Education News Roundup: July 12, 2016

 

Farm to School Program/ Education News Roundup

Farm to School Program/ Education News Roundup

Education News Roundup

Today’s Top Picks:

 

School Children’s Trust Director Tim Donaldson discusses trust management.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7wp (CVD)

 

” As (State Superintendent Sydnee) Dickson takes the reins, we are confident in her ability to render a sober assessment of the state of our schools and to chart a course, in collaborative fashion, for the future.” — Deseret News editorial

http://gousoe.uen.org/7w3 (DN)

 

GOP platform writers in Cleveland give thumbs down to federal transgender guidance in schools, but thumbs up on use of the Bible as literature in school.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7w1 (Dallas Morning News)

 

One idea on reducing cheating on tests: Block all social media in the country during national exams.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7wf (AP)

 

 

 

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TODAY’S HEADLINES

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UTAH

 

Safeguarding state lands to benefit schools

 

Rock Canyon Elementary School demolished

 

USDA lauds Jordan District’s Farm to School program

 

Kids eat free at ‘Farm to Summer’ meals event at Liberty Park

 

Census: Utah is young, growing more diverse

 

United Way of S.L. invites volunteers to ‘Stuff the Bus’

 

2 Free Educational Programs Offered to Utah Students

 


 

 

OPINION & COMMENTARY

 

Hopeful expectations for Utah’s new superintendent of public instruction

 

Salt Lake City School District dumps diversity goof in new superintendent’s lap

 

Is School Reform Really Driving Teachers Out of the Profession?

 

When it comes to wiping out the achievement gap for Hispanic students, rigor is only part of the battle ACT’s director for equity in education discusses ways to make more resources available for Spanish-speaking families

 

The Politics of the Common Core Assessments Why states are quitting the PARCC and Smarter Balanced testing consortia

 

Why Does America Invest So Little in Its Children?

How the U.S. became one of the worst countries in the developed world for kids under 5

 

America’s Children in Brief: Key National Indicators of Well-being, 2016

 

STEM + Families

Increasing Students’ Access to Opportunities in STEM by Effectively Engaging Families

 


 

 

NATION

 

GOP approves pro-Bible, anti-transgender stances in party platform

 

Illinois ends much-debated PARCC test for high school students

 

Christie school aid plan ‘the antithesis of fairness,’ group says

 

The people taking care of American children live in poverty

 

New VT law to fund public preschool a first

 

K12 Reaches Settlement With Calif. AG, but Acrimony Remains

 

Beyond Integration: How Teachers Can Encourage Cross-Racial Friendships

 

Malala Yousafzai’s 19th Birthday Is for #YesAllGirls, Access to Education

 

Sex education in schools ‘unfit’ for smartphone generation, survey finds Half of 914 people aged 16-24 surveyed by Terrence Higgins Trust rated sex education they received as poor or terrible

 

Ethiopia Blocks Social Media During National School Exam

 

 

 

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UTAH NEWS

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Safeguarding state lands to benefit schools

 

How to safeguard state lands for the benefit of education is a big topic at the Western States Land Commissioner Conference being held in Sandpoint, Idaho this week. On KVNU’s For the People program on Monday the director of the School and Institutional Trust Lands Administration for the Utah Board of Education was our guest.

Tim Donaldson says the idea goes back to Thomas Jefferson in that a self-governing republic needed an informed, educated citizenry and land was needed to fund schools.

Donaldson explained, “By the time Utah entered the nation, we got four sections per township, or about 11 percent of land in the state to support schools. Sadly, it’s kind of been a promise unfulfilled throughout history because of just mismanagement, corruption, just a lack of good trust management from state governments.”

http://gousoe.uen.org/7wp (CVD)

 


 

 

Rock Canyon Elementary School demolished

 

The old Rock Canyon Elementary School was reduced to rubble Monday morning.

On July 6, demolition began on the old Sunset View Elementary School building, and the old Rock Canyon Elementary School followed on Monday. Rock Canyon was built in 1964 and Sunset View in 1958.

