Education News Roundup: August 2 – 2016

 

 

Summer School/Education News Roundup.

Summer School/Education News Roundup

Education News Roundup

Today’s Top Picks:

 

Utah State Board of Education comments on proposed ESSA regulations.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7FJ (SLT)

and http://gousoe.uen.org/7FK (USBE)

or a copy of the comments

http://gousoe.uen.org/7FL (USBE)

 

A national perspective on the ESSA regulations:

http://gousoe.uen.org/7Fw (USN&WR)

and http://gousoe.uen.org/7Fu (Ed Week)

 

Davis School District looks at its standardized testing options.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7FF (DCC)

 

Carnegie Mellon University teams up with the Utah STEM Action Center and two Utah colleges on technology and education.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7FE (Carnegie Mellon University)

 

EEOC releases its findings on an investigation in Iron School District.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7Fb (SGN)

 

 

 

 

 

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TODAY’S HEADLINES

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UTAH

 

Utah education board wants more leeway in federal No Child Left Behind replacement

 

District considers opting 11th graders out of SAGE tests

 

Carnegie Mellon Lab Expands U.S. Education Network Satellites Being Established in Atlanta, Salt Lake City

 

Commission finds school district failed to protect 8 sexual harassment victims

 

‘After School Satan’ club will target school districts with evangelical Christian programs

 

A look inside Rock Canyon and Sunset View elementary schools

 

After initial bids came in too high, Provo City School District breaks ground on Edgemont Elementary School

 

Former Park City teacher sentenced for sending sexual messages to 13-year-old boy

 

North Ogden Police investigating ‘intentional’ gas leak near school

 

Local Teen Wins Advocacy Award

 

Dara Harrop Named Principal Of Marrington Middle School Of The Arts

 

Science students present findings following internships

 

Back to school essentials

 


 

 

OPINION & COMMENTARY

 

Nevada Awaits School Choice Ruling

 

How Media Coverage of Charter Schools Changed in the Past Decade

 

What 50,000 Swedish twins can teach us about education and longevity

 


 

 

NATION

 

The New Era of Education Accountability

States are shifting away from a one-size-fits-all accountability system mandated under the old education law to a new, build-it-yourself model.

 

Educators Weigh Learning Value of Pokémon Go Does engaging tool pose privacy risks?

 

Appeals Court Rules in Separate Strip-Search, Prom Breath-Test Cases

 

E-school students performing worse than district school peers, study says

 

Minority charter students are outperforming public school kids

 

1 in 5 charter schools ‘illegally’ screens applicants, report says

 

Teachers union leader says next president must completely reset education policy and oust current education secretary

 

California’s Ed Reform Wars

How long before a teacher is tenured? The legislature mulls it over.

 

3 Things People Can Do In The Classroom That Robots Can’t

 

Seymour Papert, 88, Dies; Saw Education’s Future in Computers

 

Catholic schools for Native Americans, known for abuse and assimilation, try to do good

 

Pope: It’s ‘Terrible’ Children Taught They Can Choose Gender

 

Tobacco, fast food in easier reach of minority and low-income students

 

 

 

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UTAH NEWS

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Utah education board wants more leeway in federal No Child Left Behind replacement

 

The Utah Board of Education wants more flexibility in new federal education regulations set to go into effect next year, it wrote in a letter to the U.S. Department of Education.

In a document released Tuesday, the board wrote that it supports the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA), which grants states more leeway in setting their own goals than did the No Child Left Behind Act . But board members believe a proposed set of regulations under the new law gives federal officials too much oversight of Utah schools.

For example, ESSA requires that a school be penalized if more than 5 percent of its students are opted out of testing. Utah’s board wants that to end.

Opt-out rates in Utah in recent years have hovered around 1 to 3 percent for the state’s end-of-year SAGE test, but it’s above 7 percent at some charter schools.

Board members also asked the U.S. Department of Education to remove dollar amounts dictating how much Utah must spend to help struggling schools. And data from prior years, not just recent numbers, the board argued, should be used in determining which schools need the state’s help. These changes would allow states to determine the best way to intervene, the board wrote.

The letter, signed by Board Chairman David Crandall and State Superintendent Sydnee Dickson was submitted during a public comment period on the proposed federal guidelines.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7FJ (SLT)

 

http://gousoe.uen.org/7FK (USBE)

 

A copy of the comments

http://gousoe.uen.org/7FL (USBE)

 


 

 

District considers opting 11th graders out of SAGE tests

 

FARMINGTON—Is one less test for 11th graders a good thing, or would opting them out of the state’s year-end standardized test create more problems?

