Education News Roundup: June 8, 2016

Today’s Top Picks:

Utah State Board of Education District 15

Utah State Board of Education District 15

The four candidates for the Utah State Board of Education District 15 (http://gousoe.uen.org/7jR, Utah Elections Office) seat square off in their first debate.
http://gousoe.uen.org/7jR (SGS)

Gov. Herbert visits Roy High and notes the school’s improved graduation rate.
http://gousoe.uen.org/7jj (OSE)

How are states feeling about the draft ESSA rules?
http://gousoe.uen.org/7jk (Ed Week)

AP looks at chronic absenteeism across the states.
http://gousoe.uen.org/7jF (AP)
or sidebar: State by state numbers
http://gousoe.uen.org/7jG (AP)

Ed Week turns to U Law Professor Amy Wildermuth, among others, for guidance on transgender guidance and administrative law.
http://gousoe.uen.org/7jM (Ed Week)

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TODAY’S HEADLINES
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UTAH

State school board debate kicks off in St. George

Utah Gov. Herbert visits Roy High, lauds improved graduation rates

Program Started to Help First Generation College Students

Political Seminar Helping Utah Teachers

9 receive scholarships from United Way of Salt Lake

Park City graduates celebrate one final day of high school
Students say Class of 2016 is defined by camaraderie

Logan man, 68, arrested on suspicion of stalking, sending packages to high school student

Granite association honors 4 administrators

Utah Valley Educator of the Week: Howard Bonzo

Utah Valley Student of the Week: Chezney Hope Ortega

OPINION & COMMENTARY

Bathroom laws may lead to inequities in sports

We need schools, teachers committed to science, fact

A new chapter in the debate over Transgender Students

Creating room for accommodation

Bilingual Education Programs Gaining Speed

The biggest threat to education today isn’t school segregation

NATION

State K-12 Leaders Cautious in Assessing Draft ESSA Rules Accountability plans wait for post-election

ESSA Wonk Alert: Can ED Set a Maximum ‘N’ Size? And What Should It Be?

Senate Panel OKs Tiny Hikes for Key K-12 Grants, $300 Million for ESSA Block Grant

A Look at Chronic Absenteeism Across America

Ending 34-month battle, Edwards, lawmakers endorse Common Core revisions

Funding Fights Vex School Districts
Officials in Kansas and Illinois work to shore up financial resources to keep programs running

As transgender teens struggle, here’s how one Kentucky school leads the way

Do shorter hours or higher wages make better teachers?

Parents of Students With Disabilities Seek Vouchers Despite Risks, Report Says

Parents wrote about their transgender five-year-old, and readers had strong reactions

Federal Agencies Team-Up to Promote Diversity in Schools and Communities, and Narrow Opportunity Gaps Will Hold Listening Session in Washington, D.C. on Wednesday

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UTAH NEWS
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State school board debate kicks off in St. George

Utah State School Board candidates are getting a chance to promote their academic platforms before the June 28 primary election.
On Tuesday, four candidates running for the school board seat in District 15 faced off during the public forum at George Washington Academy where debate topics varied from legislature influence to the controversial Common Core State Standards.
Scott F. Smith and Michelle Boulter of St. George, Wesley Christiansen of Hurricane and Neil Walter of Santa Clara are all vying for the District 15 spot, which represents Washington and Iron counties.
In total, eight positions of the 15-member school board are up for election.
Seven of the eight positions up for election will be a part of this year’s primary before the general election takes place in November.
http://gousoe.uen.org/7jy (SGS)

Utah Gov. Herbert visits Roy High, lauds improved graduation rates

ROY — Utah’s governor visited Roy High School to praise the success of a program that boosted the school’s graduation rate and inspired a statewide program that aims to do the same.
Gov. Gary Herbert congratulated Roy educators Tuesday, June 7, for creating an initiative that caused the school’s graduation rate to skyrocket. Between 2009 and 2014, the average graduation rate was 71 percent; this year, officials estimate it was about 90 percent.
The program — referred to as the Roy Cone project — started in 2014 and tackled low graduation rates with several approaches.
One approach assigned older, struggling students to tutor younger kids having trouble with math and reading. Another tasked paid advocates with finding and helping students who weren’t attending school. A third carved out time within school hours for high school students to earn back credits for classes they failed.
http://gousoe.uen.org/7jj (OSE)

