Education News Roundup: Oct. 11 – 2016

 

Artwork by second grade students at Quail Hollow Elementary

Artwork by second grade students at Quail Hollow Elementary

Today’s Top Picks:

 

State Board Endorses Ballot Measure That Would Better Fund Schools http://gousoe.uen.org/86Z (UTPo)

 

Utah State Board of Education October Meeting Summary http://gousoe.uen.org/87q (UTPublicEd)

 

Teens in juvenile detention learn to rebuild bikes through new program http://gousoe.uen.org/87i (SE) http://gousoe.uen.org/87n (AP)

 

Survey shows misplaced mistrust in Utah schools, administrators Does perception match reality in education spending?

http://gousoe.uen.org/876 (SLTrib)

http://gousoe.uen.org/87c (DNews)

 

Here’s How Schools Can Soften The Blow Of Sixth Grade http://gousoe.uen.org/87p (NPR)

 

 

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TODAY’S HEADLINES

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UTAH

 

State Board Endorses Ballot Measure That Would Better Fund Schools State board endorses proposal to send more money to schools from Utah lands fund

 

Utah State Board of Education October Meeting Summary

 

Survey shows misplaced mistrust in Utah schools, administrators Does perception match reality in education spending?

 

Teens in juvenile detention learn to rebuild bikes through new program

 

Are Utah schools violating diabetic students’ rights?

 

New Utah Schools for the Deaf and the Blind campus opens

 

Utah teen deaths probed amid national synthetic drug wave

 

Feds investigate Utah teacher’s use of racially charged word US Department of Education investigates South Ogden teacher using racial slur

 

Lockout ends at Roy High, Sand Ridge Junior High after threat was received

 

Pony Express Elementary receives PTA award after resurrecting arts program

 

‘Have the power’: Buses bedecked with students’ superhero art

 

Charges pending after High School fight sends one teen to the hospital

 

School board candidates say ‘Just say no’ to tax increases, differ on Common Core

 

Here’s How Schools Can Soften The Blow Of Sixth Grade

 

 

OPINION & COMMENTARY

 

Op-ed: Utah students need real sex ed and ‘Fight the New Drug’

 

Don’t give away tax dollars that support schools

 

Doug Robinson: Principal making ‘purposeful’ effort to build an identity at new school

 

Clowns, we’re laughing at, not with you

 


NATION

 

Sharp differences between Clinton and Trump on education

 

Chicago mayor buys peace with teachers, fiscal impact uncertain

 

Bilingual Education Poised for a Comeback in California Schools State’s voters may end era of ‘English-only’ instruction

 

U.S. Department of Education Issues First-Ever Pay for Success Awards to Expand Opportunity in Career and Technical Education, Dual Language Programs

 

Race, School Ratings And Real Estate: A ‘Legal Gray Area’

 

For New York City’s Homeless Children, Getting to School Is the Hard Part

 

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UTAH NEWS

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State Board Endorses Ballot Measure That Would Better Fund Schools

 

The Utah State Board of Education voted Friday to support Utah Constitutional Amendment B, a ballot measure that if approved by voters in November would increase and stabilize the distribution from the permanent State School Fund through the School LAND Trust program.

Amendment B allows fund earnings, as defined by statute, to be distributed, instead of solely the current interest and dividends. If approved, it would limit the annual distribution to 4 percent of the market value of the fund, to provide for “intergenerational equity” – balancing the needs of any given school year’s beneficiaries with those of all subsequent years.

Currently, only interest and dividends from the permanent State School Fund are distributed to each public school in Utah to be spent on the school’s greatest academic needs, as determined by a School Community Council. The funds must be used for direct instruction of students.

The distribution has increased from $4.95 million in 2000 to $49.3 million this year. The permanent State School Fund has grown to $2 billion. While the fund growth is impressive, passage of Amendment B could lead to higher and less volatile distributions. Last year’s fund distribution was 2.29 percent.

http://gousoe.uen.org/86Z (UTPo)

 


State board endorses proposal to send more money to schools from Utah lands fund

 

Members of the Utah Board of Education voted on Friday to support Utah Constitutional Amendment B, which will go before voters for approval in November and proposes to change the way land trust funding is distributed to public schools.

