upon us by the federal government.” The standards were adopted by Utah in 2010; however, his flip-flop came after his party primary opponent for governor had called to end Common Core. The governor went further and wanted to stop using the SAGE testing program that the state had piloted in 2008 and started using statewide in 2013.
Then last month, state Sen. Stuart Adams worked to override Herbert’s veto of three vendor bills: $3 million for K-3 Early Intervention reading, $2 million for UPSTART, an online preschool program, and $275,000 for ProStart to train students to compete in the Teen Chef Masters’ TV show. In May, the governor, rather than having his vetoes overridden, called for a special session at taxpayers’ expense, which readily restored the three bills.
The greatest problem Utah’s public education has is its outdated organizational structure where no one is responsible and accountable for its outcomes, not the governor, the Legislature or State Board of Education.
http://gousoe.uen.org/7dr

Roy High senior graduates after six years living away from parents in Mexico
(Ogden) Standard-Examiner commentary by columnist Mark Saal

Unlike most of the graduating seniors at Roy High School, when Jessenya Perez walked across the stage to receive her diploma on Wednesday, she didn’t have proud parents there to watch.
Oh, her parents are plenty proud. They just have to exhibit that pride from a great distance.
The daughter of Jose and Celia Perez, Jessenya has been living away from her mother and father for six years now — they live in Mexico, she lives in Utah.
“I was born here, but my parents are from Mexico,” Jessenya explained. “My mom and dad met here.”
Jose Perez was an undocumented immigrant.
“My dad got deported a couple of times,” Jessenya said. “But he’d come back here every time, even though he kept getting deported.”
The last time her father was deported, he wasn’t able to return to the United States. Jessenya’s mother stayed in Utah for a time, but she missed her husband and was struggling financially, so she finally went back to Mexico to be with her husband.
Jessenya and her younger brother Jose — who will be a junior at Roy High next year — stayed to receive an education.
http://gousoe.uen.org/7dQ

About Utah: Utah teacher taught 15 children from the same family, and they all came back to thank her
Deseret News commentary by columnist Lee Benson

MILLCREEK — Last Thursday, on the second to last day of the school year and her teaching career, Toni Cook — or Mrs. Cook as the kids at William Penn Elementary School know her — was just about to leave her classroom when she looked at the crowd of people coming down the hall and suspected she was either having a hallucination or her life was flashing in front of her eyes, one or the other.
Because there in front of her were 15 of her students, some current, some from as long as 19 years ago, all with their arms wide open ready to give her a big hug.
Only when she saw Laurel Osborn and Wallace Fetzer, the parents of those 15 kids, bringing up the rear did she snap back to reality.
It was the Fetzer kids, coming to say goodbye.
http://gousoe.uen.org/7dI

Every Brain Deserves a Break
Education Week op-ed by Allison Riddle, 2014 Utah Teacher of the Year

As a teacher, May is a polarizing month for me.
On one hand, it signals the final lap in the race to complete the school year. My students and I are like family now, and I enjoy watching them work smoothly together on the last few projects of the year.
On the other hand, May marks the end of an exhausting month of intense standardized testing and directed test prep.
Wait… did I say exhausting? Intense?
Unfortunately, yes. I don’t aim to challenge the validity of standardized testing. I value the information these tests provide, and I use these results each year to inform and improve my own instruction the following year. My issue with testing isn’t the purpose of it. Rather, I am troubled by the climate that is set up within the classroom, school and educational community during these testing windows. I say exhausting? Intense?
http://gousoe.uen.org/7eI

Taxpayers weren’t asked if they wanted to sue
Salt Lake Tribune letter from Isabel Quilantan

Eleven states led by Texas have joined in a lawsuit against President Obama’s directive on transgender bathroom use.
These 11 states are claiming the president did not consult with them and is ignoring their rights to decide. These 11 states are being led by a bunch of hypocrites.
Their leaders take it upon themselves to file costly lawsuits at the expense of taxpayers who were not consulted at all as to whether they wanted to participate in these lawsuits.
I, as well as many other taxpayers of the Great State of Utah, object to our hard-earned money being used to file costly lawsuits. Somehow, Gov. Gary Herbert and his clan think they have the right to do whatever they want with the resources of this land.
http://gousoe.uen.org/7dE

