Education News Roundup: August 9 – 2016

 

 

Education News Roundup

Education News Roundup

Education News Roundup

Today’s Top Picks:

Sen. Stephenson is part of the National Conference of State Legislatures group that issued a report today on what to glean from top country education systems.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7IB (NPR)

and http://gousoe.uen.org/7IK (WaPo)

or a copy of the report

http://gousoe.uen.org/7IL (NCSL)

 

Weber School District considers a tax increase.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7II (OSE)

 

Former Chairman Burningham discusses the future of Utah State Board of Education elections.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7Iu (UP)

 

New study finds teacher salaries lagging compared to other careers with similar education requirements.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7ID (Chalkbeat)

or a copy of the study

http://gousoe.uen.org/7IE (Economic Policy Institute)

 

Nevada is trying to figure out how to better govern the 320,400-student Clark County district.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7IM (Ed Week)

 

 

 

 

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TODAY’S HEADLINES

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UTAH

 

The Best Schools In The World Do This. Why Don’t We?

 

Weber School District considering tax increase

 

New Butler Elementary School set to open

 

Granite all-alumni reunion brings echoes of old songs and cheers History » Arts group opens campaign to save closed school.

 

9-year-old Sunset girl raises money to get seizure alert dog for teacher’s son

 

National PTA and Mountain America Credit Union Team Up to Help Families Achieve Their Financial Dreams

 

StateChamps Announces $1 Million “FanFocus” Campaign to Help High Schools

 


 

 

OPINION & COMMENTARY

 

Legal Action Needed to Avoid Partisan State School Board Elections

 

NY State acted, and now it’s time to end the opt-out movement

 

Our public education system ‘is failing’

 

Trump, Clinton double-team charters

Our best bipartisan education reform hope could fizzle in election feud.

 

Why don’t teachers use education research in teaching?

 

Students, Not Criminals

Punitive school policies are funneling children – especially African-Americans – out of the classroom and into jail cells.

 

The School-Security Industry Is Cashing In Big on Public Fears of Mass Shootings A spike in spending on high-tech security is diverting educational funds from districts across the country.

 

America’s Insensitive Children?

Perhaps unlike their U.S. peers, kids in Denmark—where happiness levels are the highest on Earth—are taught in school to care for one another from a young age.

 


 

 

NATION

 

New study: Teachers’ wages lag further behind their peers than ever before

 

New Plan Would Keep Nevada’s Sprawling Clark Co. District Intact

 

Online gaming may boost school scores but social media is wasted time, study suggests In what could be music to the ears of many parents, teenagers who regularly play online games are more likely to get better school scores, an Australian study suggests.

 

Voters may face record level of Colorado school funding measures in November Nearly $4 billion worth of bond, mill levy measures on the table

 

Advanced Placement Continues Growth In and Out of STEM

 

Get Experience at Top Tech Companies as a Teenager Facebook, Google and Microsoft offer educational programs for teens, but there are other ways for students to explore the field.

 

 

 

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UTAH NEWS

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The Best Schools In The World Do This. Why Don’t We?

 

For a moment, let’s pretend.

That everything you know about America’s public education system — the bitter politics and arcane funding policies, the rules and countless reasons our schools work (or don’t) the way they do — is suddenly negotiable.

Pretend the obstacles to change have melted like butter on hot blacktop.

Now ask yourself: What could — and should — we do differently?

This question drove a bipartisan group of more than two-dozen state lawmakers and legislative staffers on an 18-month journey. Their mission: study some of the world’s top-performing school systems, including those in Finland, Hong Kong, Japan, Ontario, Poland, Shanghai, Singapore and Taiwan.

Today the group, part of the National Conference of State Legislatures, released its findings, titled No Time to Lose: How to Build a World-Class Education System State by State.

The report is full of takeaways. Here are three of the biggest:

1: More Help For The Youngest Learners

2: Teachers Need To Be Better

And, in this case, “better” is a big tent. The report’s authors say it starts when future teachers are still students. Because America’s patchwork of teacher-training programs is famously broad and threadbare.

Howard Stephenson, a Republican state senator from Utah and a member of the NCSL study group, says the U.S. simply has too many institutions that claim to train teachers when, in reality, “they don’t give a damn what a school district wants or needs” in the classroom.

