Education News Roundup: June 15, 2016

 

SAGE Brochure

SAGE Brochure/Education News Roundup

Education News Roundup

Today’s Top Picks:

Utah State Board of Education Members and Legislators discuss SAGE testing.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7mD (SLT)

and http://gousoe.uen.org/7mE (DN)

 

They also look at the teacher shortage.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7mN (KUER)

 

And the State Board creates a new pathway to a teaching license.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7mG (SLT)

and http://gousoe.uen.org/7ne (Ed Week)

 

State revenue picture is weakening.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7mB (UP)

or a copy of the projections

http://gousoe.uen.org/7mC (Utah Legislature)

 

Utah State Board of Education District 15 (Washington, Iron) primary debate was last night. District 7 (Salt Lake City, Park City) debate is tonight.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7mW (SGN)

and http://gousoe.uen.org/7np (SLT)

 

Federal appeals court rules that broadband is a utility, not a luxury. This ruling has an effect on ed tech.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7n5 (Ed Week)

and http://gousoe.uen.org/7n7 (WSJ)

and http://gousoe.uen.org/7n8 (NYT)

and http://gousoe.uen.org/7n9 (USAT)

or a copy of the ruling

http://gousoe.uen.org/7n6 (U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit)

 

 

 

 

 

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TODAY’S HEADLINES

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UTAH

 

After 3 years of SAGE tests, Utah lawmakers debate replacing or changing maligned exam Education » Early discussion considers how best to revise or replace state-run assessment for Utah’s schoolchildren.

 

State Revenue Picture Starting to Look Glum

 

Education Officials, Lawmakers Will Study Teacher Shortage

 

One answer to Utah’s teacher shortage — hire people who aren’t teachers

 

2 of 4 state school board candidates address forum

 

Tonight: Candidates for Utah school board debate to represent SLC, Park City

 

School board primary election guide

 

How a Utah county silenced Native American voters — and how Navajos are fighting back A series of lawsuits could help counteract decades of racist practices.

 

Clearfield High award-winning actor New York bound

 

18-year-old Utahn works for Microsoft, gave TED talk

 

Teen, police explorers train for active shooter scenarios

 

‘Girls Go Digital!’ seeks positive disruptions; partial fee waivers available for SUU camp

 

Blessed Sacrament receives state, national honors

 

Jim Markosian steps down as SJB principal

 

Jordan School District offering free summer meals

 

Ben Lomond High swimming pool to have grand opening, free community swim

 

Utah Valley Educator of the Week: Loralene Edvalson

 

Utah Valley Student of the Week: Addyson Clark

 

 


 

 

OPINION & COMMENTARY

 

Unlike Herbert, Johnson will defend Utah’s sovereignty

 

Four approaches to ESSA accountability

 

Education Needs CEO Activism

 

 


 

 

NATION

 

State Board rejects federal guidance on transgender students Leader of advocacy group says “vast majority” of Kansas schools not in compliance

 

Alexander To Tennessee School Board Members: “New Education Law Puts Tennessee Back In Charge Of Its Classrooms”

 

Appeals Court Upholds FCC Net Neutrality, Says Broadband Is a Utility

 

Nashville schools to sue state for education funding

 

NC educators marching 23 miles to ask Gov. McCrory to do more for students Event organized by group that backs Roy Cooper for governor

 

Elementary school teachers struggle with Common Core math standards Here’s how some education programs are trying to help

 

Education Department Releases Guidance on Gender Equity in Career and Technical Education

 

Many Colleges Don’t Put Testing Requirements to the Test

 

Political critics of Obama target new school meal rules

 

During a school year of terrorist attacks, Muslim students report bullying

 

Garland Speaks at School Where He Tutors Kids

 

Walton Foundation Hires New Director to Start This Fall

 

Office Depot to hire 8,000 workers for back-to-school season

 

 

 

 

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UTAH NEWS

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After 3 years of SAGE tests, Utah lawmakers debate replacing or changing maligned exam Education » Early discussion considers how best to revise or replace state-run assessment for Utah’s schoolchildren.

 

State lawmakers and education leaders took early steps Tuesday to rework Utah’s SAGE test, the 6 1/2 hour year-end exam that has been the measuring stick for assessing students and their teachers for three years.

