Education News Roundup: June 10, 2016

Utah State Office of Education June 2016 Employee of the Month Kirin McInns (front row) accepts congratulations from (from left) Deputy Superintendent Scott Jones, Finance Manager Jaime Barrett, Finance Director Natalie Grange, Research Analyst Brian Ipson, and State Superintendent Sydnee Dickson.

Utah State Office of Education June 2016 Employee of the Month Kirin McInns (front row) accepts congratulations from (from left) Deputy Superintendent Scott Jones, Finance Manager Jaime Barrett, Finance Director Natalie Grange, Research Analyst Brian Ipson, and State Superintendent Sydnee Dickson.

Education News Roundup

Today’s Top Picks:

 

How can Utah get and keep more teachers?

http://gousoe.uen.org/7kI (DN)

or a copy of the report

http://gousoe.uen.org/7kJ (USOE)

 

Trib follows up on yesterday’s Census report on school funding in the U.S.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7kv (SLT)

and http://gousoe.uen.org/7kY (Syracuse [NY] Post-Standard) or a copy of the report http://gousoe.uen.org/7kw (Census)

 

Utah Policy’s Bob Bernick takes a look at the education issue in the gubernatorial race. OK. Mostly in the GOP gubernatorial race.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7kX (UP)

 

Ed Week takes a look at teachers’ use of technology in the classroom.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7kS (Ed Week)

 

Washington State Superintendent talks about shutting schools down in response to the funding crisis there.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7kC (Seattle Times)

 

Malia Obama graduates from high school today.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7kP (USAT)

 

 

 

 

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TODAY’S HEADLINES

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UTAH

 

Utah’s teacher problem: What can be done to keep educators in the profession?

 

Census: Utah still last for spending per student State board chairman points to improved test scores as evidence of funding efficiency.

 

First-generation college students excel with “TRiO” program

 

Woman finds photos of every fallen soldier from Utah for Vietnam memorial

 

Summit Academy’s postseason ban overturned by UHSAA’s Board of Trustees Prep football » Board of Trustees overturns postseason ban.

 

Logan man charged with stalking high school student

 

Several Logan District students recognized in city sesquicentennial essay contest

 

Controversial ‘Vaxxed’ film comes to Utah

 

 


 

 

OPINION & COMMENTARY

 

Reading, Writing and the Gubernatorial Race

 

Wayne County, SITLA hardly neutral in gravel pit fight

 

Swearing at school should be punished

 

Absent an Education

Millions of students nationwide are chronically absent, but there are solutions to the problem.

 

Liberals and Equal Protection

Will California judges hear a case challenging teacher tenure?

 

How unfair funding makes it harder to desegregate schools

 

10 States Spend More on Employee Retirement Costs Than on Higher Education

 

 


 

 

NATION

 

Teachers Still Struggling to Use Tech to Transform Instruction, Survey Finds Many teachers see themselves as risk takers or early adopters in using tech, a new Education Week Research Center survey shows.

 

Alaska seeks standardized testing waiver after the fact

 

Washington’s school superintendent says it’s time to consider closing public schools Randy Dorn says it could be time to close Washington state’s K-12 public schools. You wouldn’t expect the state superintendent of public instruction to say that. But he is serious about seeking ways to enforce the state Supreme Court’s 2012 ruling that demands education funding.

 

Judge refuses to expand Douglas County voucher program to include religious schools Krieger says law extremely unsettled

 

Teaching the teachers

Great teaching has long been seen as an innate skill. But reformers are showing that the best teachers are made, not born

 

Common, Yo-Yo Ma, Arne Duncan promote ‘reimagining high school’

 

‘You were born in a Taco Bell’: Trump’s rhetoric fuels school bullies across US The xenophobic spirit of the presumptive Republican nominee has led to playground spats and ugly exchanges in classrooms across the country

 

Pittsburgh school board to meet to discuss superintendent

 

Columbia Admissions drops SAT Subject Test, standardized writing requirements

 

How time flies: Malia Obama, 17, graduates from high school

 

 

 

 

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UTAH NEWS

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Utah’s teacher problem: What can be done to keep educators in the profession?

 

SALT LAKE CITY — Andrew Platt was no stranger to the teaching profession.

