Education News Roundup: Aug. 24 – 2016

 

 

 

"Fly to be Free" by Kal Jo, grade 2/Provo School District.

“Fly to be Free” by Kal Jo, grade 2/Provo School District.

Education News Roundup

Today’s Top Picks:

This year’s ACT scores are released. Utah maintains status quo, national scores drop as more students take the test.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7Ov (SLT)

and http://gousoe.uen.org/7Ow (USBE)

and http://gousoe.uen.org/7OR (WaPo)

and http://gousoe.uen.org/7OT (WSJ)

and http://gousoe.uen.org/7OX (Ed Week)

and http://gousoe.uen.org/7OS (Inside Higher Ed) and http://gousoe.uen.org/7OU (AP) and http://gousoe.uen.org/7Pf (Las Vegas Review Journal) or a copy of the national report and individual state reports http://gousoe.uen.org/7Ox (ACT)

 

The Facebook tax break is off the table.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7Oh (SLT)

and http://gousoe.uen.org/7Oi (DN)

and http://gousoe.uen.org/7OF (LHJ)

and http://gousoe.uen.org/7Ph (KUTV)

and http://gousoe.uen.org/7OK (KTVX)

and http://gousoe.uen.org/7OM (KSL)

and http://gousoe.uen.org/7ON (KSTU)

and http://gousoe.uen.org/7Pe (Albuquerque [NM] Journal)

 

KUTV looks at injuries at schools.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7OH (KUTV)

 

Tribune editorial board sticks up for SAGE testing.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7Ok (SLT)

 

Ed Week finds that a lot of the nation’s high schools don’t have physics classes.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7Pd (Ed Week)

 

 

 

 

————————————————————

TODAY’S HEADLINES

————————————————————

 

 

UTAH

 

Utah’s ACT scores hold steady as national average slips Education » Average score of 20.2 good enough for acceptance into most colleges.

 

Utah’s Facebook data center deal is off

Data center » West Jordan pulls the plug after state Board of Education’s push for scaled-down incentives.

 

New data show when, how Utah children get hurt at school

 

How Alta High School is Helping Students Get College Jump Start

 

House passes Chaffetz amendment to improve Navajo school bus routes

 

Utah test scores higher in high income neighborhoods

 

SAGE scores 2016: Top Utah schools in mathematics

 

S.L. School District superintendent hosting monthly breakfasts

 

Utah lawmaker makes push for later school start times

 

Williams leaving communications director position with Ogden School District

 

Charges dismissed against Utah school principal accused of assaulting wife

 

Nearly 50 Homes, Elementary School Evacuated After Gas Leak Monroe Elementary school will resume as normal Wednesday

 

Logan school placed on temporary lockdown as police look for alleged shooter

 

Northern Utah parents share their kids’ first day of school pictures

 

Girls on the Run Southern Utah Launches Heart & Sole Program for 6th Through 8th Grade Girls

 

5 Back-to-School Health Concerns

 


 

 

OPINION & COMMENTARY

 

Utah needs to stick with SAGE tests, and take the results seriously

 

Thirty years in, Education Foundation deserves our thanks

 

Texas teacher’s note went viral because it’s so simple, yet so hard

 

Student identity should be the first priority of education

 

Rocket scientists need instructors. So do teachers.

 

ESSA’s Disputed Funding Rule: Comparing Older, Newer Education Dept. Language

 

Victory for Bad Teachers

 

How Education Reform Lost Its Mojo

Today’s reformers don’t know how or when to fight.