Moving high-schoolers to the ACT or SAT is one idea the committee is considering. But any shift will not be easy, said Rich Nye, associate state superintendent.

“We just now have teachers getting their heads wrapped around it,” Nye told members of the Interim Education Committee at Salt Lake Community College’s satellite campus in the capital city.

Still, changes are needed, noted Committee Chairman Rep. Brad Last, a Hurricane Republican. The system has a public-relations problem in addition to practical flaws, he said.

Though the test was created at the State Office of Education, critics have lambasted it as a federal mandate. The U.S. Department of Education requires annual testing in most grades, but did not design the Utah exam.

“It was created by Utah teachers,” Last said. “But many outside of this room do not understand that.”

A new Salt Lake Tribune poll of likely Utah voters found that 46 percent of respondents said schools should stop using SAGE.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7mD (SLT)

 

http://gousoe.uen.org/7mE (DN)

 


 

 

State Revenue Picture Starting to Look Glum

 

Ouch!

New state revenue projections for the current fiscal year, which ends June 30, show income could be as much as $100 million short — in the red.

Or, the tax collections could see a surplus of $85 million, a group of executive branch and legislative branch economists told legislative leaders Tuesday afternoon.

Of course, lawmakers hope for the later.

But they may be wise to plan for the former, with the most likely averaging projection being around $15 million below estimates made during the 2016 Legislature.

Those are the ranges of the General Fund and the Education Fund – fueled by the state sales tax and personal and corporate income taxes.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7mB (UP)

 

A copy of the projections

http://gousoe.uen.org/7mC (Utah Legislature)

 


 

 

Education Officials, Lawmakers Will Study Teacher Shortage

 

Utah education officials will convene this summer to take a deeper look at why the state is having trouble recruiting and keeping teachers in the classroom.

Utah’s teacher shortage is not new. In fact, today’s retention rates are comparable to the years prior to the economic recession. Education officials say historically, it’s easier to find and keep teachers in a struggling economy. But right now, Utah is shedding teachers at a faster rate than the rest of the nation.  So what’s happening? Everyone has an explanation, including Rich Nye, interim deputy superintendent for the Utah State Board of Education. He says the rate of retirement is exasperating the shortage.

“Our student enrollment continues to increase by about 110,000 a year, which would also create more demand for teachers,” Nye says.

Other culprits?

“Money is one of them,” says Republican Representative Brad Last. “The teaching environment is one of them. Class size for example may be one of them.”

http://gousoe.uen.org/7mN (KUER)

 


 

 

One answer to Utah’s teacher shortage — hire people who aren’t teachers

 

As Utah lawmakers are asking for research into why 2 in 5 public-school teachers leave the profession within five years, the state school board is trying to put people — not necessarily teachers — at the front of classrooms as soon as possible.

The board passed a new policy Friday that allows schools to hire individuals without teaching licenses or experience. Applicants must have a bachelor’s degree in any field, pass an ethics exam, prove they are proficient in subject areas by taking a test and pass a background check.

After being hired, they’d be mentored and supervised by a “master teacher” at the school for three years.

State Rep. Carol Spackman Moss, D-Salt Lake City, said the relaxed requirements are a shortsighted fix to a larger problem. Teachers, she said, need expertise in managing classrooms and breaking subjects into manageable chunks.

“It’s a science and an art,” Spackman Moss said. The speedier route, she maintains, is “not the answer.”

But some board members said the adjustment is necessary.

The new policy has entered its public-comment phase. Barring a request for a hearing, it goes into effect Aug. 7.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7mG (SLT)

 

http://gousoe.uen.org/7ne (Ed Week)

 


 

 

2 of 4 state school board candidates address forum

 

  1. GEORGE – Two of four candidates for the state school board spoke at a Dixie Republican Forum Tuesday while a third candidate’s wife represented her husband at the event which was held at the Washington County Commission Chambers.

Four candidates are running for District 15, which comprises much of Washington and Iron counties. Michelle Boulter, Neil Walter, Wesley Christiansen and Scott Smith are running for the office; Smith declined to participate in the forum and Neil Walter had other commitments so Michelle Walter spoke for him.