Education was “always in the family,” he said. His mother was a teacher for several decades, and many of his siblings, aunts, uncles and cousins are educators.

Platt had worked in restaurants, call centers and warehouses, but pursued an education to be an educator. He knew he wouldn’t make a fortune as a teacher in Utah, and he was OK with that. So he finished a history degree in anticipation of teaching the subject in high school.

But when he finally entered the classroom, it jarred his lifelong expectations of what it meant to be a teacher. And it left him feeling bitter.

“Out of all the jobs I’ve done, by far, teaching has the most responsibilities, the most duties, the things that you’re held accountable for. I was overwhelmed,” Platt said. “I don’t have children, but I thought to myself, ‘If I was a dad and had a family of my own, there’s no way I would have time for this.’ It’s just not feasible.”

The “big shock and disappointment” came when four years into the profession, he went into forbearance on his student loans, his furnace had been broken for two winters, and he maxed out his credit cards just to make ends meet.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7kI (DN)

 

A copy of the report

http://gousoe.uen.org/7kJ (USOE)

 


 

 

Census: Utah still last for spending per student State board chairman points to improved test scores as evidence of funding efficiency.

 

Utah continues to set aside fewer public dollars for each K-12 student than any other state.

That’s according to a Census Bureau analysis released Thursday that considered data from 2014.

The state’s large under-18 population has much to do with its dead-last ranking. Growing student enrollment, now at 633,900, continues to gobble up tax dollars.

Nationally, total per-student school spending ticked up 2.7 percent, or $1,109 — the largest increase since 2008, when the increase was 6.1 percent.

In Utah, the Legislature has boosted state education funding in recent years, by 3.75 percent in 2016 and by 5.6 percent last year. The percentages are higher than the national average, but it hasn’t been enough to pull Utah out of last place.

State school board Chairman David Crandall said he isn’t sure whether the state will move up the chart in the foreseeable future. But he points to improving test scores as evidence that the state is making progress — and is making wise choices with the funding it does have.

“It’s important to make sure that we’re spending our money in the best way we can,” Crandall said. “Each dollar is precious, and we need to make sure it’s going to the benefit of our students.”

To that end, Crandall and fellow state education leaders will meet with Utah lawmakers this summer to design a database that will better allow the Legislature and public to trace the path of state education dollars.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7kv (SLT)

 

http://gousoe.uen.org/7kY (Syracuse [NY] Post-Standard)

 

A copy of the report

http://gousoe.uen.org/7kw (Census)

 


 

 

First-generation college students excel with “TRiO” program

 

CEDAR CITY — Since the seventh grade, Cedar City natives Kaylin Shelley and Samara Rangel have had leadership, service and professional development opportunities available to them through the federal “TRiO” program hosted by Southern Utah University. Upon graduating this year from Canyon View High School, these all-star students had already received their associate degrees through Southern Utah University’s Success Academy, but they’re not done yet.

Shelley and Rangel are members of the university’s TRiO “Educational Talent Search” program through Canyon View, a program that recruits students from low-income, first-generation families and helps build a desire and passion for academics and higher education.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7kN (SGN)

 


 

 

Woman finds photos of every fallen soldier from Utah for Vietnam memorial

 

SALT LAKE CITY — After searching for more than a year, a woman from Hawaii has found photos of every soldier from Utah who died in the Vietnam War.

Janna Hoehn has been working with the goal of finding photos of every fallen soldier for the Faces Never Forgotten project, which is run by the Vietnam Memorial Fund. The same organization supports the iconic memorial in Washington, D.C.

The photos Hoehn finds are added to the Wall of Faces, an online memorial dedicated to remembering those who died. When she first started focusing on Utah, 85 of the 364 young Utahns who died in the Vietnam War were missing photos.

To find the missing photos, Hoehn reached out to news organizations like KSL.com, and readers responded. She also worked with another man to contact high schools and school districts in an effort to search yearbooks.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7kU (KSL)

 


 

 

Summit Academy’s postseason ban overturned by UHSAA’s Board of Trustees Prep football » Board of Trustees overturns postseason ban.