 


 

 

NATION

 

2 in 5 High Schools Don’t Offer Physics, Analysis Finds Smaller schools least likely to offer subject

 

DPI expanding teacher license options to address staffing shortages

 

Court Actions Leave Uncertainty on Transgender Student Rights

 

Corporal Punishment Use Found in Schools in 21 States Punishment rates for blacks nearly double those for whites

 

Justice Department sues Georgia over segregation of students with disabilities

 

Colorado districts wrestle with new law allowing students to use medical marijuana at school

 

Hillary Clinton walks tightrope on education

 

Charter school’s leader steps down after mailer controversy, but school resolved to open

 

Former Grand Prairie ISD chief accused of using armored trucks to steal $600,000 from district

 

Report Names the 50 Most-Segregating School District Boundaries by Income

 

New school year to include terror attack drills for French students

 

 

 

————————————————————

UTAH NEWS

————————————————————

 

Utah’s ACT scores hold steady as national average slips Education » Average score of 20.2 good enough for acceptance into most colleges.

 

That gap in ACT scores between Utah and the nation tightened this year as thousands of new test-takers drove down performance across the country, according to data released Wednesday by ACT.

Utah’s graduating seniors earned an average score of 20.2 — on a 36-point scale — compared with the U.S. average of 20.8.

The state’s composite score is unchanged from 2015, while the national average ticked down from a score of 21 last year on the college readiness exam.

Deputy State Superintendent Rich Nye said the results are encouraging, particularly when considering that Utah is one of 19 “full census” states where the ACT is taken by all public high school students.

A score of 20.2, Nye said, is enough for the average Utah graduate to enroll at most institutions of higher education.

“Universities will accept a much lower composite score than 20.2,” Nye said. “It does speak to the opportunities that are being made available to our students.”

http://gousoe.uen.org/7Ov (SLT)

 

http://gousoe.uen.org/7Ow (USBE)

 

http://gousoe.uen.org/7OR (WaPo)

 

http://gousoe.uen.org/7OT (WSJ)

 

http://gousoe.uen.org/7OX (Ed Week)

 

http://gousoe.uen.org/7OS (Inside Higher Ed)

 

http://gousoe.uen.org/7OU (AP)

 

http://gousoe.uen.org/7Pf (Las Vegas Review Journal)

 

A copy of the national report and individual state reports http://gousoe.uen.org/7Ox (ACT)

 

 


 

 

Utah’s Facebook data center deal is off

Data center » West Jordan pulls the plug after state Board of Education’s push for scaled-down incentives.

 

West Jordan pulled the plug Tuesday on a deal to entice Facebook to build a massive data center in Utah with the promise of a hefty tax-incentive package worth up to $260 million over 20 years.

The deal killer was a vote by the State Board of Education to approve only a scaled-down plan, capped at $100 million in tax breaks.

“Effective immediately, all negotiations between the company known as Discus and the City of West Jordan are hereby terminated. Any and all incentives and inducements preliminarily offered the company to locate in West Jordan are hereby rescinded in whole without prejudice,” West Jordan City said in a press release.

West Jordan City’s Council unanimously supported the agreement and the Jordan School District had followed suit, albeit with complaints that it was too generous. But Salt Lake County Mayor Ben McAdams and the County Council unanimously opposed the package as giving away too much for far too little return: an estimated 50 to 300 permanent jobs.

Because the offered tax breaks involved several taxing entities, West Jordan needed two-thirds approval of a committee made up of representatives of the different agencies. The State School Board decision on Tuesday assured that supporters would be one vote short of the required majority to move forward with the whole package.

The board instructed its tax representative to demand a series of conditions. Most significant among them: that the incentives apply only to the first third of a proposed six-stage building process, and that they be capped at $100 million. The proposal before the tax entities didn’t include a cap and was projected to be worth $195 million in property tax rebates to Facebook at full buildout. Other incentives also were offered, including sales-tax breaks, reduced energy taxes and unspecified incentives from the state.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7Oh (SLT)

 

http://gousoe.uen.org/7Oi (DN)

 

http://gousoe.uen.org/7OF (LHJ)

 

http://gousoe.uen.org/7Ph (KUTV)

 

http://gousoe.uen.org/7OK (KTVX)

 

http://gousoe.uen.org/7OM (KSL)

 

http://gousoe.uen.org/7ON (KSTU)

 

http://gousoe.uen.org/7Pe (Albuquerque [NM] Journal)

 


 

 

New data show when, how Utah children get hurt at school

 

Utah students often get hurt during lunch recess and PE class, and the top injury across all grades is a broken bone, according to new data from the Utah Department of Health.