Herbert fights LGBT families
Salt Lake Tribune letter from Lawson Miller

Gov. Gary Herbert spent $1.2 million in an unsuccessful attempt to fight against same-sex marriage. Justice and equality prevailed. Herbert is now using the power of his office to bully transgender children and teens to make sure they can’t use the proper bathrooms in schools.
While LGBT children struggle with bullying more and more every day, the governor has only added to the stigma. When the World Congress of Families came to Utah, Herbert spoke to them. He didn’t care that they were defined as a hate group, responsible for promoting anti-LGBT environments in countries like Uganda and Russia, where LGBT people are beaten and even killed.
He stated that “we are a welcoming state.” That is unless you are LGBT.
http://gousoe.uen.org/7dH

It’s Republican politicians who need their own bathrooms
Salt Lake Tribune letter from Michele Stuart

Here we go again. Another Utah lawsuit, this time on the new guidelines of the transgender bathroom debate.
Utah’s attorney general says this is about federal overreach and three members of the Alpine School District Board of Education argue that this is “an invasion of the rights of a majority.” I wonder what civil rights would look like if each state were allowed to make their “own rules” in favor of the majority.
As for the bathroom debate, there have been no instances in which a trans person assaulted someone in a public restroom. However, John Hinson, former Mississippi Congressman; Larry Craig, senator from Idaho; and Florida state Rep. Bob Allen have been caught performing lewd acts in public restrooms.
http://gousoe.uen.org/7dG

‘Total disregard’
(St. George) Spectrum letter from Skip and Linda Wells

With disappointment and disgust, we are dropping our subscription after reading your editorial on 5/22. This is advocacy journalism at its worst. When a newspaper is in the business of promoting “social progressive-isms,” in total disregard of the beliefs of the community and state in which they reside, they have lost all credibility.
When children’s safety is used as pawns to promote an amoral ideology against age- old realities -that nature determines our gender and sex, then you have lost the ability to distinguish right from wrong and are propagating “moral relativism”, which denies any objective truth (except for the truth that there is no truth).
http://gousoe.uen.org/7ea

Racial slur would probably die out if black people didn’t use it, reader says
(Ogden) Standard-Examiner letter from Stanley Miller

It’s interesting how much of a fuss a teacher’s recent use of the “N-word” has caused (”Weber School District details stance on teacher’s N-word use,” May 10).
A number of years ago, I was in a barbershop of a black friend working on some of his equipment. There must have been six or seven black teenagers in waiting room. As they talked to each other, there was hardly a sentence spoken that didn’t contain the “N-word,” along with other epithets.
The “N-word” would probably die out if it weren’t for certain blacks who perpetuate its use. Charles Barkley said he is going to continue using it, for instance.
http://gousoe.uen.org/7dZ

A Fresh Turn in the New Orleans Charter School Miracle
Oversight will revert to the city from the state, but with safeguards to ensure that gains remain intact.
Wall Street Journal op-ed by JOHN WHITE, Louisiana state superintendent of education

The state of Louisiana has begun a new phase in the transformation of New Orleans schools. Senate Bill 432, signed into law May 12, transfers oversight of 52 charter schools, serving nearly 30,000 students, from the state to local authorities. In doing so it creates a novel role for the New Orleans school board and the district’s central office—a governance model that offers hope to other cities that seek enduring improvements in public education.
American education reformers have made great strides in improving academic standards and creating new schooling options for low-income parents. Yet urban school districts’ central offices, often overly bureaucratic and occasionally corrupt, have proven resistant to lasting reform.
Consider the abuse of power displayed by the Orleans Parish School Board before Hurricane Katrina. The board’s former president pleaded guilty to charges of accepting $140,000 in bribes from an algebra software vendor. Principals recall midyear dictates, without explanation, to overhaul curriculum and staffing. It was an incoherent mess of a school system that served well enough those students qualifying for academically selective schools but could not address the needs of its largely impoverished student body.
http://gousoe.uen.org/7dt

The Colorado Department of Education’s revolving door
Denver Post op-ed by MICHAEL VAUGHN, former Denver Public Schools spokesman

