Education News Roundup: June 7, 2016

Civil Rights Data

Civil Rights Data

Today’s Top Picks:

Utah State Board of Education helps keep a homeless student program open in Midvale.
http://gousoe.uen.org/7iO (DN)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/7jf (USBE)

Trib looks at gay-straight alliance clubs and Utah Catholic schools.
http://gousoe.uen.org/7ix (SLT)

U.S. Department of Education’s Office of Civil Rights releases data on disparities in U.S. schools.
http://gousoe.uen.org/7iB (Ed Week)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/7iz (USN&WR)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/7iA (WaPo)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/7j6 (CSM)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/7iZ (Reuters)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/7j3 (AP)
or a copy of the report
http://gousoe.uen.org/7iC (ED)

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TODAY’S HEADLINES
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UTAH

Education for homeless kids gets a one-month boost at Midvale shelter

Utah has best state economy with high marks for investment in workforce, infrastructure, report says

Seek and ye won’t find: Student pushes for gay-straight club, but Utah Catholic school keeps balking
A petition draws hundreds of signatures, but officials say the school’s existing clubs can cover all necessary issues.

State School Board Candidates Face Off

Utah’s Primary Election is June 28. Are You Ready to Vote?

Controversial ‘Vaxxed’ documentary to show in Utah County

Former 9th-grade teacher sent to jail for sex with student

Two principals join Concord schools

OPINION & COMMENTARY

In Ogden, supporting the educational success of our most valuable resource

Transparency lacking in Crimson High School, Middle School planning

Tomorrow’s Test
For the first time, there are more students of color than white students in our public schools. How we confront this change will determine the fate of this generation—and the country.

How to Change White Teachers’ Lenses
America’s students are now majority-minority, but its teachers are not. That’s why they need to be “culturally competent.”

The Bronx is Learning
Content-rich curriculum drives achievement at Icahn Charter School

Forget cupcakes and car washes:
These high schools are taking a more ambitious look at entrepreneurship Creating nimble learners

NATION

Disparities Continue to Plague U.S. Schools, Federal Data Show

Gloucester’s School Board taking transgender bathroom case to U.S. Supreme Court

Brownback calls Kansas lawmakers into special session on schools
The state Supreme Court rejected school funding changes made by GOP lawmakers

Low-Income Students Set Up for Academic Failure

House Speaker Ryan’s Policy Blueprint Includes Early Learning, Career Education

Foundation funded state agency and 2 schools it saved

Okla. teachers among lowest paid

The Gates Foundation’s Teaching Partnerships: 5 Early Research Takeaways

Some home-schooled students sidelined from DODEA graduation

Walking to school in Camden: Shootings, stabbings, drug sales, and prostitutes

A third of children in poor nations fail to meet mental development milestones: research

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UTAH NEWS
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Education for homeless kids gets a one-month boost at Midvale shelter

SALT LAKE CITY — Some 50 homeless children staying at the Road Home’s Midvale Center are ensured a timely start to their summer education programs thanks to funding approved by the Utah State Board of Education.
The state school board unanimously approved a one-time allocation of $15,000 to help fund the program until July 1, when other funding is expected to be available. The funds, federal mineral lease revenue in the state board’s discretionary account, will be combined with a $10,000 private donation, to funding programs for the remainder of the month.
Canyons School District and the Midvale Boys and Girls Club are partners in the educational program, which is offered weekdays 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. It includes meals, academic instruction from certified teachers, field trips and other activities.
Starting July 1, a $450,000 appropriation authorized by the Utah Legislature for education programs for children experiencing homelessness, can be utilized.
http://gousoe.uen.org/7iO (DN)

http://gousoe.uen.org/7jf (USBE)

Utah has best state economy with high marks for investment in workforce, infrastructure, report says