3: Fix Career And Technical Education (CTE)

You know, the classes formerly known as “voc-ed” — auto repair, welding, carpentry, etc. The report suggests that, in the U.S., many schools have failed to adapt their CTE offerings to fit the needs of the modern economy, preparing students for jobs of the past instead of matching them with today’s employers.

It’s strange given the mantra heard often from U.S. policymakers and educators, that today’s schools should prepare students to be “college and career ready.” In reality, Takumi, the Hawaii Democrat, says many schools “have kind of pushed career to the side.” As a result, too often students need college in order to be career ready.

To make matters worse, in the U.S. CTE also has a perception problem. Stephenson, the Utah Republican, says “it is considered a second tier for low-performing students. … That is our tradition in America.”

http://gousoe.uen.org/7IB (NPR)

 

http://gousoe.uen.org/7IK (WaPo)

 

A copy of the report

http://gousoe.uen.org/7IL (NCSL)

 


 

 

Weber School District considering tax increase

 

WASHINGTON TERRACE — Officials at the Weber School District are planning on Wednesday to raise taxes for all residents by an average of about $36 per year.

Following a public hearing, the proposed increase will be voted on the by the school board at its meeting at 6 p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 10, at the Weber School District Offices, 5320 S. Adams Ave., in Washington Terrace.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7II (OSE)

 


 

 

New Butler Elementary School set to open

 

COTTONWOOD HEIGHTS — The public is invited to a reception, open house and ribbon-cutting for the new Butler Elementary School on Thursday, Aug. 18, at 5:30 p.m.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7IH (DN)

 


 

 

Granite all-alumni reunion brings echoes of old songs and cheers History » Arts group opens campaign to save closed school.

 

As the old Granite High School campus in South Salt Lake continues to fall into disrepair, the first verse of the school’s “Song of the G” might best sum up the remembrances of 103 years of alumni.

“When sights and sounds of the campus fade in the long, busy years, yet will return in our memories, echoes of old songs and cheers.”

As more than 300 Granite alumni including Class of 1940 member Bruce Ridd gathered Saturday night at the Infinity Event Center in Salt Lake City to celebrate their old school at the Forever-A-Farmer All-Alumni Reunion, school ghosts came alive for the night.

The event celebrated the school’s past and marked the kickoff of a last-ditch effort called the Granite High Encore Project by the Utah Arts Alliance to preserve at least part of the campus from demolition.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7IG (SLT)

 


 

 

9-year-old Sunset girl raises money to get seizure alert dog for teacher’s son

 

SUNSET — A 9-year-old Sunset girl has braved 10 weeks of heat to setting up a snow cone stand every Monday afternoon. October Davis said she wanted to make money this summer, not for herself but for her teacher.

“She was pretty sad. She was crying often to her class,” October said. “She was emotional ever since April … and our whole class was emotional.”

Her teacher, Mrs. Schneider, found out earlier this year that her 3-year-old son Trevyn has Doose syndrome. The disease makes it difficult for Trevyn’s body to control seizures. The family now needs a seizure alert dog, but it’ll cost them $24,000. And when October heard that, she started to raise money on her own by setting up a snow cone stand at 2656 N. 275 West in Sunset.

Since the start of June, she has raised $1,400 by charging 50 cents for a small cup and $1 for a large cup. She said since the stand opened, dozens of people have stopped by.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7IJ (KSL)

 


 

 

National PTA and Mountain America Credit Union Team Up to Help Families Achieve Their Financial Dreams

 

ALEXANDRIA, VA–National PTA® is pleased to announce that Mountain America Credit Union has become the association’s newest Member Benefit Provider. Through the alliance, all PTA members can join Mountain American Credit Union. The credit union is also offering PTA members and PTAs a cash incentive when they open an account.

National PTA and Mountain America Credit Union Team Up to Help Families Achieve Their Financial Dreams http://gousoe.uen.org/7IZ (Marketwired)

 


 

 

StateChamps Announces $1 Million “FanFocus” Campaign to Help High Schools

 

BIRMINGHAM, AL –“Data shows that less than 1% of high schools nationwide actually invest in the online promotion of their events. As a result, attendance is dropping and budgets are stretched thin,” StateChamps CMO Eric Housh said. “The idea of the FanFocus campaign is primarily to build support for our partner schools, but also to educate athletic programs on how to intelligently and cost-effectively market their events online.”

