Education News Roundup: July 20, 2016

 

 

Summer Meals Program/Education News Roundup

Summer Meals Program/Education News Roundup

Education News Roundup

Today’s Top Picks:

 

Latest numbers from the Utah Tax Commission show the state’s education fund is in the black.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7zw (UP)

or a copy of the revenue report

http://gousoe.uen.org/7zx (Utah Tax Commission)

 

Westlake High parents speak against a move by Alpine School Board members to refuse federal funds in light of the transgender guidance.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7zN (PDH)

 

Jordan School Board approves a bond election for November.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7zy (DN)

 

Filming begins on Teen Chef Pro.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7zJ (SLT)

 

States are still trying to figure out how to measure school quality under new ESSA rules.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7zD (Ed Week)

 

Maryland and Wisconsin high school students file lawsuits over transgender issues.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7zA (WaPo)

and http://gousoe.uen.org/7zz (Milwaukee Journal Sentinel) and http://gousoe.uen.org/7zC (Baltimore Sun)

 

 

 

 

 

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TODAY’S HEADLINES

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UTAH

 

Utah’s Budget Picture ‘Rallies’ at End of Fiscal Year

 

Westlake High School closed to out-of-area requests, community speaks in favor of transgender bathroom guidelines

 

Jordan board calls for special bond election in November

 

Utah cooking show ‘TeenChef Pro’ gives teens an entree into the restaurant biz Program’s legislative ties raised eyebrows, but lawmakers nevertheless restored its appropriation.

 

RNC 2016 live updates: Protesters from opposing sides voice views in lively Public Square

 

Olympian Picabo Street opens school for athletes

 

Transitions

 

Ecker Hill Middle School earns prestigious honor

 

Audit: Employee stole $67K from Utah Schools for the Deaf and Blind Theft » Ex-employee at Utah Schools for Deaf and Blind falsified and diverted records, report says.

 

Girls Go Digital: Summer camps for young girls promote future tech careers

 

‘Uniquely Utah’ inspires section of book published by Venture Academy students

 

Lehi’s Skyridge High School has 2,200 reasons to open in August

 

Committee to recommend changing Park City school start times

 

Summer reading programs popular in northern Cache Valley

 


 

 

OPINION & COMMENTARY

 

Not liking top of tickets? Create change from the bottom up

 

Local And State Officials “Just Say No” To The Department Of Education

 

Clinton Hands Trump an Opening: Pence’s Record on Education Hillary assails the Indiana governor for his charter-school policies—but that’s a fight the Republicans ought to embrace.

 

The RNC Stays Focused on Bashing Clinton Trump’s children are the only convention speakers articulating a positive case for the Republican nominee.

 


 

 

NATION

 

Data Looms Large in Quest for New School-Quality Indicator States look hard at what’s required to meet ESSA’s mandate

 

Q&A: U.S. Secretary of Education John B. King Jr.

One-on-one with the federal agency’s top official

 

Transgender students in Maryland, Wisconsin file federal discrimination lawsuits

 

Donald Trump Jr. Blasts ‘Soviet-Era’ Schools, Tenured Teachers in RNC Speech

 

Mike Pence’s Record on Education Is One of Turmoil and Mixed Results

 

A Detroit charter shuts down. Is this what school accountability looks like?

 

Gulen Movement’s Charter Schools May Be Caught Up in Turkey-U.S. Standoff Turks’ accusations against cleric could affect new schools and charters up for renewal

 

State schools chief Randy Dorn sues 7 school districts over ‘illegal’ use of levy money State schools chief Randy Dorn filed a lawsuit Tuesday against Seattle Public Schools and six other districts alleging that they illegally rely on local levies to fund basic education.

 

At the White House, college-bound students celebrated for overcoming steep odds

 

City looking to hire with soda-tax funds

 

How should children’s violent ‘media diet’ be managed?

A new policy statement from the American Academy of Pediatrics looks at how to mitigate the adverse effects of screen violence on children.

 

How Chalkbeat is trying to build a bigger audience for education news

 

More US Schools Accused of Denying Education to Immigrants

 

‘Broken-hearted and sad’, British schoolchildren learn empathy for refugees

 

 

 

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UTAH NEWS

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Utah’s Budget Picture ‘Rallies’ at End of Fiscal Year

 

With a “rally” of the state sales and corporate income tax receipts this spring, Utah government’s final tax take for the fiscal year that ended June 30 should be about even – maybe $10 million extra in the road fund and up to $35 million in the black in the General and Education Funds.

So says Jonathan Ball, the Legislature’s top fiscal officer, after reviewing the latest Tax Commission TC23 report on revenue collections.