Exterior work and asphalt is complete at the two new Sunset View and Rock Canyon elementary schools, and landscaping has begun. The insides of both schools have been tiled and carpeted.

The new schools are scheduled to open this fall.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7wd (PDH)

 


 

 

USDA lauds Jordan District’s Farm to School program

 

WEST JORDAN — The U.S. Department of Agriculture has awarded the Jordan School District’s Farm to School program, which has been bringing locally grown produce to school cafeterias for the past seven years, with its One in a Melon award.

The USDA says when a school district adds fresh off-the-farm produce to cafeteria menus, children love it. And when students try new, fresh food there tends to be less waste and higher school breakfast and lunch participation rates.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7wb (DN)

 


 

 

Kids eat free at ‘Farm to Summer’ meals event at Liberty Park

 

Children 18 and under can get a free lunch during the “Farm to Summer” event, designed to raise awareness about the state’s Summer Meals Program.

Kids can enjoy a petting zoo, learn about embryology, see honey bees and learn more about where their food comes from. Parents can get information about the state-wide program that provides food to children in low-income situations when school is not in session.

Future Farmers of America will help with the event, sponsored by The Dairy Council of Utah/Nevada, The Utah State Office of Education and Utahns Against Hunger.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7wv (SLT)

 


 

 

Census: Utah is young, growing more diverse

 

SALT LAKE CITY — Census data shows Utah’s population is young and growing more diverse.

The new U.S. Census data puts the state’s median age under 31 years old, about seven years younger than the rest of the country.

Perlich said schools could be getting some relief come fall in accommodating growing class sizes. She said the state known for large families has seen a decrease in births since 2008.

“We should be able to get a kind of a breather there,’” Perlich said. “Exactly what those numbers will be depends upon the migration patterns because we’ve got better employment growth here than a lot of other places.”

http://gousoe.uen.org/7wt (DCC)

 


 

 

United Way of S.L. invites volunteers to ‘Stuff the Bus’

 

SALT LAKE CITY — United Way of Salt Lake is encouraging the members of the community to “Stuff the Bus” by hosting school supply drives and volunteering to stuff backpacks that will help 11,000 children get the tools they need for the upcoming school year.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7wc (DN)

 


 

 

2 Free Educational Programs Offered to Utah Students

 

Ashley and Kristen, from the Loveland Living Planet Aquarium, shared with us two exciting outreach programs the aquarium offers. These are programs that travel to local schools and correlate with the Utah State Core Curriculum by grade level.

They are currently offering their Rainforest Van Program FREE to 2nd grade public/charter Utah students and their Utah Waters Van Programs FREE to 4th grade public/charter Utah students.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7wr (KTVX)

 

 

 

 

 

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OPINION & COMMENTARY

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Hopeful expectations for Utah’s new superintendent of public instruction Deseret News editorial

 

The new leader of Utah’s education system, the fourth person to hold that job in as many years, comes to office at a tumultuous time when the challenges facing public schools are as pressing as any in recent history. Sydnee Dickson, appointed last month as superintendent of public instruction, has vast experience as both an educator and an administrator and is no doubt well grounded in the challenges facing teachers in the classroom and policymakers in the boardroom. On each level, the tasks before her are formidable.

The state is on the verge of a crisis in maintaining sufficient ranks of qualified teachers. We are also immersed in cantankerous debate over the development and use of core curriculum, and we are far from united on how best to measure classroom success through standardized testing. Her resume suggests Dickson will be adept at seeing policy through the lens of someone who has worked in the trenches. She promises to make frequent contact with teachers and students, explaining to the Deseret News, “It’s really important to keep those fresh voices in my ear and see their faces. By doing that, when you engage in policy, it becomes real.”

http://gousoe.uen.org/7w3

 


 

 

Salt Lake City School District dumps diversity goof in new superintendent’s lap Salt Lake Tribune editorial

 

Lexi Cunningham took over last week as the new superintendent of the Salt Lake City School District. But, instead of a nice floral arrangement or a fruit basket, what was waiting for her on her desk was a big, embarrassing — and totally avoidable — mess.

