Education News Roundup: July 14, 2016

 

 

Daniela Bergantz, Age 10. Picture courtesy of PBS.org.

Daniela Bergantz, 10. Picture courtesy of PBS.org.

Education News Roundup

Today’s Top Picks:

 

Legislators discuss teacher preparation in Utah.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7xn (DN)

and http://gousoe.uen.org/7xN (KSL)

 

Ed Week offers some national perspective on the same issue.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7xs (Ed Week)

or a copy of the report

http://gousoe.uen.org/7xt (CCSSO)

 

Davis Supt. Bryan Bowles announces retirement plans.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7xz (SLT)

and http://gousoe.uen.org/7xE (DN)

 

Reps. Bishop and Chaffetz introduce their public lands bill.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7xU (SLT)

and http://gousoe.uen.org/7xV (DN)

and http://gousoe.uen.org/7xW (KSL)

 

Congratulations to Utah’s Daniela Bergantz, state winner of this year’s Healthy Lunchtime Challenge with her recipe for American Flag Ravioli in Creamy Garden Sauce.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7xv (WaPo)

or copies of the winning recipes

http://gousoe.uen.org/7xw (PBS)

or just the Utah recipe

http://gousoe.uen.org/7xx (PBS)

 

 

 

 

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TODAY’S HEADLINES

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UTAH

 

Keeping teachers in the classroom may bring a ‘K-20 conversation’

 

Davis School District superintendent to retire

Education » He now will work as associate professor at BYU.

 

Bishop, Chaffetz unveil long-awaited lands bill, win support from green group

 

SUU, Iron County School District partner to help math students

 

  1. visit provides new experiences for Native American students

 

Nebo Board of Education OKs first compensatory raise for board members in decades

 

Utah Dems Criticize Alternative Teacher Credentialing Plan

 

For LGBTQ Students, Author Says, Safety Is ‘Not Enough’

 

Suicide Is Now Leading Cause of Death for Children 10-17 in Utah; Attending Church Could Help, Study Says

 

Utah Gets CDC Grant to Prevent Injuries, Deaths

 

Girl falls through skylight at junior high school

 

Young Humanitarian Finalist from Weber High School an Example of Selfless Service

 

GCHS sports teams could move to 3A classification in fall of 2017

 

Families, teachers prepping for school now

 

What to look for in a high-quality preschool

 


 

 

OPINION & COMMENTARY

 

The injustice of California’s teacher tenure

 

Rewrite Education Platform Behind Closed Doors, and Abandon Core Party Values

 

Five Reasons Why Pokémon Go Will Change Education, and One Reason Why It Won’t

 


 

 

NATION

 

Report: Low pay hurts teacher recruiting, retention in New Mexico

 

State superintendent’s $20,000 bonus to depend on communications, ESSA and three-year plan for Ohio’s schools

 

How Can Schools Use Federal Funds for a ‘Well-Rounded’ Education?

 

States Progressing on Teacher-Prep Accountability—But Big Gaps Remain

 

Schools Are Racing To Test Their Water For Lead

But there is still reason to be concerned about weak regulations for water testing in schools.

 

LGBT History Lessons Edging closer to California Classrooms

 

Where Books Are All But Nonexistent

In many high-poverty urban neighborhoods, it’s nearly impossible for a poor child to find something to read in the summer.

 

Recipe contest brings young chefs to the White House for a kids’ ‘state dinner’

Michelle Obama hosts the winners of the Healthy Lunchtime Challenge.

 

Mexico Agrees to Revise Teacher Evaluation

 

 

 

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UTAH NEWS

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Keeping teachers in the classroom may bring a ‘K-20 conversation’

 

SALT LAKE CITY — In the midst of an intensifying teacher shortage, Utah lawmakers and education leaders are looking for ways to improve collaboration between K-12 and higher education when it comes to preparing new teachers.

Part of it means giving prospective educators a path to licensure that’s friendly to unique circumstances, such as a career changes, school needs and other factors. But it also means strengthening traditional routes that involve educator training in college and licensure after graduation.