Can you hear a big sigh of relief from Capitol Hill?

Estimates a few months ago had the state down maybe $80 million or more at fiscal year’s end.

Of course, in a $14-billion budget, that’s not much of a percent.

But, still, lawmakers and GOP Gov. Gary Herbert would have had to come up with the deficit money somewhere, for the state by law must balance out each fiscal year’s budget.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7zw (UP)

 

A copy of the revenue report

http://gousoe.uen.org/7zx (Utah Tax Commission)

 


 

 

Westlake High School closed to out-of-area requests, community speaks in favor of transgender bathroom guidelines

 

Westlake High School is now closed to students who live outside its boundaries.

The Alpine School District Board of Education voted Tuesday evening to close the Saratoga Springs school to out-of-area requests as the school’s student population continues to increase, with more growth projected in the next few years.

For the 2015-16 school year, the school had 2,550 students enrolled. About 2,780 students are projected to attend the school in the fall.

The school, which opened in 2009, can hold 2,400 students. Twenty satellite classrooms have been brought in to accommodate its current population.

The school may have more than 3,200 students for the 2018-19 school year, which is one year before a new high school could open in Eagle Mountain if a proposed bond the board has discussed is both approved by the board next month, and then by the public in the November election.

The board voted on the out-of-boundary proposal Tuesday without any discussion, with board member Paula Hill citing the statistics provided on the school’s enrollment.

“It probably should have been closed last year,” she said.

But while the decision to close the school to out-of-area students was met with little discussion, a crowd packed into the board’s chambers to speak out against a failed substitute motion made at the board’s June meeting that asked for a budget to be created for consideration that would reject federal funding.

The motion, made in reference to federal directives such as a letter sent from the Obama administration this summer stating that schools must allow transgender students to use restrooms that correspond with their gender identity or risk losing federal funding, failed last month.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7zN (PDH)

 


 

 

Jordan board calls for special bond election in November

 

WEST JORDAN — The Jordan School District’s Board of Education has unanimously approved a resolution calling for a local special bond election on Nov. 8.

The proposed bond is for $245 million and would be used to build six new schools in areas that are experiencing the most extreme growth in the district. One of the six new schools would include rebuilding of West Jordan Middle School at its current location.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7zy (DN)

 


 

 

Utah cooking show ‘TeenChef Pro’ gives teens an entree into the restaurant biz Program’s legislative ties raised eyebrows, but lawmakers nevertheless restored its appropriation.

 

Filming began last week on the second season of “TeenChef Pro,” a Utah-cooking competition that the creator says is entertaining, educational and can launch high school students into restaurant careers.

Yet the show was nearly chopped in March when Gov. Gary Herbert used a line-item veto to nix its $275,000 in state funding. While fun to participate in and watch, the governor questioned whether the cooking show — which debuted in 2015 under the name “Teen Chef Masters” — was the best use of tax dollars.

The funding loss didn’t stand, however, as the Utah Restaurant Association, which produces the show, and its lobbyist, Andrew Stephenson, successfully persuaded the Legislature to restore the money because of the program’s educational value.

A minor amount in the overall state budget, Herbert still questions the spending, said Jon Cox, Herbert’s communications director. “The governor is supportive of the ProStart Culinary program, but prefers that taxpayer funds be used exclusively for the program’s educational endeavors,” he said. “Ultimately it’s a matter of priorities, and Gov. Herbert believes that future funding for this type of programming should come from private sources.”

Behind the scenes, the dispute also raised eyebrows because of personal and business connections of those involved. Stephenson is the son of state Sen. Howard Stephenson, R-Draper, a senior member of the Legislature, while the producer is Katy Sine, vice president of communications for the Utah Restaurant Association, who has a background in film and uses her production company to create the show, although, she asserts, not for profit.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7zJ (SLT)

 


 

 

RNC 2016 live updates: Protesters from opposing sides voice views in lively Public Square

 

Utah Governor Gary Herbert, Lt. Gov. Spencer Cox and 75 other state delegates and family members spent the morning in Kirtland, the site where Joseph Smith — founder of the Mormon faith — began his first church and received most of the revelations and visions that guide the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints.

Delegate Spencer Stokes said spending time in Northeast Ohio’s holy place “has been a highlight of the trip.”

The group toured the historic buildings, watched a video, and were greeted by local dignitaries.

The Utah delegation is staying at the Holiday Inn in Akron.

“We have loved staying in Akron. It’s actually a very beautiful city. Hats off to everyone who’s rolled out the red carpet for us,” Stokes said.

That includes West Side Bakery, whose employees were up bright and early this morning to fill the delegation’s order for 100 breakfast cinnamon rolls.