If you ask the 11th graders you might get one enthusiastic answer in favor of opting out, but members of the Davis School District Board of Education have more to consider than the time and stress of taking a test.

At a recent meeting, Logan Toone, director of assessment for the district, presented the pros and cons of the new option offered by the Utah State Legislature this year.

HB 200 allows districts to opt their 11th graders out of SAGE (Student Assessment for Growth and Excellence) tests, with the thinking that the ACT tests they take that year are a sufficient measure of ability.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7FF (DCC)

 


 

 

Carnegie Mellon Lab Expands U.S. Education Network Satellites Being Established in Atlanta, Salt Lake City

 

A program to empower students with technology by leveraging Carnegie Mellon University’s robotics and computer science talent with education expertise at partner universities is expanding beyond the Western Pennsylvania and West Virginia region to include satellite labs in Atlanta and Salt Lake City.

With support from a $250,000 grant from the Infosys Foundation USA, CMU’s Community Robotics, Education and Technology Empowerment (CREATE) Lab will work with partners in both cities to provide educators with tools and training to help their students learn about technology and adapt it to their individual and community needs.

In Utah, the CREATE team will work with the Utah STEM Action Center (STEM AC), which drives research and implementation of STEM education best practices across the state. Its existing, strong network of educators, administrators and government and business leaders positions them to support and coordinate engagement in more than one location. STEM AC will establish two local CREATE Lab satellites at Southern Utah University and Utah Valley University.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7FE (Carnegie Mellon University)

 


 

 

Commission finds school district failed to protect 8 sexual harassment victims

 

CEDAR CITY – An investigation by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission recently found the Iron County School District failed to protect eight female employees from years of ongoing verbal and sexual harassment – despite the fact district administrators knew it was going on.

The EEOC’s findings have been turned over to the U.S. Department of Justice for review.

The investigation stemmed from a complaint filed with the EEOC last year by the eight women, following a criminal case involving Samuel Naim El-Halta, who was convicted on seven counts of sexual battery and two counts of accessing pornographic material on school property, all class A misdemeanors.

El-Halta was employed at the time as a counselor at Cedar Middle School and worked with all of the women, who were counselors, secretaries and aides.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7Fb (SGN)

 


 

 

‘After School Satan’ club will target school districts with evangelical Christian programs

 

The Satanic Temple, a group of nonbelievers who push for the further separation of church and state, wants evangelical Christianity out of public schools. But since the Supreme Court ruled in favor of Christian student groups in 2001, the Satanists want their place in schools, too.

On Monday, the group launched “After School Satan,” a program that’s also a protest against popular, evangelical Christian Good News Clubs. The Satanic Temple plans to contact every school district where the Good News Clubs are active or have been present before, The Washington Post reported.

“The group’s plan for public schoolchildren isn’t actually about promoting worship of the devil. The Satanic Temple doesn’t espouse a belief in the existence of a supernatural being that other religions identify solemnly as Satan, or Lucifer, or Beelzebub,” the article said.

Instead, the group will focus on science, literature and art projects and assure participants that religious practice isn’t essential to being a good person.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7EX (DN)

 

http://gousoe.uen.org/7FI (KSL)

 

http://gousoe.uen.org/7Fc (KSTU)

 

http://gousoe.uen.org/7Fk (MUR)

 

http://gousoe.uen.org/7Fm (WaPo)

 

http://gousoe.uen.org/7Fz (Fox)

 


 

 

A look inside Rock Canyon and Sunset View elementary schools

 

The rebuilt Rock Canyon and Sunset View elementary schools are almost ready for students.

The Provo City School District schools, located at the same sites as the old schools of the same name, were toured Monday by members of the Provo City School District Board of Education.

“Besides all the infrastructure improvements, from seismic codes to mechanic and electrical and technology infrastructure, to general safety improvements, you can’t compare these buildings to the old ones,” said Mark Wheeler, director of facilities and maintenance for the district.

Sunset View is located at 525 S. 1600 West and Rock Canyon is located at 2405 N. 650 East.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7F9 (PDH)

 


 

 

After initial bids came in too high, Provo City School District breaks ground on Edgemont Elementary School

 

About two months after original bids came in significantly over budget, Provo City School District broke ground on the new Edgemont Elementary School.

