Education News Roundup: August 10 – 2016

 

 

Education News Roundup

Child Nutrition Programs' Team Up for Success Training/Education News Roundup

Child Nutrition Programs’ Team Up for School Nutrition Success Training/Education News Roundup

Today’s Top Picks:

 

Provo and Washington districts raise taxes. D-News reports on other districts considering the move.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7Jo (PDH)

and http://gousoe.uen.org/7Js (SGN)

and http://gousoe.uen.org/7JL (SGS)

and http://gousoe.uen.org/7J8 (DN)

and http://gousoe.uen.org/7Ju (KSL)

 

Emery District is looking for more substitute teachers.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7JJ (Emery County Progress)

 

Columbia University takes a look at who’s part of the opt-out movement.

“The most common reason opt-out supporters cited for boycotting the tests was opposition to using test data to evaluate teacher performance, with 36.9 percent of respondents listing that as one of their top two reasons to support opting out (45 percent of the respondents work in education). That was followed by concerns over teaching to the test (33.8 percent), opposition to the growing role of corporations in schools (30.4 percent), fears that the tests cut into instructional time (26.5 percent), and opposition to Common Core standards (25.8 percent).”

http://gousoe.uen.org/7Jf (Chalkbeat)

or a copy of the report

http://gousoe.uen.org/7Jg (Columbia University)

 

Illinois now requires driver education programs to offer instruction on what to do when you’re pulled over by the police.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7JF (WLS)

 

 

 

 

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TODAY’S HEADLINES

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UTAH

 

Provo City School District Board of Education approves tax increase

 

School board OKs tax hike; cites inflation, teacher salaries

 

Dozens of Utah cities, schools propose property tax hikes

 

New path to teacher licensing comes under scrutiny

 

Emery School District announces need for guest teachers and offers on-line training

 

Being Bilingual Keeps Your Brain Fit

A journey into the evolving research on the benefits of speaking multiple languages.

 

150 Springville High alumni surprise retired orchestra teacher with concert

 

Ridgeline conducts open house, ribbon cutting

 

Independence High gets a new principal

 

UVU names new presidential chief of staff

 

Brushing up before hitting the books

 

Salt Lake County Library holding mad science events

 

Pender High launches suicide prevention program

 

Charter School Capital Acquires Three School Facilities from American Charter Development for $19.1 Million Deal Includes Two Charter Schools in Florida and One in Texas

 


 

 

OPINION & COMMENTARY

 

Law and order and education

 

The must-have technology for heading back to school

 

Obama administration accused of trying to dictate education policy to states — again

 

A Public-School Paradox

Why do so many presidents send their kids to private school?

 

Why the Black Lives Matter movement has to take on charter schools Education reform’s race problems mirror unequal treatment in criminal justice system

 

Street-Savvy School Reform

Lessons learned from six big-city school systems

 

Waivering as Governance

Federalism During the Obama Administration

 


 

 

NATION

 

Who is driving the opt-out movement? The answer might surprise you

 

ACT shakes up security unit, plans audit after cheating reports

 

Cost reaches $545K for Nevada in education savings account challenge

 

Teachers in Common-Core States Have Big Say in Choosing Resources, Report Suggests

 

Facebook’s newest partnership is pushing an innovative approach to learning in 120 Silicon Valley schools

 

Black School Choice Group Pushes Back on NAACP Charter School Moratorium

 

After Student Tossed, South Carolina Eyes Role of Officers

 

New Law Requires Students to Learn How to Handle Being Pulled Over by Police

 

Can testing save arts education?

Teachers hope exams will make arts matter as much as math and English

 

What one assistant principal learned from shadowing a student for a day

 

Appeals Court Revives Suit Challenging Ten Commandments at Pa. High School

 

Comcast Announces Six Time Olympic Medal Winner Jackie Joyner-Kersee to Serve as National Spokeswoman for Internet Essentials Joyner-Kersee to Participate in a National Road Show for the 2016 – 2017 Academic Year

 

 

 

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UTAH NEWS

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Provo City School District Board of Education approves tax increase

 

For the first time in seven years, the Provo City School District Board of Education has voted to increase the local tax levy.

While assessed values of homes have increased locally, the amount of money the school district receives from property taxes has remained the same, meaning the tax rate has decreased. In that time, there has been inflation without any matching increases from taxpayers.

“For several years, we have had no increases and we have had inflation year and year after year,” said Stefanie Bryant, the district’s business administrator.