StateChamps is also currently providing online ticketing services for the Delaware Interscholastic Athletic Association, the Michigan High School Athletic Association, the Nevada Interscholastic Activities Association, the, the Utah High School Athletic Association, the Massachusetts Interscholastic Athletic Association, and the Rhode Island Interscholastic League, as well as hundreds of individual high schools nationwide.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7J0 (PRWeb)

 

 

 

 

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OPINION & COMMENTARY

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Legal Action Needed to Avoid Partisan State School Board Elections Utah Politics commentary by Kim Burningham, former chairman of the Utah State Board of Education

 

Tragically, Utah will – if something isn’t changed – select the State School Board through an unconstitutionally partisan election starting in 2018.

Some may be surprised by this statement.  This year, the election is proceeding in an orderly non-partisan fashion to select members of the State School Board, but in a weird compromise fashioned by the State Legislature in the waning hours of the 2016 session, this is the last time the election will be non-partisan.

The Legislature could remedy the ill-advised move, but I believe this is highly improbable.   The most certain and appropriate action to make sure the State School Board remains non-partisan would be legal action.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7Iu

 


 

 

NY State acted, and now it’s time to end the opt-out movement (New York) Newsday editorial

 

In June, 75 percent of the standardized math and English test questions given to students in grades three through eight this year were released for public scrutiny. There was no outcry. That’s because the questions were vetted by at least 22 New York public school teachers before being used and were judged to be appropriate.

It’s unfortunate that 20 percent of students statewide and more than 50 percent of those on Long Island opted out of those exams this past spring. So while the tests were fine, the broad results released by the state on July 29 are practically useless for evaluating classes, schools and districts on Long Island.

That’s a shame, and a waste. The new questions represented important changes by the state.

As a result of the parent and teacher revolt against Common Core standards in recent years, new standardized tests were instituted in New York in the spring. Test results for individual students are more detailed and are released earlier to teachers. The percentage of test questions released has tripled. All questions are scrutinized by teachers before the tests. The tests are shorter, and their time limits are gone. All learning objectives have been reviewed to assure they are appropriate. Strong teaching tools are in place. And the teacher evaluation method that created so much fear among educators and parents, based partly on student achievement on the tests, is in a four-year moratorium.

What the “opt-out” activists could reasonably expect to achieve, they have. So now it’s time to end the opt-out movement.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7Iy

 


 

 

Our public education system ‘is failing’

CNBC op-ed by Scott McNealy, former CEO, Sun Microsystems

 

The major stakeholders in K-12 public education are at an impasse. Teachers’ Unions are primarily concerned with self-preservation, maintaining extravagant perks for union administrators and exerting disproportionate political influence. A handful of publishing houses sell us $8 billion worth of warmed- over text books every year. Testing companies collectively spent tens of millions lobbying in states and on Capitol Hill from 2009 to 2014. These politically powerful, entrenched special interests are heavily invested in maintaining the failing status quo.

The U.S. is falling behind other countries in test scores across a broad range of subjects and grade levels. Polls show growing public dissatisfaction with everything from school choice, classroom sizes, aging infrastructure, standardized testing and curriculum. Everyone can criticize our government’s public education system, with justification. Based on any rational review of the facts, it is failing.

The current presidential wannabes address us with empty platitudes about fulfilling potential, without talking specifically about how they would actually fix our failing education system. This is mainly because the amount of money at stake is enormous. In 2015, U.S. government spending on education topped $1,435.8 billion, with $788.7 billion for K-12 alone. It may be political suicide to risk alienating sources of political contributions, blocs of union voters and entrenched special interests, but here’s what needs to be done:

http://gousoe.uen.org/7IT

 


 

 

Trump, Clinton double-team charters

Our best bipartisan education reform hope could fizzle in election feud.

USA Today commentary by David Osborne, director of the project on Reinventing America’s Schools at the Progressive Policy Institute, and Richard Whitmire, author of The Founders

 

The list of failed school reforms launched since 1983’s A Nation at Risk is embarrassingly long. Worse yet, these sputtering reforms appear to be stacking up at a faster rate: Common Core, evaluating teachers partly on student test scores, luring top teachers into low-performing schools.