Those statistics show when — and how –- Utah children are getting hurt at school.

According to the department, there were 4,508 injuries reported during the 2014-15 school year –- the most recent year with available data. That’s down from 3,954 reported injuries during the 2013-14 school year, but it’s up from 5,413 in 2012-13.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7OH (KUTV)

 


 

 

How Alta High School is Helping Students Get College Jump Start

 

It’s back to school day for thousands of students in Canyons School District. There are a lot of cool things to look forward to for the school year, especially at Alta High School. The school’s principal, Brian McGill explained the early college program, Step2theU.

The program is an agreement between Canyons District and the University of Utah. It gives Alta students a chance to work towards completing 2 semesters of colleges classes before they graduate high school.  In addition to classes on campus, they will be able to study with University of Utah professors at the U.’s Sandy Campus.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7OI (KTVX)

 


 

 

House passes Chaffetz amendment to improve Navajo school bus routes

 

An amendment introduced by Congressman Jason Chaffetz was adopted into the House Interior Appropriations bill (H.R. 5538).

The amendment provides dedicated funding for dirt school bus routes on American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) trust lands within the Bureau of Indian Affairs.

This funding would be available to repair dangerously rutted and flood-prone roads in the San Juan County portion of the Navajo Nation.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7Pc (San Juan Record)

 


 

 

Utah test scores higher in high income neighborhoods

 

Utah standardized test scores are rising slowly in Math and Science, and staying flat in Language Arts, but as the State Office of Education released 2016 test scores the results at the local level were starkly different.

In this week’s Max Facts, I take a look at the correlation between the level of income in a given zip code and the performance of the local elementary school on Utah’s SAGE tests.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7OO (KSTU)

 


 

 

SAGE scores 2016: Top Utah schools in mathematics

 

The newest batch of results from the SAGE exams are out.

This is the third year of results from the controversial SAGE tests. Results from this year’s batch show that most of the state’s students are still below proficiency levels.

Students were tested in three areas: mathematics, language arts and science.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7Oy (DN)

 


 

 

S.L. School District superintendent hosting monthly breakfasts

 

SALT LAKE CITY — Parents are invited to attend monthly breakfasts with Salt Lake City School District Superintendent Alexa Cunningham.

The breakfasts will be held 7-9 a.m. at the following locations:

http://gousoe.uen.org/7OB (DN)

 


 

 

Utah lawmaker makes push for later school start times

 

SALT LAKE CITY – Should students start school a little later to get some extra zzz’s? Rep. Carol Spackman Moss says yes, and she’s got science on her side.

Before Spackman Moss, D-Salt Lake City, became a lawmaker, she taught English at Olympus High School. She saw firsthand how lack of sleep impacts students in the classroom.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7OP (KSTU)

 


 

 

Williams leaving communications director position with Ogden School District

 

OGDEN — Zac Williams is leaving his position as public information officer/director of communication with the Ogden School District.

Effective Sept. 2, Williams will leave the post he’s occupied for three years and focus on building business for Williams Visual, a strategic communications firm he started prior to his time with the district.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7OD (OSE)

 


 

 

Charges dismissed against Utah school principal accused of assaulting wife

 

Charges have been dismissed against a Davis School District principal who was accused of assaulting his wife, after she invoked spousal privilege and refused to testify against her husband.

Donald Beatty, 54, was arrested and charged in May with class B misdemeanor counts of domestic violence assault, unlawful detention, threats of violence and interruption of a communication device.

All four charges were dismissed Tuesday by Davis County Justice Court Judge John Ynchausti, after prosecutors filed a motion stating that without the woman’s testimony there was insufficient evidence to prosecute the case.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7Pi (SLT)

 


 

 

Nearly 50 Homes, Elementary School Evacuated After Gas Leak Monroe Elementary school will resume as normal Wednesday

 

WEST VALLEY CITY, Utah – Nearly 50 homes were evacuated Tuesday night into Wednesday morning after a gas leak.