“We had a delightful time with them in the store when we went to pick them up,” Stokes said.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7Ae (Akron [OH] Beacon Journal)

 


 

 

Olympian Picabo Street opens school for athletes

 

Picabo Street knows as well as anybody what it’s like to be a serious teenage athlete while juggling the demands of school.

Graduating high school was a challenge for the former ski racer, who won a gold medal at the 1998 Olympics. She began traveling the world for competition when she was 15. Finding the right balance between being a world-class skier and making sure she was ready for her next math test was difficult.

Now, she is doing her best to ensure students no longer have to face similar struggles.

Street is among the founders of the Picabo Street Academy, a new school in Park City for athletes who need the kind of flexible schedules traditional schools can’t provide.

The school, at 1762 Prospector Ave., will operate year-round and allow students to tailor their course loads to their needs. If they’re busy training and competing during the winter, they can schedule the brunt of their schoolwork during the summer. If they need a break from school in the spring, the school will help them make that work, too.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7Ac (PR)

 


 

 

Transitions

 

Sydnee Dickson

Sydnee Dickson, the interim schools superintendent in Utah, has been selected to stay in that position. She has worked for the state board of education since 2007. Before that, she worked in Utah’s Granite, Davis, and Murray districts as an administrator and in other school leadership positions.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7A6 (Ed Week)

 


 

 

Ecker Hill Middle School earns prestigious honor

 

Ecker Hill Middle School has been named a national School to Watch by the National Forum to Accelerate Middle-Grades Reform. According to the group’s website, middlegradesforum.org, the honor recognizes schools that are “well on their way to meeting the Forum’s criteria for high performance.” The schools are academically excellent, developmentally responsive and socially equitable. According to a newsletter from the Park City School District, some members from the Ecker Hill staff were honored in Washington, D.C., where they met with Congressman Rob Bishop, R-Utah, to talk about the needs of middle-school students.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7Aa (PR)

 


 

 

Audit: Employee stole $67K from Utah Schools for the Deaf and Blind Theft » Ex-employee at Utah Schools for Deaf and Blind falsified and diverted records, report says.

 

A financial analyst at the Utah Schools for the Deaf and Blind (USDB) skimmed at least $67,000 from school accounts over four years, according to a report released Tuesday by the Utah State Auditor’s Office.

State Auditor John Dougall said the theft was brought to his attention by USDB Superintendent Joel Coleman, who had noticed accounting irregularities after being named superintendent in 2013.

Dougall credited Coleman and his staff for working to address weaknesses in the handling of school funds, which led to the discovery of improprieties by a former employee, who was not identified in the audit.

“If it hadn’t been for their new procedures, I’m not sure how long this would have kept going on undetected,” Dougall said.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7zI (SLT)

 

http://gousoe.uen.org/7zK (DN)

 

http://gousoe.uen.org/7zP (KUTV)

 

http://gousoe.uen.org/7zR (KSL)

 

http://gousoe.uen.org/7zS (KUER)

 


 

 

Girls Go Digital: Summer camps for young girls promote future tech careers

 

SALT LAKE CITY — Savannah Jo Patience says she wants to be an “imagineer.”

“It’s sort of like an engineer, except you work for Disney and you do the rides and stuff,” the 11-year-old said as she watched the robotic ball she coded swerve around the room.

Savannah was one of 66 girls participating in a Girls Go Digital summer camp, hosted by Junior Achievement, 444 W. 100 South, on Monday and Tuesday to learn about computers, programming, technology and design.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7zL (DN)

 


 

 

‘Uniquely Utah’ inspires section of book published by Venture Academy students

 

OGDEN, Utah — Becoming a published author is hard enough work for an adult, but what about a kid?

This summer a new book hits the shelves that includes essays and illustrations from 175 middle school students in Utah.

The book is called “Utah By Kids For Kids.”

It was a three-month long social studies project by the sixth-, seventh- and eighth-grade classes at Venture Academy.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7zQ (KSTU)

 


 

 

Lehi’s Skyridge High School has 2,200 reasons to open in August

 

Skyridge High School in Lehi is on track to open for its more than 2,000 students on Aug. 22.

“It’s been an exciting process. I’ve loved it,” Principal Joel Perkins said Tuesday morning.

Perkins is a school-debut veteran, having helped open Orem High School after a major rebuild in 2010, and is familiar with the ebb and flow of construction deadlines.

“We will be ready. The building will be done,” Perkins said. “We won’t have any problems.”

Funded through a 2011 bond by the Alpine School District, the $56 million school will be completed by Aug. 4.