Every board member voted in favor of the property tax increase during the board’s meeting Tuesday evening.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7Jo (PDH)

 


 

 

School board OKs tax hike; cites inflation, teacher salaries

 

  1. GEORGE – Citing inflation and the need to keep teacher salaries competitive, the Board of Education for the Washington County School District approved a 1.85 percent tax increase during a public Truth-in-Taxation hearing Tuesday.

One school board member voted against the tax increase.

“I default on the side of the taxpayer even though we do need more money for the teachers, even though inflation is real,” school board member Craig Seegmiller said, who was the lone dissenter in the vote. Interim board member Ralph Brooks did not attend Tuesday’s meeting.

“There’s a lot of compelling arguments for why it needed to happen,” Seegmiller said. “But I always want the public to know that we’re listening. I want the public to know that we understand that there are compelling arguments on the other side too.”

http://gousoe.uen.org/7Js (SGN)

 

http://gousoe.uen.org/7JL (SGS)

 


 

 

Dozens of Utah cities, schools propose property tax hikes

 

SALT LAKE CITY — Dozens of Utah cities, school districts and other municipal entities are considering property tax increases that, if all approved, could result in residents paying millions more in taxes.

Hearings on the proposals began last week and will continue throughout August.

Reasons for the proposed hikes vary from city to city. Many officials highlighted a need to beef up public safety and make capital improvements, and said they had avoided raising taxes for years during the recession.

But Billy Hesterman of the Utah Taxpayers Association said property owners should question officials.

“I think that every city has something in the budget that could be cut,” Hesterman said. “There’s always certain projects or certain things that get funded that might be nice but aren’t necessary.”

Six cities, school districts and other entities in Davis County; seven in Utah County; and five in Salt Lake County are among the entities that posted property tax increase proposals.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7J8 (DN)

 

http://gousoe.uen.org/7Ju (KSL)

 


 

 

New path to teacher licensing comes under scrutiny

 

A new policy from the Utah State Board of Education that would make it easier for people without teaching experience to get state licensure is drawing ire from teachers statewide and in Park City.

In June, the Board of Education passed the Academic Pathway to Teaching rule. The rule, designed to alleviate staffing problems caused by a statewide teacher shortage, allows people with professional experience and a bachelor’s degree in a field of study to teach provisionally if they pass a test for certification and an ethics exam.

Once hired by a school district, the new teachers would undergo three years of mentorship and training from another teacher before the state grants them a license.

But critics of the rule, which the Board of Education was set to review at its August meeting after a public hearing last month, say it drastically lowers the standard to become a teacher. Being an expert in a field, even with years of professional experience, they say, does not equip someone with the pedagogical knowledge teachers rely on in a classroom.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7JK (PR)

 


 

Emery School District announces need for guest teachers and offers on-line training

 

With the approach of the new school year, the Emery School District is working on building up its bank of guest teachers (substitutes). The district is also offering guest teachers and prospective guest teachers an opportunity to participate in on-line training which will not only prepare them for their classroom experiences but which will also increase their substitute pay.

“While we currently have a strong pool of guest teachers we call on often to substitute teach,” Ralph Worthen, the district’s supervisor over the guest teacher program, said, “we are always looking to add to that list so that we will be able to meet the needs of our schools at even the most critical of times.”

http://gousoe.uen.org/7JJ (Emery County Progress)

 


 

 

Being Bilingual Keeps Your Brain Fit

A journey into the evolving research on the benefits of speaking multiple languages.

 

In a café in south London, two construction workers are engaged in cheerful banter, tossing words back and forth. Their cutlery dances during more emphatic gesticulations and they occasionally break off into loud guffaws. They are discussing a woman, that much is clear, but the details are lost on me. It’s a shame, because their conversation looks fun and interesting, especially to a nosy person like me. But I don’t speak their language.

Out of curiosity, I interrupt them to ask what they are speaking. With friendly smiles, they both switch easily to English, explaining that they are South Africans and had been speaking Xhosa. In Johannesburg, where they are from, most people speak at least five languages, says one of them, Theo Morris. For example, Theo’s mother’s language is Sotho, his father’s is Zulu, he learned Xhosa and Ndebele from his friends and neighbours, and English and Afrikaans at school. “I went to Germany before I came here, so I also speak German,” he adds.

Was it easy to learn so many languages?

“Yes, it’s normal,” he laughs.