The non-partisan District 15 candidates who will be on the June 28th primary ballot. The top two finishers in the primary will move on to the November election.

Christiansen, Boulter and Walter all spoke against federal overreach and the strings that come with accepting federal money for education. They also agreed that the Common Core curriculum should be abandoned.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7mW (SGN)

 


 

 

Tonight: Candidates for Utah school board debate to represent SLC, Park City

 

Seven candidates vying to represent Salt Lake City and Park City on the Utah Board of Education are scheduled to debate Wednesday evening.

The debate will begin at 6:30 p.m. at the Salt Lake Arts Academy. It is hosted by the Utah Association of Public Charter Schools, the Sutherland Institute, the Hinckley Institute of Politics and KSL.

Incumbent Leslie Castle is seeking a third term in the board’s District 7 seat, which includes Salt Lake City east of Redwood Road and the northwest portion of Wasatch County.

Castle is running against six challengers: geologist Frank Strickland; businessman and former teacher Dan Tippets; lobbyist Shelly Teuscher; high school teacher Frank Langheinrich; elementary school teacher Laurie Williams; and attorney Carol Barlow-Lear, who previously worked for the Utah State Office of Education.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7np (SLT)

 


 

 

School board primary election guide

 

Park City School Board primary election voter guide.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7nf (PR)

 


 

 

How a Utah county silenced Native American voters — and how Navajos are fighting back A series of lawsuits could help counteract decades of racist practices.

 

To understand why Wilfred Jones wanted an ambulance, you have to understand where he lives. San Juan County, in southeastern Utah, is nearly as big as New Jersey but is home to fewer than 15,000 people. The lower third is part of the Navajo Nation and is almost entirely Ute and Navajo. The upper two-thirds are white and predominantly Mormon.

Jones, a 61-year-old grandfather with jet-black hair and a diamond stud in each ear, lives in the lower third, five miles south of the blink-and-you-miss-it town of Montezuma Creek. It’s rough, rocky country, where bullet holes riddle the road signs and lonely pumpjacks ply oil from the earth. The nearest services are in Blanding, some 40 miles north.

Sixteen years ago, when Jones joined the board of the Utah Navajo Health System, he realized his neighbors were dying because the closest ambulances — the county’s, in Blanding, and the tribe’s, in Kayenta, Arizona — were an hour away “on a good day.” So Jones asked the county commission if one of San Juan’s ambulances could be housed in a garage in Montezuma Creek. From there, it would take half the time to rush an elder suffering a heart attack to medical care.

But the county wasn’t interested. Over the next decade, Jones says, he and other health advocates repeatedly tried to get the commission to improve ambulance service on the reservation. But while the sole Navajo commissioner was supportive, the two white commissioners were usually not. (Former Navajo Commissioner Mark Maryboy and others corroborate Jones’ account, though no official votes appear in county records.)

Eventually, Jones gave up: The Utah Navajo Health System trained its own EMS volunteers, built a garage and bought ambulances with tribal and federal funds. It stung, but wasn’t surprising. Though Native Americans on the reservation don’t pay property taxes, they indirectly contribute millions of dollars in oil revenue and federal funds to the county each year, which is supposed to be returned in services like education and health care. But many Navajo requests — from building schools to implementing bicultural education to improving roads — have been denied by Anglo residents, who have always held a majority in elected offices despite comprising less than half of the county’s population.

Now, Native Americans could gain control of county government for the first time. Earlier this year, U.S. District Court Judge Robert J. Shelby ruled that San Juan County violated both the 1965 Voting Rights Act and the U.S. Constitution by relying on race to draw the boundaries of its voting districts. By engaging in “racial gerrymandering,” San Juan County systematically diluted the strength of the Native vote, keeping Natives out of power and skewing the makeup of the county commission and the school board. The system, perpetuated for decades, “offends basic democratic principles,” Shelby wrote.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7nn (High Country News)

 


 

Clearfield High award-winning actor New York bound

 

CLEARFIELD — Angel Martinez wasn’t sure what to expect when he started his senior year at Clearfield High School last fall. Martinez had just moved to Utah from Colorado and knew he wanted to be a part of the high school musical program but didn’t know how he would fit in.

Well, as it turns out, he fit in just fine. Better than fine.