Nothing seems to work out, with one very big exception: Districts that fold high-performing charter schools directly into the mix of schools offered to parents.

Denver is probably the best example of a traditional school district taking that path, called a portfolio strategy. In many other cities, including Boston, Los Angeles, Washington and New York, charter schools that are independent of districts — but in some cases experimenting with district collaborations — offer the best opportunities for kids growing up in poverty.

In Denver, business groups, foundations and community organizations were all fed up with the traditional district’s failures. When the board hired a new superintendent in 2005 — today’s Democratic U.S. Sen. Michael Bennet — he quickly realized they were right. His decision to embrace charters had support from both sides of the aisle.

Back then, Denver had the lowest rates of academic growth of Colorado’s medium and large districts. Since 2012, it has had the highest. By fall 2014, the percentage of students scoring at or above grade level in reading, writing and math had increased 15 percentage points (from 33% to 48%), far faster than the state average. On a new state test last year, Denver took a huge leap, its middle schools surpassing the state average. Charters are among the biggest reasons.

Now, just when other cities should be greenlighting similar reforms, Denver-style innovations could be at risk.

The cause? Look no further than the Republican and Democratic conventions that just wrapped up. On the surface, that might sound odd. Who cares what happened in Cleveland and Philadelphia? Cities are free to choose their own school designs.

Here’s the problem: Denver-style reforms get launched via a unique confluence of liberal and conservative thinking. Conservatives, who have long been advocates of “school choice,” especially vouchers, reluctantly concede that vouchers haven’t produced much compared with charters.

Liberals, who might otherwise embrace the teachers’ unions’ anti-charter views, reluctantly concede that charter schools give thousands of poor and minority kids a shot at the American dream.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7IA

 


 

 

Why don’t teachers use education research in teaching?

Royal Society of Chemistry commentary by Paul MacLellan, Deputy Editor, Education in Chemistry

 

In June I gave a presentation on the gap between teaching and education research at the ResearchED Maths and Science conference. This is the transcript of that talk.

Last year, three education researchers from Durham University tried an interesting experiment. They carried out an intervention with several primary schools – an intervention that should have had a positive impact on their students’ learning. But the researchers weren’t interested in the outcome for the students – at least, not directly. What they were interested in was how the teachers implemented the intervention.

The intervention was based on research published in 2007 by John Hattie and Helen Timperley on enhanced feedback. Their research highlighted the characteristics of effective feedback and formalised those characteristics into a structure teachers could apply in their teaching. The effectiveness of the implementation of enhanced feedback was not in question in the Durham study: several previous studies have shown an effect size of around 0.6.

One of the Durham researchers, Stephen Gorard, says: ‘You could imagine, though I’m not keen on this translation, that is about four months extra progress in reading or maths.

Stephen and co-workers, Beng Huat See and Nadia Siddiqui, were looking to see if teachers could take a piece of research with proven benefits and apply it in a way that had a positive outcome for their students.

Beng Huat See explains: ‘The aim of the project was to see if the schools could engage with research evidence and use it to inform their instruction. So the schools came together – the heads, lead teachers and subject leaders – and they read the paper by John Hattie and Helen Timperley, extracting information to help them understand the different types of feedback strategies to be used in a classroom. Afterwards, they went back to their schools and cascaded the training to the other teachers.’

http://gousoe.uen.org/7IU

 


 

 

Students, Not Criminals

Punitive school policies are funneling children – especially African-Americans – out of the classroom and into jail cells.

U.S. News & World Report op-ed by Ebony Slaughter-Johnson, researcher, Institute for Policy Studies

 

Ten years ago, six African-American boys in Louisiana got into a fight with a white classmate at school. Rather than breaking it up, school administrators called the police.

Where other students might have been sent home or suspended, the “Jena Six” were arrested and charged with attempted second-degree murder and conspiracy. Together, the boys, ranging in age from 14 to 17, faced almost 100 years in prison without the possibility of parole. District Attorney Reed Walters assumed the boys were guilty before their trials had even begun, warning them, “When you are convicted, I will seek the maximum penalty allowed by law.”