Colorado’s new education commissioner, Richard Crandall, abruptly announced earlier this month that, effective immediately, he was now the old Colorado education commissioner.
Crandall’s departure and the subsequent appointment of Katy Anthes as the interim commissioner bring us to a grand total of four different state education commissioners in less than a year — an average tenure of about three months, which is just about long enough to get your business cards printed.
By comparison, during the preceding eight-year span of 2007 to 2015, Colorado had two education commissioners: Dwight Jones and Robert Hammond. Jones was in the job for three years and Hammond for five. Plenty of time for business cards — and the actual business of improving schools.
The turmoil created by heavy turnover comes at an especially bad time. The new federal education law — the Every Student Succeeds Act — gives state education departments significantly more control over school accountability. And Colorado’s schools, while showing improvement over the past decade, still need to get a lot better.
http://gousoe.uen.org/7eC

How I answer my students’ tough questions about military service
NewsHour commentary by Retired U.S. Air Force Technical Sergeant E-6 Darrell Jones who teaches history at Armstrong Middle School in Starkville, Mississippi

Here in the Deep South, we start school in August and end the last week of May. The last couple of days of school, I like to talk about Memorial Day and how it differs from Veterans Day. (Veterans Day is a day of thanks to our servicemen and women, while Memorial Day is a day of remembrance for our fallen heroes.)
My students are already out of school by Memorial Day, and like most Americans, they look forward to cookouts and family outings and have a pretty cheerful outlook about one of our country’s most somber holidays.
Many of my students have grandfathers and great-uncles who lost their lives in combat decades before they were born. But since our country has moved away from the draft and toward an all-volunteer force, fewer and fewer people personally know anyone who has lost their life in service to their country.
As retired USAF, I feel it is my duty to explain to them that since our country was founded, over a million service members have lost their lives at war and countless others during peacetime. My students know that I have been to the desert more than a few times and like to ask if I knew anyone who died over there. I tell them that I was an aircraft mechanic, so my friends and I were not outside the walls in combat.
In reality, I have lost many friends who were still on active duty when they died. As a crew chief in the USAF, I was there when bombers crashed during training flights, fighter planes went down at airshows and planes crashed in a war zone.
http://gousoe.uen.org/7ew

Four ways to make teacher evaluations meaningful
Refocusing on teacher growth: A path forward under ESSA
Hechinger Report commentary by ROSS WIENER and DANIELLE M. GONZALES of the Aspen Institute

Teacher evaluation can be a lightning rod issue that elicits strong opinions, fierce debate and high-profile media coverage.
But these conversations tend to overshadow the primary purpose of evaluation: to act as a single — albeit important — part of a robust system for supporting educators’ growth.
Now, as the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) takes effect and provides states with more discretion over education policy, leaders have a prime opportunity to re-examine what’s working and what can be improved to build and strengthen teacher evaluation systems that deliver on this core purpose.
It is important, however, to not throw the baby out with the bathwater.
http://gousoe.uen.org/7ez

Schools Shouldn’t Approach Technology Like Businesses Once Did
Efficiencies should not be the objective of successful teaching.
U.S. News & World Report op-ed by Craig Blewett, senior lecturer in education and technology, University of KwaZulu-Natal

Computers began reaching the business world during the 1980s. Companies used them to automate many routine manual tasks. This led to what economist Robert Solow dubbed the Productivity Paradox. In 1987, he famously quipped: “You can see the computer age everywhere but in the productivity statistics.”
The problem Solow had identified was that while computers could automate manual processes, real productivity gains would only be experienced when technology was actively used to reinvent business processes.
The best businesses soon realised that computers were not just a tool to improve efficiencies but to redesign business processes. This sort of thinking has given rise to many modern innovative businesses like Twitter, Uber and Airbnb.
Now schools are falling into the same trap as businesses did 30 years ago. They are focusing on the wrong objective when it comes to using technology in their classrooms.
http://gousoe.uen.org/7eF

Helping Teachers of Mathematics Integrate the Knowledge and Culture of Families Into Their Practice
Harvard Family Research Project commentary