 

Summit Academy won its appeal with the Utah High School Activities Association Board of Trustees to overturn the decision made by the UHSAA Executive Committee to ban the Draper-based charter school from the 2016 football postseason after it was found guilty of undue influence in May.

The BOT, which overcame an original deadlock and voted 3-1 in favor of the reversal, upheld the additional penalties imposed by the Executive Committee of two maximum fines totaling $3,000, placing every athletic program at the school on a two-year probation period, and forcing the school to finance a compliance audit for this year and two years forward to ensure transferring students are not being recruited.

“We’re obviously excited. We feel like this is the best decision for the boys that are in the program. I think it’s a fair decision by the UHSAA,” said first-year Bears football coach Les Hamilton. “… There was a pressure and anxiety going into the hearing today, and having watched some of the reaction from the boys on Twitter, there’s a lot of positivity. I think it will be bonding and motivating factor for our kids, now without the unknown, to move forward.”

The original sentence was levied after text messages from former Summit Academy assistant football coach Jeff Callahan encouraging players from Copper Hills to transfer for athletic purposes were presented to the Executive Committee.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7kG (SLT)

 

http://gousoe.uen.org/7kV (DN)

 


 

 

Logan man charged with stalking high school student

 

LOGAN — A Logan man accused of mailing sexually explicit packages to a high school student was charged Thursday.

Thomas Thackeray, 68, was charged in 1st District Court with stalking, a third-degree felony, court documents state.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7kK (DN)

 


 

 

Several Logan District students recognized in city sesquicentennial essay contest

 

Several Logan City School District elementary students were recognized by the city for their participation in an essay contest honoring Logan’s sesquicentennial anniversary.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7kL (LHJ)

 


 

Controversial ‘Vaxxed’ film comes to Utah

 

SALT LAKE CITY — Three months after Utah lawmakers rejected a bill requiring parents to watch an educational video before exempting their children from vaccinations, a controversial film arrived in Utah theaters this week that raises claims of a government coverup of a connection between the measles-mumps-rubella vaccine and autism.

“Vaxxed: From Cover-Up to Catastrophe,” which was released in April in New York City, began playing in Utah at the Megaplex theaters in Lehi and Salt Lake City Monday. The film was originally scheduled to be screened at the Tribeca Film Festival but was pulled from the lineup by actor and festival founder Robert De Niro after reviewing the film with members of the scientific community, according to USA Today.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7kO (KSL)

 

 

 

 

 

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OPINION & COMMENTARY

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Reading, Writing and the Gubernatorial Race Utah Policy commentary by columnist Bob Bernick

 

We’re just over two weeks away from the June 28 Utah primary election and the showdown between GOP Gov. Gary Herbert and his intra-party challenger, Jonathan Johnson.

This is the major primary race of 2016.

For the winner, it’s pretty much a downhill slide to victory in November.

Johnson, who is clearly trying to run from Herbert’s political right, is again beating the governor up over Common Core, and it’s bedfellow, the SAGE testing program.

This spring, Herbert – who had GOP AG Sean Reyes conduct an “investigation” that showed no Utah education laws were being broken and, in fact, Common Core and other state standards WERE NOT being ordered by the federal government – backed away from Common Core, saying while it is not a federal takeover of local schools, the controversy is hurting education here.

Herbert also said SAGE testing in high schools should be dumped – such a swing that there was blowback from teachers and the State School Board which actually oversees these programs – not the governor’s office.

Now Herbert has a new TV spot running where he says over the next four years Utah will become No. 1 in public education among the states.

This is quite a claim – or goal – considering that Utah remains in last place among the states in per-student spending – and there’s likely no way taxes could be raised enough to balance that out.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7kX

 


 

 

Wayne County, SITLA hardly neutral in gravel pit fight Salt Lake Tribune letter from Bonnie Mangold

 

It is disingenuous for Wayne County and SITLA to play the role of helpless bystanders relative to the permitting of an open pit gravel mine adjacent to the residential, agricultural, scenic towns of Torrey and Teasdale, gateway to Capitol Reef. Neutrality was not demonstrated in the rush to permit the gravel pit, starting with a vote of support from the commissioners prior to the then required zoning change, prior to the affected citizens’ knowledge of the proposal.