“One of the contractors who had put in an aggressive bid was able to jump to the aid of the Provo City School District and say, ‘We’ll work with you. Let’s talk about how we can make this happen for the Edgemont community,’” said Doug Finch, principal of Edgemont Elementary School, during a groundbreaking ceremony Monday morning.

The new school will be built at the same location — 566 E. 3650 North — as the current Edgemont.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7Fa (PDH)

 


 

 

Former Park City teacher sentenced for sending sexual messages to 13-year-old boy

 

PARK CITY, Utah — A former music teacher who was found guilty of sending sexually explicit email messages to a teenage student was sentenced for the crimes Monday.

Derek Spitzer was given two sentences, to be served concurrently, of one to 15 years in the Utah State Prison.

Police said Spitzer, a former music teacher at Ecker Hill Middle School in Park City, used school computers to send more than 500 sexual messages to a 13-year-old boy over a four-month period.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7Fd (KSTU)

 

http://gousoe.uen.org/7FD (Houston Chronicle)

 

http://gousoe.uen.org/7FG (San Francisco Chronicle)

 


 

 

North Ogden Police investigating ‘intentional’ gas leak near school

 

NORTH OGDEN, Utah – Authorities are investigating a gas leak they say appears to be intentional.

Officials say they were called about suspicious noises and then the strong smell of gas near Bates Elementary at about 11 p.m. Monday.

North Ogden residents were evacuated for the leak overnight and are now back in their homes.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7FH (KSTU)

 


 

 

Local Teen Wins Advocacy Award

 

ST GEORGE, Utah – Jarom Price, a soon-to-be senior at Pine View High School and next year’s president of the Washington County Youth Coalition (WCYC), recently received the Utah Youth Community Engagement Advocate of the Year award.

This award was given by the Utah Department of Health in recognition of Jarom’s exemplary drug prevention work in our local community as a WCYC member, as well as his commitment and dedication to furthering the fight against Big Tobacco.

Shorten

http://gousoe.uen.org/7Fi (KCSG)

 


 

 

Dara Harrop Named Principal Of Marrington Middle School Of The Arts

 

BERKELEY COUNTY, S.C.– Dara Harrop has been named the new principal of Marrington Middle School of the Arts in Goose Creek, South Carolina.

The Berkeley County School Board approved the appointment at their meeting on Tuesday, July 26. Harrop will begin her new assignment August 1 to prepare for the upcoming school year.

Harrop has invested 16 years in public education, beginning her career in Springville, Utah. She joined BCSD in 2002.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7FC (Berkeley [SC] Observer)

 


 

 

Science students present findings following internships

 

People gather to ask questions as 13 students from Juan Diego Catholic High School’s Academy of Science program present their findings during a poster symposium at the Skaggs Pharmacy Building at the University of Utah on Monday. While many high school students have been enjoying summer vacation, the 13 students have spent the last eight weeks conducting scientific research at the U.’s College of Pharmacy in order to obtain a special Academy of Sciences designation on their student transcripts. Students at the Draper school may enter the Academy of Sciences track during their freshman or sophomore year, and they must complete several requirements to receive the designation. The requirements include conducting independent research; participating in a nationally recognized science competition; completing several Advance Placement courses; participating in science extracurricular activities; and performing service projects related to the sciences, such as tutoring or volunteering at a science summer camp.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7F8 (DN)

 


 

 

Back to school essentials

 

Summer is almost already over and it is time for that back to school shopping! Sandra with Canyons School District gives us a checklist for all the essentials your kids will need.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7Fh (KSTU)

 

http://gousoe.uen.org/7FB (KTVX)

 

 

 

 

 

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OPINION & COMMENTARY

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Nevada Awaits School Choice Ruling

Wall Street Journal commentary

 

EdChoice Vice President Leslie Hiner on oral arguments in a state supreme court case with national implications.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7EY (video)

 


 

 

How Media Coverage of Charter Schools Changed in the Past Decade American Enterprise Institute analysis by Frederick M. Hess, Kelsey Hamilton, and Jenn Hatfield

 

Key Points:

* In this analysis, we compared the tone of press coverage of charter school in 2005 with that in 2015.

* Charter coverage became more opinionated and more negative between 2005 and 2015.

* In 2005, 73 percent of articles were neutral and 12 percent were negative, whereas by 2015, 53 percent were neutral, and 28 percent were negative. This occurred despite public opinion of charter schools becoming dramatically more positive during that time.