The road along 3100 South was closed while crews worked to clean up the gas saturating the ground.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7OJ (KTVX)

 

http://gousoe.uen.org/7Pj (CVD)

 


 

 

Logan school placed on temporary lockdown as police look for alleged shooter

 

LOGAN — The first day of school at Ellis Elementary School on Tuesday had a little more excitement than students and administrators were expecting.

“It was just really bad timing,” said Logan Police Chief Gary Jensen.

As students were walking to school, 348 W. 300 North, police were pursuing a possible shooting suspect nearby, causing the school to go into a lockdown mode as a precaution. Neither the school nor any of the students were ever threatened http://gousoe.uen.org/7OL (KSL)

 


 

 

Northern Utah parents share their kids’ first day of school pictures

 

Tuesday, Aug. 23 was the first day of school for several Northern Utah school districts, and nothing says “first day of school” more than a first day of school picture.

We asked local parents to share their first day pictures on Facebook. Here are some of our favorites.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7OC (OSE)

 


 

 

Girls on the Run Southern Utah Launches Heart & Sole Program for 6th Through 8th Grade Girls

 

Washington County, Utah – Girls on the Run Southern Utah (GotRSU) is proud to announce an expansion to its already successful program. Beginning September 19th, GotRSU will offer its Heart & Sole program at two intermediate schools in Washington County.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7OQ (KCSG)

 


 

 

5 Back-to-School Health Concerns

 

Are you feeling a bit wistful and melancholy as school resumes? Or perhaps you’re breathing a deep sigh of relief that the house is quieting down and a semblance of order is returning to your days.

Whether you’re bittersweet or blissful now that the kids are back in class, you probably share a few typical concerns with every other parent. It can be tough to wave goodbye in the morning and spend your day wondering what health challenges the next eight hours may hold for your little ones. Let’s look at five of the most common health concerns to help you prepare.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7Pb (University of Utah Health Care)

 

 

 

 

 

————————————————————

OPINION & COMMENTARY

————————————————————

 

Utah needs to stick with SAGE tests, and take the results seriously Salt Lake Tribune editorial

 

The fact that the levels of student proficiency on Utah’s SAGE tests have inched up over the three years the system has been in use does not necessarily mean that our children are getting smarter. It might just mean that they — their teachers and their parents — are getting used to the tests.

And that’s a good thing.

Measuring how well students are doing — individually, by district, by school and by ethnic, economic and other subdivisions — is crucial to building a functioning educational system. Otherwise, we have no idea whether the students are making necessary, even minimal, progress until they show up at work or in college.

When it is all but too late to do anything about it.

And unless a state or a district sticks with the same basic testing over several years, it is impossible to know whether anyone is making improvements year-to-year.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7Ok

 


 

 

Thirty years in, Education Foundation deserves our thanks Park Record editorial

 

Teachers returned to their classrooms this week with large ambitions. They are aiming to set up their students for success and to enrich their lives like only a first-rate education can. But in Park City, they don’t have to do it alone.

Among the many annual rites that accompany the return of school, one stands out: The Park City Education Foundation is ramping up for another year of helping Park City schools deliver an excellent education.

But this is a particularly special school year for the foundation. It has reached its 30th anniversary, and it’s a milestone that everyone in Park City should celebrate. The foundation began in 1986 with a $2,000 grant, but over the years, it has morphed into an organization that changes students’ lives in meaningful ways on a near-daily basis.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7Pg

 


 

 

Texas teacher’s note went viral because it’s so simple, yet so hard Deseret News commentary by columnist Jay Evensen

 

Back-to-school night with my 14-year-old this week reminded me that the beginning of a marathon is always more pleasant than the 15th mile, when you’re struggling up a hill, trying to keep focused on a distant goal.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7Oz

 

http://gousoe.uen.org/7OZ (USAT)

 

http://gousoe.uen.org/7P7 (CSM)

 


 

 

Student identity should be the first priority of education Salt Lake Tribune op-ed by Lynn Stoddard, author of “Educating for Human Greatness”

 

Teachers and parents, if you form a crystal-clear, mental image of identity as the first priority of education and maintain that image at the front of your mind, your brain will invent strategies for accomplishing this priority even while you sleep.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7Oj

 


 

 

Rocket scientists need instructors. So do teachers.