An open house for the school is tentatively planned for Aug. 13, the same day as the first Falcons football game, the “Orange and Grey” intersquad scrimmage.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7zM (PDH)

 


 

 

Committee to recommend changing Park City school start times

 

A committee that has been studying the possibility of shifting school start times in the Park City School District is set to recommend to the Board of Education next month that Park City High School begin classes later in the morning starting in the 2017-2018 school year.

Todd Hauber, the district’s business administrator and a member of the committee, said the decision to encourage the school board to delay the high school’s start time was due to two main factors: research that shows students that age learn best when classes start around 8:30 or 9 a.m.; and the results of a survey that showed Park City residents support the change.

According to a newsletter the district sent out last week, 66 percent of the more than 2,900 people who took the survey, conducted online in recent months, indicated that they were in favor of changing start times. Further, 71 percent of those people supported moving the first classes at the high school and Treasure Mountain Junior High to after 8 a.m.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7Ad (PR)

 


 

 

Summer reading programs popular in northern Cache Valley

 

Libraries in northern Cache Valley said they’re summer reading programs continue to grow. The Smithfield, Richmond, Newton and Lewiston Public Libraries each have something new and different but one thing they share is a consortium that makes checking out your books faster and easier.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7zO (CVD)

 

 

 

 

 

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OPINION & COMMENTARY

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Not liking top of tickets? Create change from the bottom up Salt Lake Tribune op-ed by Peter Corroon, chair of the Utah Democratic Party, and Katie Christensen, a Bernie Sanders supporter

 

Now that the Utah primary is over, our nation’s political attention has turned toward the Democratic and Republican National Conventions and the 2016 presidential election.

Here in Utah, the tumultuous 2016 political cycle has brought a wave of newly-registered voters. During the neighborhood caucuses, Democrats saw more than 17,000 new voters and record caucus attendance. Sen. Bernie Sanders inspired many, young and old, who had traditionally sat on the sidelines, to show up and vote. During the primary election, we saw another large turnout statewide by both Democrats and Republicans.

But with Sanders out and Donald Trump at the top of the GOP ticket, many people now wonder: Will Utahns now stay home in November? Will Sanders’ supporters remain engaged if Hillary Clinton is the Democratic nominee? Will Trump keep voters from both parties from going to the polls on Nov. 8?

To those disenchanted with the presidential race, we say: Look to our many state and local races, and stay engaged! State and local elections are not simply watered-down versions of what many perceive as the pick-your-poison national spectacle of 2016. These candidates affect us more than we may realize: They determine how much funding our public schools get and control the administration of important programs like Medicaid expansion. For better or for worse, state and local elections can bring about tremendous change. Moreover, state and local governments often drive national policy, more so than some of your Utah elected officials would have you believe.

In many ways, the Utah election does not mirror the national one, and frustration with the latter need not preclude participation in the former. Many of our local races feature first-time candidates who finally have a reason to believe they can wrestle democracy away from corporate interests and entrenched politicians. This is a good thing for our democracy! These candidates, determined to infuse ethics and integrity into government at every level, will be fueled only by your vote and support on Nov. 8.

Insurgent candidates cannot elect themselves. They need you, me and the other people who showed up to caucus meetings on March 22 (and those who didn’t), to show up again in November with their families and friends, all of whom are beginning to question our worsening air quality, the state of our water supply, the lack of respect towards our education system, a health insurance system that leaves too many without health care and our neglected transportation system.

As Sanders stated: “We need to engage in local politics in an unprecedented way. Now we need many of you to start running for school boards, city councils, county commissions, and state legislatures.”

http://gousoe.uen.org/7A8

 


 

 

Local And State Officials “Just Say No” To The Department Of Education Townhall commentary by columnists Emmett McGroarty and Jane Robbins

 

Piercing the gloom of the current educational and political landscape are a few glimmers of hope. One promising development is that some state and local education officials are now openly discussing what previously was never uttered aloud for fear of being struck down by the gods of lucre – the possibility of relinquishing federal funding to regain autonomy over education.

An early sign of light appeared in response to the unlawful decree issued by the U.S. Department of Education (USED) concerning transgender students. After USED threatened public schools if they didn’t open up all restrooms, locker rooms, sleeping quarters, and probably sports teams to both sexes, three school board members (Brian Halladay, Wendy Hart, and Paula Hill) in Utah’s Alpine School District sent a letter to state leaders objecting to a “level of federal overreach [that] is as unprecedented as it is unconstitutional.”

These board members downplayed USED’s probably bogus threats of funding loss but declared that even if the federal dictators followed through, such bullying could have a silver lining — an “ideal opportunity to declare Utah’s sovereignty, and to allow our children to be free from the tyrannical mandates of our federal government.” The board members went on to argue that student safety and privacy should trump any funding concerns, especially when just 8 percent of the district’s budget comes from federal funds.