TODOS: Mathematics for ALL (TODOS) is an international professional organization that advocates for equity and high-quality mathematics education for all students, particularly those who are Latino or Latina. By offering math educators high-quality professional development opportunities—through webinars, in-person conferences, publications, and online resource banks—TODOS helps educators establish equitable, rigorous, and coherent mathematics programs in their classrooms.
Harvard Family Research Project had an opportunity to speak with Diane Kinch, president of TODOS, and Marta Civil, vice president of TODOS and a professor of mathematics education at the University of Arizona, to talk about ways to develop and support mathematics educators to engage families in their teaching practices. Below are four interrelated ideas that persist throughout their work:
http://gousoe.uen.org/7ey

————————————————————-
NATIONAL NEWS
————————————————————-

ESSA Accountability Proposal a Departure From Punitive Past, Secretary King Says
Education Week

Washington — Secretary of Education John B. King Jr. said Thursday that the department’s proposed accountability regulations for the Every Student Succeeds Act represent an attempt to move away from the “overprescriptive and to some extent punitive” approach to accountability that proliferated under ESSA’s predecessor, the No Child Left Behind Act.
During a visit to the J.C. Nalle Elementary School, King visited a classroom here and discussed the new rules with reporters. He emphasized that the new regulations were based on “a lot of listening” by department staffers to a variety of groups.
King also participated in a roundtable discussion at J.C. Nalle with education advocates, teachers, and others in a bid to highlight how ESSA and the draft rules the department released on it Wednesday try to broaden the definition of student success and give schools new ways to excel.
“We’ve tried to balance state and local flexibility with strong civil rights guardrails,” King told reporters.
The much-anticipated rules deal with a number of complicated and often controversial topics such as school ratings, test participation, school turnaround requirements.
Among other hot-button issues: The rules don’t require states to give indicators like test scores a specific weight. But they are required to give academic factors more weight. And when it comes to identifying schools for turnarounds, academic indicators would essentially carry more weight.
http://gousoe.uen.org/7dy

New Education Law: Bipartisan No More
Republicans are fuming over what they perceive as complete disregard for the intent of the reform law.
U.S. News & World Report

Republicans on Capitol Hill and conservative education policymakers are accusing the Obama administration of breaking its promises on education reform, saying recently released federal guidelines for how states and school districts should implement the bipartisan law are overreaching and encroach on local authority.
“The administration has decided that rather than try to find a middle ground or to work in a spirit of cooperation that they are going to push their own policy preferences to the max,” says Michael Petrilli, president of the Thomas B. Fordham Institute, a conservative education think tank. “Many administrations have done the same, but to do this on the heels of a bipartisan compromise, it’s left a bitter taste in a lot of people’s mouths.”
The White House was quick to push back on that assessment.
“This bill is a result of consensus that this law needed to be reformed and refined,” said Cecilia Munoz, assistant to the president and director of the Domestic Policy Council, to a group of reporters Thursday. “We needed to get away from the one-size-fits-all approach, and I’m quite confident that that coalition is not going to break up.”
She continued: “The details matter a lot, but the consensus around what we needed to accomplish, what we in fact accomplished by passing the law and what we believe we are accomplishing with these regulations is quite strong.”
http://gousoe.uen.org/7dz

As Charters Grow, Public Schools See Sharp Enrollment Drop
Associated Press

LOS ANGELES — Standing before the Los Angeles Unified School Board, Susan Zoller delivered a startling assessment: More than 100,000 students in the nation’s second-largest district were now enrolled in charters, draining more than $500 million from the budget in a single academic year.
“The financial future of Los Angeles is difficult,” said Zoller, a consultant hired by the district’s union. Board member Richard Vladovic leaned anxiously toward his mic.
“We are bleeding,” he said.
If current trends continue, the district could be significantly diminished in another 10 years – at least a third smaller than at the start of the century.
In financially struggling urban districts from LA to Philadelphia – and most notoriously, Detroit – the increasing popularity of charter schools, combined with family flight to the suburbs and declining birth rates, have caused enrollment to plummet. The changes have unfolded slowly for years and recently accelerated in some places.
http://gousoe.uen.org/7dv

Sidebar
http://gousoe.uen.org/7dw (AP)

Teaching children to read: Portland, Beaverton reject mainstream series, forge own approaches
(Portland) Oregonian