And SITLA only signed the lease after local opposition was being voiced and disenfranchised. Legal improprieties forced repeated meetings, but magically it was discovered, thanks to counsel for the Utah Association of Counties, that no zoning was needed, allowing the county to pass a toothless conditional use permit, quite meaningless without appropriate underlying zoning and enforcement.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7kH

 


 

 

Swearing at school should be punished

(Logan) Herald Journal letter from Evan VonNiederhausern

 

I am writing to share my opinion about the amount of swearing in my school. This past school year, I heard swearing every day in the hallways and the cafeteria. I heard every bad word I knew and probably some I didn’t know. The profanity came from both boys and girls. It made me feel uncomfortable and bad inside. Sometimes adults heard the swearing and just told the kid not to say that. But there was no punishment.

At home, my parents don’t allow swearing, or movies, video games, music, and TV that contain swearing. So why do I have to hear it at my school, a place where I should be learning how to be a good, smart kid? I think there needs to be a discipline for swearing at school. It should be punishable like all the other bad things that kids shouldn’t do.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7kM

 


 

 

Absent an Education

Millions of students nationwide are chronically absent, but there are solutions to the problem.

U.S. News & World Report op-ed by Hedy Chang, executive director of Attendance Works, a national initiative aimed at advancing student success by addressing chronic absence

 

The promise of the American dream is that every child has the chance to learn and succeed regardless of their social class or the circumstances to which they are born. But this promise is at risk for millions of our students.

A new report, just released by the U.S. Department of Education’s Office for Civil Rights, provides, for the first time, hard data on how many students are chronically absent, defined as missing 15 or more days of school.

The numbers are staggering. More than 6.5 million nationwide missed 15 or more days of school in the 2013-14 academic year. These chronically absent students included 3 million high school students (18 percent) and 3.5 million elementary school students (11 percent). Because the data was collected only by school and not by grade, the report can’t immediately validate the findings of local and state studies, which suggest chronic absence is especially high among kindergarten and first-grade students. But the national data clearly show some populations, especially American-Indian, African-American, Pacific Islander and multiracial children, experience significantly higher levels of chronic absence than white students.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7kx

 


 

 

Liberals and Equal Protection

Will California judges hear a case challenging teacher tenure?

Wall Street Journal editorial

 

California’s Supreme Court has the opportunity to make a civil-rights breakthrough by agreeing to hear a landmark case that challenges teacher tenure laws on equal protection grounds. Let’s see if the court’s liberals have the courage of their convictions.

Four years ago, nine public school students sued to overturn California’s lifetime teacher job protections and “last-in-first-out” policies, which have concentrated ineffective teachers in poor and minority communities. Reams of evidence in Vergara v. State of California show how disadvantaged students are the most harmed by these laws.

Teachers in California receive tenure after two years, making them nearly impossible to fire. Fewer than 0.002% of teachers statewide are dismissed for unprofessional conduct or poor performance. Thousands are ranked grossly ineffective, yet only about 20 have been terminated over the last decade. In Los Angeles Unified School District, it takes upward of 10 years and between $250,000 to $450,000 to fire a teacher. Administrators typically reassign lousy teachers to less desirable schools in poor areas.

Due to seniority rights, inexperienced teachers are disproportionately assigned to poorer schools. State law also mandates that the newest hires be the first dismissed during budget layoffs regardless of performance. During a recent budget crunch, Oakland laid off 90% of teachers, including many Teach for America alums, in some low-income schools.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7kD

 


 

 

How unfair funding makes it harder to desegregate schools Washington Post op-ed by Danielle Farrie, research director at the Education Law Center and co-author of “Is School Funding Fair? A National Report Card”

 

While Brown v. Board of Education eliminated de jure segregation in schools in 1954, in 1973 the San Antonio Independent School District v. Rodriguez decision all but guaranteed that de facto segregation would continue.

That decision was about school funding. In Rodriguez, the Supreme Court ruled that a system of relying on local property taxes for supplemental educational revenue was nondiscriminatory, even though it meant that schools in poorer districts without a high property tax base would inevitably receive less funding.