After success in a supporting role in “Aida” at the first of the year, Martinez landed the lead as Gomez Addams in the school’s production of the “The Addams Family” in November. He so impressed the Utah High School Musical Theatre Awards committee that he was nominated for both best supporting actor and best actor for his two roles.

The senior had the chance to reprise both roles on stage in May at the Utah High School Musical Theatre Awards in Ogden and won the honors for best actor. So later this month, Martinez will travel to New York City to represent Utah at the National High School Musical Theatre Awards.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7mS (OSE)

 


 

 

18-year-old Utahn works for Microsoft, gave TED talk

 

SALT LAKE CITY — Graduating from high school can be a daunting and confusing time of life, but a freshly graduated Utah teen has already taken the world by storm and is building quite the impressive resume.

It isn’t peculiar that 18-year-old Valeria Rodriguez recently graduated from Hillcrest High School or that she’s headed to Westminster College in the fall, but it is unusual that she works for Microsoft.

Rodriguez has been working since she was a 13-year-old babysitter, but her jobs have since escalated greatly. She said when she was 14, she got nominated to become a People to People Student Ambassador and studied at Johns Hopkins University for a few weeks in the summer. To pay for that experience, she got a job as a sweeper at a middle school.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7no (KSL)

 


 

 

Teen, police explorers train for active shooter scenarios

 

At a public school building in Sandy, teenagers who are interested in some day becoming police officers, have been involved in a week-long academy that involves training for active shooter or mass shooting scenarios.

The prepare for situations like the one that happened over the weekend in Orlando, Florida where 49 people were shot dead at a night club.

The police explorers involved in the academy are 14 to 21 years old.

Salt Lake Police Chief Mike Brown said if young people are truly interested in becoming police officers, then they need to prepare for the realities of the job – including the possibility of responding to a mass shooting.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7mY (KUTV)

 


 

 

‘Girls Go Digital!’ seeks positive disruptions; partial fee waivers available for SUU camp

 

CEDAR CITY — When it comes to science, technology, engineering and math — or STEM — classes, Rachel Ramsey wants to flip instruction on its head, especially when it comes to girls. Ramsey is the founder of “Girls Go Digital!” a four-day camp providing opportunities for girls ages 8-18 to learn more about computers, programming, technology and design.

Girls Go Digital! just wrapped up its camp last week at Dixie State University. The next camp will be at Southern Utah University from June 20-23, and Ramsey said there are still openings, including slots that come with partial fee waivers.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7mX (SGN)

 


 

 

Blessed Sacrament receives state, national honors

 

SANDY — Blessed Sacrament School has been recognized as a Platinum Level “Green School” by the Utah Society for Environmental Education (USEE).

The Utah Green Schools initiative recognizes sustainable practices demonstrated by schools through curriculum and facility management http://gousoe.uen.org/7nl (IC)

 


 

 

Jim Markosian steps down as SJB principal

 

DRAPER — After 36 years as a teacher and administrator, Saint John the Baptist Middle School Principal Jim Markosian is leaving education, but not the campus – he will remain as facilities manager at the Skaggs Catholic Center.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7nm (IC)

 


 

 

Jordan School District offering free summer meals

 

WEST JORDAN — The Jordan School District is providing children with free breakfast and lunch at five elementary schools during the summer.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7mR (DN)

 


 

 

Ben Lomond High swimming pool to have grand opening, free community swim

 

OGDEN — With the arrival of summer and the finishing touches in place, Ogden School District is opening a newly renovated swimming pool for a free community swim.

A grand opening for Ben Lomond High School’s swimming pool will take place at 12:30 p.m. Saturday, June 18, followed by free open swimming from 1-4 p.m., according to a statement from the school district.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7mT (OSE)

 


 

 

Utah Valley Educator of the Week: Loralene Edvalson

 

Loralene Edvalson, a severe special education teacher for kindergarten through third grade at Barnett Elementary in Payson, was chosen as the Daily Herald’s Utah Valley Educator of the Week.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7mU (PDH)

 


 

 

Utah Valley Student of the Week: Addyson Clark

 

Addyson Clark, a sixth-grader at Brockbank Elementary in Spanish Fork, was chosen as the Daily Herald’s Utah Valley Student of the Week. Addyson lives in Spanish Fork and is going to junior high in the fall.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7mV (PDH)

 

 

 

 

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OPINION & COMMENTARY

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Unlike Herbert, Johnson will defend Utah’s sovereignty Salt Lake Tribune op-ed by Rep. Ken Ivory

 

As a parent, what wouldn’t you give for a personal instruction manual for your children? Parenting is a special responsibility that requires love, a clear understanding of appropriate boundaries, and a dedication to discipline … especially when it’s hard. When parents shrink from this important responsibility in order to be liked, everyone suffers.