He’s right. Around the world, more than half of people—estimates vary from 60 to 75 percent—speak at least two languages. Many countries have more than one official national language—South Africa has 11. People are increasingly expected to speak, read and write at least one of a handful of “super” languages, such as English, Chinese, Hindi, Spanish or Arabic, as well. So to be monolingual, as many native English speakers are, is to be in the minority, and perhaps to be missing out.

Multilingualism has been shown to have many social, psychological and lifestyle advantages. Moreover, researchers are finding a swathe of health benefits from speaking more than one language, including faster stroke recovery and delayed onset of dementia.

Could it be that the human brain evolved to be multilingual—that those who speak only one language are not exploiting their full potential? And in a world that is losing languages faster than ever—at the current rate of one a fortnight, half our languages will be extinct by the end of the century—what will happen if the current rich diversity of languages disappears and most of us end up speaking only one?

One option is to teach children in different languages. In many parts of the world, this is already being done: many Indian children, for example, will use a different language in school from their mother or village tongue. But in English-speaking nations, it is rare. Nevertheless, there is a growing movement towards so-called immersion schooling, in which children are taught in another language half the time. The state of Utah has been pioneering the idea, with many of its schools now offering immersion in Mandarin Chinese or Spanish.

“We use a half-day model, so the target language is used to teach in the morning, and then English is used in the afternoon—then this is swapped on other days as some learn better in the morning and some in the afternoon,” explains Gregg Roberts, who works with the Utah Office of State Education and has championed immersion language teaching in the state. “We have found that the kids do as well and generally better than monolingual counterparts in all subjects. They are better at concentrating, focusing and have a lot more self-esteem. Anytime you understand another language, you understand your language and culture better. It is economically and socially beneficial. We need to get over our affliction with monolingualism.”

http://gousoe.uen.org/7JI (The New Republic)

 


 

 

150 Springville High alumni surprise retired orchestra teacher with concert

 

SPRINGVILLE — Saturday evening, a man who taught orchestra for the Nebo School District for more than 27 years listened as about 150 of his former students played a surprise concert for him.

Earlier this year, Sam Tsugawa retired from Springville High School. This fall, he will begin teaching at Brigham Young University.

Kjersti Jones Christensen, whom Tsugawa taught for five years, organized the surprise concert, which she said was supposed to be a recreation of the film “Mr. Holland’s Opus.” The performers ranged from people who graduated high school in 1990 to current Springville High School students, Christensen said.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7Jv (KSL)

 


 

 

Ridgeline conducts open house, ribbon cutting

 

MILLVILLE — There are still some finishing touches to be made before the first day of classes, but the newest high school in Cache Valley welcomed visitors Tuesday night to check out the $50,546,117 facility.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7Jq (LHJ)

 

http://gousoe.uen.org/7Jr (CVD)

 


 

 

Independence High gets a new principal

 

PROVO — The Provo School District has named Chris Sorensen as the new principal at Independence High School.

Sorensen replaces Lani Quinsenberry, who took a position outside the state to be closer to family.

Sorensen served as Nebo School District superintendent from 2004-10 and was also the district’s director of elementary education.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7Jl (DN)

 


 

 

UVU names new presidential chief of staff

 

OREM — Utah Valley University President Matthew S. Holland has named Justin Jones as the new chief of staff for the president’s office. The appointment is effective Aug. 16.

Jones replaces Fidel A. Montero, who recently became the principal of Timpview High School.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7JN (DN)

 


 

 

Brushing up before hitting the books

 

Dental students Kevin Yu and Kiran Napa check out Kenzlie Binks’ teeth as Kenzlie’s mom, Kim, and brother, Taysen, look on at Roseman University in South Jordan on Tuesday. The dental students provided free back-to-school dental exams for children and teens entering grades K-12 during its second annual Back to School Brush-Up event. Those who came in for a checkup and cleaning got a voucher to return to the Roseman clinic for a free comprehensive exam, free X-rays and up to $50 in additional care. According to the National Children’s Oral Health Foundation, tooth pain and other oral health problems account for about 51 million hours of missed school every year, and it is estimated that as many as 17 million children suffer from untreated tooth decay, making it the single most common chronic childhood disease in the U.S.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7Jn (DN)

 


 

 

Salt Lake County Library holding mad science events

 

SALT LAKE CITY — The Salt Lake County Library is sponsoring free “Mad Science — Sounds Like Science” events at several libraries in August.