(Ogden) Standard-Examiner letter from Dixie Mathis

 

I have been a frequent reader of Mark Saal’s column for several years. I have always found his humor amusing and his ideas thought-provoking. However, his demeaning reference to teaching (“Teaching? Hey, it’s not rocket science”) in his August 16, 2016, column touched a raw nerve with me.

I have been an educator for over 50 years, and more than 10 of those years were spent in training non-educators to teach in a career college setting. Yes, as Saal indicates, these people can be trained to teach — some much more easily than others — but someone with teaching expertise must do that training. Many skills are essential to becoming a good teacher — probably just as many as becoming a good rocket scientist. Just as with the rocket scientist, learning those skills does not happen without expert guidance. Every rocket scientist has been touched by many teachers who were well prepared to not only help him/her with the necessary development of rocket science skills, but also to guide the scientist in acquiring the love of learning, the determination, the motivation, and the excitement that must be there to be successful in any field.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7OE

 


 

 

ESSA’s Disputed Funding Rule: Comparing Older, Newer Education Dept. Language Education Week commentary by columnist Andrew Ujifusa

 

We’ve covered a lot of the vinegary debate over spending rules for the Every Student Succeeds Act that are due out pretty soon. But here’s one other thing for you to consider: U.S. Department of Education guidance distributed to states in July 2015 about how federal money should be used as a supplement for school budgets..

That guidance is some of the most recent language we have from the Education Department about the issue, before the Every Student Succeeds Act passed last December. It’s another window into the department’s thinking on the subject. And like other facets of this issue, it highlights the big debate over the extent to which federal funds can and should be used as leverage for creating greater equity between wealthy schools and their disadvantaged counterparts.

Quick refresher: When ESSA passed, the department was tasked by Congress to work with a team of district, state, and other K-12 representatives and create rules for the requirement that federal money be used in addition to state and local cash. Those negotiations this spring, however, failed to produce a consensus plan, leaving it to the department to craft its own set of draft rules.

So what happens when we compare what the guidance says (and doesn’t say) to the plans the department pitched during negotiated rulemaking? What has the department said constitutes an equitable distribution of funds by a district? And what additional questions does this comparison raise about what the department will propose for regulating federal dollars?

http://gousoe.uen.org/7Pa

 


 

 

Victory for Bad Teachers

Wall Street Journal commentary

 

Center for Education Reform Founder and CEO Jeanne Allen on the California State Supreme Court’s decision to uphold public-school teacher tenure.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7Ol  (video)

 


 

 

How Education Reform Lost Its Mojo

Today’s reformers don’t know how or when to fight.

U.S. News & World Report op-ed by Robert Pondiscio, senior fellow and vice president for external affairs at the Thomas B. Fordham Institute

 

It’s been a terrible, horrible, no good, very bad summer for education reform. After many years of bipartisan support, key elements of the reform agenda – higher standards, better teachers, test-based accountability, parental choice – are starved for oxygen in both the Republican and Democratic party platforms. Earlier this month, the NAACP further upset the reform apple cart with a call for a moratorium on new charter schools. Not to be outdone, a “platform” released by the Movement for Black Lives, a group of organizations organized by Black Lives Matter, issued a scorched earth condemnation of every aspect of the ed-reform agenda, which it characterized as “a systematic attack … coordinated by an international education privatization agenda, bankrolled by billionaire philanthropists … and aided by the departments of education at the federal, state, and local level.”

Response to this series of stunning attacks and political reversals has overall been mild to muted. The usual groups have told journalists where and how they disagree with the antis, but there’s been no outcry of support for the agenda items under attack, and certainly not from any political leaders, prominent columnists, etc.