Currently, only interest and dividends from the permanent state School Fund can be awarded to schools each year.

Under Amendment B — which passed the Legislature with near-unanimous support in March — fund managers would be permitted to award up to 4 percent of the endowment’s value.

Proponents say the change would allow for increased education funding and year-to-year consistency in school budgets.

“As state policymakers, we are responsible for providing a fair fund distribution for both current and future students,” school board Vice Chairman David Thomas said. “This amendment safeguards the distribution by including a rolling three-year average of fund growth to ensure it doesn’t respond too quickly to market volatility.”

http://gousoe.uen.org/879 (SLTrib)

 


Utah State Board of Education Meeting Summary

 

In its October 7, 2016 meeting, the Utah State Board of Education:

Made student growth, a 2.5 percent increase in weighted-pupil unit funding, and moving the state to the use of ACT and ACT Aspire tests for secondary assessment as its top three legislative priorities.

Endorsed school funding measure Amendment B on Utah’s November ballot.

Extended SAGE testing in grades 3 – 8 though spring 2018 while the Board considers overall changes in Utah’s statewide assessment and move forward with a new assessment request for proposal.

http://gousoe.uen.org/87q (UTPublicEd)

 


Survey shows misplaced mistrust in Utah schools, administrators

 

Utahns estimate that roughly a quarter of public education funding is spent on school administration, according to a new survey, and would prefer that portion of the budget trimmed to about 14 percent.

But in reality, Utah’s school districts spend less than 10 percent of their budgets on administration, with the majority of education dollars directed toward classroom costs like teacher salaries, student services and supplies.

The Beehive State’s school administration costs are among the lowest in the nation, averaging $63 per student, compared to a national average of $202, according to the most recent data from the U.S. Census Bureau.

“For me, it was a surprise,” Envision Utah spokesman Jason Brown said. “I should trust more that the district is doing the right thing, that it’s putting the money into helping students gain knowledge and skills.”

http://gousoe.uen.org/876  (SLTrib)

 


Does perception match reality in education spending?

 

SALT LAKE CITY — More than 70 percent of Utahns think the state spends too little on education, but half say they’re either unwilling to pay for more education funding or unsure if they would, according to a recent survey from Envision Utah.

Jason Brown, a spokesman for the nonprofit organization, said the results reflect a “lack of trust that doesn’t need to be there” in how funding will be spent.

That’s because Utah residents who were surveyed by the group seemed to think schools are spending more on administration than they should and were not confident that new funding would actually improve educational outcomes, according to Envision Utah.

That perception doesn’t match up with reality, Brown said, noting that administrative costs in Utah are among the lowest in the nation.

“Essentially, they think there’s money in administration, where it shouldn’t be,” he said.

http://gousoe.uen.org/87c (DNews)

 


Teens in juvenile detention learn to rebuild bikes through new program

 

On a Tuesday afternoon in early October, a group of young women gather around a row of broken down bikes in Farmington for their semiweekly bicycle repair class.

The tables of tools and collections of bike stands are the same as what you would find in any cycling store, but the setting is markedly different. All of the students rebuilding the bikes are part of the Ogden Bicycle Collective’s new juvenile detention center bike mechanics program.

In a fluorescent lit common room at the Farmington Bay Youth Center, six teenagers in matching black and red outfits listen as Danielle Fry lays out the plan for the day.

“Today we’re going to do cables and housing,” says Fry, holding up a fistful of cut cables.

“Where do the four cables go?” Fry asks as the students sketch different types of brake and shifter cable ends in their notes.

http://gousoe.uen.org/87i (SE)

http://gousoe.uen.org/87n (AP)

 


Are Utah schools violating diabetic students’ rights?

 

SALT LAKE CITY — The life of a diabetic is the only life that 5-year-old Brannon has ever known.