By limiting any federal oversight of states’ school funding systems, the Rodriguez decision maintained a status quo in which states, not the federal government, were responsible for making sure school funding systems meet constitutional standards. This has not been a success: Despite dozens of state-level legal challenges about equitable school funding since the 1973 case, the condition of state school finance in most states remains unfair and inequitable, depriving millions of poor and minority students of the opportunity for school success.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7ky

 


 

 

10 States Spend More on Employee Retirement Costs Than on Higher Education TeacherPensions.org commentary by Chad Aldeman

 

On Friday, The New York Times ran a story called “Higher Education in Illinois Is Dying” and cited rising pension costs as a major factor in the state’s budget woes. Similarly, in our recent report on pensions in the state of Illinois, we noted Illinois taxpayers are now contributing more toward teacher pensions alone than for all of the state’s public colleges and universities combined.

Unfortunately, Illinois is not alone. Like the insatiable Pac-Man, pensions are eating further and further into state and local education budgets, eating up dollars that could be spent on lots of other things. That’s true for all public services, but higher education is uniquely harmed by rising pension costs.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7kA

 

 

 

 

 

 

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NATIONAL NEWS

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Teachers Still Struggling to Use Tech to Transform Instruction, Survey Finds Many teachers see themselves as risk takers or early adopters in using tech, a new Education Week Research Center survey shows.

Education Week

 

A majority of K-12 educators responding to a new survey see themselves as risk takers or early adopters in using technology.

But the exclusive survey, conducted by the Education Week Research Center for this year’s edition of Technology Counts, found that teachers, on the whole, still face systemic challenges in adapting their instruction to new technologies in transformative ways.

The survey was conducted online in April, with participation from about 700 classroom teachers and school-based instructional specialists who are registered users of edweek.org. While the sample is not statistically representative of the nation’s teachers, the results capture the views of a diverse group of educators whose schools vary in grade ranges, poverty level, and location.

The results also illustrate the complexity of creating meaningful technological change in American classrooms, the subject of this year’s report http://gousoe.uen.org/7kS

 


 

 

Alaska seeks standardized testing waiver after the fact Fairbanks (AK) News Miner

 

FAIRBANKS — The state of Alaska is retroactively asking the federal government to waive its standardized testing requirement after the state failed to administer its statewide assessments during the 2015-16 school year.

The first few days of testing in Alaska were so plagued by technical difficulties that four days into the testing window the state Department of Education and Early Development decided to stop trying to administer the tests at all. The 2015-16 school year would have marked the second administration of a new standardized test developed for Alaska by the Achievement and Assessment Institute at the University of Kansas.

The tests — the Alaska Measures of Progress — were first implemented during the 2014-15 school year. That year, the Measures of Progress became the first computer-based assessments to be administered statewide in Alaska.

The federal government requires states to administer standardized tests to measure student achievement in grade school. States are then required to share the achievement data on state and local “report cards” that are submitted to the U.S. Department of Education.

Because only a fraction of students successfully completed sections of the tests before the state ceased testing, Alaska has no statewide student achievement data for the 2015-16 school year.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7kz

 


 

 

Washington’s school superintendent says it’s time to consider closing public schools Randy Dorn says it could be time to close Washington state’s K-12 public schools. You wouldn’t expect the state superintendent of public instruction to say that. But he is serious about seeking ways to enforce the state Supreme Court’s 2012 ruling that demands education funding.

Seattle Times

 

OLYMPIA — Randy Dorn says it could be time to close Washington state’s K-12 public schools.

You wouldn’t expect the state superintendent of public instruction to say that.

But Dorn, who isn’t seeking re-election, argues in a court brief filed Wednesday that the state Supreme Court needs to get serious about enforcing its 2012 ruling that the state was violating its constitution in underfunding K-12 schools.

Serious, Dorn says in the court filing, means the court should consider closing the schools until the Legislature makes real progress.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7kC

 


 

 

Judge refuses to expand Douglas County voucher program to include religious schools Krieger says law extremely unsettled Denver Post

 

A federal judge on Thursday refused to expand a recently created Douglas County School District voucher program to include religious schools that had been excluded as part of a revamped effort to let students attend private schools using public funds.

In a decision delivered from the bench, U.S. District Judge Marcia Krieger said “the law in this area is extremely unsettled” and injects doubt into whether the plaintiffs could win on the merits of the case.