Program Started to Help First Generation College Students

A new program to help first generation college students is starting in Park City. Katie Wright and Abby McNulty with the Park City Community Foundation and Rebecca Gonzales from Bright Futures share more about Bright Futures program.
The group says students who would be the first in their family to attend college often aren’t as prepared to navigate the college world. They can become discouraged and often drop out.
Bright Futures will provide these first generation students with social and emotional support from the end of ninth grade right through college.
http://gousoe.uen.org/7jz (KTVX)

Political Seminar Helping Utah Teachers

The Huntsman Seminar in Constitutional Government for Teachers is a five-day (June 13-17, 2016), summer seminar for teachers and administrators sponsored by The Huntsman Foundation. The primary focus of the seminar is to improve the quality of civic education in Utah schools. Participants gain valuable knowledge and insight into current events in American Politics by learning from, and interacting with, political experts, judges, university faculty, and elected officials. The Huntsman Seminar is a unique opportunity for teachers to gain an in-depth understanding of local, state, and national political issues.
http://gousoe.uen.org/7jL (KTVX)

9 receive scholarships from United Way of Salt Lake

SALT LAKE CITY — United Way of Salt Lake has announced the first recipients of scholarships provided through the Deborah Bayle Scholarship Fund for Youth.
A total of $33,500 was awarded to nine students — six from Cottonwood High School and three from Kearns High School — whose students have had the opportunity to participate in supportive programs offered through United Way of Salt Lake’s Collective Impact partnerships. These programs ensure that students have the tools they need to succeed in school and in life.
http://gousoe.uen.org/7jr (DN)

Park City graduates celebrate one final day of high school
Students say Class of 2016 is defined by camaraderie

Before he marched with his peers down the middle of Dozier Field in front of the waiting crowd, Harrison Wakefield scanned the Park City High School gym, where the Class of 2016 was gathered.
What he saw as he looked around at his classmates one last time as a high school student will leave a lasting impression. He contemplated what it has been like to grow up with them, and he wondered what it would be like next June, when they will be a year into their adult lives, many living them far from Park City.
“It’s pretty cool to be here today,” he said,” especially because I’ve come up all the way through the Park City School District. A lot of these kids I’ve known for, like, 12 years. So it’s cool to be able to go through this with them.”
Wakefield and the rest of his classmates were honored Friday at Park City High School’s commencement ceremony.
http://gousoe.uen.org/7jO (PR)

Logan man, 68, arrested on suspicion of stalking, sending packages to high school student

A 68-year-old Logan man suspected of sending sexually explicit material to a high school student is in jail today, and according to police, there may be additional victims.
Police Chief Gary Jensen said Thomas Thackeray was arrested Tuesday night after detectives posted a video on social media asking for help in identifying the man. Police say he sent five packages to a high school student. The packages contain adult oriented material and sexually explicit letters.
Thackeray is reportedly a parolee who was convicted in 2008 for a similar crime in Weber County. He pleaded guilty to four counts of dealing in materials harmful to a minor, a second-degree felony, and one count of stalking, a third-degree felony.
http://gousoe.uen.org/7jv (LHJ)

http://gousoe.uen.org/7jx (CVD)

http://gousoe.uen.org/7jP (SLT)

http://gousoe.uen.org/7jA (KSTU)

Granite association honors 4 administrators

SOUTH SALT LAKE — The Granite Association of School Administrators has recognized four individuals for their outstanding service during the 2015-16 school year.
The administrators are:
http://gousoe.uen.org/7jQ (DN)

Utah Valley Educator of the Week: Howard Bonzo

Howard Bonzohas taught at Landmark High School for the past 20 years and was selected as the Daily Herald’s Utah Valley Educator of the Week.
http://gousoe.uen.org/7ju (PDH)

Utah Valley Student of the Week: Chezney Hope Ortega

Chezney Hope Ortega, 12, is from Payson and attends Wilson Elementary. Chezney was selected as the Daily Herald’s Utah Valley Student of the Week.
http://gousoe.uen.org/7jt (PDH)

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OPINION & COMMENTARY
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Bathroom laws may lead to inequities in sports
Deseret News commentary by columnist Doug Robinson