The week before — while nobody, including members of the school board, was looking — outgoing Superintendent McKell Withers rearranged his administrative box chart in such a way that the district official in charge of equity and diversity was kicked down a rung in official stature. The occupant of that post, rather than reporting directly to the superintendent, now resides one bureaucratic layer below, under a member of the superintendent’s cabinet.

The change may well prove, over time, to be a distinction without a difference. There is no immediate evidence that matters involving the district’s respect for the wide diversity of its student body has or will decline, that any student or student’s family will ever notice any change.

But the appearance of such things matters, and it matters a lot.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7w2

 


 

 

Is School Reform Really Driving Teachers Out of the Profession?

Education Week commentary by Douglas Harris, director of the Education Research Alliance for New Orleans and a Professor of Economics and the University Endowed Chair in Public Education at Tulane University

 

The idea that school reform, especially test-based accountability is driving teachers out of the profession has been widely reported in the media, especially in a recent NPR article. This assertion, unfortunately, relies mostly on anecdotes. When we actually look at the data, there is evidence of problems in the teacher pipeline to be sure, but not an overall teacher shortage. In New Orleans and other reform-driven cities, the answers (and even the questions) are a bit different.

The possibility of a teacher shortage is a recurring part of the debate about U.S. education. For many decades, the focus has been on what seemed like high teacher turnover. Ten years ago, I worked on a study to test this and found that teachers left the profession at about the same rate as similar professions like social workers and nurses, and teachers actually had lower turnover rates than the average college graduate. That is, it appears that turnover is high among new teachers mainly because they are young and young workers do not yet know what they want to do with their lives. This is just how the labor market works.

Given the massive changes in state and federal policy starting with No Child Left Behind, it seemed plausible that reform had created a new turnover/shortage problem. Teachers generally don’t like high-stakes testing, and they especially dislike being held accountable based on value-added measures that have become more common in recent years. Add to that the regular threats to teacher tenure, the reduction in bargaining rights in Wisconsin and other states, and you have a plausible case that recent policies have driven teachers out of the profession.

Nevertheless, in reading a recent brief on the topic by CALDER, I am convinced again that the conventional wisdom of a teacher shortage is still a myth.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7w7

 


 

 

When it comes to wiping out the achievement gap for Hispanic students, rigor is only part of the battle ACT’s director for equity in education discusses ways to make more resources available for Spanish-speaking families Hechinger Report commentary by JUAN GARCIA, senior director of the ACT Center for Equity in Education

 

When I emigrated to the U.S. from Peru 30 years ago, I spoke no English at all. My first job was as a dishwasher at a Holiday Inn in Des Moines, Iowa. I was making less than the minimum wage, but it was the only job I could get. So, as I tell the many students and parents whom I encounter in my work, if I can do it, anybody can do it.

As an ACT employee and a native Spanish-speaker, I’m often asked what I think will help improve college and career readiness for Hispanic students.

College aspirations among Hispanic students are high, with 82 percent of ACT-tested Hispanic graduates saying they plan to enroll in postsecondary education, compared to 86 percent among all 2015 graduating high school seniors.

The caveat is that their readiness trails their ambitions. ACT’s recent report on Hispanic students in the 2015 graduating class shows that, while the percentage of Hispanic graduates meeting three of the four ACT College Readiness Benchmarks has grown slightly — from 23 to 25 percent — since 2011, it still lags significantly behind the 40 percent national average.

This achievement gap is surely unsurprising to anyone who even casually follows education trends. However, the answers to the question of how we can close this gap — and prepare more Hispanic students for college and career success —are less obvious.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7wi

 


 

 

The Politics of the Common Core Assessments Why states are quitting the PARCC and Smarter Balanced testing consortia Education Next analysis by Ashley Jochim, research analyst at the Center on Reinventing Public Education at the University of Washington, and Patrick McGuinn, professor of political science and education at Drew University

 

In 2009, 48 states and the District of Columbia joined together to launch the Common Core State Standards Initiative. Their mission: to develop common academic standards in English and mathematics that would help ensure that “all students, regardless of where they live, are graduating high school prepared for college, career, and life.”