The Jena Six incident turned out to be just the tip of the iceberg in the growing criminalization of school misbehavior, which has matured into a national problem for African-American students. Over the years, schools have introduced a host of policy changes that undermine the safe haven they are supposed to offer children. Mirroring the federal government’s tough-on-crime approach of the mid-1990s, thousands of schools have implemented so-called zero-tolerance policies that drastically raise the stakes for getting in trouble at school. And more troubling still, more and more have come to rely on school resource officers – that is, uniformed cops – to police hallways and classrooms, leading to increased contact between students and the criminal justice system.

The use of these officers first took off after the 1999 Columbine High School massacre and spiked again following the 2013 Sandy Hook shooting. But instead of providing enhanced protection, they have turned minor school behavior issues, like talking back to a teacher or throwing things in class, into issues for the criminal justice system. Students in schools with these officers receive more suspensions, expulsions and court summonses than their peers in schools without them.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7IW

 


 

 

The School-Security Industry Is Cashing In Big on Public Fears of Mass Shootings A spike in spending on high-tech security is diverting educational funds from districts across the country.

The Nation commentary by Sasha Abramsky, author of The House of 20,000 Books

 

“Security was the number-one factor for me in choosing a school,” explained one of the mothers I met late last winter at a Montessori preschool in an affluent suburb of Salt Lake City. A quality-control expert at a dietary-supplement company, the woman said she vividly remembers the jolt of horror she felt when she first learned of the Columbine massacre in 1999. So when the time came to send her child to preschool, she selected one that markets itself not only as creative, caring, and nurturing, but also as particularly security-conscious.

To get the front door of the school to open, visitors had to be positively ID’d by a fingerprint-recognition system. In the foyer, a bank of monitors showed a live feed of the activity in every classroom. After drop-off, many parents would spend 15 minutes to half an hour staring at the screens, making sure their children were being treated well by their teachers and classmates. Many of the moms and dads had requested Internet access to the images, but the school had balked, fearing that online sexual predators would be able to hack into the video stream. All of the classroom doors had state-of-the-art lockdown features, and all of the teachers had access to long-distance bee spray—which, in the case of an emergency, they were instructed to fire off at the eyes of intruders. The playground was surrounded by a high concrete wall, which crimped the kids’ views of the majestic Wasatch Mountains. The imposing front walls, facing out onto a busy road, were similarly designed to stop predators from peering into the classrooms.

“I fear a gunman walking into my child’s school and gunning up the place,” the mother continued. (I have withheld her name, and that of the school, upon request.) “And I fear someone walking onto the playground and swiping a kid. And I fear an employee of the school damaging my child. These things happen more commonly than people expect.”

Actually, they don’t. Despite the excruciating angst suffered by this woman and so many other parents, school violence is a rarity in America. According to the National Center for Education Statistics, 34 children in the United States were murdered while in school during the 1992–93 school year. From 2008 to 2013, the most recent years for which the NCES provides data, the average annual figure was 19. In recent decades, the numbers have waxed and waned, hitting 34 again in 1997–98 and going as low as 11 in 2010–11. Generally, the trend has been downward.

If one adds the deaths of teachers and other staff, as well as suicides by students during the school day, the numbers go up, of course. In the 20-year period covered by the NCES data, 2006–7 was the deadliest, with 63 violent deaths occurring in America’s schools. That is unquestionably 63 too many violent deaths, and for the families directly affected by the killings, it represents unfathomable—and inextinguishable—anguish.

But it isn’t quite the national epidemic that one might picture based on the vast media coverage these killings receive. In fact, far more children and young adults are killed on the impoverished streets of America’s large cities every year. By several orders of magnitude, far more kids die each year in car crashes or drowning accidents—or from asthma. And far more young lives are lost to a host of other diseases closely correlated with poverty.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7IY

 


 

America’s Insensitive Children?

Perhaps unlike their U.S. peers, kids in Denmark—where happiness levels are the highest on Earth—are taught in school to care for one another from a young age.

Atlantic commentary by JESSICA ALEXANDER, co-author of The Danish Way of Parenting

 

Contrary to popular belief, most people do care about the welfare of others.