These members pursued the subject at the next board meeting. They noted that their district has been accommodating transgender students for years, without complaint, and argued that this successful local policy should not be preempted by federal mandates. They then pushed for a backup budget that would exclude the $40 million federal portion of a nearly $500 million district budget. Objections from the fainthearted, including the chairman, dissuaded the board from taking that step immediately, but the board did promise to continue the discussion. Given the hitherto verboten nature of musings about financial independence from the feds, that in itself was a significant victory.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7A7

 


 

 

Clinton Hands Trump an Opening: Pence’s Record on Education Hillary assails the Indiana governor for his charter-school policies—but that’s a fight the Republicans ought to embrace.

Wall Street Journal commentary by columnist Allysia Finley

 

Hillary Clinton used a rally of the American Federation of Teachers in Minneapolis on Monday night as another occasion to blast Mike Pence, but the slap came off as a backhanded compliment. The Indiana governor, she said, is “one of the most hostile politicians in America when it comes to public education.”

Donald Trump has been vague on education, and his running mate’s efforts to expand school choice in Indiana have been largely overshadowed by the state’s culture wars. So it is nice to see Mrs. Clinton calling attention to Mr. Pence’s strong record of school reform. The Trump campaign ought to be doing the same.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7zZ

 


 

 

The RNC Stays Focused on Bashing Clinton Trump’s children are the only convention speakers articulating a positive case for the Republican nominee.

The Nation commentary by columnist D.D. Gutten

 

Cleveland—They got the wrong Trump.

Donald Trump Sr. may be a short-fingered vulgarian, a compulsive liar, multiple bankrupt, and serial philanderer. Not to mention his terrible policy “ideas.” But on the evidence of tonight’s speech, Donald Trump Jr. might really have a future in politics. Unlike Senior, who also inherited a fortune from his father, Junior never pretends to be self-made. And though he also appears to have inherited The Donald’s chutzpah—his rant about “public schools that too often fail our students” was a bit rich, coming from a product of the Hill School (other alumni include filmmaker Oliver Stone, Edmund Wilson, and Lamar Hunt)—Junior seems to have dodged his father’s narcissism. On a night when Paul Ryan sounded like he was reading out confessions on North Korean state television and Mitch McConnell struggled to say anything positive about Trump beyond his not being Hillary Clinton, Trump Junior gave an articulate, enthusiastic endorsement of his dad. Which at least made a nice change from Bush 43 and his father.

Of course, Junior turned out to have taken part of his speech from an article written by somebody else—but since that somebody was a Canadian law professor, who got paid for helping draft Junior’s speech, we must, in the words of the immortal Tom Lehrer, “be sure to always call it please ‘research.’”

Junior also figured in the only piece of actual news here today, casting the votes of the New York delegation that put his father over the top for the nomination, triggering a minute (literally. I timed it) of tastefully restrained celebration, followed by a rousing rendition of “New York, New York.”

I was down on the floor at the time, chatting with the Utah delegation, who were about to get rolled by Reince Preibus. Back in March, Ted Cruz won nearly 70 percent of the votes in Utah’s Republican primary, entitling him to all 40 of the Beehive State’s delegates. But when the state totals were announced, all 40 votes had been awarded to Trump. The same thing happened to Alaska, which miraculously got recognized by the chair and demanded a poll of the state delegation—forcing a shamefaced Preibus to take the podium and explain which arcane rule allowed the party to take votes away from candidates who’d dropped out. But Chris Herrod, a Cruz loyalist from Provo and the Utah delegation’s resident parliamentarian, had no such luck.

Herrod, who drove to Cleveland with his wife (an alternate), daughter (also an alternate), and two other children, wasn’t happy about his family’s unexpected lesson in power politics. “We’re delegates. I’m supposed to get a vote. They don’t get to vote my vote. And that’s what they did,” he told me.

Matt Throckmorton, another Utahn for Cruz who runs a charter school in Riverdale, said he wasn’t surprised by the maneuver. “This is how it is. You just gotta know the rules better than the other side.” What worried him was what would happen after Trump’s defeat in November. “They’re gonna set Trump up to lose to Hillary—and then blame the conservatives,” he said.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7A5

 

 

 

 

 

 

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NATIONAL NEWS

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Data Looms Large in Quest for New School-Quality Indicator States look hard at what’s required to meet ESSA’s mandate Education Week

 

States scrambling to come up with more nuanced ways to measure school quality under the new federal K-12 law are running smack into an old problem: how to make sure they have the right data.