“We really don’t want to tweak a system. We want to make some real differences,” Diana Suddreth, director of teaching and learning for the Utah State Board of Education, said at the Utah Legislature’s Education Interim Committee meeting on Tuesday.

In that process, Suddreth and other education leaders plan to use research and results shared through the Network for Transforming Educator Preparation, a collaboration of states that aims to elevate the abilities of new teachers upon entering the profession. The network is sponsored through the Council of Chief State School Officers, a national education advocacy nonprofit.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7xn (DN)

 

http://gousoe.uen.org/7xN (KSL)

 


 

 

Davis School District superintendent to retire

Education » He now will work as associate professor at BYU.

 

Bryan Bowles, 14-year superintendent of the Davis School District, will retire from his post Aug. 31, the district announced Tuesday.

Following his retirement, Bowles will work as an associate professor at Brigham Young University’s David O. McKay School of Education.

“I’ve appreciated the work that I’ve done here,” Bowles said during a Tuesday meeting of the Davis Board of Education. “I’ve had a wonderful opportunity. We’ve done great work together as a team and we’ve done it, sometimes, in very difficult situations.”

An interim superintendent is expected to be chosen prior to Bowles’ departure.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7xz (SLT)

 

http://gousoe.uen.org/7xE (DN)

 


 

 

Bishop, Chaffetz unveil long-awaited lands bill, win support from green group

 

Washington • Reps. Rob Bishop and Jason Chaffetz introduced legislation Thursday to preserve some 1.4 million acres of the Bears Ears region in southeastern Utah in a tweak to their Public Lands Initiative that has already garnered support of one environmental group and interest from others.

The long-awaited bill designates about 4.6 million acres of federal land for conservation, opens up more than 1.1 million acres for recreation and mineral development, consolidates more than 300,000 acres of states lands and expands Arches National Park by nearly 20,000 acres.

The legislation also would create the Jurassic National Park from the Cleveland-Lloyd dinosaur-fossil quarry. And redesignate 80,000 acres of wilderness study areas for other purposes.

A companion bill would block any president from naming new national monuments or expanding existing ones in seven Utah counties: Summit, Uintah, Duchesne, Carbon, Grand, Emery, and San Juan.

The Utah Republicans behind the sweeping measure — a three-year effort aimed at bringing together all parties of the public lands debate — heralded their compromise proposal as something that should please all sides.

“It demonstrates this is a very balanced approach, from energy developers to environmentalists, from the cattlemen to the county commission, we have very broad, strong, local support,” Chaffetz said in an interview, noting that he hopes this effort will head off any unilateral action by the White House to create a Bears Ears National Monument as some green groups and tribal leaders have proposed.

“It would be cavalier and irresponsible for the president to institute a national monument when we have such broad support for PLI,” Chaffetz added.

The Utah congressmen pointed to supportive statements from several people involved in the process arguing their ground-up compromise should be more acceptable than a White House-driven decision.

“The virtues of the PLI bill include permanent protection for some of Utah’s most spectacular places, a significant funding stream for Utah’s schoolchildren, and diverse new economic opportunities for rural Utah communities provided by wilderness designations,” said Mike Matz, director of U.S. public lands issues for The Pew Charitable Trusts.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7xU (SLT)

 

http://gousoe.uen.org/7xV (DN)

 

http://gousoe.uen.org/7xW (KSL)

 


 

 

SUU, Iron County School District partner to help math students

 

If your college-bound high school student struggles in math, help is on the way.

In an effort to boost scores on ACT exams for students in Iron County, Southern Utah University and the Iron County School District have partnered for several tutoring opportunities.

“Nationwide, there are college students that struggle in their senior year because they have not passed math,” said Leilani Nautu, director of K-12 programs at SUU. “We are trying to bridge that gap and get Iron County students to enter college with higher ACT scores in math so they don’t have that problem later on.”

SUU was recently awarded a $75,000 StepUP READY grant from the Utah System of Higher Education to achieve those means, according to a news release.

More than 160 high school seniors took their ACTs in March, with the average math score being an 18, said Jennifer Wood, ICSD secondary education director.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7xD (SGS)

 


 

 

  1. visit provides new experiences for Native American students

 

SALT LAKE CITY — “It looks like string cheese,” a Native American elementary school student said to his friend as he pulled something “stringy” out of a cow heart.