This week, however, by marked contrast, the atmosphere inside the edu-bubble was set alight by – wait for it – John Oliver. Yes, that John Oliver, British comedian and host of a faux HBO news show, who did a “takedown” of charter schools that was quickly and correctly dismissed by Nick Gillespie of Reason as “clever, glib and uninformed.” From the reactions of education reformers, however, you’d think Oliver was Edward R. Murrow, and that the expose had appeared on “60 Minutes,” not a late-night comedy show.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7P8

 

 

 

 

 

————————————————————-

NATIONAL NEWS

————————————————————-

 

2 in 5 High Schools Don’t Offer Physics, Analysis Finds Smaller schools least likely to offer subject Education Week

 

Physics, as champions of the subject will remind you, is the cornerstone of many professions, including those in engineering, health care, aerospace, and architecture. And for students hoping to pursue those and other science, technology, engineering, and math fields during college, getting a jump on physics during high school is all but a requirement.

Yet, across the country, 2 in 5 high schools don’t offer physics, according to an Education Week Research Center analysis of data from the U.S. Department of Education’s office for civil rights.

The numbers are worse in some states than others: In both Alaska and Oklahoma, about 70 percent of high schools don’t offer the course. Florida and Utah are close behind, with nearly 60 percent of high schools lacking physics. Iowa, New Hampshire, and Maine do much better, with only about 15 percent of schools not offering the subject.

A closer look shows that the problem is associated with school size: Nationally, the high schools that offer physics have an average of about 880 students. Those that don’t offer it enroll an average of just 270 students.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7Pd

 


 

 

DPI expanding teacher license options to address staffing shortages

(Madison) Wisconsin State Journal

 

The state’s education agency is making it easier for retired and prospective teachers to get professionally licensed in an effort to address shortages within the state’s teaching ranks.

State schools Superintendent Tony Evers on Tuesday announced a group of changes to the state’s teacher licensing process including allowing teachers with emergency one-year licenses to renew even if they haven’t yet passed required tests, and allowing retired teachers or teachers planning to retire to gain a nonrenewable five-year license without going through training typically required to get such licenses.

“It’s gotten to a point in the state of Wisconsin that we can no longer say the department can’t do anything about this,” said Department of Public Instruction spokesman Tom McCarthy. “If we don’t take action, it will start to impact kids and that’s where the buck stops for us.”

The state’s rules on rehiring public employees drawing pension payments would apply to retired teachers seeking the five-year license. Rehired public employees collecting pensions cannot work full time and also collect pension payments.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7Or

 


 

 

Court Actions Leave Uncertainty on Transgender Student Rights Education Week

 

The debate over which restroom transgender students may use at school is now playing out in the nation’s courtrooms, presenting a lot of uncertainty for school leaders just as millions of students return to classrooms for the new academic year.

Earlier this week, a federal district judge based in Wichita Falls, Texas, issued a nationwide order that temporarily halts the Obama administration’s enforcement of guidelines meant to expand transgender students’ access to restroom and locker room facilities in schools. That ruling—which came as part of a 13-state legal challenge led by the state of Texas—comes on the heels of the U.S. Supreme Court intervening in a different transgender-rights case that signals that it may be ready to take up the merits of the issue.

The high court surprised many observers by stepping into a Virginia case and blocking an injunction won by a 17-year-old transgender student seeking to use the boys’ restroom at his high school.

The justices on Aug. 3 voted 5-3 to stay lower-court orders that would have allowed Gavin Grimm, who was born female but now identifies as a male, to use the boys’ restroom at his high school in Gloucester County, Va. The high court will decide later whether to take up the merits of the case for full argument and decision.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7OY

 


 

 

Corporal Punishment Use Found in Schools in 21 States Punishment rates for blacks nearly double those for whites Education Week

 

Corporal punishment has declined so rapidly in the United States in the last 15 years that many people think it’s practically nonexistent in modern American public schools.