SALT LAKE CITY — Utah has the best state economy in the U.S., according to a report published Monday by WalletHub, a national financial research and consulting organization.
Financially, it falls between Illinois, now in its second year without a state budget, and California, whose gross domestic product is seventh-largest in the world, comparable with Brazil’s 2014 GDP of $2.2 trillion. Utah’s state government surplus ranked 27th in the country, showing that Utah isn’t the state with the most money.
But when it comes to performance and overall economic health, Utah outranks most other states in metrics such as GDP growth, the percentage of fastest-growing firms, business startup activity and jobs in high-tech industries, the report states.
It’s good news, but it comes as little surprise to many Utahns seeing the benefits of investments that were made more than a decade ago, as well as current policies that make for a business-friendly economy.
“It’s in our DNA as a people — we’re a very entrepreneurial state,” said Natalie Gochnour, associate dean of the David Eccles School of Business and director of the Kem C. Gardner Policy Institute at the University of Utah.
Utah earned the top overall score in the report on state economies, as well as second place for “economic activity” and “economic health,” and fourth place for “innovation potential.”
Utah ranked highest in its percentage of fast-growing firms and its growth in nonfarm payrolls; third place in business startup activity; fourth place in educational attainment of immigrant workers; seventh in GDP growth and the percentage of jobs in high-tech industries; and ninth in its unemployment rate.
http://gousoe.uen.org/7jb (DN)

A copy of the report
http://gousoe.uen.org/7jc (WalletHub)

Seek and ye won’t find: Student pushes for gay-straight club, but Utah Catholic school keeps balking
A petition draws hundreds of signatures, but officials say the school’s existing clubs can cover all necessary issues.

With the books closed on another Utah school year, a Judge Memorial student hopes administrators spend the summer rethinking the Catholic high school’s policies on clubs.
Louis Fisher tried twice in the spring to convince officials that Judge needed a gay-straight alliance. They said no — despite a petition that drew nearly 1,200 signatures of support.
“This is something we need that we don’t have here,” said the 16-year-old senior-to-be, who came out at the start of the 2015-2016 academic year. “And we have clubs for a lot of stuff.”
In two letters about the denials, Fisher said, school officials told him they could not endorse a club that used the LGBT acronym in its name, or a club that might promote homosexuality or sexual activity.
Commonly called GSAs, these alliances are designed to bring together lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and straight students to promote dialogue and understanding that enhances overall school safety and support, regardless of sexual orientation or gender identity.
http://gousoe.uen.org/7ix (SLT)

State School Board Candidates Face Off

From establishing student testing to assessing curriculum standards, decisions made by the Utah State School Board directly affect the state’s 643,000 public school students, their families, teachers, and administrators.
Seven of eight school board positions up for election will involve a primary this year. As a result, the Utah Association of Public Charter Schools, Hinckley Institute of Politics at the University of Utah, Sutherland Institute and KSL/Deseret News have teamed up to host public forums with the candidates.
http://gousoe.uen.org/7iy (UP)

http://gousoe.uen.org/7iS (SGS)

http://gousoe.uen.org/7iV (KUER)

http://gousoe.uen.org/7iW (Sutherland Institute)

Utah’s Primary Election is June 28. Are You Ready to Vote?

Utah’s primary election is taking place on June 28th, and there are a variety of different voting options that will make the process easier than ever before. For example, many counties will mail your ballot to you. Other counties will offer early voting beginning June 14th and polling locations on Election Day, and some counties may be offering all three options to their voters.
If you’re confused about how to participate in the June 28 primary election, it’s time you visit VOTE.UTAH.GOV. This website is your go-to resource to learn how to vote and answer any other questions you might have. Let your voice be heard and vote in the June 28th primary election.

2. What positions are up for this year’s primary election?
The positions you can vote for depends on the party primary you select and where you live. Major primary contests include U.S. Congressional District 3, Governor, and 11 Utah legislative seats for the Republican primary, U.S. Senate for the Democratic primary, and 7 nonpartisan state school board seats. Your ballot may also include county and local school board primaries.
http://gousoe.uen.org/7je (SLT)

Controversial ‘Vaxxed’ documentary to show in Utah County

A film that made national headlines in March after being struck from the Tribeca Film Festival lineup in April will be showing in Utah County for a few days.
“Vaxxed,” a controversial documentary which claims a link between certain vaccines and autism in children, is showing at the Megaplex Theatre at Thanksgiving Point June 6-9.
The show was brought to the area through the efforts of an informal group that wanted the opportunity to view the film locally, said Kristen Chevrier, who was instrumental in the efforts to bring the film to Utah.
Chevrier viewed “Vaxxed” previously in New York City, and said there has been a local demand to view the film. A Facebook page titled “Bring Vaxxed to Utah” currently has nearly 1,000 likes, and Chevrier said two of the showings in Utah County are nearly sold out.
Chevrier said she has been actively involved in advocating for vaccine choice for two years now, and thinks it’s important viewing in Utah.
http://gousoe.uen.org/7iR (PDH)