It was a laudable goal, but one that 15 years of federal mandates had failed to accomplish. Tasked by the federal government with bringing all students to “proficiency,” most states set undemanding standards, and the quality of their assessments varied widely. The Council of Chief State School Officers and the National Governors Association set out to raise and unify K–12 standards through the Common Core initiative.

Common standards call for common assessments. Late in 2009, the Obama administration, through its Race to the Top (RttT) program, announced a competition for $350 million in grant money to spur the development of “next-generation” tests aligned to the Common Core. Six consortia formed to submit applications for funding, but mergers left just two seeking to develop the new assessments. The government awarded four-year grants to the Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium (SBAC) and the Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers (PARCC).

Earlier in 2009, also through Race to the Top, the administration had offered $4.35 billion in funding through a competitive grant program designed to encourage states to enact the feds’ preferred school-reform policies—including the adoption of better standards and assessments. Most states were willing to sign on to Common Core and the aligned tests to improve their chances of winning a grant. By 2011, one year after the standards had officially been released, 45 states plus the District of Columbia had signed on to the standards and joined one or both of the assessment consortia.

But as states moved to implement the new standards and assessments, controversy began to swirl around the reforms. Although the Common Core standards drew criticism from parents and pundits, from the right and the left, most states stood firm in embracing them. Yet loyalty to the consortia’s assessments has proved much weaker. The number of states planning to use the new tests dropped from 45 in 2011 to 20 in 2016.

This presents a puzzle: why have so many states abandoned the consortia, even as the standards on which they are based continue to live on in most places?

http://gousoe.uen.org/7w8


 

 

Why Does America Invest So Little in Its Children?

How the U.S. became one of the worst countries in the developed world for kids under 5 Atlantic commentary by LILLIAN MONGEAU, engagement editor and West Coast correspondent at The Hechinger Report

 

“He was very angry. He was scratching his face, kicking, and screaming,” Carrie Giddings, a preschool teacher, said of one of her students during his first days in her class at Kruse Elementary School in northern Colorado.

The boy’s father had been in and out of jail, Giddings said. She thinks the 3-year-old had witnessed abuse at home before he enrolled in preschool at Kruse. His family was poor. For a while, they had lived with relatives, unable to afford their own place.  “Everything that could happen to a kid, he’d had it all,” Giddings said, asking that the child’s name not be used. “He was a year and a half behind.”

A child like this boy will have a tough road ahead. Research has shown that unrelenting stress at a young age, known as toxic stress, causes long-lasting brain damage. The worse the damage, the harder it is for children to pay attention, absorb new information, or trust adults—all skills critical for success in school—as they get older.

In fact, the fate of all children is largely determined by their first years on this planet. Forming healthy relationships with adults early on lays the foundation for future healthy relationships. Exposure to language through stories, songs, and conversations sets the stage for academic achievement. Playing outside to master gross motor skills; creating art to master fine motor skills; pretending to be a doctor, chef, or firefighter to learn teamwork; building a tower of blocks to learn basic physics lessons—all of these activities are critical preparation for a successful school and adult life.

The most straightforward way to ensure all children have such experiences is to provide free or affordable high-quality preschool for them when they are 3- and 4-year-olds.

The idea is not as radical as it sounds. The United States has even provided universal public preschool before, for a few years during World War II. That program ended in 1946. Since then, a growing body of research has demonstrated the value of high-quality preschool for both children and their communities. Nearly every industrialized country has recognized that value and begun offering a version of universal public preschool for its children. Not the U.S.

On every level—local, state, and federal—this country invests little to nothing in the first five years of a child’s life, putting it decades and dollars behind the rest of the developed world.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7vZ

 


 

 

America’s Children in Brief: Key National Indicators of Well-being, 2016 ChildStats.gov analysis

 

Each year since 1997, the Federal Interagency Forum on Child and Family Statistics has published a report on the well-being of children and families. The Forum fosters coordination and collaboration among 23 federal agencies that produce or use statistical data on children and families, and seeks to improve federal data on children and families. The America’s Children series provides accessible compendiums of indicators drawn across topics from the most reliable official statistics; it is designed to complement other more specialized, technical, or comprehensive reports produced by various Forum agencies. The America’s Children series makes federal data on children and families available in a nontechnical, easy-to-use format in order to stimulate discussion among data providers, policymakers, and the public.