To the contrary, more than 109,000 students were paddled, swatted, or otherwise physically punished in U.S. classrooms in 2013-14, according to Education Week Research Center analyses of the most recent wave of federal civil rights data.

Corporal punishment is often seen by proponents as a good alternative to suspending students. But in a field that requires specialized certification for all manner of programs and subjects, corporal punishment stands out for the virtual nonexistence of training or detailed procedures on how to paddle children of different sizes, ages, or psychological profiles. And in the absence of such training or guidance, the practice can leave students more vulnerable to injury and districts at greater risk of expensive lawsuits.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7Om

 

http://gousoe.uen.org/7OV (AP)

 

http://gousoe.uen.org/7P5 (NewsHour)

 


 

 

Justice Department sues Georgia over segregation of students with disabilities Washington Post

 

The Obama administration on Tuesday sued the state of Georgia over its treatment of thousands of students with behavioral disabilities, alleging that the state is unnecessarily segregating those children in schools that lack extracurricular activities and other basic amenities, including gymnasiums, libraries and certified teachers.

The Justice Department’s complaint, filed in a U.S. District Court in Georgia, also alleges that many of the 4,600 children who are enrolled in the state-run program for students with disabilities are taught via computer programs, and that many go to school in poor-quality facilities once used as schools for black children during the days of Jim Crow. The lawsuit seeks to force the state to provide students with the services they need in integrated, general-education settings, where they can interact with — and have the same educational opportunities as — their non-disabled peers.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7On

 

http://gousoe.uen.org/7Oo (McClatchy)

 


 

 

Colorado districts wrestle with new law allowing students to use medical marijuana at school Denver Post

 

Colorado school districts this year are wrestling with a new law that allows students with a valid prescription to get medical marijuana treatments on school property with or without help from a school nurse.

“Jack’s Law” offers two alternatives for the state’s 179 school districts. They can write policies limiting where on campus the treatments can take place or what forms of nonsmokable cannabis can be administered. If the district doesn’t create a policy, parents or a designated private caregiver would have no limitations on where they could administer the treatment.

“It’s an either/or for the school districts,” said Rep. Jonathan Singer, a Longmont Democrat who was the bill’s sponsor. He wanted to give parents the right to administer cannabis medicine while also allowing school districts a way to police its use.

“Ultimately, the school districts can figure it out,” Singer said, “or the state will figure it out for you.”

So far, some school districts — including Boulder Valley, Jefferson and Douglas County — are  working on policies or have produced them.

Denver Public Schools, meanwhile, has refused to write a policy, saying marijuana use is still a violation of federal law, even for medicinal purposes.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7Ou

 


 

 

Hillary Clinton walks tightrope on education CBS

 

The Democratic Party consists of two opposing groups when it comes to K-12 education policy — the teachers’ unions and the reformists, who loudly disagree on issues concerning teacher accountability and school choice.

And Hillary Clinton is trying to walk a tightrope between the two.

The teachers’ unions want loosened teacher accountability measures and increased regulations of charter schools, while reformists support the opposite. In the past eight years, President Obama and former education secretary Arne Duncan have aligned themselves much more closely with the reformist agenda, creating a tenuous climate for Hillary Clinton as she balances each group’s support and continuing Obama’s legacy.

After endorsing Clinton and then Obama in 2008, the teachers’ unions have been very vocally opposed to Duncan’s and Obama’s education agenda. The rift was so large that the National Education Association (NEA), one of the largest teachers’ unions in the country, called for Duncan’s resignation. Obama’s choice for Duncan’s replacement, the reformist John King, who previously founded a charter school network and advocated for strong teacher evaluation and accountability measures in New York, was not well-received by the teachers’ unions.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7P9

 


 

 

Charter school’s leader steps down after mailer controversy, but school resolved to open Allentown (PA) Morning Call

 

CATASAUQUA — Trustees of the Innovative Arts Academy vowed to push forward after the CEO resigned Tuesday amid a maelstrom over an unauthorized direct mailer using a drug arrest of a Liberty High School student to entice Bethlehem Area students to attend the new charter school in Catasauqua.