Former 9th-grade teacher sent to jail for sex with student

OGDEN — A former teacher charged with having sex with a ninth-grade student has been sentenced to a year in jail.
Justin James Davenport, 35, of Ogden, was ordered Thursday to serve one year in jail after pleading guilty to one count of forcible sexual abuse, a second-degree felony. Credit was given for the single day Davenport spent in jail at the time of his April 2015 arrest.
Davenport, who at the time was a teacher at Highland Junior High in Ogden, was originally charged with two counts of rape, a first-degree felony; four counts of forcible sodomy, a first-degree felony; and forcible sexual abuse, a second-degree felony. In a deal with prosecutors, all but the single second-degree felony charge were dismissed in April.
Following a year in jail, Davenport must complete 36 months probation and register as a sex offender.
http://gousoe.uen.org/7iP (DN)

http://gousoe.uen.org/7iU (KSL)

Two principals join Concord schools

DUNLAP — School board members Monday welcomed two new additions to the Concord Community Schools family.
Greg Dettinger was hired to serve as the Concord High School principal and Michael “Mickey” Wagner will assume the role of principal of Concord Intermediate School, effective July 1.
Dettinger, 57, joins Concord after serving as the principal of New Prairie High School in New Carlisle, Indiana, since 2013. Prior to his current position, Dettinger served as principal at Tahoe Truckee High School in Truckee, California and as principal of Milford High School in Milford, Utah.
http://gousoe.uen.org/7jd (Goshen [IN] News)

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OPINION & COMMENTARY
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In Ogden, supporting the educational success of our most valuable resource
(Ogden) Standard-Examiner op-ed by SANDY COROLES, superintendent of the Ogden School District

In response to the June 5 opinion piece regarding last year’s graduation rates, ”When just 66 percent of Ogden seniors graduate, we’re failing our children,” I feel it important to add my voice to the dialogue on what we must do to support the educational success of our most valuable resource, our children. In the Ogden School District, we agree education is vital for the rising generation to take their place as Ogden’s future community and business leaders.
Throughout the past several months, we have been extremely concerned about last year’s decline in graduation rates, as addressed in the editorial. We have identified several factors which may be contributing to the decline, including raised expectations and rigor, along with a shift in retaining students at risk of dropping out rather than transferring them to alternative schools.
Even with these factors, we have acknowledged we must do more.
http://gousoe.uen.org/7iQ

Transparency lacking in Crimson High School, Middle School planning
St. George News letter from Kathy Bence

During the process of establishing new schools, transparency can go a long way to help ease concerns in a community. Unfortunately, honest openness was lacking in some major aspects of planning for the Crimson High School-Middle School complex to be built in Washington Fields.
One of those aspects is the location of Crimson High’s main building. The Washington Fields site is surrounded on the east and south sides by undeveloped land, on the north side by 4200 South and on the west side by St. George homes on 3430 East. The school district has chosen to place a 3-story high school building — the largest structure on the campus — adjacent to the existing homes on 3430 East, with a minimally required buffer.
http://gousoe.uen.org/7iT

Tomorrow’s Test
For the first time, there are more students of color than white students in our public schools. How we confront this change will determine the fate of this generation—and the country.
Slate commentary by Sarah Carr, editor of the Teacher Project at Columbia’s Graduate School of Journalism

If you want to know what America will look like in a generation, look at its classrooms right now. In 2014, children of color became the new majority in America’s public schools. Over the last 20 years, the number of Hispanic public schoolchildren has more than doubled, and the number of Asians has swelled by 56 percent. The number of black students and American Indians grew far more modestly—but the number of white students fell by about 15 percent.
The majority-minority milestone has arrived in our public schools early—a consequence of white children’s overrepresentation in private schools and the relative youth of America’s black and Hispanic populations. It is not a fluke. It is a preview of a transforming country.
Demographers predict that non-Hispanic whites will make up less than half of the country’s population by 2044, if not before. This change will affect not just our workplaces and our institutions but entire communities the country over. It will also transform our politics—in fact, it already is. Donald Trump’s success in the Republican primaries testifies to the growth of white-identity politics based on a fear of an historical “other” upending the established order.
http://gousoe.uen.org/7j9