About 20 students in fifth through eighth grades in the Duchesne and Uintah school districts visited the University of Utah on Wednesday afternoon to explore the campus and participate in a dissection of a cow heart.

Donna Eldridge, administrative program coordinator for the School of Medicine’s Office of Inclusion and Outreach at the U., said the activity was a way to provide deeper interest in academia among Native American students.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7xB (DN)

 


 

 

Nebo Board of Education OKs first compensatory raise for board members in decades

 

The Nebo Board of Education unanimously approved a referendum Wednesday to increase board members’ compensation for the services rendered to the school district.

For more than 20 years, members of the Nebo Board of Education received $250 each month to compensate for committee assignments, weekly meetings and a plethora of other assignments all in the name of the district’s students. This was mandated by the Legislature until about eight years ago.

Since then, board members have had to fill out tedious reimbursement forms to account for everything from gas expenses to attendance at committees not required, but recommended, by the school district.

To simplify the process of compensating school board members, the referendum doubled the compensation allotted to each member of the board, making it $500 a month.

Additionally, reimbursement forms will be completely done away with as the board assumes $500 to be close to the monthly expenses for each member.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7xC (PDH)

 


 

 

Utah Dems Criticize Alternative Teacher Credentialing Plan

 

Now that a month has passed since Utah state education leaders created a new pathway toward gaining a teaching certification, 12 Democratic lawmakers are speaking out against the change.

Democrats from the Utah House of Representatives are now saying that the policy introduced in June that would allow more people who are interested in teaching, but do not have degrees in education, to instruct the state’s K-12 pupils is a poor idea, according to The Salt Lake Tribune’s Annie Knox.

The legislators are saying that the plan would result in filling classrooms with teachers who are unprepared and will only add to the current teacher morale problem.

A letter addressing the complaint and signed by the dissenting Democrats was sent to School Board Chairman David Crandall Briscoe, a former high school teacher with a 26-year tenure.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7xS (Education News)

 


 

 

For LGBTQ Students, Author Says, Safety Is ‘Not Enough’

 

Across the country there are stories like this: In a high-poverty area of Honolulu, a high school social worker helps her Asian-Pacific Islander students talk with their families about being LBGTQ.

At a time when LGBTQ concerns in schools are increasingly visible — and often debated — teachers and administrators are looking for new ways to support students.

In Puyallup, Washington, a third-grade teacher coaches her students on how to respond to language like “that’s so gay” by starting discussions about respect for LGBTQ people in the classroom.

And in a Utah, a socially conservative state, students at a high school with supportive staff connect over social media with students in communities that are less accepting of LGBTQ lifestyles.

Michael Sadowski brings us these stories in his new book, Safe Is Not Enough: Better Schools for LGBTQ Students.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7xM (NPR)

 


 

 

Suicide Is Now Leading Cause of Death for Children 10-17 in Utah; Attending Church Could Help, Study Says

 

Suicide was the leading cause of death among 10 to 17-year-old children in Utah again last year and experts believe children who regularly attend religious services or eat meals with their family are at lower risk of committing the act.

“Last year we were over 600 (suicides),” Dr. Todd Grey, chief medical examiner for Utah told Fox 13 about suicides in the state. “We’re certainly on track for being over 600 this year. So that means every day, on average, we’re going to see at least one to possibly two suicides.”

In less than a decade, according to The Associated Press, suicide rates among Utah’s youth has tripled. A state report released this month shows Utah’s youth suicides was 8.5 per 100,000 people in 2014, the most recent data available. In 2007, the rate was just 3.0 per 100,000.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7xO (Christian Post)

 


 

 

Utah Gets CDC Grant to Prevent Injuries, Deaths

 

SALT LAKE CITY — The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention awarded a five-year, $1.25 million grant to Utah to prevent critical injuries and violence. The funds are part of a $30 million program across 23 state health departments intended to enhance and develop local programs to decrease violence.