Designed for those in elementary school, the event features a mad scientist who creates crazy cacophony with a garbage can, a swinging sound tube and a metal pipe.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7Jm (DN)

 


 

 

Pender High launches suicide prevention program

 

PENDER COUNTY, NC – Pender High School is launching a “HOPE Squad,” a suicide prevention program made up of students.

Dr. Gregory Hudnall, a former high school principal, student service director and associate superintendent in Utah with over 20 years of experience in suicide prevention, spoke to parents, students, church leaders, law enforcement officials, emergency responders, mental health and healthcare professionals, school administrators, and other community members Monday at Pender High School.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7JO (Wilmington [NC] WECT)

 


 

 

Charter School Capital Acquires Three School Facilities from American Charter Development for $19.1 Million Deal Includes Two Charter Schools in Florida and One in Texas

 

PORTLAND, Ore. — Charter School Capital, the nation’s leading provider of funding for charter schools, including growth capital and facilities financing, announced today that its facilities arm, American Education Properties (AEP), has acquired three charter school facilities from American Charter Development (ACD) for $19.1 million. Charter school facilities acquired include St. Cloud Preparatory Academy and San Jose Academy and Preparatory High School in Florida for $10.3 million and $3.9 million, respectively, and High Point Academy in Texas for $4.9 million. Under the terms of the deal, AEP will assume the current lease terms for all of the schools and will invest in facilities improvements and additions at two of the three properties.

Over the past decade, American Charter Development has successfully developed more than four dozen schools ranging from $5 million to $25 million in cost. Its track record includes one of the largest charter schools ever opened in the United States – American Leadership Academy in Spanish Fork, Utah – which is still operating at full capacity today.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7JM (PR Newswire)

 

 

 

 

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OPINION & COMMENTARY

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Law and order and education

(Provo) Daily Herald op-ed by Don Jarvis, a retired university professor and community activist

 

We are all in favor of law and order. But how do we achieve it? By putting more people in prison or by improving education?

Harsh sentencing laws passed during the 1990s have resulted in the United States having the world’s highest fraction of its population behind bars — nearly one in every 100 citizens. We are worse than Russia or South Africa, which is not only shameful, but expensive.

Keeping people incarcerated is not cheap. Even anti-tax advocate Grover Norquist urges more cost-effective ways to reduce crime.

Surprisingly, conservative Texas is a leader in the sentencing reform movement and has invested more money in treatment programs. While not perfect, that has slowed the explosive growth of Texas’s prison population, giving many more drug offenders effective therapy and reducing recidivism.

As the above suggests, it is much cheaper to educate people than to keep them locked up. In Utah we spend almost $30,000 per year on each prisoner and less than one-fourth that amount, about $6,500, on each public school pupil.

How about promoting law and order by putting more money into education in schools and prisons? It could reduce crime and prison costs as well as being far more humane.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7Jp

 


 

 

The must-have technology for heading back to school Deseret News commentary by columnist Amy Iverson

 

When it’s time for kids to go back to school, parents have a lot to think about.

Gone are the days when Mom or Dad could grab some No. 2 pencils and a notebook and send the kids out the door. In our fast-paced world, students need technology to thrive, and that leaves parents to decide how basic or elaborate to get when they pull out their credit card.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7JP

 


 

 

Obama administration accused of trying to dictate education policy to states — again Washington Post commentary by columnist Valerie Strauss

 

The U.S. Education Department solicited public comment on draft regulations it has created for states to implement the school “accountability” and data reporting provisions of the new Every Student Succeeds Act — and, boy, did it get feedback, some of it scathing.

When Education Secretary John B. King Jr. announced the proposed rules in May, he said they were designed to “give states the opportunity to work all of their stakeholders … to protect all students’ right to a high-quality education,” and that they “give educators room to reclaim for all of their students the joy and promise of a well-rounded educational experience.”

King was referring to the mess created by No Child Left Behind, the K-12 education law that ESSA was passed last December to replace. NCLB, with accountability goals literally impossible to meet, had led to a severe narrowing of the curriculum and an over-emphasis on high-stakes standardized testing. Congress finally replaced No Child Left Behind — eight years late — because of NCLB’s flaws and because of criticism from across the political spectrum that the Obama administration had become too prescriptive and heavy-handed in education policy.

Now, the deadline for public comment of the proposed regulations has just passed, and education officials in some states as well as teachers, superintendents and others have told the Obama administration that it is still overreaching with its proposed ESSA regulations — and in at least one instance, went further and blasted the Education Department.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7JH

 


 

A Public-School Paradox

Why do so many presidents send their kids to private school?