States are literally the parents of the national government, not the other way around. “All of us need to be reminded,” President Reagan famously said, “that the federal government did not create the states; the states created the federal government.”

For seven years now, Gov. Gary Herbert has, at best, stood idly by as federal control over our state metastasizes. For example, Gov. Herbert has:

  • embraced the national Common Core and SAGE testing, undermining local control over the education of our children; http://gousoe.uen.org/7mF

 


 

 

Four approaches to ESSA accountability

Fordham Institute commentary by Institute President Michael J. Petrilli and Editorial Director Brandon Wright

 

Though it sometimes appears that Education Secretary John King didn’t get the memo, the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) represents a significant devolution of authority from the federal government to the states. This is a praiseworthy development that, in our view, better fits America’s constitutional principles of federalism and opens up many areas of education policy for innovation and improvement.

That devolution includes the heart of ESSA: school-level accountability. States now enjoy a freer hand to decide how they want to rate (or “grade”) their schools and determine which are worthy of either praise or aggressive intervention. The new law doesn’t give states carte blanche; they can’t move away from student achievement as a major indicator of quality, for example. But they certainly have more leeway than under No Child Left Behind.

So what forms might—and should—this take? How might states approach the particular challenge of redesigning their accountability systems? The contestants in our “accountability design competition” in February surfaced ideas aplenty and made many promising suggestions. With a few months of reflection on them, we see that there are competing camps or worldviews when it comes to ESSA accountability (much as there are regarding school choice). We see four such factions forming. Let’s identify them by their slogans:

  1. Every School is A-OK!
  2. Attack the Algorithms
  3. Living in the Scholars’ Paradise
  4. NCLB Was Extended, Not Ended

Let’s take a look.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7mJ

 


 

 

Education Needs CEO Activism

FoxBusiness commentary by Scott Laband , president of Colorado Succeeds

 

Remember when political and social activists targeted CEOs and their companies for various alleged sins? Nowadays, it’s big business and big-name executives carrying the protest signs.

Top corporate executives, such as Apple’s (AAPL) Tim Cook, PayPal’s (PYPL) Dan Schulman and Salesforce’s Marc Benioff, among others, have admonished politicians, and, in some cases, threatened economic reprisals against several Southern and Midwest states because of legislative action on hot-button social issues.

CEOs are using their wealth as well as the bully pulpit, too. For instance, not long ago, Facebook (FB)Chief Executive Mark Zuckerberg donated $100 million to Newark, N.J., school system; EBay (EBAY) founder Pierre Omidyar has used his wealth to back public interest journalism; and PayPal co-creator Peter Thiel, in the recent Gawker case, has spent some of his billions, controversially, to fight salaciousness-seeking journalists who invade the privacy of public figures.

Regardless of what you think of these issues, it shouldn’t surprise us that a CEO’s voice can lead to major changes in a state or nationally. CEOs have the ability to direct conversation and wield significant influence. At their best, they are leaders who think strategically, can persuade through direct discussion, networking, and exert political influence.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7nd

 

 

 

 

 

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NATIONAL NEWS

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State Board rejects federal guidance on transgender students Leader of advocacy group says “vast majority” of Kansas schools not in compliance Topeka (KS) Capital-Journal

 

The Kansas State Board of Education unanimously rejected federal guidance on the rights of transgender students Tuesday afternoon in a motion asserting that Kansas schools already handle the matter effectively. The head of an anti-discrimination advocacy group called that “unfortunately not true.”

Jim McNiece, the state board’s chairman and author of the motion, said his intention wasn’t to spurn the needs of transgender students but rather to oppose regulations that fetter schools on a matter that requires flexibility.