It’s a life that includes insulin at breakfast, finger pricks throughout the day and a state of constant concern for his mother, Rachelle Arrington, who sends him off to a school without a full-time nurse on campus.

Arrington’s worst fears came true last week when she remembered that the school nurse wasn’t going to be at Brannon’s school that day and that she had to give him his lunchtime insulin shot — an arrangement she said the school nurse invoked several times a week.

Arrington said she panicked when she walked in and saw Brannon looking pale and glazed over, eating Goldfish crackers by himself in the school office.

She later learned that his blood sugar had dropped as low as 39 milligrams per deciliter — far below the level needed to send him into a hypoglycemic seizure. The teacher, she said, had decided to pull him back from recess but otherwise wasn’t sure what to do.

http://gousoe.uen.org/877 (DNews)

 


New Utah Schools for the Deaf and the Blind campus opens

 

EAST MILLCREEK — A ribbon-cutting and celebration on Thursday marked the grand opening of a new campus for the Utah Schools for the Deaf and the Blind.

Named the C. Mark Openshaw Education Center in honor of the late member of the Utah State Board of Education, the 48,000-square-foot facility at 1655 E. 3300 South provides space for blind and visually impaired, deaf-blind, and deaf and hard of hearing students. It includes 10 additional classrooms and a state-of-the-art gymnasium and theater facilities.

Openshaw, who died with his wife and two children in a plane crash in June of 2015, was a supporter of schools and its students.

http://gousoe.uen.org/878 (Dnews)

 

 

Utah teen deaths probed amid national synthetic drug wave

 

SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — Police are investigating the deaths of two 13-year-old boys in the Utah ski-resort town of Park City that may be connected to a new synthetic drug found at entertainer Prince’s estate as law enforcement around the country struggles with a national epidemic of opioid drugs.

The deaths of best friends Grant Seaver and Ryan Ainsworth, found by their parents separately within days of each other, were initially a mystery. There were no clues as to what killed the otherwise healthy kids, one of whom was a talented skier, said Park City Police Chief Wade Carpenter.

But on other social media, investigators found conversations about a drug called U-47700, sometimes known as “pink,” Carpenter said. Though they’re waiting on toxicology results to confirm how the two boys died, police have since found evidence of other local kids ordering the drug online, according to search warrants.

http://gousoe.uen.org/87b (AP)

 


Feds investigate Utah teacher’s use of racially charged word

 

OGDEN, Utah (AP) — Utah school officials say the U.S. Department of Education’s Office for Civil Rights is investigating a white teacher’s use of a racially charged word in a junior high class.

The Ogden Standard-Examiner reported Tuesday (http://bit.ly/2e706m7) that Weber School District spokesman Lane Findlay said federal officials contacted the district following a parent complaint about teacher Douglas Barker’s use of the N-word before showing the Civil War movie “Glory”

Department of Education spokesman Michael Germano said the agency doesn’t comment on open investigations.

Barker has said he was making sure his students understood why the word would be used in the film in April.

But parent Holly Frye, who is black, said her 14-year-old son didn’t feel safe at school after the teacher used the word.

NAACP leaders in Ogden have also expressed concern.

http://gousoe.uen.org/87d (TH)

http://gousoe.uen.org/87h (SE)

 


Lockout ends at Roy High, Sand Ridge Junior High after threat was received

 

In a tweet sent out just before 2 p.m. Friday, the Weber School District said Roy High and Sand Ridge Junior High were under lockout. The school district tweeted the lockout — which was a precaution — had been lifted at 2:40 p.m.

Though Weber School District spokesman Lane Findlay didn’t specify the exact nature of the threat, he described it as “a threat of violence” they found out about through an anonymous tip. In a tweet, the school district said officials suspect is was “another prank.”

Findlay said the threat was directed at Roy High School. Because Sand Ridge Junior High is near the high school, it was also placed on lockout as a precaution, Findlay said.