Atlantic commentary by columnist ALIA WONG

 

When President Jimmy Carter assumed office in 1977, he did something remarkable: He enrolled his 9-year-old daughter, Amy, in a predominantly black Washington, D.C., public school. The move was symbolic, a commitment the Democrat from Georgia had made even before he securing the presidency. In his presidential-nomination acceptance speech the previous year, Carter criticized “exclusive private schools that allow the children of the political and economic elite to avoid public schools that are considered dangerous or inferior.”

Amy became the first child of a sitting U.S. president to attend a public school since 1906. She still is. When Sasha and Malia Obama moved to 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue with their dad, they enrolled in the $40,000-a-year Sidwell Friends—a highly selective Quaker school that also boasts Chelsea Clinton, Julie and Tricia Nixon, and Albert Gore III, among other political progeny, as alumni. Boarding schools such as Phillips Exeter Academy have been another popular option among past presidents, including John F. Kennedy, Calvin Coolidge, and Theodore Roosevelt. For the many presidents whose kids were adults by the time they assumed office, it’s hard to say where those kids would have attended school as first children had they been younger. But if Clinton’s trajectory is any indication, those presidents probably wouldn’t have taken the Carter route: Even children who had traditionally attended public school—such as Chelsea Clinton—enrolled in private school once their father assumed the presidency.

Scrutinizing where Malia and Chelsea and Amy went to school as first kids is a reminder that even presidents face the kinds of decisions that everyday parents have to make in an increasingly heterogenous school landscape. Perhaps more importantly, though, it’s a reminder of the disconnect that often separates public-school classrooms from the people who decide what happens in them: Given how much power the president of the United States wields over the nation’s public schools, it’s noteworthy how few of the country’s soon-to-be 45 commanders-in-chief actually had real, personal stakes in the public-education systems they helped—or will soon help—shape.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7JE

 


 

 

Why the Black Lives Matter movement has to take on charter schools Education reform’s race problems mirror unequal treatment in criminal justice system Hechinger Report commentary by columnist Andre Perry

 

Black school systems are treated like black men and women in America. Urban schools are broken up, experimented upon and policed in efforts to improve them. The reformers expect students, teachers and parents to be grateful and accept test score growth in return, just as black communities were expected to be grateful when crime dropped even as incarceration rates rose.

But finally, the same voices decrying the unequal treatment of black communities by the criminal justice system are turning to the unequal treatment of black communities in school reform.

The Black Lives Matter collective – representing approximately 50 organizations – released an official platform last week titled a Vision for Black Lives. Its education section called for an end to the privatization of education and petitioned for more community control of schools. A list of demands included “a moratorium on charter schools and school closures.” The NAACP also took a stand against charters at their annual national convention by approving a resolution that calls for a moratorium on the expansion of privately managed charters. It has yet to be approved by the national board.

Zero-tolerance policies in the criminal justice system are the first cousins of zero-tolerance policies in schools.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7JD

 


 

 

Street-Savvy School Reform

Lessons learned from six big-city school systems Education Next analysis by Paul Hill and Ashley Jochim

 

Political scientist E. E. Schattschneider likened politics to a fight between two men in a street. If nobody intervenes, the stronger will win. But if the weaker fighter can get a bystander to join in on his side, the dynamic changes. As Schattschneider noted, the result depends less on the strength of the two fighters than on the behavior of the crowd.

One bystander might enter because he thinks a combatant is fighting dirty and he wants to defend the principle of fair play; another because he identifies with the race or religion of one of the combatants; another because he hopes to make off with one fighter’s watch; and so on. The issues at stake can evolve as parties with different agendas join one side or the other.

These insights into the nature of political conflict explain much about contemporary education reform. Efforts to improve big-city school systems provoke a struggle. Like a street fight, the result depends less on the strength of the combatants than on the actions of others who join in.