In the latest incursion of sports into the world of social engineering, NBA commissioner Adam Silver has pitted his league against North Carolina for its passage of the so-called bathroom law. His edict: Change the law, which bans people from using bathrooms that do not match their biological sex, so that it’s less restrictive, or lose the 2017 All-Star Game. Last week, the commissioner said he has established no deadline for when a decision would be made to move the game if the state makes no change.
There are all kinds of problems with this, but there’s one that no one seems to be talking about: Has Silver — or anyone, for that matter — considered the implications for sports?
As you will recall, North Carolina passed House Bill 2, which states that transgender people who have not undergone surgery and completed legal procedures to change their gender cannot use the bathroom of their new orientation.
Now this might seem perfectly logical, reasonable and sensible to most people, especially for those who have daughters, but, no, some people are livid. Predictably, various businesses and Hollywood types — Springsteen, Pearl Jam, Ringo — are following the official PC protocol (you know the drill) and taking their business elsewhere, or threatening to do so. This includes the NBA, complete with a big dose of self-righteousness. To put it simply, they want people to be able to use whatever bathroom they feel like using.
OK, you know where this is headed, don’t you?
http://gousoe.uen.org/7js

We need schools, teachers committed to science, fact
(Logan) Herald Journal commentary by columnist Thad Box

I am a graduation ceremony junkie. I regularly attend graduations at universities where Ph.Ds are hooded and sent into the world to unravel secrets of the universe, professionals are trained to manage lands and the liberal arts examine what it means to be human. I go to high school graduations where youngsters with raging hormones and developing brains are given diplomas in a ritual called commencement. I go because it is a happy time, a time when the promise of a better world is handed to a new generation.
A week ago, I experienced the highlight of my 2016 graduation season. I sat in the Taggart Student Center and watched kids I did not know receive diplomas from Cache High School. It matters not that an alternate high school student is the first in her family to finish high school. Or that a young USU Ph.D. studying life itself is receiving her degree. What matters is that dedicated teachers give their lives to prepare a new generation of young folks to make the world better. Unfortunately, teachers are not recognized as the heroes they are.
http://gousoe.uen.org/7jw

A new chapter in the debate over Transgender Students
KNRS commentary by host Rod Arquette

This took less time that a lot of people expected. In Alaska a Transgender HS Students (born with boy parts but living as a girl) has qualified for the state track meet displacing a a young woman who was born with girl parts.
http://gousoe.uen.org/7jB

Creating room for accommodation
Sutherland Institute commentary by William C. Duncan, director of the Center for Family and Society

With a certain logic (since the sexual revolution is primarily a revolution against natural constraints), the topic of the moment has become the appropriate policies that govern the use of segregated school shower, locker room and restroom facilities by members of the opposite sex.
This had not been a topic because the 1972 Title IX act, which has become the locus of the legal debate, specifically provided for separate facilities for men and women. As recently explained, however, in the last few years, federal administrators have begun to revise the understanding of what it means to be a man or a woman.
The most recent policy innovation is last month’s decree that for purposes of all facilities designated for a single sex, the definition of sex must be entirely subjective and potentially shifting. In other words, if a man (or boy) identifies as female, he must be allowed to use the women’s shower facilities at school, and vice versa.
Most dramatically, the “guidance” from the Department of Education specifically forbids school administrators to: (1) use any objective standard (anatomical, medical, etc.) in assessing the demand to use opposite-sex facilities, or (2) take into consideration the discomfort of other students or parents in acceding to the request.
http://gousoe.uen.org/7jC

Bilingual Education Programs Gaining Speed
Education Week commentary by Matthew Lynch, an educational consultant and owner of Lynch Consulting Group, LLC

Teaching via combined languages is important as multiple races and immigrants from different countries live in the United States. Equality among students with diverse upbringings is key. Bilingual education provides an opportunity for students to write and speak in their native language and feel pride for their cultural background. Dual language programs can be difficult at first for both the teacher and students. The educator’s teaching style and techniques are important to ease students into the material.
In New York City, there are 180 bilingual education programs that teach Chinese, French, Hebrew, Korean, Russian, Polish, among others. Nearly 9 percent of Utah’s public elementary students are learning via dual language programs, while 10 percent of Portland, Oregon students are enrolled in similar programs. North Carolina and Delaware are also focusing on bilingual education.
http://gousoe.uen.org/7jN

The biggest threat to education today isn’t school segregation
Washington Post op-ed by Gerard Robinson, resident fellow in education policy studies at the American Enterprise Institute