From an evolutionary standpoint, empathy is a valuable impulse that helps humans survive in groups. In American schools, this impulse has been lying dormant from a lack of focus. But in Denmark, a nation that has consistently been voted the happiest place in the world since Richard Nixon was president, children are taught about empathy from a young age both inside and outside of school.

Children in the Danish school system participate in a mandatory national program called Step by Step as early as preschool. The children are shown pictures of kids who are each exhibiting a different emotion: sadness, fear, anger, frustration, happiness, and so on. The students talk about these cards and put into words what the child is sensing, learning to conceptualize their own and others’ feelings. They learn empathy, problem-solving, self-control, and how to read facial expressions. An essential part of the program is that the facilitators and children aren’t judgmental of the emotions they see; instead, they simply recognize and respect those sentiments.

Another program, which is increasingly popular, is called CAT-kit. This program is aimed at improving emotional awareness and empathy and focuses on how to articulate experiences, thoughts, feelings, and senses. Tools in the CAT-kit include picture cards of faces; measuring sticks to gauge intensity of emotions; and pictures of the body, on which participants can draw the physical aspects and location of emotions. Another tool is called My Circle: Children draw their friends, family members, professionals, and strangers in different parts of the circle as part of an exercise on learning to better understand others.

Denmark’s Mary Foundation—named after the country’s crown princess and soon-to-be queen—has contributed to empathy training in schools, too. It’s anti-bullying program, which has been implemented across the country, encourages 3- to 8-year-olds to talk about bullying and teasing and learn to become more caring toward each other. It has yielded positive results, and more than 98 percent of teachers say they would recommend it to other institutions.

Another, less obvious example of empathy training in Danish schools is in how they subtly and gradually mix children of different strengths and weaknesses together.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7IR

 

http://gousoe.uen.org/7IX (Salon.com)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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NATIONAL NEWS

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New study: Teachers’ wages lag further behind their peers than ever before Chalkbeat

 

The wage gap between teachers and other professionals with similar education and experience reached an all-time high of 17 percent in 2015, according to a new study by the Economic Policy Institute, a nonpartisan think tank. In the mid-1990s, the gap was only 1.8 percent.

While there are many reasons teachers stay in the profession or leave it, the report notes that other jobs might become more appealing to both potential and existing teachers as their salaries continue to lag behind.

There are no states where teachers make the same or more than their peers. In New York, teachers are paid about 91.3 percent of what similarly-educated workers earn.

For even the most experienced teachers nationwide, compensation has failed to keep pace with the rest of the job market. In the mid-1990s, senior teachers, ages 45-54, actually led their peers in earnings by 1.9 percent. But by 2015, they trailed by 17.8 percent.

Young teachers, ages 25-34, fare slightly better with a 16.4 percent gap, while teachers ages 35-44 fare the worst, with a 21.7 percent gap.

Unionized teachers are better off than their non-unionized peers, the study found. Those in a collective bargaining agreement have a six percent smaller wage gap than those who are not.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7ID

 

A copy of the study

http://gousoe.uen.org/7IE (Economic Policy Institute)

 


 

 

New Plan Would Keep Nevada’s Sprawling Clark Co. District Intact Education Week

 

A year after state lawmakers gave the green light to break up the nation’s fifth largest school district—Nevada’s Clark County schools—a new plan has emerged that would keep the sprawling system intact.

Rather than split the approximately 320,400-student district into a number of smaller entities, the committee charged with reorganizing Clark County schools is now proposing to give much broader authority over how the schools are managed to principals.

In a way, the district will be resurrecting and expanding a successful, but short-lived, program it ran starting in the 2006-07 school year, when a select number of school principals were given expanded autonomy as part of an “empowerment schools” model. Empowerment schools’ students scored higher in state English/Language Arts and math tests than before the schools adopted the model, according to the state legislature.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7IM

 


 

 

Online gaming may boost school scores but social media is wasted time, study suggests In what could be music to the ears of many parents, teenagers who regularly play online games are more likely to get better school scores, an Australian study suggests.

Australian Broadcasting Corporation

 

Research released from RMIT University has found gaming helps boost results in maths, science and reading.

But researchers said scrolling through Facebook, Instagram or chat sites had the reverse effect, by hindering academic success in high school.