This article is based on the experience of civic and education leaders in six big-city school systems—New York City, New Orleans, Denver, Oakland, Newark, and Cleveland—that have adopted a “portfolio strategy.” This approach calls for continuous improvement of a city’s schools through managing a mix, or portfolio, of schools—traditional public schools, privately managed schools, and charter schools—and regularly adjusting that mix (opening some and reconstituting others) in light of student needs. But our findings are relevant to any reform strategy bold enough to threaten established interests.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7JG

 


 

 

Waivering as Governance

Federalism During the Obama Administration Educational Researcher analysis by Andrew Saultz, Andrew McEachin, Lance D. Fusarelli

 

This article analyzes how the Obama administration used executive power to grant waivers from federal education policies and assesses whether they used this power differently than previous administrations and in other sectors (e.g., health or welfare). The executive use of waivers to shape state policy is not a new trend. However, we find that recent education waivers differ in purpose and specificity from past education waivers, as well as waivers in other social policy arenas, and that the Obama administration is using this executive power to further its policy objectives in ways that often circumvent congressional intent. As the executive branch continues to utilize waivers as a policy lever, this research has important implications for the future of federal involvement in educational policy and provides critical background for Congress’s reaction to waivers in the recently reauthorized Elementary and Secondary Education Act.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7Jd ($)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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NATIONAL NEWS

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Who is driving the opt-out movement? The answer might surprise you Chalkbeat

 

Members of the country’s growing opt-out movement aren’t necessarily who you think they are.

According to a report released Tuesday, they’re not all parents of public school students. Many don’t have children at all. And they’re worried about more than the effect of high-stakes testing on students. The reasons why they support boycotting the tests runs the gamut from opposition to federal overreach to concerns about the role of corporations in public schools.

The report from Teachers College at Columbia University surveyed 1,641 supporters of the opt-out movement across 47 states, including 588 from New York, in an attempt to answer fundamental questions about who they are and what they want.

Some of those findings aren’t surprising. “The typical opt out activist is a highly educated, white, married, politically liberal parent whose children attend public school and whose household median income is well above the national average,” states the report. The median household income of respondents surveyed was $125,000, compared with the national median, which was $53,657 in 2014, the most recent year available.

But it’s the breadth of the movement that’s noteworthy, explains Oren Pizmony-Levy, one of the report’s authors.

“It’s not just about the tests. They’re saying something bigger about the direction of education reforms in the U.S.,” Pizmony-Levy said. “It does bring together all sides of the political spectrum.”

The most common reason opt-out supporters cited for boycotting the tests was opposition to using test data to evaluate teacher performance, with 36.9 percent of respondents listing that as one of their top two reasons to support opting out (45 percent of the respondents work in education). That was followed by concerns over teaching to the test (33.8 percent), opposition to the growing role of corporations in schools (30.4 percent), fears that the tests cut into instructional time (26.5 percent), and opposition to Common Core standards (25.8 percent).

http://gousoe.uen.org/7Jf

 

A copy of the report

http://gousoe.uen.org/7Jg (Columbia University)

 


 

 

ACT shakes up security unit, plans audit after cheating reports Reuters

 

ACT Inc, maker of America’s most popular university entrance exam, is laying off its head of test security and plans to audit nearly 200 education centers after Reuters detailed widespread cheating in an ACT-owned college-prep program for international students.

Rachel Schoenig, who oversees a 14-person team that handles security for thousands of ACT exam centers in 177 countries, will leave the not-for-profit organization next month, according to people familiar with the matter. It is not clear whether she will be replaced.

In June, a leaked test forced ACT Inc, based in Iowa City, Iowa, to cancel sittings for its college-entrance exam in Hong Kong and South Korea. Reuters reported last month that Schoenig’s unit had repeatedly recommended tightening security overseas before the breach and cancellations, but that ACT executives had rejected the recommendations.

Schoenig is among several top security officials to leave ACT Inc recently. A senior investigator in her unit, Cody Shultz, recently quit, according to people familiar with the matter. And ACT’s head of information security, Shari Lewison, left the organization to take a job this month at University of Iowa Health Care, according to her LinkedIn page.

Schoenig declined to comment. Shultz and Lewison did not respond to requests for comment.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7Jh

 

http://gousoe.uen.org/7Ji (WaPo)

 


 

 

Cost reaches $545K for Nevada in education savings account challenge Las Vegas Review Journal

 

Nevada taxpayers will spend more than half a million dollars to defend the state’s contested education savings account program.

The total price tag reached $545,000 on Tuesday as the state Board of Examiners voted 2-0 to approve a $125,000 extension to a contract with the out-of-state law firm Bancroft PLLC, led by former U.S. Solicitor General Paul Clement.

Since October, Clement has assisted the state attorney general’s office in crafting its defense of Senate Bill 302, which authorizes a voucher-style program for parents to spend per-pupil state funds on private school tuition.