Diamonds are forever. Desegregation orders will be, too, if our end goal for Brown v. Board of Education and the Civil Rights Act of 1964 is merely to color-code American classrooms rather than to create equality of opportunity.
The latest case comes from the state of Mississippi. On May 13, to meet a desegregation order that began in the 1960s, a U.S. district judge ordered the state’s Cleveland School District to consolidate its two middle and high schools beginning in the 2016-’17 school year. According to Judge Debra M. Brown, Cleveland’s failure to consolidate its largely racially separate schools in the past had “deprived generations of students of the constitutionally guaranteed right to an integrated education.” This is just one of hundreds of cases like it; the Justice Department currently has 177 open desegregation cases.
Enforcing desegregation orders is important because desegregation’s effects on American schooling have been positive. For example, a 2015 report found that black children born between 1945 and 1968 who attended a desegregated school were more likely to complete college, more likely to earn a higher salary, less likely to be incarcerated and had better health than their peers.
Yet if this race-balancing philosophy is the guiding logic for desegregation cases moving forward, a recent Government Accountability Office report on racial and economic disparities in public schools shows that progress will be an uphill battle.
http://gousoe.uen.org/7jK

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NATIONAL NEWS
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State K-12 Leaders Cautious in Assessing Draft ESSA Rules Accountability plans wait for post-election
Education Week

Though the Obama administration got to propose—and will get to finalize—the regulations on accountability for the Every Student Succeeds Act, it will be up to the next administration to approve state plans and hold states to their promises.
The uncertainty about who in Washington will take the baton and how they’ll handle it, along with the extent to which schools’ performance during the 2016-17 academic year will play into accountability under ESSA, are among the major concerns expressed by state K-12 leaders as they continue to study the newly released draft regulations.
To take one such knotty example, states are still teasing out how they want to handle the requirement in the proposed rules for a single, “summative” rating for each school, such as an A-F grade or numerical score.
Overall, Chris Minnich, the executive director of the Council of Chief State School Officers, said his group was “really pleased with what the department has done” on the proposed regulations.
But many state schools chiefs themselves have said they’re still reviewing the proposed rules, and were still unwilling to comment publicly about specifics in the ESSA accountability regulations that the U.S. Department of Education published for comment at the end of last month.
http://gousoe.uen.org/7jk

ESSA Wonk Alert: Can ED Set a Maximum ‘N’ Size? And What Should It Be?
Education Week

The U.S. Department of Education’s proposed accountability regulations for the Every Student Succeeds Act would let too many English-language learners, students in special education, minorities, and disadvantaged slip through the cracks, according to a report for the Alliance for Excellent Education, an advocacy organization.
The proposed regulations allow states to pick any “n” size, or minimum number of students from a particular group that a school would have to have for that group to count for accountability purposes. But the draft rules say if it states want to go above 30, they must justify it. (Thirty is currently a middle-of-the-road “n” size according to this report from the department.)
So, for instance, if a state’s “n” size is 20 and a school has 18 English language learners in the 3rd grade, the school wouldn’t have to break out its test data relative to other kids. And it wouldn’t necessarily have to take action if they aren’t performing well. The idea behind an n-size is to protect student privacy, and make sure the data that identifies which schools need help is statistically sound.
The Alliance is recommending states set an “n” size of 10 or below. Right now, only 13 states are at or below that number, according to the Alliance. And eight have a number of 40 or more, the report says.
http://gousoe.uen.org/7jn

A copy of the report
http://gousoe.uen.org/7jo (Alliance for Excellent Education)

Senate Panel OKs Tiny Hikes for Key K-12 Grants, $300 Million for ESSA Block Grant
Education Week

Washington, D.C. — School districts and states wouldn’t see big increases to funding for special education, or Title I money for disadvantaged students under a spending bill approved Tuesday by the Senate panel that oversees education, labor, and health spending.
And, to the chagrin of many advocates, a new flexible spending fund created under the Every Student Succeeds Act—called the Student Support and Academic Enrichment Grant program—would be slated to receive only $300 million, or a little more than the roughly $278 milllion the programs that make up the block grant (such as Advanced Placement and elementary and secondary school counseling) are getting currently.
http://gousoe.uen.org/7jl

A Look at Chronic Absenteeism Across America
Associated Press

WASHINGTON — The government is out with discouraging new figures on how many students are habitually missing school, and an Associated Press analysis finds the problem is particularly acute in the nation’s capital, where nearly one-third of students were absent 15 days or more in a single school year.
Washington state and Alaska were not far behind, with absentee rates hovering around one-quarter of students with that level of absences.
Florida had the lowest rate of absences, with 4.5 percent of public school students chronically missing school in the 2013-2014 academic year.
The national average was 13 percent, about 6.5 million students, according to the Education Department. Bob Balfanz, a research professor at Johns Hopkins University and director of the Everyone Graduates Center, called that number disturbing.
“If you’re not there, you don’t learn, and then you fall behind. You don’t pass your classes. You don’t get the credits in high school and that’s what leads to dropping out,” Balfanz said in an interview.
The report was the first release of chronic absentee figures from the department.
http://gousoe.uen.org/7jF