Associate Professor Alberto Posso from RMIT’s School of Economics, Finance and Marketing said online gaming appeared to be a more useful way to spend time online for teenagers, compared with social media.

“Kids that are spending more time on online gaming — for example in a maths test — they’re likely to score 17 points above the average, which is about 4 per cent above the average [test score],” he said.

Associate Professor Posso used data from the Program for International Student Assessment (PISA) to analyse the online habits of 12,000 Australian 15 year olds, which he then compared to their academic results.

He said the PISA data revealed that online gaming helped young people develop analytical and problem-solving skills.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7Iv

 

http://gousoe.uen.org/7Iw (Science Daily)

 

A copy of the study

http://gousoe.uen.org/7Ix (International Journal of Communication)

 


 

 

Voters may face record level of Colorado school funding measures in November Nearly $4 billion worth of bond, mill levy measures on the table Denver Post

 

Voters probably will be asked for a record-setting sum to pay for public education in Colorado this year.

Nearly $4 billion worth of bond issues and mill levy overrides to fund capital improvements, buttress technology purchases and beef up staffing at hundreds of schools statewide could end up on the November ballot, according to data provided by the Colorado School Finance Project.

While some of the funding measures are still in the discussion stage and may not make it to the election, 2016 should set a record for the most money sought for school funding in Colorado’s history — eclipsing the nearly $2.7 billion districts requested from voters eight years ago.

Taken alone, Jefferson County and Denver — the state’s two largest school districts with a combined enrollment topping 177,000 students — will ask voters for nearly $1.2 billion in funding to build new schools and fix hundreds of others. In total, 34 school districts across Colorado will send, or are discussing sending, funding measures to the ballot in November.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7IF

 


 

 

Advanced Placement Continues Growth In and Out of STEM Education Week

 

An early look at figures from the 2016 Advanced Placement tests shows continued growth in test-taking in subjects such as physics and computer science, and a trend of increasing scores in a number of fast-growing subjects.

On the College Board’s new Physics 2 exam, for instance, the mean score increased from 2.77 to 2.89 between 2015 and 2016, even as the number of test-takers grew by nearly 30 percent.

Some topline figures about Advanced Placement test-taking in 2016 were shared with a group of AP teachers at a conference in Anaheim and with Education Week last month. More data on AP test-taking, including demographic information, will be released later in the year.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7IN

 


 

 

Get Experience at Top Tech Companies as a Teenager Facebook, Google and Microsoft offer educational programs for teens, but there are other ways for students to explore the field.

U.S. News & World Report

 

When it comes to landing a job in the tech industry, 15-year-old Enrique Avina may have an edge on the competition. He spent the summer participating in a program for high schoolers at Facebook.

“You see all the tech companies on TV and on news stations, but it doesn’t really become real until you see it in person and live it,” he says. “That’s kind of what happened in my experience.”

The Facebook program, a partnership with nonprofit Foundation for a College Education, welcomes a small group of high schoolers living near the company’s Menlo Park, California, headquarters for six weeks and is geared toward students from underprivileged backgrounds.

Facebook is not the only big-name tech company with programs for teens – similar opportunities exist at Google and Microsoft. These programs may be something for teens who are eligible to think about for next summer. Applications are typically available each winter.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7IP

 

 

 

 

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CALENDAR

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USOE Calendar

http://www.schools.utah.gov/main/CALENDAR.aspx

 

 

UEN News

http://www.uen.org

 

 

August 11:

Utah State Charter School Board meeting

8:30 a.m., 250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://go.uen.org/62M

 

Utah State Board of Education study session, USDB and committee meetings

3 p.m., 250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspx

 

 

August 12:

Utah State Board of Education meeting

8 a.m., 250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspx

 

 

September 13:

Joint Education Conference

8 a.m., 800 W University Parkway, Orem

http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2016&com=SPEJEC

 

 

September 20:

Executive Appropriations Committee meeting

2 p.m., 445 State Capitol

http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2016&com=APPEXE

 

 

September 21:

Education Interim Committee meeting

1:15 p.m., 30 House Building

http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2016&com=INTEDU

 

 

September 22:

Public Education Appropriations Subcommittee meeting

9 a.m., 445 State Capitol

http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2016&com=APPPED

 

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