Clement in July argued on behalf of the state in two hearings before the Nevada Supreme Court on the constitutionality of SB302. The justices are expected to issue a decision soon.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7Jj

 

http://gousoe.uen.org/7Jk (Reno [NV] Gazette-Journal)

 


 

 

Teachers in Common-Core States Have Big Say in Choosing Resources, Report Suggests Education Week

 

Teachers of math and English/language arts in states following the common-core standards are playing a strong role in developing or selecting the classroom resources they use, a report has found.

More than 90 percent of math educators surveyed on the report, for instance, said they either selected or developed their own materials. And many teachers at the elementary level said they used those self-selected or developed materials frequently—at least once a week.

Educators at the secondary level also made those choices, but less often, according to the report, released by the RAND Corporation.

Teachers in the states aligned to common-core standards also reported relying heavily on resources selected or developed by their districts, said the report, released by the RAND Corporation.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7JA

 


 

 

Facebook’s newest partnership is pushing an innovative approach to learning in 120 Silicon Valley schools Business Insider

 

Facebook is partnering with a charter school network to push out an innovative concept in 120 Silicon Valley schools: student-directed learning.

Announced Tuesday, the Facebook-Summit Public Schools partnership centers on a learning system co-created by the social media behemoth and charter network through an undisclosed amount of money, The New York Times reported.

Called the “Summit Personalized Learning Platform,” the software enables students to create their own timelines for completing projects and lessons for the year, supplemented with one-on-one mentorship by teachers.

In return, the system gives students wide berth to develop creative problem solving skills and learn time management on their own, the creators of the platform say. The software will be free of charge to schools.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7J9

 

http://gousoe.uen.org/7Ja (Ed Week)

 

http://gousoe.uen.org/7Jb (NYT)

 


 

 

Black School Choice Group Pushes Back on NAACP Charter School Moratorium Education Week

 

An African-American pro-charter advocacy group is appealing to leaders of the NAACP to reject a recent resolution from members of the venerable civil rights organization that calls for a moratorium on expanding charter schools.

Citing increased segregation and high rates of exclusionary discipline among other issues, members of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People voted at the organization’s national conference late last month to approve a resolution calling for a ban on new charter schools. The civil rights organization has long held a skeptical view of charters, but this resolution may amount to its strongest opposition to date.

Soon after, Black Lives Matter activists joined a coalition of several civil rights and advocacy groups in releasing an education agenda that also calls for a ban on charters, among other initiatives.

Organized under the Movement for Black Lives, the agenda also targets some of the most powerful philanthropic backers of the charter school sector—the Walton Family Foundation, the Eli and Edythe Broad Foundation, and the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation—for bankrolling what it calls “an international education privatization agenda”.

African-American supporters of charter schools have since been pushing back against the NAACP’s resolution (which has yet to be approved by the group’s leadership).

http://gousoe.uen.org/7Jx

 


 

 

After Student Tossed, South Carolina Eyes Role of Officers Associated Press

 

COLUMBIA, S.C. — Ten months after video captured a South Carolina deputy pulling a teenager from her desk and tossing her across the floor – sparking a national debate over an officer’s role in the classroom – state officials on Tuesday tentatively approved new rules limiting officers’ involvement with student discipline.

The state Board of Education also unanimously recommended new classifications for student misbehavior. The proposed rules say officers should not get involved until offenses become criminal, defined as posing a “direct and serious threat” to safety, such as assault, drug sales or gun possession.

Last October, a Richland County deputy was called to a classroom after the then-16-year-old student refused to stop using her cellphone and wouldn’t leave the classroom when told by a teacher or administrator. The deputy was fired two days later, after video of a white officer arresting the black student spread.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7Jw

 

http://gousoe.uen.org/7Jy (Ed Week)

 


 

 

New Law Requires Students to Learn How to Handle Being Pulled Over by Police

(Chicago) WLS

 

Students in Illinois driver’s education classes will soon be required to learn something new before they can get behind the wheel. A new law requires instruction time on how to handle being stopped by the police.

Governor Bruce Rauner signed the bill into law on Friday. The change is aimed at preventing teens from panicking when being pulled over, and also from doing anything that may seem like a red flag to police.

For young drivers, getting behind the wheel for the first time is a thrill they’ve been looking forward to and many don’t anticipate the frightening feeling of getting pulled over.

But to help the experience go smoothly, there is now a state law that requires driver’s education teachers in both public and private school, and driver training schools, to instruct students on how to interact with police during a traffic stop.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7JF

 


 

 

Can testing save arts education?