The Every Student Succeeds Act requires that states—in addition to using English-language proficiency, graduation rates, and scores on statewide achievement tests—add at least one new indicator of school quality or student success, such as school climate, chronic absenteeism, discipline, or college and career readiness.

For many states, adding that new indicator may mean spending more on data systems and collection, avoiding approaches that might demand too much of a data lift, or picking something off the shelf rather than crafting a more challenging indicator, because the information isn’t easily available.

Complicating the matter, the law requires that the data for the new school-quality indicator must be valid, reliable, and comparable across districts, and that officials be able to break out the information by student demographics.

That presents a challenge for state education agencies that want to pick indicators that use classroom observations or teacher and parent surveys to measure schoolwide indicators. Those might include whether parents feel engaged or if teachers are participating in effective peer-mentor programs, for example.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7zD

 


 

 

Q&A: U.S. Secretary of Education John B. King Jr.

One-on-one with the federal agency’s top official Education Week

 

U.S. Secretary of Education John B. King Jr. sat down with Education Week Assistant Editor Alyson Klein in his office earlier this summer to talk about the many twists and turns in the implementation of the new Every Student Succeeds Act, as well as a few broader issues. Here’s an abridged transcript.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7zE

 


 

 

Transgender students in Maryland, Wisconsin file federal discrimination lawsuits Washington Post

 

Transgender high school students in Maryland and Wisconsin who were banned from boys’ facilities in their schools have filed federal lawsuits arguing that the prohibitions violate their civil rights.

The two lawsuits — filed by transgender boys from Talbot County, Md., and Kenosha, Wis. — are the latest actions in a flurry of litigation surrounding the question of how schools treat transgender students. The cases challenge the legality of restricting transgender students to unisex restrooms or to the restrooms that correspond with the sex shown on their birth certificates rather than allowing them access to the public-school bathrooms — and locker rooms — that match their gender identity.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7zA

 

http://gousoe.uen.org/7zz (Milwaukee Journal Sentinel)

 

http://gousoe.uen.org/7zC (Baltimore Sun)

 


 

 

Donald Trump Jr. Blasts ‘Soviet-Era’ Schools, Tenured Teachers in RNC Speech Education Week

 

Cleveland — Although they had prime speaking slots at the Republican National Convention here Tuesday, neither New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie nor Speaker of the House Paul Ryan mentioned education in their speeches. Instead, it was Donald Trump Jr., the son of the GOP presidential nominee who devoted a part of his remarks to education, delivering a fiery denunciation of teacher tenure while giving a shout-out to school choice.

Trump Jr. blasted schools for failing American students and serving other interests.

“Our schools used to be an elevator to the middle class. Now they’re stalled on the ground floor,” he said of schools. “They’re like Soviet-era department stores that are run for the benefit of the clerks and not the customers.”

http://gousoe.uen.org/7zW

 

http://gousoe.uen.org/7zX (Talking Points Memo)

 

http://gousoe.uen.org/7A4 (WaPo, video)

 


 

 

Mike Pence’s Record on Education Is One of Turmoil and Mixed Results New York Times

 

As the Republican nominee for president, Donald J. Trump has said little about what he would do on education.

The subject follows “The Establishment,” “Political Correctness” and “Unifying the Nation” among the issues on his campaign website. Mr. Trump says only generally that he is “a tremendous believer” in education and that he wants to end the Common Core. (“It’s an absolute disaster.”)

For his running mate, Gov. Mike Pence of Indiana, education has been a signature issue — and a contentious one.

As a congressman, he was one of just two dozen Republicans to vote against the No Child Left Behind act championed by President George W. Bush. Mr. Pence said he was concerned about federal intrusion into what had been a state and local issue. He has largely hewed to Republican ideas of more school choice and a smaller federal role in education. But he has also alienated some members of his own party, who said Mr. Pence paid more attention to politics than to policy http://gousoe.uen.org/7zT

 

http://gousoe.uen.org/7A0 (Forbes)

 


 

 

A Detroit charter shuts down. Is this what school accountability looks like?

(Ann Arbor) Michigan Radio

 

How do you decide if a so-called “failing” school should shut down, and is there a right way to do it?

Three Detroit charter schools shut their doors forever at the end of this school year.

One of them, Allen Academy, was one of the city’s very first charters. And its closure leaves a wake of upheaval.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7zY

 


 

 

Gulen Movement’s Charter Schools May Be Caught Up in Turkey-U.S. Standoff Turks’ accusations against cleric could affect new schools and charters up for renewal Wall Street Journal

 

Scores of U.S. charter schools run by Turkish-Americans risk getting caught up in the political fallout between the U.S. and Turkey over a cleric living in the U.S. but accused of orchestrating Friday’s failed coup in Istanbul.