Sidebar: State by state numbers
http://gousoe.uen.org/7jG (AP)

Ending 34-month battle, Edwards, lawmakers endorse Common Core revisions
Baton Rouge (LA) Advocate

Gov. John Bel Edwards endorsed revisions in the Common Core academic standards Tuesday, ending a 34-month controversy that divided the Legislature, state leaders and Louisiana’s top school board.
Edwards took the action shortly after the House and Senate education committees approved the changes after a hearing devoid of the anger and passion that dominated so many previous gatherings.
The review by the governor, a Common Core critic, and lawmakers was required under a compromise approved by the Legislature last year in hopes of ending bickering over the guidelines in reading, writing and math.
http://gousoe.uen.org/7jm

Do shorter hours or higher wages make better teachers?
The Economist

ATTRACTING bright, motivated people into teaching is a struggle in many countries. Low pay is often blamed, especially when it is combined with long working hours. The difficulties of teacher recruitment, one argument goes, is why pupils in some countries do so poorly in school. But data from the OECD, a club of mostly rich countries, suggest that—at least for educational outcomes—neither hours nor pay matters much. Japanese and South Korean pupils are neck-and-neck near the top of the PISA rankings of 15-year-olds’ literacy, numeracy and scientific knowledge. Their teachers are paid about the same, but put in vastly different hours: a whopping 54 hours per week in Japan, compared with 37 in South Korea. Pupils in Estonia, which has the lowest-paid teachers in the group, do better than those in the Netherlands, where teachers’ salaries are five times as high and hours just the same. Even when GDP per person is taken into account the Netherlands is unusually generous to teachers, and Estonia unusually stingy.
So what should teachers who want more free time and better pay do? Those from two-thirds of the countries in the group would benefit from moving to the Netherlands (the others would have to work longer hours after such a move). Portuguese teachers could cut their working day by more than three hours if they moved to Italy, while seeing their salaries clipped by a mere 2%. British teachers who, like most of their compatriots, balk at the idea of learning a new language have options, too. Moving to Canada would bag them a 41% pay rise; to America, 29%; or to Australia, 19%. Only those plumping for Canada would have to work longer for the extra money—by just half an hour a day.
http://gousoe.uen.org/7jI

Parents of Students With Disabilities Seek Vouchers Despite Risks, Report Says
Education Week

Some parents of students with disabilities see a clear benefit to voucher programs to escape public schools that are a poor fit, even though the vouchers rarely pay the full cost of private school tuition and, in some cases, accepting one means giving up rights under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act.
The Council for Parent Attorneys and Advocates, a group that supports the legal and civil rights of students with disabilities, surveyed the landscape of voucher and other school choice programs in a June 8 report called School Vouchers and Students with Disabilities: Impact in the Name of Choice. (COPAA has organized a panel on the report for Congressional staffers that I am moderating.)
The Friedman Foundation for Educational Choice says that 11 states have voucher programs that are explicitly for students with disabilities, or that include students with disabilities among other targeted student groups (for example, students in schools deemed to be failing, or from low-income families). They are: Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Indiana, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, Utah and Wisconsin.
COPAA found that its membership was split on the value of vouchers or similar school choice programs. Some members saw choice programs as a way to provide appropriate services for children while avoiding legal battles.
http://gousoe.uen.org/7jp

A copy of the report
http://gousoe.uen.org/7jq (COPAA)

Funding Fights Vex School Districts
Officials in Kansas and Illinois work to shore up financial resources to keep programs running
Wall Street Journal

Lawmakers in some states have a daunting homework assignment over their summer break: to find hundreds of millions of dollars to make sure the next school year can start on time.
Stung by lower tax revenue and nearing the end of the regular legislative sessions, politicians and school administrators in Kansas, Illinois and some other Midwestern states are scrambling to firm up financial packages that would keep some educational programs running through the summer, and ensure that classrooms open again in the fall.
The Kansas Supreme Court ruled last month that legislative efforts to make funding for poorer school districts more equitable didn’t go far enough to meet a standing court order; judges said Friday that the state had until June 30 to bring funding formulas in line with constitutional requirements or the court would shut schools.
The Kansas fight is the latest fallout from a move by the state’s Republican governor and Legislature to cut taxes dramatically in an effort to spur economic growth.
http://gousoe.uen.org/7jJ