Teachers hope exams will make arts matter as much as math and English Hechinger Report

 

KINGSTON, N.H. — It sounded like an ordinary assignment for a visual arts class: Teacher Karen Ladd asked her freshmen at Sanborn Regional High School to research an artist, create a piece of art inspired by the artist’s work and then write a reflection about the experience.

Dressed in tank tops and shorts that heralded the arrival of summer weather, some students studied the assignment while others listened to headphones as they browsed for artists online. One girl begged to be allowed to use Bob Ross as her inspiration; another searched determinedly for paintings of bowling to use.

But this was no ordinary class project: It was a test.

This spring, with a six-district pilot, New Hampshire joined a small but growing list of at least a half-dozen states experimenting with large-scale arts testing. Educators prefer to call the new exams assessments, because they’re so different in form and format from traditional standardized tests. The goal, though, is to create a common “test” — often in the form of a project — that can be given to students in different classrooms across the state and used to help compare the performance of schools and districts.

But coming up with a uniform and efficient way to measure a subject that’s all about creativity is difficult.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7JC

 


 

 

What one assistant principal learned from shadowing a student for a day NewsHour

 

Karen Ritter, an assistant principal at a high school just outside of Chicago, wanted to see her school through a student’s eyes. So she decided to follow 9th grader Alan Garcia, who came to her asking to be switched out of the many remedial classes in which he is enrolled, hoping to get a clear view of his experience in the classroom.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7JB

 


 

 

Appeals Court Revives Suit Challenging Ten Commandments at Pa. High School Education Week

 

A federal appeals court has revived a lawsuit challenging a 60-year-old monument displaying the Ten Commandments at a Pennsylvania high school.

A three-judge panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 3rd Circuit, in Philadelphia, ruled unanimously to restore the suit brought by a mother and daughter against the New Kensington-Arnold school district near Pittsburgh.

The suit by Marie Schaub for herself and on behalf of her daughter (identified only as Doe 1) and backed by the Madison, Wis.-based Freedom From Religion Foundation, challenges the Ten Commandment monument installed in 1956 at Valley High School in New Kensington, Pa.

The school’s Ten Commandments monument was donated by the Fraternal Order of Eagles, part of a campaign to place such nearly 200 such granite memorials at public parks, municipal buildings, and schools across the country. (The fraternal organization was encouraged by Cecil B. DeMille, the director of the film “The Ten Commandments,” which came out in 1956.)

The lawsuit challenged the presence of the Ten Commandments monument as an unconstitutional government establishment of religion.

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled in an unsigned 1980 decision in Stone v. Graham that a Kentucky statute requiring the posting of the Ten Commandments on the walls of public school classrooms violated the establishment clause.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7Jz

 


 

 

Comcast Announces Six Time Olympic Medal Winner Jackie Joyner-Kersee to Serve as National Spokeswoman for Internet Essentials Joyner-Kersee to Participate in a National Road Show for the 2016 – 2017 Academic Year Business Wire

 

PHILADELPHIA–Comcast Corporation today announced Jackie Joyner-Kersee will serve as a national spokeswoman for Internet Essentials, the largest and most successful broadband adoption program in the country. Soon to kick off its sixth annual back-to-school season, Internet Essentials has helped close the digital divide for more than 600,000 families, benefitting 2.4 million low-income Americans.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7Jc

 

 

 

 

 

 

————————————————————

CALENDAR

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USOE Calendar

http://www.schools.utah.gov/main/CALENDAR.aspx

 

 

UEN News

http://www.uen.org

 

 

August 11:

Utah State Charter School Board meeting

8:30 a.m., 250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://go.uen.org/62M

 

Utah State Board of Education study session, USDB and committee meetings

3 p.m., 250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspx

 

 

August 12:

Utah State Board of Education meeting

8 a.m., 250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspx

 

 

September 13:

Joint Education Conference

8 a.m., 800 W University Parkway, Orem

http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2016&com=SPEJEC

 

 

September 20:

Executive Appropriations Committee meeting

2 p.m., 445 State Capitol

http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2016&com=APPEXE

 

 

September 21:

Education Interim Committee meeting

1:15 p.m., 30 House Building

http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2016&com=INTEDU

 

 

September 22:

Public Education Appropriations Subcommittee meeting

9 a.m., 445 State Capitol

http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2016&com=APPPED

 

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