“I’m confident that Kansas schools are meeting the safety needs, first of all, of the students,” he said. “And anytime the parents, the student and the school are working together, you’ve got a perfect solution. We didn’t need the government coming in here and telling us, ‘You have to do this and you have to do that.’ ”

McNiece, a Wichita Republican, said other states may not be handling the needs of transgender students properly and may need federal guidance, but Kansas doesn’t.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7mH

 

http://gousoe.uen.org/7mP (WaPo)

 

http://gousoe.uen.org/7n3 (AP)

 


 

 

Alexander To Tennessee School Board Members: “New Education Law Puts Tennessee Back In Charge Of Its Classrooms”

Chattanoogan

 

Lamar Alexander on Tuesday welcomed members of the Tennessee School Boards Association to his Washington office. He told the members, “Tennessee public school classrooms are back in the hands of Tennesseans thanks to the new education law that repeals the federal Common Core mandate, reverses the trend toward a national school board and restores local control of public schools.”

“We have reversed the trend toward a national school board and are moving decisions out of Washington into the hands of classrooms, teachers and parents,” said Senator Alexander. “I’d recommend that you form a coalition in Tennessee of teachers, principals, parents, superintendents, legislators, along with Governor Haslam and Education Commissioner Candace McQueen, and work together to write a new state education plan, which is necessary to receive federal dollars for your schools. The national coalition that worked to pass the law, is now working to see that it is implemented it as Congress wrote it—a state coalition is just as important.”

Senator Alexander, who chairs the Senate education committee talked with the school board members about the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA), which was passed by the House 359-64, passed by the Senate 85-12, and signed by the president in December. In addition to ending the National School Board run out of Washington, D.C., the new law ended the federal Common Core mandate, “Mother May I?” conditional waivers, the highly qualified teacher definition and requirements, teacher evaluation mandates, federal school turnaround models, federal test-based accountability and adequate yearly progress.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7mO

 


 

 

Appeals Court Upholds FCC Net Neutrality, Says Broadband Is a Utility Education Week

 

The Federal Communication Commission’s groundbreaking net neutrality rules issued last year—which are meant to prevent internet service providers from assigning content to fast and slow lanes—have survived a challenge in federal court.

In a 2-1 ruling announced Tuesday, a United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit panel upheld the FCC’s decision to treat broadband internet as a utility, thereby opening the service to heavier regulation.

Telecommunications companies like Verizon and Comcast had argued that the provision of broadband is an information service, and that the agency’s regulations are unduly burdensome and raise Constitutional questions.

The industry had also voiced concerns that the ruling could stunt investment in broadband internet infrastructure and drive up costs for all consumers.

Big content providers like Netflix, by contrast, are celebrating the ruling. They had voiced concerns that without net neutrality rules, internet providers could charge unfairly high fees for the transmission of data heavy content, or theoretically, throttle access to websites at will.

FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler, who helped craft the regulations, said in a statement that the victory “ensures the internet remains a platform for unparalleled innovation, free expression and economic growth.”

Some ed-tech industry experts had previously worried that educational content might become financially outgunned by more mainstream digital entertainment.

Without federal protections, a number of ed-tech advocates worried that schools would see slower delivery of their online content, unless the vendors attempting to serve them could pay for “fast-lane” services.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7n5

 

http://gousoe.uen.org/7n7 (WSJ)

 

http://gousoe.uen.org/7n8 (NYT)

 

http://gousoe.uen.org/7n9 (USAT)

 

A copy of the ruling

http://gousoe.uen.org/7n6 (U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit)

 


 

 

Nashville schools to sue state for education funding

(Nashville) Tennessean

 

The Metro Nashville Public Schools board voted Tuesday evening to sue the state for a greater share of education funding, saying Tennessee is not providing enough money to help teach English to children for whom it is a second language.

The board approved the lawsuit, with six members in favor and two — Elissa Kim and Mary Pierce — abstaining. Board member Jo Ann Brannon was unable to attend the meeting.

The subject of suing the state for education funds has been a topic for the past year, and the issue came to a head after Metro Law Director Jon Cooper sent a letter June 1 asking the state why Nashville received less money for its English language learners, or ELL, this year.