How to Change White Teachers’ Lenses
America’s students are now majority-minority, but its teachers are not. That’s why they need to be “culturally competent.”
Slate commentary by Vanessa Romo, a freelance education reporter based in Los Angeles

LOS ANGELES—When she began teaching a class of second-graders in South Los Angeles in 2002, Amy Davis expected she’d occasionally hit snags with issues like lesson planning. But she figured she’d have little trouble relating to her mostly low-income black and Latino students. After all, she was raised nearby, in a household headed by a single mother who for years survived on welfare and food stamps. Like her students, Davis knew what it was like to grow up poor.
But Davis, who is white, struggled to connect with several of the children—particularly a 7-year-old black student named Patrick.
If Patrick came to school in good spirits, Davis’ day generally went smoothly. But if he showed up in a sullen or angry mood, Davis knew there was a good chance he would derail her plans for the class. She couldn’t control his meltdowns, which could be triggered by both his classmates and his schoolwork. On those days, she’d often end up crying throughout the car ride home.
It took months of worrying, and the advice of a veteran colleague in the classroom next door, for Davis to have an epiphany: Despite her own experiences as a child, she was now, unlike her students, a firmly established member of the middle class. The leap from economic insecurity to stability had created an inevitable chasm.
Davis, now 48, marks that moment as the beginning of her efforts to become a more “culturally competent” teacher, someone who strives to understand where her students are coming from—literally and metaphorically.
In the most basic terms, Davis represents the quintessential American teacher: white, middle-class, female. But where Davis approaches teaching as a social-justice mission, and has painstakingly worked to build influential relationships with her students, countless other well-intentioned educators never succeed in forging similar bonds. Yet they are charged with changing lives and boosting test scores in some of the nation’s poorest and most struggling schools.
http://gousoe.uen.org/7j8

The Bronx is Learning
Content-rich curriculum drives achievement at Icahn Charter School
Education Next analysis by Charles Sahm, education policy director at the Manhattan Institute for Policy Research

Donald Trump could learn much about the beautiful culture and rich history of Mexico from the 1st graders in Angela Napoletano’s class at Icahn Charter School 3 in the South Bronx. The day I visited her class, students were busy working on a Diego Rivera–style mural, each section representing a unique aspect of Mexican culture. When I told them that I had traveled some in Mexico, the room exploded with curiosity.
“Have you been to Chichén Itzá?” one boy asked, jumping out of his seat. “Were you there on the Day of the Dead?” a girl excitedly inquired. Another boy, noticing the colorful striped skirt worn by school principal Marcy Glattstein, said, “Look, Mrs. Glattstein’s dress looks like a China poblana!” (a type of traditional Mexican dress). I nearly fainted when a girl correctly pronounced the ancient Aztec name for Mexico City, Tenochtitlán (tĕ-nōch-tē-tlän).
None of these children were Mexican or had ever been to Mexico. Yet these 6-year-olds knew more about our neighbors to the south than the majority of American adults, and possibly more than many Mexican adults. When I recounted this story to Jeff Litt, superintendent of Icahn’s network of seven charter schools, he was unsurprised. “Learning about history, other cultures, other countries—these subjects are fascinating to children,” Litt remarked.
http://gousoe.uen.org/7iD

Forget cupcakes and car washes:
These high schools are taking a more ambitious look at entrepreneurship Creating nimble learners
Hechinger report commentary by MICHAEL CRAWFORD, Director of Coaching, Courses, and Curriculum at Story2

It’s no secret: today’s high schools aren’t meeting the needs of their students. The more time students spend in school — especially students from low-income backgrounds — the less engaged they are.
We know adolescents are ready and craving more, and we know the potency of entrepreneurship to stimulate, challenge, and engage students.
In today’s world, entrepreneurship is a hot field and career path. Research from New York University indicates that a large proportion of teens want to be business owners. With billionaire founders gracing the covers of magazines, shows like “Shark Tank” permeating society, and Donald Trump running for president, it’s no surprise that people’s interest in entrepreneurship is growing.
Despite the attention, entrepreneurship isn’t exactly what most people think it is. Simply put, entrepreneurship is a search process. It’s identifying problems, testing possible fixes, and manifesting solutions.
And getting this wrong in schools is not okay. If entrepreneurship in schools isn’t problem-based, student-driven, experiential, and peer-to-peer, then it isn’t entrepreneurship. If students aren’t challenged to navigate ambiguous circumstances, where the paths and outcomes are unknown, then it isn’t entrepreneurship. If it’s getting students to sell cupcakes or wash cars for a grade, then it isn’t entrepreneurship.
Fortunately, there are forward-thinking educators out there who are embedding entrepreneurship in their schools, enabling students to learn and think and grow just like entrepreneurs in the wild.
http://gousoe.uen.org/7j7