Ted Castellanos, public health analyst with the CDC, said the program is ultimately aimed at preventing unnecessary deaths.

“Violence and injuries are the leading cause of death for the first four decades of life for Americans,” Castellanos said. “In fact, for the first half of life, more Americans die from violence and injuries than from any other cause.”

The program requires each participating state to fund and develop programs that address four core issues: child abuse and neglect, traumatic brain injuries, motor vehicle safety and intimate partner/sexual violence.

According to Castellanos, the program requires states to collaborate with stakeholders and other partners to develop successful strategies.

Utah will spend its grant money on a variety of programs, he said, including promoting better family relationships to prevent child abuse, working with schools to assess students for sports injuries and concussions and increasing seat belt use to prevent car accident injuries. Preventing sexual assault will also be a key focus.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7xP (Public News Service)

 

http://gousoe.uen.org/7xQ (CDC)

 


 

 

Girl falls through skylight at junior high school

 

SALT LAKE CITY— A 12-year-old girl has survived a fall through a skylight at a junior high school in Utah.

Authorities said Tuesday that she climbed roof at Tooele Junior High to retrieve a ball.

Tanya Turnbow with Tooele police says the girl fell about 15 feet.

She was conscious and alert when emergency crews arrived, and flown to Primary Children’s Hospital for treatment.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7xF (MUR)

 


 

 

Young Humanitarian Finalist from Weber High School an Example of Selfless Service

 

There is the old saying that says, “Time is money,” which many may feel is all about earning top dollar while giving our time to anything.  Certainly, it is rewarding to receive a paycheck after a hard day’s work, but a deeper satisfaction stems from giving one’s time without monetary value attached.  Rather, the joy of serving others has a more lasting impact overall.

Michaela Kowalewski, a recent 2016 graduate of Weber High School, has discovered service can be immensely rewarding.  As a young woman, her interests and talents include hiking, running and traveling.  She also enjoys math and science.  Adding to that list is her fierce love of serving.  Kowalewski was recently a top 5 finalist for the Youthlinc Young Humanitarian Award, which is Utah’s largest service-based scholarship.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7xR (Weber Sentinel)

 


 

 

GCHS sports teams could move to 3A classification in fall of 2017

 

After decades of competing within the 2A classification for sports and activities, Grand County High School could be bumped up to 3A starting in the fall of 2017, under the new alignment proposal tentatively approved by the Utah High School Activities Association’s (UHSAA) board of trustees in March.

The proposed realignment for the two-year period 2017-19 will create a sixth classification, with the largest schools in the state being designated 6A, a first for Utah. According to the UHSAA, the number of recommended schools in each classification is between 24 and 32 schools for both 5A and 6A, and between 15 and 24 schools for each of the other four classifications.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7xT (Moab Times-Independent)

 


 

 

Families, teachers prepping for school now

 

It may be summertime, but parents and educators alike are beginning to look ahead towards the 2016 school year. Here are three ways they are getting prepared.

The school year brings with it a lot of contact with a lot of kids. An annual physical, scheduled before the school year begins is an excellent way to make sure children are up-to-date with vaccinations and in good general health. Parents of young athletes may want to speak to their pediatrician about injury prevention and other related concerns.

This is also an ideal time to schedule an appointment with an optometrist if kids are complaining of any near or farsightedness. Whether it’s the blackboard, a book or a projected image in the classroom, wearing needed glasses on day one will make the transition to a new school year much smoother.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7xL (PDH)

 


 

 

What to look for in a high-quality preschool

 

When enrolling a child in preschool, there are multiple factors to consider to ensure the best early learning experience possible.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7xA (DN)

 

 

 

 

 

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OPINION & COMMENTARY

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The injustice of California’s teacher tenure

Washington Post commentary by columnist George Will

 

LOS ANGELES — The mills of justice grind slowly, but life plunges on, leaving lives blighted when justice, by being delayed, is irremediably denied. Fortunately, California’s Supreme Court might soon decide to hear — four years after litigation began — the 21st century’s most portentous civil rights case, which concerns an ongoing denial of equal protection of the law.