“(The threat) doesn’t appear to be reliable, but whenever we get a threat we take it seriously,” Findlay said.

http://gousoe.uen.org/87g (SE)

 


Pony Express Elementary receives PTA award after resurrecting arts program

 

The parents were determined to bring back the visual arts program at Pony Express Elementary School in Eagle Mountain.

“We have amazing parents that come in and volunteer their time, and that’s one of the greatest blessings we have here at our school,” said Ashley Pitcher, the school’s PTA president. “We have so many parents who are willing to help serve our students.”

About seven years ago, the enrollment at Pony Express dropped and the school lost its funding for its visual arts specialist. The school’s PTA sent out a survey to parents last year, which showed parents overwhelmingly wanted to bring back a visual arts program.

So it did, with about 30 volunteers coming into the school to teach monthly art classes.

“It was so widely successful,” Pitcher said. “The kids loved it, the parents loved it. The parents were just beyond thrilled we had the visual arts back in our school.”

http://gousoe.uen.org/87j (DH)

 


‘Have the power’: Buses bedecked with students’ superhero art

 

RICHMOND — Sixth graders packed a Cache Valley Transit bus parked outside White Pine Middle School on Monday as teachers snapped photos of them with their artwork of colorful superheroes like “Black Strike,” “Phoenix” and “Titan.”

The White Pine Middle School students completed the bus interior vinyl place cards showing superheroes who could clean up the air as part of the “Art in Transit: From Schools to Community Project,” a partnership between Cache County School District (CCSD) and CVTD. The goal of Art in              Transit is to showcase student artwork in public places.

The students completed the superheroes project when they were fifth-graders at Park Elementary.

“They have the power to help clean up the pollution in the air,” said Kelsey Clark, a Park Elementary fifth-grade teacher who came to watch her students get a tour of the bus on Monday. “The superhero kind of gave them the identity to do that.”

http://gousoe.uen.org/87k (HJ)

 

 

Charges pending after High School fight sends one teen to the hospital

 

Cache County Sheriff’s deputies are investigating a fight that occurred between two students at Sky View High School that sent one to the hospital, and the other to juvenile detention.

Witnesses report the two sophomores were arguing Friday, when one of them punched the other, knocking him unconscious. The victim was rushed to an area hospital before being flown to Primary Children’s Medical Center.

Chief Deputy Matt Bilodeau said the incident left the victim with serious injuries. The identities of both boys are being withheld because they are minors.

Some of the students who witnessed the fight, videoed it on their cell phones.

Bilodeau explained that deputies are reviewing the video footage and interviewing witnesses.

http://gousoe.uen.org/87m (CVD)

 


School board candidates say ‘Just say no’ to tax increases, differ on Common Core

 

  1. GEORGE — Two newcomers looking to fill the seat of interim school board member Ralph Brooks are on the ballot for Washington County School Board District 1 in this year’s Nov. 8 election.

Becky Dunn and Richelle Nelson are campaigning for the school board seat that represents Santa Clara, Ivins, Dammeron Valley, Veyo, Gunlock, Central, Pine Valley and Enterprise.

The seat was previously occupied by Barbara Beckstrom who was elected to the board in 2012. She died in March and Ralph Brooks was chosen by the board as interim member. Brooks did not file to retain the seat.

Dunn, an accountant, said her platform is focused on what’s best for the district’s children. That means getting parents involved, she said, which she learned firsthand while participating in the PTA at the local, regional and state level.

http://gousoe.uen.org/87o (SGN)

 

 

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OPINION & COMMENTARY

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Op-ed: Utah students need real sex ed and ‘Fight the New Drug’

Salt Lake Tribune commentary by Clay Olsen, Gary Wilson, Jill Manning, Candice Christiansen and Donald Hilton

 

The importance of supporting youth as they navigate an increasingly sexualized world is something virtually everyone can agree upon. How to best accomplish this in homes, schools and communities — with many different complementary approaches available — is a conversation bound to involve some meaningful differences in perspective.