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NATIONAL NEWS
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Disparities Continue to Plague U.S. Schools, Federal Data Show
Education Week

New federal data show a continuing deep gulf between the educational experiences of traditionally disadvantaged student groups and their peers on a broad range of indicators, findings that follow years of efforts by government and advocacy groups to level the playing field in U.S. public schools.
Black and Latino students are still more likely to be suspended, more likely to attend schools with high concentrations of inexperienced teachers, and less likely to have access to rigorous and advanced coursework than their white peers, according to the data released today by the U.S. Department of Education’s office for civil rights.
“Our systemic failure to educate some groups of children as well as others tears at the moral fabric of the nation,” U.S. Secretary of Education John B. King Jr. said in a call with reporters. The data, which highlights disparities for students of color, students with disabilities, and English-language learners, shows that “we still fall far short” of the ideal of educational equity, he said.
The data also shows some bright spots, including a nearly 20 percent drop in out-of-school suspensions nationwide.
The newest Civil Rights Data Collection—data on more than 50 million students collected from more than 99 percent of public schools and districts in the country during the 2013-14 school year—also includes, for the first time, information about education in correctional facilities, the presence of law-enforcement officers in schools, and national data on chronic absenteeism.
http://gousoe.uen.org/7iB

http://gousoe.uen.org/7iz (USN&WR)

http://gousoe.uen.org/7iA (WaPo)

http://gousoe.uen.org/7j6 (CSM)

http://gousoe.uen.org/7iZ (Reuters)

http://gousoe.uen.org/7j3 (AP)

A copy of the report
http://gousoe.uen.org/7iC (ED)

Gloucester’s School Board taking transgender bathroom case to U.S. Supreme Court
Richmond (VA) Times-Dispatch

Gloucester County’s School Board will appeal a federal court ruling on bathroom access for a transgender student to the U.S. Supreme Court.
The 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled last week to deny the School Board’s appeal asking for the full court to rehear a three-judge panel’s ruling in favor of a transgender student suing the district for the right to use the boys bathroom.
The Richmond-based appeals court agreed Tuesday to hold off making its ruling final while the Supreme Court decides whether to take the case.
The three-judge panel’s ruling in April overturned a district court’s denial of a preliminary injunction, saying the lower court judge was “guided by erroneous legal principles.”
The court also ruled that the student’s lawyers could reinstate a claim that the School Board’s bathroom policy violates federal sex discrimination law.
http://gousoe.uen.org/7iX

http://gousoe.uen.org/7iY (WaPo)

http://gousoe.uen.org/7j2 (Reuters)

Brownback calls Kansas lawmakers into special session on schools
The state Supreme Court rejected school funding changes made by GOP lawmakers
Kansas City Star

Gov. Sam Brownback is calling the Kansas Legislature into special session to try to avert a Supreme Court showdown that could close schools July 1.
“After discussion with Legislative Leadership, I have decided to call a special session to keep Kansas schools open, despite the Court’s threat to close them,” Brownback said in a written statement Tuesday. He did not set a date.
The Supreme Court compelled the governor and the Legislature to action when it ruled May 27 that the state’s funding formula for schools was inequitable in its support of poorer school districts and therefore unconstitutional.
The court’s ruling, in the long-running Gannon v. State of Kansas case, gave the Legislature until June 30 to change the formula. Failing to do so, the court ruled, would mean that money on education could not “lawfully be raised, distributed or spent.”
http://gousoe.uen.org/7j4

http://gousoe.uen.org/7j5 (Ed Week)