Every year, measurable injuries are inflicted on tens of thousands of already at-risk children by this state’s teacher tenure system, which is so politically entrenched that only the courts can protect the discrete and insular minority it victimizes. In 2012, nine Los Angeles students, recognizing the futility of expecting the legislature to rectify a wrong it has perpetrated, asked California’s judiciary to continue its record of vindicating the rights of vulnerable minorities by requiring the state’s education system to conform to the state’s Constitution.

After 10 weeks of testimony, the trial court found the tenure system incompatible with the California Supreme Court’s decision, now almost half a century old, that the state Constitution, which declares education a “fundamental” state concern, guarantees “equality of treatment” to all K-12 pupils. It “shocks the conscience,” the trial court said, that there is “no dispute” that “a significant number of grossly ineffective teachers” — perhaps more than 8,000, each with 28 students — are doing quantifiable damage to children’s life prospects.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7xq

 


 

 

Rewrite Education Platform Behind Closed Doors, and Abandon Core Party Values

The 74 commentary by Peter Cunningham, who served as the Assistant Secretary for Communications and Outreach in the U.S. Department of Education during the first term of the Obama Administration

 

The Democratic Party has always stood for one thing: we fight for the little guy. In the field of education, the little guy is the student. He can’t vote. He doesn’t have much say about his school. He mostly has to do what he’s told. And he is trusting us to do right by him and set him on a path to success.

That should mean that we are giving him a good school filled with hard-working adults who set high expectations and hold themselves accountable for results. It should mean that when the student isn’t learning the adults in his school don’t blame factors outside the classroom. Instead, they make the most of things under their control – like time, curriculum, technology, parents and the trusted relationship between teacher and student.

It should mean giving him and his guardian the freedom to find the right school for his unique needs, whether he is gifted or struggling, non-English speaking, poor, gay, straight, trans, athletic, artistic, emotionally stable or vulnerable. It should mean that we don’t allow adult rules about governance or working conditions to inhibit the child’s right to a quality public school and an effective teacher. The needs of the student come first.

Unfortunately, the new Democratic platform does not fully commit to any of these things. Instead, the one adopted behind closed doors in Orlando last weekend affirms an education system that denies its shortcomings and is unwilling to address them.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7xp

 


 

 

Five Reasons Why Pokémon Go Will Change Education, and One Reason Why It Won’t

Inside Higher Ed commentary by John Warner, author of the story collection Tough Day for the Army

 

Five reasons why Pokémon Go is the future of education…

  1. It’s popular.
  2. It’s fun.
  3. It’s on phones and kids like their phones, so education of the future will have to be on phones.
  4. It utilizes augmented reality, which is better than reality because as Jane McGonigal tells us, “reality is broken,” so if we can fix reality be augmenting it, we should.
  5. Disruptive technology is coming for education, and if previous disruptive technologies such as MOOCs, adaptive software, Instagram, Uber, Snapchat, Twitter, badges, Candy Crush, the Kardashians, microcredentials, Comet Hale-Bopp, and so on haven’t managed to disrupt education, then surely Pokémon Go will because something has to eventually.

… and one reason it won’t.

  1. No one knows the future of education, and in fact, the future of education will never arrive because the future is always in the future, which means we should spend a lot more energy considering the present.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7xK

 

 

 

 

 

 

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NATIONAL NEWS

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Report: Low pay hurts teacher recruiting, retention in New Mexico

Santa Fe New Mexican

 

A new report by the Legislative Education Study Committee says New Mexico is lagging when it comes to teacher pay, and that’s hurting efforts to recruit and retain educators around the state.

Meanwhile, an expert told lawmakers on the committee, teacher salaries nationwide are failing to keep pace with earnings in other professions. As a result — particularly in rural and low-income states like New Mexico — prospective teachers are increasingly looking into other career fields.

New Mexico ranks 43rd in the nation for teacher pay levels, according to the report released Wednesday. While the national average pay for teachers is $58,064, New Mexico teachers earn $47,163, the report says. The state’s teachers rank about midway in pay compared to educators in six other Southwestern states. Teachers in Oklahoma, for example, earn an average of $44,921 — a low for the region — while teachers in Nevada earn $56,943, the region’s high.