* Opinion pieces made up a much larger share of charter school coverage in 2015 than in 2005. In addition, race became much more prominent in charter school coverage over time, with the share of articles that mentioned race rising from 7 percent in 2005 to 16 percent in 2015.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7F2

 


 

 

What 50,000 Swedish twins can teach us about education and longevity Vox commentary by columnist Brian Resnick

 

Studies consistently find that people with more education tend to live longer. But scientists aren’t exactly sure why.

One explanation could be that they’re richer and thus have more money to invest in their health. Or maybe there’s just something intrinsically special about people who stay in school longer. Perhaps they’re smarter, more resilient. Those qualities could easily help them live longer, healthier lives.

But that isn’t a satisfying answer because we — mostly — can’t control our genes and the environments we’re born into.

There’s another hypothesis for why school may yield longer lives. It’s that education builds “human capital,” or a systematic way of thinking that benefits every decision. Those tiny good decisions add up to a protective factor that helps you live longer.

“Education is likely to provide general human capital that can be used to maintain and improve health in a wide range of circumstances,” David Cutler, Angus Deaton, and Adriana Lleras-Muney — Harvard and Princeton economists — write in a 2006 paper in the Journal of Economic Perspectives. This human capital, they say, will aid long-term survival “whenever there exists a mechanism or technology that more knowledgeable and educated people can use to improve their health.”

A new study from researchers in Sweden adds compelling evidence to the human capital argument. Its main conclusion: People with higher levels of schooling (more than 13 years) live around three years longer than people with less schooling (under 10 years), after controlling for biology and childhood environment.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7Fx

 

A copy of the study

http://gousoe.uen.org/7Fy (Demography $)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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NATIONAL NEWS

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The New Era of Education Accountability

States are shifting away from a one-size-fits-all accountability system mandated under the old education law to a new, build-it-yourself model.

U.S. News & World Report

 

With No Child Left Behind in the rear view mirror and waivers a thing of the past, states are embarking on a new era of school accountability under the new education law, the Every Student Succeeds Act.

And as they get to work using their newfound flexibility to create a more personalized system of checks and balances, the question weighing heavy on everyone’s mind is whether states will be able to shed No Child Left Behind’s one-dimensional accountability system in favor of one that results in measureable improvements.

“As state agencies, we had a lot of information but we didn’t do a good job putting it out in a way parents or teachers could engage with,” said Chris Minnich, the executive director of the Council of Chief State School Officers, speaking last week during an event on accountability at the Brookings Institution. “It was largely an exercise in becoming transparent, that’s how I would explain the No Child Left behind era.”

He continued: “I think the promise of ESSA is to go beyond transparency, to go into the idea that it’s not enough just to tell a school they’re not getting it done for kids, but we have to actually help that school get better.”

To be sure, most states have been trying to do just that – operating under their own unique accountability systems for the last two years thanks to waivers issued by the Education Department that exempted states from major provisions of the No Child Left Behind law. Those waivers, however, expired Monday, ushering in a symbolic sea change in K-12 policy.

States will now officially begin shifting away from a one-size-fits-all model mandated under the old law to a new, build-it-yourself model that allows each state to choose for themselves how best to measure their education systems.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7Fw

 

http://gousoe.uen.org/7Fu (Ed Week)


 

 

Educators Weigh Learning Value of Pokémon Go Does engaging tool pose privacy risks?

Education Week

 

Like a thunderbolt from Pikachu’s tail, Pokémon is once again electrifying the nation.

The latest incarnation of the Japanese franchise is a mobile app, Pokémon Go, which puts a digital overlay on the real world, requiring users to walk around their neighborhoods to collect characters and do battle with one another.

The game has exploded in meme-driven popularity to become the largest mobile game ever, only 10 days after its launch in July.

The unexpected summer surge has parents and educators buzzing about the potential for educational applications, and fretting about privacy and safety risks they’d prefer children to avoid. Educators say they see opportunities to capitalize on students’ love for the game in the teaching of subjects like social studies, local history, math, mapping, and literacy.