In a June 3 response, Maryanne Durski, the Tennessee Department of Education’s local finance office director, notified Cooper that the funding allocation through the fiscal year general appropriations act provided adequate funds.

Board Vice Chairwoman Anna Shepherd said the letter was the last straw for her.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7mI

 


 

 

NC educators marching 23 miles to ask Gov. McCrory to do more for students Event organized by group that backs Roy Cooper for governor Raleigh (NC) News& Observer

 

RALEIGH — A teachers’ group that is backing state Attorney General Roy Cooper’s campaign to become governor launched a 23-mile overnight march on Tuesday to demand that Gov. Pat McCrory do more to support North Carolina students.

More than 50 educators, parents, students and community leaders started walking Tuesday afternoon from Neal Middle School in Durham and Wakefield High School in Raleigh. After an overnight stop, the #StudentsDeserveMore marchers will link up in downtown Raleigh on Wednesday afternoon and try to meet with McCrory.

The walk is co-sponsored by Organize 2020, a caucus within the North Carolina Association of Educators, which has endorsed Cooper, a Democrat, for governor.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7mM

 


 

 

Elementary school teachers struggle with Common Core math standards Here’s how some education programs are trying to help Hechinger Report

 

Cookies and math tend to go together in an elementary school classroom. And not always as reward for a correct answer. Teachers use them as conceptual props to explain an operation like division. It works intuitively enough with whole numbers. If you have 12 cookies and four friends, how can you give an equal number of cookies to each friend?

The trouble with this standby analogy comes when you divide by a fraction. You can have the same 12 cookies, but if you divide by ¼, the old approach won’t work. We don’t have friends who come in quarters.

“You have to think that you’re not dividing up the cookies, you are seeing how many times ¼ can fit into 12,” explained Juli Dixon, professor of mathematics education at the University of Central Florida and author of several books on teaching math. “It’s a change in thinking. We used to teach procedural math, but now students have to understand the ‘why’ as much as the ‘how’.”

Depth of understanding was hailed by its architects as a cornerstone of the Common Core, a set of educational guidelines for what students need to know in each grade in English and math that have been adopted in 43 states and the District of Columbia. The problem is that most elementary school teachers did not learn math that way, and many now struggle to teach to the new standards.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7nb

 


 

 

Education Department Releases Guidance on Gender Equity in Career and Technical Education U.S. Department of Education

 

As part of the Administration’s United State of Women Summit, the U.S. Department of Education’s Office for Civil Rights (OCR) and Office of Adult, Career, and Technical Education released a Dear Colleague Letter today to make clear that all students, regardless of their sex, must have equal access to the full range of career and technical (CTE) programs offered.

“As the father of two daughters, I want my girls – and all young women in this country – to have access to the careers of their dreams, no matter the path,” said U.S. Secretary of Education John B. King Jr. “Career and technical education is not just about preparing some students for successful lives and careers, it’s about giving all students the tools to succeed.”

Ensuring that all students have access to high-quality secondary and postsecondary CTE programs is central to achieving equity required in law. The Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Act requires states to meet negotiated targets for participation and completion rates of males and females in programs that are nontraditional for their sex. Despite efforts to increase enrollment of male and female students in fields that are non-traditional for their sex, disparities persist in certain fields.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7mZ

 

A copy of the letter

http://gousoe.uen.org/7n0 (ED)

 


 

 

Many Colleges Don’t Put Testing Requirements to the Test Chronicle of Higher Education

 

Any student who sweats through the ACT or SAT has reason to ask why such examinations are even necessary. Some colleges, it seems, can offer a more convincing explanation than others.

Although most four-year institutions require standardized tests, only half (51 percent) measure how well test scores predict student success on their own campuses. Of those, 59 percent do so annually.

Those findings come from a new report by the National Association for College Admission Counseling, which surveyed more than 400 colleges to learn more about how its members use entrance exams — and evaluate their usefulness.

The report describes the prevalence of predictive validity studies, which gauge the correlation between admission criteria and specific outcomes, such as first-year grade-point averages. In short, the studies help colleges understand the extent to which their selection tools — grades and test scores — help forecast future performance.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7mK

 

http://gousoe.uen.org/7na (Ed Week)

 

A copy of the report

http://gousoe.uen.org/7mL (NACAC)

 


 

 

Political critics of Obama target new school meal rules (El Dorado Hills, CA) Cabinet Report

 

District of Columbia — Plans to more aggressively sanction states for errors and omissions in following federal school meal program requirements are getting stiff pushback from parents, elected officials, community groups and critics of the Obama administration.