The school’s attorney also said he believes legal boundaries were crossed and the school would pursue litigation if necessary to find out who is behind the advertisements.

Loraine Petrillo, who said she and the board were unaware of who was behind the mailer and an earlier full-page newspaper ad in The Morning Call, submitted her resignation letter at Tuesday’s trustees meeting.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7P2

 


 

 

Former Grand Prairie ISD chief accused of using armored trucks to steal $600,000 from district Dallas Morning News

 

The former chief financial officer of the Grand Prairie School District used armored trucks to help her steal more than half a million dollars from the district, according a federal grand jury indictment.

Carolyn Foster, 61, of Lewisville was arrested Monday by U.S. Secret Service agents and charged with one count of federal program theft after $600,000 was declared missing from district coffers, Assistant U.S. Attorney Aaron Wiley said.

Foster was arrested at the Richardson office of her current job at International Leadership of Texas, a charter school with several campuses in Dallas-Fort Worth. She pleaded not guilty in her initial court appearance Monday before U.S. Magistrate Judge David L. Horan and was released on bond.

She faces up to 10 years in prison, plus a $250,000 fine if convicted.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7Op

 


 

 

Report Names the 50 Most-Segregating School District Boundaries by Income Education Week

 

Ohio has three of the 10 most-segregating school district boundaries by income in the United States, while Alabama has six such district lines out of the 50 most-segregated in that category, according to a new report from EdBuild, a nonprofit organization which studies school funding issues.

“Fault Lines: America’s Most Segregating School District Borders” looks at student-poverty rates between adjacent districts, and examined more than 33,500 such district boundaries to see where there were the biggest such income disparities between neighboring districts.

The most-economically segregating district boundary was between Grosse Pointe and Detroit schools in Michigan, according to EdBuild’s analysis.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7P3

 

http://gousoe.uen.org/7P6 (CSM)

 

A copy of the report

http://gousoe.uen.org/7P4 (EdBuild)

 


 

 

New school year to include terror attack drills for French students

(Paris) France 24

 

French schools will now hold three security drills a year – including one in which an alleged assailant enters their premises – as the French government ramps up security measures after a string of deadly extremist attacks.

Education Minister Najat Vallaud-Belkacem and Interior Minister Bernard Cazeneuve announced a series of measures Wednesday to improve how French schools and children handle terror threats.

Students will be taught how to hide or to escape, depending on the situation and where they are.

All students aged 13-14 and class representatives will also get a basic training on life-saving measures. Vallaud-Belkacem said, as of now, only 30 percent of students are trained.

In pre-school and kindergarten, for children aged 2 to 6, no mention of an attack or a danger should be made but children must be taught to hide and keep quiet through games, Vallaud-Belkacem said.

http://gousoe.uen.org/7OA

 

http://gousoe.uen.org/7OW (AP)

 

 

 

 

 

————————————————————

CALENDAR

————————————————————

 

USOE Calendar

http://www.schools.utah.gov/main/CALENDAR.aspx

 

 

UEN News

http://www.uen.org

 

 

September 8:

Utah State Charter School Board meeting

250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://go.uen.org/62M

 

Utah State Board of Education study session, USDB and committee meetings

250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspx

 

 

September 9:

Utah State Board of Education meeting

250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspx

 

 

September 13:

Joint Education Conference

8 a.m., 800 W University Parkway, Orem

http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2016&com=SPEJEC

 

 

September 20:

Education Interim Committee meeting

8:30 a.m., TBD

http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2016&com=INTEDU

 

Executive Appropriations Committee meeting

2 p.m., 445 State Capitol

http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2016&com=APPEXE

 

 

September 21:

Education Interim Committee meeting

1:15 p.m., 30 House Building

http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2016&com=INTEDU

 

 

September 22:

Public Education Appropriations Subcommittee meeting

9 a.m., 445 State Capitol

http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2016&com=APPPED

 

Related posts:

Comments are closed.