Low-Income Students Set Up for Academic Failure
Education Week

The National Center for Education Statistics recently released a report titled, “The Condition of Education 2016.” The latest data shows that students entering kindergarten from low-income backgrounds are already at a statistical disadvantage. These children tend to score lower on tests, are more inclined to drop out of school and less inclined to pursue higher education.
The report states that children entering kindergarten from low socio-economic families are less likely to have a positive approach to learning, compared to their more affluent peers. This translates to these students not being able to pay attention in class, follow classroom rules or possess a generally favorable outlook on learning. Due to this lack of a “positive approach,” students hailing from low socioeconomic backgrounds don’t excel in school, particularly in comparison to middle and upper-class students.
Children from disadvantaged homes tend to grow up with less resources, books, educational materials and toys, as well as exposure to quality preschool programs. This sets the course for their education and may affect them throughout their entire school career. Without a positive approach to learning, students are found to have lower than average reading and math scores both before entering and upon leaving kindergarten.
If a low-income student does happen to exhibit a positive approach to learning, they are typically able to make significant academic gains. When positive learning behaviors are demonstrated among low-income students, their academic gains will actually be stronger than more affluent students.
http://gousoe.uen.org/7iG

House Speaker Ryan’s Policy Blueprint Includes Early Learning, Career Education
Education Week

The policy blueprint laid out by GOP Speaker of the House Paul Ryan includes proposals dealing with early learning and career and technical education, and also praises the Every Student Succeeds Act for providing additional support to charter schools.
“A Better Way: Our Vision for a Confident America” was created by the House Republicans’ Task Force on Poverty, Opportunity, and Upward Mobility in order to address a variety of policy issues. It was presented to the public by Ryan and other House Republicans, including Rep. John Kline, R-Minn., the chairman of the House education committee, on Tuesday.
The report doesn’t spend a ton of time dealing with K-12, but there are a few things worth noting in the 35-page plan.
http://gousoe.uen.org/7ja

Foundation funded state agency and 2 schools it saved
Chicago Sun-Times

A private foundation started by the late Walmart mogul Sam Walton and his wife has contributed heavily to the Illinois State Charter School Commission and to two charter operators whose schools the state agency has blocked the Chicago Board of Education from closing over poor student performance, records obtained by the Chicago Sun-Times show.
Even in the complex history of public education in Chicago, the situation involving the two charters, the Chicago Public Schools, the charter commission and the Arkansas-based Walton Family Foundation is unusual.
For years, CPS has faced criticism for allowing the expansion and taxpayer-financed funding of privately run charters even as it shut down traditional public schools over low enrollment and bad test scores.
Aiming to show it expects charters to meet the same standards as CPS schools, the Board of Ed moved last November to cut off funding for three schools — including the Amandla Charter School in Englewood and Lighthouse Academies’ school in Bronzeville — over poor student performance. The charter commission overruled the Board of Ed and, in March, blocked CPS from closing the schools.
http://gousoe.uen.org/7iF

Okla. teachers among lowest paid
Oklahoma Watch via Norman (OK) Transcript

In South Dakota, one of two states with lower average teacher pay than Oklahoma, the Legislature in March approved a half-cent sales tax intended to boost salaries by thousands of dollars.
The other state, Mississippi, also is phasing in a teacher pay increase.
By contrast, when Oklahoma legislators adjourned Friday, they left ambitions of higher salaries for teachers unfulfilled. That means the state could find itself dead last in teacher pay soon unless more funding is generated.
The only viable option left this year — a penny hike in the state sales tax — awaits the decision of voters in November.
The situation means that school districts are bracing for continued teacher shortages as candidates seek higher pay in surrounding states or choose different professions. Some out-of-state districts, including Dallas and Las Vegas, are recruiting Oklahoma teachers, dangling the carrot of higher pay.
http://gousoe.uen.org/7iH

The Gates Foundation’s Teaching Partnerships: 5 Early Research Takeaways
Education Week

The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation’s intensive teaching partnership projects show signs of promise, but they have not yet translated into widespread achievement gains for students.
That’s one of the major results from three interim reports released today by the RAND corporation covering implementation of the grants, access to effective teaching, and impact on student outcomes, through 2013-14. Researchers are still analyzing another two years of data, so this is really a teaser of things to come.
Gates announced the intensive partnerships in 2010. The foundation gave grants to three districts—Memphis, Tenn., Pittsburgh, Pa.; and Hillsborough, Fla.; and to one consortia of charter schools in California. The grantees agreed to craft new teacher-evaluation systems (including consideration of student achievement), and to re-orient professional development, teacher career options, and hiring around those systems.
http://gousoe.uen.org/7iJ