The Turkish government has threatened to make the U.S. an enemy if it does not turn over Fethullah Gulen, who has lived a reclusive life of self-imposed exile in a compound in Saylorsburg, Pa., about 90 miles north of Philadelphia, for nearly two decades.

Mr. Gulen denies having any role in the military’s attempt to unseat democratically elected President Recep Tayyip Erdogan last week. Instead, Mr. Gulen accuses Mr. Erdogan himself of orchestrating the coup to legitimize his own rule.

The cleric’s international following, known as the Gulen movement, is said to be tied to around 150 U.S. charter schools, ranging from networks in Texas, Illinois and Florida to stand-alone academies in Maryland, said Joshua Hendrick, an assistant professor of sociology and global studies at Loyola University Maryland, who studies the Gulen movement.

The political controversy won’t have any immediate effect on the schools, since Mr. Gulen does not have a direct hand in operating them, and many of the schools dispute any connection to the cleric, Mr. Hendrick said.

But in the long term, the accusations against Mr. Gulen and tension between the U.S. and Turkey could affect new schools and charters up for renewal that are run by Turkish-Americans and are said to be connected with the cleric, Mr. Hendrick said.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7A3

 


 

 

State schools chief Randy Dorn sues 7 school districts over ‘illegal’ use of levy money State schools chief Randy Dorn filed a lawsuit Tuesday against Seattle Public Schools and six other districts alleging that they illegally rely on local levies to fund basic education.

Seattle Times

 

State schools chief Randy Dorn has filed a lawsuit against seven school districts alleging that they illegally rely on local levies to fund basic education, including teacher salaries.

The seven school districts, which the lawsuit says are named as examples, are Seattle, Everett, Bellevue, Spokane, Tacoma, Evergreen and Puyallup. The suit filed Tuesday in King County Superior Court also lists the state of Washington as a defendant.

Dorn said last week that he doesn’t fault the school districts but believes they don’t have the authority to use levy dollars to pay for basic needs.

“This is not a step I want to take,” Dorn, the superintendent of public instruction, said Tuesday.

Dorn said the goal of the lawsuit is to put additional pressure on the Legislature to come up with a full plan to fund K-12 education.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7A2

 


 

 

At the White House, college-bound students celebrated for overcoming steep odds Washington Post

 

Nia Hill’s family was evicted last summer, just before the Chicago teenager was about to enter her senior year of high school. Her final year was supposed to be spent focusing on grades, preparing for college and basking in senior rituals and prom. Instead, she had to grit it out as her family moved six times, searching for stability and a place to call their own.

“It definitely humbled me, but it also made me realize that I’m very blessed. It strengthened me,” Hill said Tuesday at the White House, where she was among 130 college-bound students from across the country taking part in Beating the Odds, a day-long event hosted by first lady Michelle Obama to showcase seniors who have overcome personal setbacks and financial hardship to go to college.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7zB

 


 

 

City looking to hire with soda-tax funds Philadelphia Inquirer

 

The city of Philadelphia is on a hiring spree, sparked by the recently passed sweetened-beverage tax.

More than two dozen jobs have been posted since last week, and city officials say more are on the way. They range from data analysts and school-health specialists to a workforce manager for a prekindergarten expansion, all listed as the city prepares to launch both the tax and the programs it will fund.

“These are important early steps that we need to take to make sure the programs are implemented effectively,” city finance director Rob Dubow said.

The city has budgeted about $2.6 million in the first year for the new hires. City spokeswoman Lauren Hitt said the salaries will be paid with revenue from the sweetened-beverage tax and, before the tax is implemented, from the general fund.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7zH

 


 

 

How should children’s violent ‘media diet’ be managed?

A new policy statement from the American Academy of Pediatrics looks at how to mitigate the adverse effects of screen violence on children.

Christian Science Monitor

 

Can doctors, parents, and policymakers help children navigate news, movies, and video games full of violence? A new policy statement by the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) published on Monday says “yes,” and shows how.

The AAP reviewed research literature on the effects of viewing violence, and concludes that there is a “proven scientific connection between virtual violence and real-world aggression.” It recommends that pediatricians, parents, and policymakers all do their part in assessing and managing the quality of the media that children consume.

This policy statement is “a more open-minded and less rigid take on media than the Academy has had in the past,” Steven Schlozman, associate director of The Clay Center for Young Healthy Minds at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston tells The Christian Science Monitor in a phone interview.