This report reveals that the adolescent birth rate declined across all race and Hispanic origin groups and the rate of immediate college enrollment increased among White, non-Hispanic; Black, non-Hispanic; and Hispanic high school completers. Poverty rates and percentages of children living in food-insecure homes remain higher for Black, non-Hispanic and Hispanic children than for their White, non-Hispanic counterparts. New this year is a supplemental poverty measure for White, non-Hispanic; Black, non-Hispanic; Hispanic; and Asian, non-Hispanic children. The Brief concludes with its usual At a Glance summary table displaying the most recent data for all 41 indicators.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7w0

 


 

 

STEM + Families

Increasing Students’ Access to Opportunities in STEM by Effectively Engaging Families National PTA white paper

 

The U.S. Department of Commerce estimates that jobs in STEM will grow 17% by 2018—that’s 55% faster than non-STEM jobs over the next decade. Several reports have linked STEM education to the continued scientific leadership and economic growth of the United States. The possibilities sound exciting, however economic projections also predict that there could be as many as 2.4 million unfilled STEM jobs by 2018.

Most people think of civil engineers, doctors, accountants or scientists when they think of STEM careers–all professions that require at least a four-year degree. But the truth is, approximately half of all STEM jobs only require a two-year degree. Well-paying positions in fields like computer programming, environmental engineering and nursing—just to name a few—are available through post-secondary certificates and associates degrees. Unfortunately, underrepresented youth including girls, minorities and students from low-income families aren’t finding their way into these fast-growing STEM fields.

We want that to change. We think families are the answer.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7w9

 

 

 

 

 

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NATIONAL NEWS

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GOP approves pro-Bible, anti-transgender stances in party platform Dallas Morning News

 

CLEVELAND — In the first real test of party unity ahead of their national convention next week, Republican delegates broke with their presumptive nominee Donald Trump on transgender rights but gave preliminary approval to his desire to build a wall on the border with Mexico.

Ahead of their convention to be held here next week, the 112 members of the GOP party’s platform committee debated issues as diverse as public education and prairie chicken. They shot down multiple attempts by a small group to soften the platform’s anti-transgender and gay rights language, and approved of efforts to force the federal government to hand over all public lands to states.

Of any issue, the full platform committee spent the longest time discussing whether to encourage states to teach the Bible as a literature elective in public schools. The proposal was ultimately adopted.

Any language approved by the platform committee this week will have to be given a final stamp of approval next week by the full convention. The platform is the collection of the party’s official positions on public policy issues. It’s non-binding, and many candidates and officeholders stake out their own positions.

But it matters greatly to many rank-and-file party members, so the debate could be contentious, depending on whether anti-Trump forces within the party conjure up enough support to push back against some of his more divisive stances.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7w1

 


 

 

Illinois ends much-debated PARCC test for high school students Chicago Tribune

 

Illinois is ditching the controversial state PARCC exam for high school students, instead giving 11th-graders a state-paid SAT college entrance exam next spring.

The announcement from the Illinois State Board of Education on Monday comes after only two administrations of PARCC, in the spring of 2015 and 2016, following dismal test scores and thousands of students skipping the exams.

Still, third- through eighth-graders will continue taking the Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers in reading and math, exams designed to prepare students for college and work. The state tests have drawn opposition from families who questioned the amount of testing at school — part of a national movement that has prompted some states to stop using the PARCC exams, which are based on Common Core standards.

At the high school level, the PARCC exams took away from key instruction time, school administrators said, as tests piled up in the spring, including Advanced Placement exams for honors-level students and a college entrance exam in many districts.