“Pokémon Go is interdisciplinary in a way that’s hard to obtain with other programs,” said Jessica Torres, an assistant principal at Brook Avenue Elementary School in Waco, Texas. “I’m tired of seeing science in one area, reading in another area, math somewhere else.”

http://gousoe.uen.org/7Fq

 


 

 

Appeals Court Rules in Separate Strip-Search, Prom Breath-Test Cases Education Week

 

A federal appeals court, in separate rulings involving the Fourth Amendment, has denied immunity for a school administrator in the strip search of a student to look for drugs, but upheld the use of portable blood-alcohol tests for students entering the high school prom.

Separate panels of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 11th Circuit, in Atlanta, issued the significant rulings involving school searches of students late last week.

In the drug case, a three-judge panel ruled unanimously on July 29 that an assistant principal faces potential personal liability for allegedly requiring a Georgia 7th grader to remove his underwear in a search for marijuana.

In the prom case, a separate three-judge panel, also ruling unanimously, held on July 28 that administrators at a Florida high school were immune from liability over an incident in which some 40 students arrived at the prom in a party bus and were required to take a Breathalyzer test. By the time the tests were applied to all students in the group, the prom was over.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7Fr

 

Copies of the rulings

Strip Search: http://gousoe.uen.org/7Fs (11th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals) Breath Test: http://gousoe.uen.org/7Ft (11th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals)

 


 

 

E-school students performing worse than district school peers, study says Columbus (OH) Dispatch

 

Ohio students enrolled in online charter schools aren’t learning as much as their peers in brick-and-mortar schools and are dragging down the state’s charter-school system, a new study has found.

On average, Ohio’s e-school students “are academically behind at the start of each school year and lose even more ground during the year spent at the e-school,” according to the report, Enrollment and Achievement in Ohio’s Virtual Charter School, by June Ahn, an education-tech expert and associate professor at New York University.

Across all grades and subjects, e-school students in Ohio perform worse than peers in district schools, the study found.

The report was commissioned by the Thomas B. Fordham Institute, a conservative-leaning education think tank based in Washington, D.C., and Dayton. The institute supports the privately operated, tax-funded schools and sponsors several charter schools in Ohio.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7F0

 

A copy of the study

http://gousoe.uen.org/7F1 (Fordham Institute)

 


 

 

Minority charter students are outperforming public school kids New York Post

 

Minority students at city charter schools significantly outperformed their public school peers on 2016 state math and reading exams, according to an advocacy group’s analysis of recently released city figures.

Black and Hispanic charter school students were twice as likely to be proficient in math than their district school counterparts, and 50 percent more likely to be proficient in English, according to the analysis by Families for Excellent Schools.

The pro-charter group said their numbers show that a doubling of city charter schools would eradicate stubborn achievement gaps between black and Hispanic students and their peers.

“This year’s results definitively prove that expanding charter schools is the single best solution to educational inequality in New York City,” said Jeremiah Kittredge, CEO of Families for Excellent Schools. “Charter schools are responsible for much of the city’s gains in English and Math proficiency, especially among students of color.

“By doubling the number of charters in the city’s poorest districts, we can finally erase the city’s racial achievement gap and give every child the high-quality education they deserve,” Kittredge said in a statement Monday.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7F7

 


 

1 in 5 charter schools ‘illegally’ screens applicants, report says (Pasadena, CA) KPCC

 

California law lays out a straightforward admissions process for charter schools: charters, like all public schools, essentially must admit any student who wants to enroll so long as there’s space.

But “at least” 253 of the state’s 1,200 charter schools ask students and their families to jump through extra hoops before letting them in, according to a report the ACLU and Public Advocates released Monday.

For instance, 22 charter schools in California ask students to prove they have strong grades or test scores before letting them in. In other cases, students must prove they meet a minimum level of English proficiency or participate in entrance interviews or essays. Sometimes schools ask families to donate money or volunteer hours.

For vulnerable student populations — low-income kids, immigrants, English Learners and students with disabilities — such policies erect onerous barriers to admission in charter schools, the report’s authors conclude. In some cases, they argue the policies may even be against the law.

It’s possible to quibble with the report’s count of schools with “plainly exclusionary” admissions policies. California Charter Schools Association leaders said they agreed with the report’s authors that using grades or volunteer commitments as a condition for enrollment isn’t justifiable, but they disagree that entrance interviews or essays are necessarily discriminatory.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7F3

 

http://gousoe.uen.org/7F4 (San Diego Union-Tribune)

 

A copy of the report

http://gousoe.uen.org/7F5 (ACLU)

 


 

 

Teachers union leader says next president must completely reset education policy and oust current education secretary Hechinger Report

 

After playing defense for the better part of two decades, the presidents of the nation’s two teachers unions took the stage at the Democratic National Convention along with other union leaders to speak to Hillary Clinton’s labor bone fides. The two union presidents were some of the earliest and fiercest supporters of Clinton’s presidential bid, and in a speech on the opening night of the convention, American Federation of Teachers president Randi Weingarten talked about what she hopes they’ll get in return.