The proposed fines are part of an update of the regulations governing an array of programs that help provide safety-net food services to low-income students.

Although federal officials have said their intent is to tighten the oversight of schools and districts where accounting and claiming errors cost taxpayers close to $3 billion annually, the proposed rules appear to have become fodder for political dissent in an election year charged with polarized viewpoints.

“Please stay out of our schools,” said Judy McDowel, whose public comment submitted online is among the more than 5,000 received on the plan since it was proposed in March.

Like many, McDowel—who did not disclose her state of residence or her professional status—didn’t comment directly on the new regulations, but rather the notion that the USDA could exert authority over schools to begin with.

“They (schools) should be run locally,” she wrote. “The federal government has no business doing ANYTHING with them.”

http://gousoe.uen.org/7nc

 


 

 

During a school year of terrorist attacks, Muslim students report bullying Washington Post

 

As her high school debate competition ended, Hannah Shraim extended a hand to her opponents.

Then she waited.

“They were avoiding my hand at all costs,” said Shraim, a Muslim student from suburban Maryland who has worn a hijab since she was 15, describing her first brush with discrimination at school. “I could tell it was my religious orientation because they were very kind to my partner and they shook her hand.”

That moment of apparent rejection for the recent Northwest High School graduate is not unlike what many Maryland Muslim students reported in surveys this school year in the aftermath of terrorist attacks in Paris and San Bernardino, Calif., and at a time when a U.S. presidential candidate has proposed banning Muslims from entering the country.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7mQ

 


 

 

Garland Speaks at School Where He Tutors Kids Associated Press

 

WASHINGTON — Supreme Court nominee Merrick Garland hasn’t made much progress winning over Senate Republicans, but he found a more receptive audience Wednesday in a room full of graduating fifth graders.

Garland delivered brief commencement remarks for a Washington elementary school where he has tutored students for the last 18 years.

He urged the children from J.O. Wilson Elementary School to “go ahead and dream, but also work to make those dreams come true.”

http://gousoe.uen.org/7n4

 


 

 

Walton Foundation Hires New Director to Start This Fall Associated Press

 

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. — The Walton Family Foundation has hired a new executive director to lead the philanthropic organization starting this fall.

The foundation created by Wal-Mart’s founders announced Wednesday that it hired Kyle Peterson, a managing partner and board member of the nonprofit consulting firm FSG based in Boston.

Peterson has worked with FSG since 2002 on education, health, economic development and environmental projects.

Peterson will be the third executive director in the foundation’s history, replacing Buddy Philpot, who announced last year he will move to Walton Enterprises. The foundation funds grants to programs for K-12 education, environmental causes and improving the quality of life for the Northwest and Delta regions of Arkansas.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7n2

 


 

 

Office Depot to hire 8,000 workers for back-to-school season Reuters

 

Office Depot Inc, whose merger with larger rival Staples Inc was scrapped due to antitrust concerns, said it planned to hire 8,000 temporary and full-time workers during the busy back-to-school season.

Office Depot said temporary staffing will rise by a third as it prepares for the increased customer traffic from July through September.

Some of the new hires will help fulfill the “buy online, pick up in store” service that the company offers, Lynn Gross, Office Depot’s vice president of human resources for retail, told Reuters.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7n1

 

 

 

————————————————————

CALENDAR

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USOE Calendar

http://www.schools.utah.gov/main/CALENDAR.aspx

 

 

UEN News

http://www.uen.org

 

 

June 15:

Education Interim Committee meeting

1:15 p.m., 30 House Building

http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2016&com=INTEDU

 

 

July 12:

Executive Appropriations Committee meeting

2 p.m., 445 State Capitol

http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?Year=2016&Com=APPEXE

 

 

July 14:

Utah State Charter School Board meeting

250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://go.uen.org/62M

 

 

August 11:

Utah State Board of Education study session, USDB and committee meetings

250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspx

 

 

August 12:

Utah State Board of Education meeting

250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspx

 

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