Portland Public Schools, searching for a new way to teach young students to read and write after years of struggle, has decided to go it alone.
At the strong urging of teachers and other educators who’ve sampled various reading series, Oregon’s largest district on Tuesday rejected offerings from every major publisher. Instead, it decided to buy six components from five companies and combine them into a unique reading and writing curriculum of its own.
Beaverton schools have already made a similar shift and will add the same main reading program that Portland picked, Units of Study in Reading, to all 33 of its elementary and K-8 schools this summer.
It’s becoming increasingly common for the nation’s school districts to create their own elementary reading curriculum. Educators have realized that rigidly adhering to a single reading series, which used to be praised as showing “fidelity,” poorly served a lot of children, including those learning English as a second language, said Donald Bear, a literacy expert and author of both mainstream and supplemental reading programs.
Mixing and merging an assortment of reading programs “is risky,” said University of Oregon education professor Gina Biancorosa, a Harvard University-trained expert in reading and literacy. The effectiveness of the suite of materials Portland and Beaverton have chosen is unproven, and the approach requires greater skill and judgment by teachers to pick the right lessons and the smartest sequence for skill-building.
But sticking with a mainstream reading series would be risky, too, Biancorosa said, noting there’s no solid evidence that textbooks by familiar names such as Scott Foresman or Houghton Mifflin are effective either.
http://gousoe.uen.org/7du

The Benefits of Teaching in Two Languages
Bilingual education facilitates connections beyond the confines of a classroom.
Atlantic

From New York to Utah, U.S. schools have seen a steady rise in bilingual education. Dual-language immersion programs first appeared in the U.S. in the 1960s to serve Spanish-speaking students in Florida. Since then, the demand—and controversy—surrounding these programs has been widespread, and they now address the needs of more than 5 million students who are English-language learners in the country’s public-school system.
Teresa Chávez has been a teacher for almost 20 years, and is currently the lead teacher for Little Canada Elementary’s Dual Language Immersion program in Minneapolis, Minnesota. I spoke to Chávez about the implementation of the Spanish-language program and how bilingual education facilitates connections beyond the confines of a classroom. A lightly edited transcript of our conversation follows.
http://gousoe.uen.org/7eA

How a Libertarian Looks at Education: Where Gary Johnson Stands
Education World

Former governor of New Mexico Gary Johnson is a fixture in news this week after cinching the Libertarian nomination at the party convention in Orlando, Florida on Sunday.
His nomination raises the question for those of us who are concerned about the future of our country’s education under the next president- where does Johnson stand on education as a candidate representing the Libertarian party?
According to Forbes contributor Maureen Sullivan, Johnson has been the most outspoken on his education views when it comes to the Department of Education, school vouchers and competition to raise salaries and inspire the best and brightest teachers.
Johnson is one of the biggest proponents for school vouchers that is currently working in the political sphere. As Governor, Johnson proposed a plan for every state student to receive a $3,500 voucher to attend whatever school their family wanted.
To critics who say voucher programs deplete resources from public schools, Johnson argued public schools would be receiving more funding under the system for less students to manage.
http://gousoe.uen.org/7eB

Active-shooter Drills Help Schools Prepare for the Worst
Associated Press

CARMEL, Ind. — “Lockdown, lockdown, lockdown. This is a drill.”
With those seven words, calmly announced over the intercom system, an eerie silence overtook a bustling elementary school of 650 students in suburban Indianapolis. Lights were turned off and blinds shut. In some classrooms, doors were barricaded with small desks and chairs.
From start to finish, the “intruder drill” at the Forest Dale Elementary School in Carmel took about 10 minutes – an exercise now as routine at the school as a fire drill. What might sound terrifying to some parents has become the norm in many schools nationwide after a rash of school shootings.
More than two-thirds of school districts surveyed by the U.S. Government Accountability Office conduct “active shooter” exercises.
Some schools make their drills very realistic, simulating the sounds of gunshots and using smoke and fake blood. In one case, armed police officers with weapons drawn burst into a Florida middle school, terrifying staff and students alike.
Staff and teachers are usually given a warning that drills will happen.
http://gousoe.uen.org/7dC

A copy of the report
http://gousoe.uen.org/7dD (GAO)

Schools to Begin Monitoring Students from Military Families
Associated Press via Military.com