In an op-ed last weekend (“Utah students need real sex ed, not ‘Fight the New Drug,'” Oct. 2), the authors portrayed our own public health efforts at Fight the New Drug (FTND) in a manner that misrepresented in significant ways who we are and what we do. We appreciate the opportunity to respond as researchers, therapists and professionals associated with or supportive of FTND.

http://gousoe.uen.org/87a

 


Don’t give away tax dollars that support schools Salt Lake Tribune letter from Tab Uno

 

We need to cap future school taxes that go to support business development. Rarely do I agree with Sen. Howard Stephenson R-Draper, but his proposal to put a 50 percent cap on the amount of new property taxes a school district can contribute to economic development projects (The Tribune, Sept. 22) is sorely needed to protect education funding.

As a former Salt Lake City School Board member, I often sat in board meetings where the school superintendent and the district’s financial manager would simply recommend approval of a redevelopment project tax exemption and the school board with little discussion would automatically approve it.

Even now I don’t know if the board’s approval really mattered or not to educating our students, if it brought the district more or less money, or whether it was economically beneficial to the school district or not.

http://gousoe.uen.org/87e

 


Doug Robinson: Principal making ‘purposeful’ effort to build an identity at new school Deseret News commentary by Doug Robinson

 

LEHI — By the time they cut the ribbon to open Skyridge High School, Joel Perkins — the school’s first principal in a school year of firsts — already had been on the job for 18 months. He didn’t hammer any nails, but he spent long days and nights working on everything else, from designing the official school crest and creating the school colors to arranging for a school song and hiring faculty and staff, establishing school boundaries and giving input on architecture.

“You get a little tired through this process,” he says, “but it’s worth it.”

Once-tiny Lehi has grown into a two-high school city. There were 19,000 residents in Lehi only 16 years ago; now there are 54,000 and counting, thanks to the thriving tech industry. The population is growing so fast that the junior high couldn’t handle all the students and passed the ninth-grade class to Perkins and the new high school. To prepare for the extra students, 16 classrooms were added to Skyridge in January. The school has 2,350 students, and Perkins has been tasked with making it all work.

http://gousoe.uen.org/87f (Dnews)

 


Clowns, we’re laughing at, not with you

Herald Journal commentary by Steve Kent

 

I think it’s time to start laughing at clowns again.

You’re probably well aware of this, but reports of “creepy clowns” have been popping up here and there across the country for months now. In the past few days, the clown-car has rolled up in Utah, and now story after story — more clown stories than you ever thought we could write — are tumbling out.

Nearly all of these reports involve an uptick in threats against schools and unverified clown sightings. And many of these reports try to really drive home the point: There’s a lot of talk of clowns going around, but there aren’t that many instances of actual, verified clown encounters.

Yes, there have been some terrifying exceptions, but to put things in perspective, in the past couple of weeks, there have been maybe a half-dozen unverified clown sightings in Cache Valley.

http://gousoe.uen.org/87l

 

 

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NATIONAL NEWS

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Sharp differences between Clinton and Trump on education

 

WASHINGTON (AP) — A quality education for all students, especially young children, is something Hillary Clinton has been talking about for decades. It’s mostly new territory for Donald Trump, who more recently has been touting his education ideas beyond his oft-repeated criticism of Common Core.

The Republican presidential nominee added plans for education to his still relatively thin roster of policy proposals last month, unveiling an effort to spend $20 billion during his first year in office to help states expand school choice programs.

Trump wasn’t shy about his intentions, debuting his ideas at an inner-city charter school in Cleveland as part of a new outreach to minority voters. “There’s no failed policy more in need of urgent change than our government-run education monopoly,” Trump said at the school, blaming the Democratic Party for having “trapped millions of African-American and Hispanic youth in failing government schools.”