Restroom Guidance a Thorny Study in Administrative Law
Education Week

Two radically different narratives are emerging about the federal guidance over transgender students and restrooms.
President Barack Obama’s administration asserts that its guidance calling for schools to allow transgender students to choose restrooms and locker rooms “consistent with their gender identity” is an interpretation of long-standing regulations under Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, the federal law barring discrimination “based on sex” in federally funded education programs.
“This guidance does not add requirements to applicable law, but provides information and examples to inform recipients about how the Departments [of Justice and Education] evaluate whether covered entities are complying with their legal obligations,” those departments said in a May 13 “Dear Colleague” letter.
Meanwhile, about a dozen states, several school districts, and two parents’ groups have filed lawsuits painting the guidance in different terms.
http://gousoe.uen.org/7jM

As transgender teens struggle, here’s how one Kentucky school leads the way
NewsHour

Gender dysphoria is a difficult situation for a teenager to manage; nearly half of all transgender teens around the country report having suicidal thoughts. Some schools are taking steps to address the issue, such as Atherton High School in Louisville, which became Kentucky’s first to adopt an official policy for transgender students.
http://gousoe.uen.org/7jH

Parents wrote about their transgender five-year-old, and readers had strong reactions
Washington Post

Ron and Vanessa Ford are the parents of a 5-year-old transgender child, and they recently wrote for The Washington Post about why they appreciate and support the Obama administration’s directive to schools on accommodating transgender students. The directive has spurred a backlash from local and state authorities who call it federal overreach, and who particularly object to the requirement that schools allow transgender students to use bathrooms that correspond to their gender identity.
For the Fords, the debate about bathroom access is really a debate about discrimination, and about whether the government will or will not sanction discrimination against their child.
“We are an interracial couple,” they wrote. “Fifty years ago, in many places across the country, it would have been legal to discriminate against us because, many people said, a fundamental part of who we are was somehow offensive and perverse. Our daughter is transgender. In many places across the country, it is legal to discriminate against her because, many people say, a fundamental part of who she is somehow offensive and perverse.”
We asked readers to weigh in on how the bathroom debate compares to earlier civil rights debates. There were many responses, representing the wide range of views and strong feelings that have characterized the discussion about transgender rights in America.
http://gousoe.uen.org/7jE

Federal Agencies Team-Up to Promote Diversity in Schools and Communities, and Narrow Opportunity Gaps Will Hold Listening Session in Washington, D.C. on Wednesday U.S. Department of Education

The U.S. Departments of Education (ED), Housing and Urban Development (HUD), and Transportation (DOT) are partnering to help state and local leaders increase diversity in their schools and communities, and to narrow opportunity gaps. On Wednesday, June 8, the agencies will host an interagency listening session for education, housing, and transportation leaders at ED’s headquarters in Washington, D.C.
The afternoon session will bring together educators, researchers and community leaders with policy experts and leaders from the three agencies to discuss voluntary, community-led strategies to promote increased diversity in our schools and neighborhoods. The event will include panels on the benefits of diversity, opportunities at the federal level, a case study on diversity work in action, and community planning. Attendees will also hear from individuals on the front lines who are doing this work, as well as from senior officials at the three agencies who will discuss opportunities to further locally-driven efforts to support diversity.
http://gousoe.uen.org/7jD

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CALENDAR
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USOE Calendar
http://www.schools.utah.gov/main/CALENDAR.aspx

UEN News
http://www.uen.org

June 9:
Utah State Board of Education study session, USDB and committee meetings
2 p.m., 250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspx

June 10:
Utah State Board of Education meeting
8 a.m., 250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspx

June 14:
Education Interim Committee meeting
8 a.m., 1575 S State Street, Salt Lake City
http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2016&com=INTEDU

Executive Appropriations Committee meeting
2 p.m., 445 State Capitol
http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?Year=2016&Com=APPEXE

June 15:
Education Interim Committee meeting
1:15 p.m., 30 House Building
http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2016&com=INTEDU

June 16:
Public Education Appropriations Subcommittee meeting
9 a.m., 445 State Capitol
http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2016&com=APPPED

July 14:
Utah State Charter School Board meeting
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://go.uen.org/62M

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