CHULA VISTA, Calif. — Schools across the country are preparing to formally track students from military families, monitoring their academic progress as they move from military base to military base and state to state, under a new provision in the federal education law.
The change comes in response to concerns raised by the Department of Defense that the children of active-duty members of the Army, Navy, Coast Guard, Air Force and Marines have academic and emotional needs that schools are ill-equipped to meet.
At Chula Vista’s Veterans Elementary School, a new effort to support students from military families already is underway to help students like fifth-grader Victoria Ayekof.
http://gousoe.uen.org/7dx

Court Ruling Raises Possibility Kansas Schools Can’t Open
Associated Press

TOPEKA, Kan. — Kansas faces a threat that its public schools won’t open for the next school year after the state Supreme Court rejected some education funding changes made by the Republican-dominated Legislature.
The Legislature had revised parts of the state’s school finance system but didn’t change the overall aid for most of its 286 local districts. The court said Friday that the remaining flaws make the system unfair to poor districts, violating the state constitution.
http://gousoe.uen.org/7eq

http://gousoe.uen.org/7er (Kansas City Star)

http://gousoe.uen.org/7eE (New York Times)

Disagreement abounds over how to fix state education department
Columbus (OH) Dispatch

Lawmakers and educators don’t dispute state Auditor Dave Yost’s scathing assessment of the Department of Education as “the worst-run state agency.”
But they aren’t quite sure what to do about it.
Many hope new state schools Superintendent Paolo DeMaria, who starts in July, will right the ship.
“You need a department that the field has faith in, that the public has faith in. We don’t have that now,” said Darold Johnson, legislative director for the Ohio Federation of Teachers.
In recent years, the Department of Education has been plagued by constant change. DeMaria will be the fourth superintendent in five years. During that time, the agency has implemented new student assessments, state report cards, teacher evaluations, charter-school oversight and other initiatives from the governor and the General Assembly, but high turnover and understaffing have presented challenges.
“The department bleeds talent,” one former employee observed.
“They are scattered all over the place,” said another about the department’s wide-reaching duties. “One floor is working on assessments, on another it’s transportation and over there, it’s (investigating complaints against) teachers.”
http://gousoe.uen.org/7eD

Clash between state, Milwaukee voucher school moves to federal court
Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

A longtime voucher school operator that has tangled with the state Department of Public Instruction for years has sued Superintendent Tony Evers in federal court, saying Evers illegally withheld more than $600,000 from the school this spring, putting it in jeopardy of closing.
Ceria M. Travis Academy Inc., which operates a kindergarten-through-12th-grade school at 4744 N. 39th St., filed the lawsuit in U.S. District Court in Milwaukee.
The lawsuit alleges Evers violated the school’s constitutional right to due process by withholding the payment, due through the state’s Milwaukee Parental Choice Program, without an evidentiary hearing.
DPI withheld the payment because it argues that Travis Academy owes the state $2.9 million, according to Jennifer Walther, the school’s attorney.
“We dispute that, and there has to be a hearing,” Walther said. “Ceria is trying to protect its rights to its property and what it views as a wrongful taking,” she said.
http://gousoe.uen.org/7dA

Chest Protectors Guard Against Deadly Blows to Chest
Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Jack Crowley was 15 when a baseball hit him in the chest and stopped his heart. The Long Island teen survived, thanks to a police officer who grabbed a defibrillator and shocked his heart back into rhythm.
A blow to the chest – one that hits at just the wrong spot, at just the wrong time – can trigger deadly cardiac arrest. Fortunately it’s rare. But most victims are otherwise healthy kid athletes. And survival hinges on fast use of those heart-zapping defibrillators that not every athletic league or school keeps near the playing fields.
There soon may be another attempt at protection: A U.S. organization that oversees athletic equipment has proposed the first performance standard for chest protectors to reduce the risk from those blows, a step that could lead to updated gear.