Against that backdrop, some students didn’t seem to take PARCC seriously.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7w5

 

http://gousoe.uen.org/7w6 (Chicago Sun-Times)

 


 

 

Christie school aid plan ‘the antithesis of fairness,’ group says (Newark, NJ) Star-Ledger

 

TRENTON — Representatives of New Jersey’s major education organizations slammed Gov. Chris Christie’s proposal to overhaul school funding on Monday and pledged to support an opposing plan from State Senate President Stephen Sweeney.

At at forum in Trenton, the New Jersey School Boards Association, New Jersey Principals and Supervisors Association, New Jersey PTA and several other groups advocated for Sweeney’s plan, which he says would give every district 100 percent of the aid owed under the state’s funding formula.

“The plan that the governor put forward is the antithesis of fairness,” said Patricia Wright, executive director of the New Jersey Principals and Supervisors Association. “We feel that it is using the enticement of reduced property taxes but on the backs of a thorough and efficient education for every student.”

http://gousoe.uen.org/7wa

 


 

 

The people taking care of American children live in poverty Los Angeles Times

 

The people paid to watch America’s children tend to live in poverty. Nearly half receive some kind of government assistance: food stamps, welfare checks, Medicaid. Their median hourly wage is $9.77 — about $3 below the average janitor’s.

In a new report, researchers at UC Berkeley say that child care is too vital to the country’s future to offer such meager wages. Those tasked with supporting kids, they say, are shaping much of tomorrow’s workforce.

“Economic insecurity, linked to low wages, remains endemic among those who care for and educate young children from birth to elementary school,” the authors wrote. “This condition has endured despite a much-altered landscape in which developmental scientists, economists, and business and labor leaders have widely recognized the importance of early care and education in shaping children’s development, promoting the health of families, and building a strong economy.”

In the United States, roughly 2 million adults make a living by caring for and educating more than 12 million children, from infants to 5-year-olds. Last year, 46% of child-care workers were part of families enrolled in at least one public safety net program, compared with 26% of those in the broader workforce. Low pay contributes to a revolving door of staffers. The average annual turnover rate among early childhood education staffers, for example, hovers around 30%.

Wages remain paltry even among the college-educated workforce. Early childhood education is the college major that yields the lowest lifetime pay.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7wj

 

A copy of the report

http://gousoe.uen.org/7wk (UC Berkeley)

 

The Utah report

http://gousoe.uen.org/7wl (UC Berkeley)

 


 

 

New VT law to fund public preschool a first Burlington (VT) Free Press

 

HINESBURG  — Vermont has become the first state to provide publicly funded pre-kindergarten programs to all 3- and 4-year-olds as of this month, state officials say.

The law requires Vermont communities to offer at least 10 hours a week of free, high quality preschool for 35 weeks per year to children in that age group. Previously, some districts offered publicly funded preschool voluntarily.

The 10 hours of free preschool has helped parents, like those whose children attend Annette’s Preschool, in Hinesburg.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7wh

 


 

 

K12 Reaches Settlement With Calif. AG, but Acrimony Remains Education Week

 

The oft-criticized online education provider K12 Inc. has reached a settlement agreement with California’s state attorney general, who alleged the company misled parents about the academic record of charter schools it manages and exaggerated enrollment numbers.

Attorney General Kamala D. Harris said the for-profit charter operator, which admitted no wrongdoing, will pay $8.5 million to settle all the claims brought by her office.

The agreement also says that K12 will forgive $160 million of its “accumulated annual balanced budget credits” to the nonprofit schools it manages. The credits are part of financial arrangements the company established with the schools.

In a statement, Harris called the forgiveness of the credits “debt relief” for the schools. Her description drew an angry reaction from K12’s CEO, who said the AG was “flat wrong” about nature of the credits and had “grossly mischaracterized” both the terms of the settlement and the accusations against the company.

In announcing the settlement, Harris said her goal was to ensure that K12 and the 14 schools affiliated with the company, known as the California Virtual Academies, are “held accountable and make much-needed improvements.”

http://gousoe.uen.org/7wg

 


 

 

Beyond Integration: How Teachers Can Encourage Cross-Racial Friendships NPR

There’s a reason Jose Luis Vilson’s students learn in groups: He wants them to feel comfortable working with anyone in the classroom, something he’s realized in his 11 years of teaching doesn’t always come naturally.