“In general, teacher compensation is not keeping up with compensation in other professions … which is impacting our ability to attract and retain teachers,” Richard Sims, chief economist for the National Education Association, told lawmakers on the Legislative Education Study Committee during a hearing at Los Alamos High School.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7xr

 


 

 

State superintendent’s $20,000 bonus to depend on communications, ESSA and three-year plan for Ohio’s schools

Cleveland Plain Dealer

 

COLUMBUS, Ohio – New State Superintendent Paolo DeMaria’s could receive a $20,000 bonus this year depending on how well he sets relationships around the state, develops a three-year strategic plan for schools and manages a plan required under the new federal Every Student Succeeds Act.

The board voted today to review DeMaria’s work after a year and award the bonus if his overall performance rates well. He started work June 27 but was sworn in as superintendent on Monday.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7xo

 


 

 

How Can Schools Use Federal Funds for a ‘Well-Rounded’ Education?

Education Week

 

One of the big selling points of the Every Student Succeeds Act is that it gives schools a chance to move beyond just reading and math and offer students a broader, “well-rounded” education that includes things like the arts, humanities, and hands-on career focused experiences.

The U.S. Department of Education is hoping states and districts embrace that flexibility. And Wednesday, they released guidance explaining how schools can use federal funds they’re already getting to further the goal.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7xu

 


 

 

States Progressing on Teacher-Prep Accountability—But Big Gaps Remain

Education Week

 

About half of the states now review the performance of their teacher-preparation programs on an annual or biennial basis, but they use a swath of different measures—some of higher quality than others, a new survey of state policy concludes.

“The best systems remain incomplete, with many measures that are serviceable but not quite adequate,” says the report, issued by the Council of Chief State School Officers.

But it’s still an improvement over the days when programs got little actionable information, said CCSSO Executive Director Chris Minnich in a call with reporters. “We are seeing progress in this area,” he said. “Feedback is always a good thing to programs, even if it’s not the perfect measure or the perfect test.”

The data give some sense of where states stand, even as the federal government’s pending rules for teacher preparation would require all states to shift to an annual reporting and accountability system.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7xs

 

A copy of the report

http://gousoe.uen.org/7xt (CCSSO)

 


 

 

Schools Are Racing To Test Their Water For Lead

But there is still reason to be concerned about weak regulations for water testing in schools.

Huffington Post

 

It may have started in Portland, where elevated levels of lead were found in the drinking water at two public elementary schools last month. High levels were later detected in more schools.

Schools in Chicago, Atlanta, D.C. and other school districts across the country have seen similar results from water testing in recent months.

With school out for summer and the ongoing Flint water crisis still looming on the minds of administrators and parents alike, many districts are moving to test their drinking water for signs of lead contamination. According to The Washington Post, at least one prominent testing firm is experiencing high demand and is already booked through the start of the school year.

Under current federal regulations, only 10 percent of schools nationwide ― those that rely on water supplies independent of any community utilities ― are actually required to test their water.

Some state lawmakers are moving to change that.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7xy

 


 

 

LGBT History Lessons Edging closer to California Classrooms

Associated Press

 

SAN FRANCISCO — After multiple delays, California education officials are moving to comply with the nation’s first law requiring public schools to include prominent gay people and LGBT rights milestones in history classes.

A curriculum outline scheduled to be reviewed by the State Board of Education on Thursday would introduce the concepts in second grade with discussions about diverse families and again in fourth grade with lessons on California’s role in the gay rights movement.

The proposed outline also touches on the topics in the fifth and eighth grades and throughout high school.

In July 2011, California lawmakers passed the law adding LGBT people to the list of social and ethnic groups whose contributions to state and U.S. history schools must teach.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7xG

 


 

 

Where Books Are All But Nonexistent

In many high-poverty urban neighborhoods, it’s nearly impossible for a poor child to find something to read in the summer.

Atlantic

 

Forty-five million. That’s how many words a typical child in a white-color family will hear before age 4. The number is striking, not because it’s a lot of words for such a small human—the vast majority of a person’s neural connections, after all, are formed by age 3—but because of how it stacks up against a poor kid’s exposure to vocabulary. By the time she’s 4, a child on welfare might only have heard 13 million words.