She also said she was not inclined to interfere with a case that may still get a look from the U.S. Supreme Court.

Krieger’s ruling came after a battery of attorneys made oral arguments before the court Thursday morning concerning a lawsuit that three families filed against the district in April.  The lawsuit, which was argued by senior attorney Michael Bindas with the Virginia-based religious freedom group Institute for Justice, sought to enjoin the program because it demonstrates unconstitutional “hostility toward religion.”

“This case is about whether a government can deny a child aid just because parents want the child to go to a religious school,” he argued before the court.

He said the government is obligated to be neutral toward religion and that the Douglas County School District’s decision to include only nonsectarian schools in its School Choice Grant Program — approved in March by the school board on a 4-3 vote — violates that provision.

But Krieger ruled that the plaintiffs hadn’t met the tests for halting the program by court order, primarily because they hadn’t shown that the three Douglas County families would be “irreparably harmed” by the program’s non-sectarian nature.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7kB

 


 

 

Teaching the teachers

Great teaching has long been seen as an innate skill. But reformers are showing that the best teachers are made, not born The Economist

 

BOSTON, NEWARK AND NEW YORK | TO THE 11- and 12-year-olds in his maths class, Jimmy Cavanagh seems like a born teacher. He is warm but firm. His voice is strong. Correct answers make him smile. And yet it is not his pep that explains why his pupils at North Star Academy in Newark, New Jersey, can expect to go to university, despite 80% of their families needing help to pay for school meals.

Mr Cavanagh is the product of a new way of training teachers. Rather than spending their time musing on the meaning of education, he and his peers have been drilled in the craft of the classroom. Their dozens of honed techniques cover everything from discipline to making sure all children are thinking hard. Not a second is wasted. North Star teachers may seem naturals. They are anything but.

Like many of his North Star colleagues are or have been, Mr Cavanagh is enrolled at the Relay Graduate School of Education. Along with similar institutions around the world, Relay is applying lessons from cognitive science, medical education and sports training to the business of supplying better teachers. Like doctors on the wards of teaching hospitals, its students often train at excellent institutions, learning from experienced high-calibre peers. Their technique is calibrated, practised, coached and relentlessly assessed like that of a top-flight athlete. Jamey Verrilli, who runs Relay’s Newark branch (there are seven others), says the approach shows teaching for what it is: not an innate gift, nor a refuge for those who, as the old saw has it, “can’t do”, but “an incredibly intricate, complex and beautiful craft”.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7kE

 


 

 

Common, Yo-Yo Ma, Arne Duncan promote ‘reimagining high school’

Chicago Sun-Times

 

It was an unlikely trio that led a student roundtable convened in Chicago by XQ: The Super School Project on Thursday at the Mikva Challenge Foundation: actor/rapper Common, world-renowned cellist Yo-Yo Ma, and former U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan.

So what did they have in common? They’re avid supporters of a “reimagining high school” project launched last year by the XQ Institute, which is chaired by philanthropist Laurene Powell Jobs, widow of Apple founder Steve Jobs.

Jobs put up $50 million for the XQ America project that is seeking the five best proposals to transform high-school learning — which XQ calls an archaic model based on institutional, factory-like learning environments. The funds are being funneled through the Emerson Collective, a reform group Jobs founded.

“I don’t have the answers, but I’m still asking the questions,” Yo-Yo Ma, long known for his arts education philanthropy, said after hearing 25 Chicago Public Schools students complain for two hours about underfunded schools, lack of learning resources, teachers who don’t care, boring curriculum, etc.

“There’s a difference between critical thinking and empathetic thinking. I’m hearing a lack of empathetic thinking. If I were teaching high school, I’d need to know how to imagine being in someone else’s shoes,” Yo-Yo Ma said.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7kT

 


 

 

‘You were born in a Taco Bell’: Trump’s rhetoric fuels school bullies across US The xenophobic spirit of the presumptive Republican nominee has led to playground spats and ugly exchanges in classrooms across the country

(Manchester) Guardian

 

Tracey Iglehart, a teacher at Rosa Parks elementary school in Berkeley, California, did not expect Donald Trump to show up on the playground.