“I don’t really give students a chance to self-select until later on, when I feel like they can pretty much group with anybody,” he says.

Vilson teaches math at a public middle school just north of Harlem in New York City. Most of his students are Latino and African-American, and Vilson pays close attention to the fact that their racial identities affect their experiences in the classroom.

Children entering adolescence, he knows, are less likely to maintain cross-racial friendships as they grow older. But teachers like him may be able to help change that, according to a new study led by researchers from New York University.

In past decades, it’s become increasingly clear that diversity in classrooms isn’t just a buzzword. A growing body of research points to classroom diversity as an important aspect of childhood development. Kids who make friends with kids of other races tend to be more socially well-adjusted, more academically ambitious and better at interacting with people who are different from them.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7we

 


 

 

Malala Yousafzai’s 19th Birthday Is for #YesAllGirls, Access to Education NBC

 

For her 19th birthday on Tuesday, Malala Yousafzai will be visiting with girls from around the world to remind them — and the world — that all girls have a right to an education.

Yousafzai, who became the youngest winner of the Nobel Peace Prize in 2014, celebrated her birthday last year by opening a girls’ school for Syrian refugees in Lebanon.

July 12th was declared “Malala Day” by United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-Moon in 2013 to commemorate Yousafzai’s 16th birthday. Then, she delivered a speech at the UN calling for worldwide access to education. In that speech, Yousafzai said that Malala Day is “not my day,” but the “day of every woman, every boy and every girl who have raised a voice for their rights.” She has spent every birthday since campaigning for girls’ education around the world, traveling to areas where girls face the greatest barriers to education.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7wo

 


 

 

Sex education in schools ‘unfit’ for smartphone generation, survey finds Half of 914 people aged 16-24 surveyed by Terrence Higgins Trust rated sex education they received as poor or terrible

(Manchester) Guardian

 

Three-quarters of young people are not taught about sexual consent, while one in seven said they did not receive any sex and relationship education (SRE) at all, and 95% said they were not taught about LGBT relationships, according to a report from the Terrence Higgins Trust.

The survey of young people by the HIV and sexual health charity said infrequent and poor-quality sex and relationship education in schools was creating a “safeguarding crisis” for young people.

The findings are in line with an Ofsted report in 2013, which found that SRE teaching was inadequate or required improvement in 40% of schools.

Where SRE is taught, Tuesday’s report found, young people said it was usually limited to biological topics such as reproduction, body parts and heterosexual sex.

The survey, called Shh … No Talking warned that SRE is “unfit” for the smartphone generation, leaving them vulnerable to abuse, bullying and poor mental and sexual health.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7wm

 

A copy of the report

http://gousoe.uen.org/7wn (Terrence Higgins Trust)

 


 

 

Ethiopia Blocks Social Media During National School Exam Associated Press

 

ADDIS ABABA, Ethiopia — Ethiopian officials have blocked social media sites across the country until the national school examination is concluded on Wednesday.

Facebook and other mobile apps have been disabled since Saturday, and citizens are complaining.

The government communications office said Sunday that the blocking of sites is meant to ensure an “orderly exam process” that begins on Monday.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7wf

 

 

 

 

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CALENDAR

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USOE Calendar

http://www.schools.utah.gov/main/CALENDAR.aspx

 

 

UEN News

http://www.uen.org

 

 

July 12:

Executive Appropriations Committee meeting

2 p.m., 445 State Capitol

http://le.utah.gov/Interim/2016/html/00003010.htm

 

 

July 13:

Education Interim Committee meeting

1:15 p.m., 30 House Building

http://le.utah.gov/Interim/2016/html/00002955.htm

 

 

July 14:

Utah State Charter School Board meeting

250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://go.uen.org/62M

 

 

August 11:

Utah State Board of Education study session, USDB and committee meetings

250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspx

 

 

August 12:

Utah State Board of Education meeting

250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspx

 

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