This disparity is well-documented. It’s the subject of myriad news stories and government programs, as well as the Clinton Foundation’s “Too Small to Fail” initiative, all of which send the message that low-income parents should talk and read to their children more. But these efforts to close the “word gap” often overlook a fundamental problem. In high-poverty neighborhoods, books—the very things that could supply so many of those 30 million-plus words—are hard to come by. In many poor homes, they’re nonexistent.

“Book reading really provides the words the children need to learn,” said Susan Neuman, a childhood- and literacy-education researcher at New York University who served as the assistant education secretary under George W. Bush. “Frankly, when you and I talk to our children, we’re talking in a baby-talk-like way—we’re not using sophisticated language. But even a very low-level preschool book like a Dr. Seuss book has more sophisticated vocabulary than oral discourse. So it’s really about the print gap and not the oral-word gap.”

In 2001, Neuman co-authored a study that found that in a middle-class community in Philadelphia, each child had access to 13 books. In a community of concentrated poverty in the same city, on the other hand, there was only a single age-appropriate book per 300 kids—or about 33 titles total, all of which were coloring books. Now, she’s out with a new study, published this month in the journal Urban Education, that helps paint a clearer picture of the nation’s “book deserts,” finding intense disparities in access to children’s reading resources in Detroit, Los Angeles, and Washington, D.C.—even between a very poor neighborhood and a slightly-less-poor one within a given city.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7xI

 

A copy of the study

http://gousoe.uen.org/7xJ (Urban Education $)

 


 

Recipe contest brings young chefs to the White House for a kids’ ‘state dinner’

Michelle Obama hosts the winners of the Healthy Lunchtime Challenge.

Washington Post

 

First lady Michelle Obama is hosting 56 young chefs for lunch at the White House on Thursday as part of the fifth annual kids’ “state dinner.” The kids aren’t diplomats from foreign countries — the usual guests at a state dinner — but are the winners of this year’s Healthy Lunchtime Challenge.

The contest asked chefs ages 8 to 12 to create “an original lunch recipe that is healthy, affordable and tasty,” and it encouraged kids to use locally grown ingredients.

From more than 1,200 entries, a team of judges picked one from each state and territory. Some of the dishes were on the menu for the lunch.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7xv

 

Copies of the winning recipes including Utahn Daniela Bergantz’s American Flag Ravioli in Creamy Garden Sauce

http://gousoe.uen.org/7xw (PBS)

 

Just the Utah recipe

http://gousoe.uen.org/7xx (PBS)

 

 


 

Mexico Agrees to Revise Teacher Evaluation

Associated Press

 

MEXICO CITY — The Mexican government will undertake a revision of the evaluation exam given to all teachers, which has been a focal point of protests, officials said Wednesday.

Education Secretary Aurelio Nuno announced the agreement on the same day that government officials were to hold their first working group meeting with representatives of the teachers. He said officials together with the national teachers union will make changes that better recognize the country’s regional differences.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7xH

 

 

 

 

 

 

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CALENDAR

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USOE Calendar

http://www.schools.utah.gov/main/CALENDAR.aspx

 

 

UEN News

http://www.uen.org

 

 

July 14:

Utah State Charter School Board meeting

9 a.m., 250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://go.uen.org/62M

 

 

July 26:

Utah State Board of Education Law & Licensing Committee public hearing

4 p.m., 250 E 500 South

http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda/July26R277511.aspx

 

 

August 4:

Public Education Appropriations Subcommittee meeting

9 a.m., 445 State Capitol

http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2016&com=APPPED

 

 

August 11:

Utah State Board of Education study session, USDB and committee meetings

250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspx

 

 

August 12:

Utah State Board of Education meeting

250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspx

 

 

September 20:

Executive Appropriations Committee meeting

2 p.m., 445 State Capitol

http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2016&com=APPEXE

 

 

September 21:

Education Interim Committee meeting

1:15 p.m., 30 House Building

http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2016&com=INTEDU

 

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