Copies of the report
Teaching Implementation: http://gousoe.uen.org/7iK (RAND)

Teaching Effectiveness: http://gousoe.uen.org/7iL (RAND)

Student Outcomes: http://gousoe.uen.org/7iM (RAND)

Some home-schooled students sidelined from DODEA graduation
Stars and Stripes

STUTTGART, Germany — The cap and gown has been ordered. Graduation pictures taken. And months earlier, family in the United States had booked flights with the expectation of watching Abigail Fay walk with her friends this week at Stuttgart High School’s commencement ceremony.
“Graduating was a big deal and still is. It is basically a right of passage for me,” said Fay, who attends classes at Stuttgart High School but will graduate with a home-school diploma because she was home-schooled for much of her academic career.
Now, it seems, Fay will watch from the sidelines when Department of Defense Education Activity-Europe students graduate. Less than a month before Wednesday’s ceremony at Stuttgart High, Fay learned from school officials that she and other students who attend military schools overseas — but plan to graduate with home-school degrees without a formal review of home-school transcripts — can’t participate in commencement.
For years, it has been common at some DODEA high schools for home-schooled students to walk with those enrolled full time. In the case of Fay, who attended Stuttgart High School as a senior, roughly half of her academic career was spent being home-schooled. Rather than a formal DODEA diploma, she will receive a home-school degree.
This year, however, DODEA has taken a closer look at how policies regarding commencement are enforced and determined that students such as Fay can’t participate.
http://gousoe.uen.org/7iE

Walking to school in Camden: Shootings, stabbings, drug sales, and prostitutes
Philadelphia Inquirer

Camden High School junior Janayzia Morris’ typical commute to school is just under 2.5 miles on foot through some of the city’s dangerous neighborhoods.
Camden students who make a similar trek say they have witnessed shootings, stabbings, drug sales, and gang fights. Often, people are just yelling in the streets, no matter the time of day. Prostitutes are part of the neighborhood landscape.
Morris, 18, fears for the safety of younger students she sees walking alone.
“It’s stuff that we shouldn’t be seeing,” Morris, who lives in the Fairview section, said, shaking her head. “It’s too much.
“Sometimes I don’t feel unsafe, but I’m irritated. And sometimes I do feel unsafe, and I see little kids walking by themselves,” she said. “I’m like, ‘Oh, my, their parents do not know what goes on here.’ ”
Morris is among students in the Camden City School District who must find their way to school on their own; they live just below the 2.5-mile threshold for transportation by school buses under state regulations. Morris said she had purchased NJ Transit bus tickets to get to school in the past, but it ended up being too much to pay month after month.
http://gousoe.uen.org/7iN

A third of children in poor nations fail to meet mental development milestones: research
Reuters

LONDON – One third of young children living in developing nations are failing to meet basic mental development milestones, which could adversely affect their health, success in adulthood, and education levels, researchers said on Tuesday.
Nearly 81 million children between three and four were not meeting basic developmental benchmarks with the highest numbers of affected children coming from sub-Saharan Africa, including Chad, Sierra Leone and Central African Republic, they said in a report.
While poverty and malnutrition are contributing factors, more research needs to be done to understand the root causes of the problem, according to Dana McCoy, lead author of the study which uses data from the U.N. children’s agency UNICEF and the U.S. Agency for International Development.
http://gousoe.uen.org/7j0

A copy of the study
http://gousoe.uen.org/7j1 (PLOS Medicine)

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CALENDAR
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USOE Calendar
http://www.schools.utah.gov/main/CALENDAR.aspx

UEN News
http://www.uen.org

June 9:
Utah State Board of Education study session, USDB and committee meetings
2 p.m., 250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspx

June 10:
Utah State Board of Education meeting
8 a.m., 250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspx

June 14:
Education Interim Committee meeting
8 a.m., 1575 S State Street, Salt Lake City
http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2016&com=INTEDU

Executive Appropriations Committee meeting
2 p.m., 445 State Capitol
http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?Year=2016&Com=APPEXE

June 15:
Education Interim Committee meeting
1:15 p.m., 30 House Building
http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2016&com=INTEDU

June 16:
Public Education Appropriations Subcommittee meeting
9 a.m., 445 State Capitol
http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2016&com=APPPED

July 14:
Utah State Charter School Board meeting
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://go.uen.org/62M

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