This was, after all, a school named after a civil rights hero in a progressive California enclave, with a melting pot of white, African American, Latino and Muslim students.

That has not stopped some children from channeling and adopting the Republican presumptive nominee’s xenophobic rhetoric in playground spats and classroom exchanges.

“They said things like ‘you’ll get deported’, ‘you weren’t born here’ and ‘you were born in a Taco Bell’,” said Iglehart, 49. “They may not know exactly what it means, but they know it’s powerful language.”

Hearing it in Rosa Parks elementary, of all places, came as a shock. “Berkeley is not an area where there are Trump supporters. This is not the land of Trump.”

They may not know exactly what it means, but they know it’s powerful language

Yet the spirit of the GOP presidential candidate has surfaced here and, according to one study, in schools across the country.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7kF

 


 

 

Pittsburgh school board to meet to discuss superintendent Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

 

Pittsburgh Public Schools board members are meeting today to discuss the controversy surrounding the district’s recently hired superintendent, Anthony Hamlet — and one board member is saying she won’t be able to support him if he plagiarized portions of his resume.

“If it’s true that he plagiarized . . . that’s game over to me,” said District 4 board member Lynda Wrenn. “I would press for a new search.”

The Post-Gazette first reported on Wednesday that Mr. Hamlet’s resume included wording almost identical to that found in a Washington Post editorial from February 2015. That report followed earlier stories that Mr. Hamlet’s resume made claims about his record as a Florida school administrator that were at odds with data filed by the Palm Beach County school district.

Ms. Wrenn said she began hearing from concerned voters after those first reports appeared, but “I said, ‘Let’s take a breath and give him a chance to explain.’ I was very supportive of him. I was very excited about him and the vision he put forward.

“But when the Wednesday story broke, I said, ‘That’s it.’ I can’t hold someone up as a leader if I’m unsure of his integrity. These are allegations, but it’s a very serious matter to me. … Our student code comes down very hard on plagiarism.”

http://gousoe.uen.org/7kQ

 

http://gousoe.uen.org/7kR (AP)

 


 

 

Columbia Admissions drops SAT Subject Test, standardized writing requirements Columbia Spectator

 

The Office of Undergraduate Admissions announced on Thursday that it will no longer require applicants to submit SAT Subject Tests or writing portions of the SAT or ACT. Columbia will join the University of Pennsylvania as the only Ivy League schools without either requirement.

Previously, applicants had to submit at least two SAT Subject Tests as well as either SAT or ACT scores, including scores from each test’s writing section. This requirement was among the most rigorous in the nation—only 13 schools require Subject Tests from all applicants.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7kW

 


 

 

How time flies: Malia Obama, 17, graduates from high school USA Today

 

WASHINGTON — President Obama has a plan for his daughter’s graduation: Wear sunglasses so no one can see him cry.

Malia Obama, 17, graduates from Sidwell Friends School in Washington Friday, and Obama told talk show host Jimmy Fallon that he expects to get weepy. “One more example of the president crying,” he said. “It’s going to be bad.”

The event does not appear on the president’s official schedule, but the White House confirmed that President and Mrs. Obama will attend the graduation Friday solely as proud parents.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7kP

 

 

 

 

 

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CALENDAR

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USOE Calendar

http://www.schools.utah.gov/main/CALENDAR.aspx

 

 

UEN News

http://www.uen.org

 

 

June 10:

Utah State Board of Education meeting

8 a.m., 250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspx

 

 

June 14:

Education Interim Committee meeting

8 a.m., 1575 S State Street, Salt Lake City

http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2016&com=INTEDU

 

Executive Appropriations Committee meeting

2 p.m., 445 State Capitol

http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?Year=2016&Com=APPEXE

 

 

June 15:

Education Interim Committee meeting

1:15 p.m., 30 House Building

http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2016&com=INTEDU

 

 

June 16:

Public Education Appropriations Subcommittee meeting

9 a.m.,  445 State Capitol

http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2016&com=APPPED

 

 

July 14:

Utah State Charter School Board meeting

250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://go.uen.org/62M

 

 

August 11:

Utah State Board of Education study session, USDB and committee meetings

250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspx

 

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