“She’ll reset education policy to focus on skills like creativity and critical thinking, not more testing,” said Weingarten at the July convention in Philadelphia.

While teachers unions have long been a key pillar in Democratic Party, they’ve been on the outs with President Barack Obama’s education department. The administration doubled down on Republican President George W. Bush’s educational agenda of holding schools accountable for students’ test scores. For struggling schools, if test scores didn’t increase, they could be either closed or converted into charter schools, the vast majority of which employ non-unionized staff.

These policies devastated some local teachers unions, including Philadelphia’s, which lost 10,000 members during the Obama and Bush administrations. Weingarten expects Clinton to totally upend this agenda, and hopes that she’ll remove Education Secretary John King, who was just confirmed by the senate in March.

The Hechinger Report sat down with Weingarten during the last night of the convention to go deeper into what she expects from the next president.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7Fv

 


 

 

California’s Ed Reform Wars

How long before a teacher is tenured? The legislature mulls it over.

American Prospect

 

This past April, the California Court of Appeals unanimously struck down the controversial Vergara v. California decision, in which a Los Angeles County Superior Court judge ruled that five longstanding teacher protections—including a two-year probationary period for new teachers and a layoff system based on how many years one’s been teaching—violated students’ constitutional right to an equal education. The lower court judge had argued that these labor protections make it harder to fire bad teachers, and bad teachers significantly undermine a child’s education. In a 3-0 decision, the appellate judges concluded that the labor protections themselves are not responsible for harming students, even if school administrators sometimes implement them injudiciously.

Students Matter, a nonprofit backed by Silicon Valley entrepreneur David Welch that’s representing the Vergara plaintiffs, has filed an appeal to California’s Supreme Court. Their supporters argue that children pay the price for such job protections as teacher tenure and seniority. They also point to research that suggests making it easier to fire teachers has positive effects on student achievement. Critics counter that the real problems students face—particularly low-income students of color—are not teacher job protections, but their under-resourced, highly segregated schools that fail to attract and retain high-quality educators. At a time when states like California face real teacher shortages, they say, the focus on firing teachers is misplaced at best.

Since the lower court’s Vergara ruling two years ago, similar suits challenging teacher job protections have been filed in New York and Minnesota.

While David Welch and his allies remain committed to waging legal battles against tenure, seniority, and other job protections, they are also pushing for statutory changes via the California legislature. Following the original Vergara decision, Republican lawmakers introduced a package of three bills to extend the time it would take a teacher to earn tenure, to repeal the “last-in, first-out” statute that makes layoff decisions based on seniority, and to establish an annual teacher evaluation system. These bills, however, got nowhere in the Democratic-controlled statehouse.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7EZ

 


 

 

3 Things People Can Do In The Classroom That Robots Can’t NPR

 

How should schools best prepare kids to live and work in the second half of the 21st century?

In previous eras, the job of school was simple: Teach them math and reading skills. Have them learn some basic facts about the world.

Today the challenge is a lot different. Most people all over the world, even in the poorest countries, have much easier access to a calculator, a dictionary and great swaths of knowledge in their pockets.

And technology isn’t just expanding access to knowledge. It’s also redefining opportunity. To put it bluntly, more and more people — in all kinds of jobs from truck driver to travel agent to lawyer — are in danger of being replaced by software on the job.

A 2013 study from Oxford University famously estimated that 47 percent of all jobs are in danger of automation. And earlier this year, the World Economic Forum said 5 million jobs might be gone in just the next four years.

These changes create a huge challenge for schools and teachers. But there are also some intriguing indicators of the way forward.

There are at least three big skill sets that human intelligence copes well with. Skills that technology — like artificial intelligence — is currently struggling with and may always struggle with.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7Fj

 


 

 

Seymour Papert, 88, Dies; Saw Education’s Future in Computers New York Times

 

Seymour Papert, a visionary educator and mathematician who well before the advent of the personal computer foresaw children using computers as instruments for learning and enhancing creativity, died on Sunday at his home in Blue Hill, Me. He was 88.