But he disagrees with the AAP conclusion that media violence causes aggression. Research has not found that viewing violent content causes violent behavior, but “some studies (though not all) have shown a statistically significant correlation” between the two, Dr. Schlozman writes in an email.

Nonetheless, the AAP policy statement asks doctors and parents to assess the individual situation first. “Sit down, figure out what they’re watching, why they’re watching it, why they enjoy it, and how they’re able to talk about it,” Schlozman says.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7zF

 

A copy of the policy statement

http://gousoe.uen.org/7zG (Pediatrics)

 


 

 

How Chalkbeat is trying to build a bigger audience for education news Columbia Journalism Review

 

IN THE ONE-WOMAN NEWSROOM of Chalkbeat Detroit, Erin Einhorn spends her time making calls, reaching out to principals, attending parent meet-ups, and arranging classroom visits, documenting the efforts to respond to the decades-long deterioration of the city’s school system.

Public schools in Detroit are among the most troubled in the country: Schools are bleeding enrollment, frequent closures mean some students transfer multiple times a year, and chronic absenteeism is worse than in any other city. Now, the district is undergoing a sweeping and politically divisive transformation. State legislators voted last month on a $617 million rescue deal, part of a controversial plan that left local lawmakers fuming.

It’s a whirlwind of a story for Einhorn, who moved to Detroit from New York with her two young children less than two years ago, and began launching Chalkbeat Detroit in March of this year. It’s also a story with personal significance.

“I am a Detroit parent,” she said. “It’s hard to predict the future of Detroit schools, which seem to be perpetually in a state of upheaval. And I figured that if it was this difficult for me—an education reporter—it must be much more difficult for families that don’t have my resources. Parents and educators need new ways to get information about what’s working, what’s not, and what solutions may be available.”

That’s an attitude that fits in well with Chalkbeat’s broader approach: local journalists, in cities around the country, reporting on strategies to improve schools and address inequity in education. Over the past few years, the nonprofit news outlet has won admirers and awards while attracting a solid base of financial support. Along the way, it has had to navigate the ethics of nonprofit funding, grapple with how to measure the impact of its reporting, and respond to critics.

Now, as the outlet looks to expand, it faces the challenge of extending its reach beyond ed-world insiders—while also serving a niche community that can be sharply divided over the very issues Chalkbeat covers.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7A1

 


 

 

More US Schools Accused of Denying Education to Immigrants Associated Press

 

PHILADELPHIA — Civil rights lawyers have sued a third U.S. school district over what they call a practice of denying older refugee and immigrant students a meaningful education by steering them to alternative high schools.

The plaintiffs in a federal lawsuit filed Tuesday in Pennsylvania are refugees ages 17 to 21 who came to the U.S. from Myanmar, Sudan and other war-torn countries.

The American Civil Liberties Union said the Lancaster School District has steered at least 30 students over three years to a disciplinary high school, denying them the classes and services offered at the traditional high school.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7zV

 


 

 

‘Broken-hearted and sad’, British schoolchildren learn empathy for refugees Reuters

 

LONDON – In a quiet suburban school in northwest London, young children are asked to imagine that they need to leave their homes because Britain is at war.

As they close their eyes and sit in silence, their teacher Teri-Louise O’Brien explains that there are 60 million displaced people in the world right now.

“Time to reflect: how would you feel if you had no home? Take a pen, and write your feelings on the paper.”

One child scribbles, “I would feel heartbroken and sad” while another writes, “I would feel sad and neglected because I wouldn’t have a warm place to sleep in”.

The children, aged between six and 11, spend time discussing the differences between a refugee, an asylum seeker, a migrant and a displaced person.

O’Brien then switches off the lights before playing a short video of Syrian refugees living in camps in Lebanon and Jordan.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7zU

 

 

 

 

————————————————————

CALENDAR

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USOE Calendar

http://www.schools.utah.gov/main/CALENDAR.aspx

 

 

UEN News

http://www.uen.org

 

 

July 26:

Utah State Board of Education Law & Licensing Committee public hearing

4 p.m., 250 E 500 South

http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda/July26R277511.aspx

 

 

August 4:

Public Education Appropriations Subcommittee meeting

9 a.m., 445 State Capitol

http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2016&com=APPPED

 

 

August 11:

Utah State Charter School Board meeting

250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://go.uen.org/62M

 

Utah State Board of Education study session, USDB and committee meetings

250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspx

 

 

August 12:

Utah State Board of Education meeting

250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspx

 

 

September 20:

Executive Appropriations Committee meeting

2 p.m., 445 State Capitol

http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2016&com=APPEXE

 

 

September 21:

Education Interim Committee meeting

1:15 p.m., 30 House Building

http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2016&com=INTEDU

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