For younger students, many states have laws encouraging or requiring defibrillators in schools but few specify athletic facilities, according to the advocacy group Parent Heart Watch.
http://gousoe.uen.org/7ep

Rape Allegation, Race, Glare of National Media Divide Town
Associated Press

DIETRICH, Idaho — Teaching her children how to peacefully respond to racist comments in a tiny Idaho town was not new for the mother of 20 adopted children, many of whom are black. She often found herself echoing the virtues taught in Dietrich’s only church.
Kindness and patience can overcome ignorance in the mostly white, rural community, she told her kids. Forgive. Turn the other cheek.
Then her black teenage son joined the football team. Within months, three of his teammates used a coat hanger to sexually assault him in a school locker room, prosecutors say. The attack came after the woman said she spent months trying to convince school officials that her and her husband’s concerns about the repeated racist harassment directed at their children needed to be treated seriously.
The allegations of prolonged racist taunts and physical abuse were revealed this month when the family filed a $10 million lawsuit against the Dietrich School District. It claims the school failed to prevent the abuse even though much of it happened in front of football coaches and school officials.
Three teens have been charged in the Oct. 23 assault: two with felonies in adult court and one in juvenile court. In the lawsuit, the victim contends one of his teammates pretended to want to hug him but instead held him down so 17-year-old Tanner Ward and 18-year-old John Howard could assault him.
Ward has pleaded not guilty, and Howard has not yet entered a plea. The juvenile court case is sealed.
http://gousoe.uen.org/7dB

Mom threatens principal when child held from graduation, report says
Child kept from graduation ceremony because of disciplinary issues
Beaufort (SC) Gazette

A mother upset her child was not allowed to participate in the Robert Smalls International Academy’s eighth-grade graduation ceremony threatened the principal and landed in jail, according to a Beaufort County Sheriff’s Office Report released this week.
Shamekia Hayward was arrested May 21 and charged with threatening the life of a public official, a felony carrying a maximum sentence of five years. She was booked into Beaufort County Detention Center and released on her own recognizance the same day, court records show.
Robert Smalls principal Nicole Holloman told deputies Hayward threatened her during a meeting May 19 to discuss Hayward’s child being held out of an eighth-grade graduation ceremony due to disciplinary issues, the report said. Hayward accused Holloman of lying about the child’s offense and asked whether the punishment was too harsh.
http://gousoe.uen.org/7eg

This Harvard graduate’s inspirational commencement speech is going viral
Boston Globe

A Harvard graduate’s commencement speech is impacting far more people than just those who received their diplomas alongside him on Wednesday.
Donovan Livingston, who received his master’s of education, addressed his fellow classmates with a spoken-word poem about the historic obstacles that have prevented African Americans from getting an education — and how a new generation of educators can overcome those that remain.
“For generations we have known of knowledge’s infinite power,” Livingston said at Harvard Graduate School of Education’s convocation ceremony. “Yet somehow, we’ve never questioned the keeper of the keys — the guardians of information.”
Livingston, who also spoke at his high school graduation, said he was prohibited from sharing a poem as part of that address. But Harvard openly embraced the idea, calling Livingston’s address “one of the most powerful, heartfelt student speeches you will ever hear!” and sharing it to the Graduate School of Education’s Facebook page.
“I came to address you in the best way I knew how,” he began. “I am eternally grateful for being able to share this piece of myself, my most authentic voice, with you this afternoon.”
By Thursday afternoon, the video had garnered more than 2 million views and had been shared nearly 60,000 times.
http://gousoe.uen.org/7es

http://gousoe.uen.org/7et (Ed Week)

http://gousoe.uen.org/7ex (CSM)

http://gousoe.uen.org/7eu (People)

http://gousoe.uen.org/7ev (BET)

————————————————————
CALENDAR
————————————————————

USOE Calendar
http://www.schools.utah.gov/main/CALENDAR.aspx

UEN News
http://www.uen.org

June 2:
Retirement and Independent Entities Interim Committee meeting
1 p.m., 30 House Building
http://le.utah.gov/Interim/2016/html/00002391.htm

June 9:
Utah State Board of Education study session, USDB and committee meetings
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspx

June 10:
Utah State Board of Education meeting
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspx

June 14:
Education Interim Committee meeting
8 a.m., 1575 S State Street, Salt Lake City
http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2016&com=INTEDU

Executive Appropriations Committee meeting
2 p.m., 445 State Capitol
http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?Year=2016&Com=APPEXE

June 15:
Education Interim Committee meeting
1:15 p.m., 30 House Building
http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2016&com=INTEDU

July 14:
Utah State Charter School Board meeting
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://go.uen.org/62M

Related posts:

Comments are closed.