His death was announced by the Logo Foundation, a nonprofit educational organization that he co­founded. His wife, the Russia scholar and author Suzanne Massie, said the cause was complications of a series of kidney and bladder infections.

Dr. Papert (pronounced PAP­ert), who was born in South Africa, was one of the leading educational theorists of the last half­century and a co­director of the renowned Artificial Intelligence Laboratory at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. In some circles he was considered the world’s foremost expert on how technology can provide new ways for children to learn.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7F6

 


 

 

Catholic schools for Native Americans, known for abuse and assimilation, try to do good Washington Post

 

“The majority of the kids I went to school with are dead,” says Manny Jules, “because of the experience they had, the abuse.”

Jules, 63, is the former chief of the Kamloops band of First Nations in British Columbia. As a child, he attended a residential Catholic school, where he remembers students experiencing physical, sexual and emotional abuse while separated from their families and community.

This trauma, shared for decades by Native American youths across Canada and the United States who were sent to Catholic schools, is at least in part to blame for the high level of alcoholism, drug abuse and suicide in Indian communities.

Today, the Catholic Church has apologized – Pope Benedict XVI did so in 2009; Pope Francis did in 2015. But the Church still operates schools for Native children. And that is where the real reconciliation is happening.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7FA

 


 

 

Pope: It’s ‘Terrible’ Children Taught They Can Choose Gender Associated Press

 

VATICAN CITY — Pope Francis has lamented that children are being taught at school that gender can be a choice, adding that his predecessor, Benedict XVI has labeled current times “the epoch of sin against God the Creator.”

Francis weighed in with his view on gender and what he said was that of the emeritus pontiff while meeting privately last week with bishops from Poland during his pilgrimage there. The Vatican released a transcript Tuesday of those closed-door remarks.

The pope said he wanted to conclude his remarks by reflecting on this: “We are living a moment of annihilation of man as image of God.”

Francis said: “Today, in schools they are teaching this to children — to children! — that everyone can choose their gender.”

Without specifying, he blamed this on textbooks supplied by “persons and institutions who donate money.” The pope blamed what he called “ideological colonizing” backed by “very influential countries” which he didn’t identify.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7Fn

 


 

 

Tobacco, fast food in easier reach of minority and low-income students Reuters

 

Compared to schools with mostly white students, schools with higher numbers of Hispanic, black, and low-income students are more likely to have tobacco retailers and fast-food restaurants in easy reach, researchers say.

“Schools are places where we expect to be healthy, supportive environments for kids, but right outside the door (students) could be exposed to unhealthy influences,” lead author Heather D’Angelo of Westat in Rockville, Maryland told Reuters Health in a phone interview.

“I was surprised that there were so many tobacco outlets near schools,” said D’Angelo, who at the time of the study was at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill.

D’Angelo and her colleagues randomly selected more than 18,000 public schools in 97 U.S. counties, then analyzed their proximity to retailers within an 800-meter radius – roughly equivalent to a 10-minute walk.

They report in the American Journal of Public Health that 40 percent of the schools were near at least one fast food restaurant, 77 percent were close to at least one retailer likely to sell tobacco products, and 38 percent of schools were close to both.

Schools with higher numbers of Hispanic, black, and low-income students receiving free and reduced-price lunch were more likely to have tobacco retailers and fast-food restaurants within a ten-minute walk.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7Fo

 

A copy of the study

http://gousoe.uen.org/7Fp (American Journal of Public Health)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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CALENDAR

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USOE Calendar

http://www.schools.utah.gov/main/CALENDAR.aspx

 

 

UEN News

http://www.uen.org

 

 

August 4:

Public Education Appropriations Subcommittee meeting

9 a.m., 445 State Capitol

http://le.utah.gov/Interim/2016/html/00003251.htm

 

 

August 11:

Utah State Charter School Board meeting

250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://go.uen.org/62M

 

Utah State Board of Education study session, USDB and committee meetings

250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspx

 

 

August 12:

Utah State Board of Education meeting

250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspx

 

 

September 13:

Joint Education Conference

8 a.m., 800 W University Parkway, Orem

http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2016&com=SPEJEC

 

 

September 20:

Executive Appropriations Committee meeting

2 p.m., 445 State Capitol

http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2016&com=APPEXE

 

 

September 21:

Education Interim Committee meeting

1:15 p.m., 30 House Building

http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2016&com=INTEDU

 

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