Trump said his approach would create “a massive education market” and produce better outcomes than the nation’s existing public education system. He also wants states to divert another $110 billion of their own education budgets to support school choice efforts, providing $12,000 to every elementary school student living in poverty to attend the school of their choice.

http://gousoe.uen.org/870 (AP)

 


Chicago mayor buys peace with teachers, fiscal impact uncertain

 

A tentative deal reached late on Monday between the Chicago Public Schools and its teachers union averted a strike that had been scheduled for Tuesday but the impact on the district’s already-shaky finances was uncertain.

Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel, who controls the nation’s third-largest public school system, agreed to pour more surplus revenue from city development districts into the CPS budget. But it is not clear if the increase to $88 million would be sufficient to fund initial contract terms. The district had included $32.5 million in its current budget.

“Chicago Public Schools’ finances will be stronger and on firmer ground because of this agreement. Parents and taxpayers will be relieved and more importantly reassured that we all came together to work together with a common purpose,” Emanuel told reporters shortly after midnight, which had been the strike deadline.

http://gousoe.uen.org/871 (Reuters)

 

 

Bilingual Education Poised for a Comeback in California Schools State’s voters may end era of ‘English-only’ instruction

 

Nearly 20 years after voting to restrict bilingual education in a state with more than 1 million schoolchildren who don’t speak English as their first language, California voters appear poised to reverse that ban.

Next month, voters will decide the fate of a statewide ballot question that would bring an end to the restrictions of Proposition 227 and close out California’s official era of English-only instruction.

The upcoming vote on Proposition 58 has rekindled a long-standing debate over the best way to help California’s 1.4 million English-learners—who account for more than …

http://gousoe.uen.org/872 (EdWeek)

 


U.S. Department of Education Issues First-Ever Pay for Success Awards to Expand Opportunity in Career and Technical Education, Dual Language Programs

 

For Town Hall with President Obama, White House Features New Pay for Success Awards as Latest Progress in Commitment to Find and Scale What Works in Advancing Opportunity

The U.S. Department of Education announced today its first-ever awards supporting Pay for Success (PFS) strategies. The awards will use the innovative PFS funding approach to improve outcomes for at-risk youth by finding and scaling career and technical education (CTE) programs, as well as to advance effective dual language programs for early learners.

Today, the President will participate in a town hall-style forum on ESPN at 10 p.m. ET at North Carolina A&T State University, a historically black institution. The event is an opportunity for the President to discuss progress made through his My Brother’s Keeper initiative (MBK) and through the important role and legacy of Historically Black Colleges and Universities. Connected with this Presidential event, the White House is spotlighting the new Education Department’s awards as the latest examples of the Administration’s continued emphasis to find and scale what works in advancing opportunity for vulnerable populations.  Since its founding, a core goal of MBK has been promoting what works to better serve at-risk youth, including boys and young men of color.

http://gousoe.uen.org/873 (U.S. ED)

 


Race, School Ratings And Real Estate: A ‘Legal Gray Area’

 

With her infant son in a sling, Monique Black strolls through a weekend open house in the gentrified Shaw neighborhood of Washington, D.C. There are lots of factors to consider when looking for a home — in this one, Monique notices, the tiny window in the second bedroom doesn’t let in enough light. But for parents like Black and her husband, Jonny, there’s a more important question: How good are the nearby schools?

It’s well known in the real estate industry that highly rated schools translate into higher housing values. Several studies confirm this and even put a dollar figure on it: an average premium of $50 a square foot, in a 2013 national study.

In Chappaqua, N.Y., an affluent bedroom community for New York City, the town supervisor recently went so far as to declare that, “The schools are our biggest industry — whether you have kids in the school or not, that’s what maintains our property values.”

http://gousoe.uen.org/874 (NPR)

 


For New York City’s Homeless Children, Getting to School Is the Hard Part

 

Family workers carrying caseloads of 256 children at a time. A girl who had transferred to four different schools, one of them twice, by age 11. Attendance reports from multiple agencies, but with none held responsible for making sure that students actually went to school.

These are some of the findings in a report on the obstacles faced by homeless children in New York schools that will be released by the city’s Independent Budget Office on Tuesday. The report, which draws largely on data from the 2013-14 school year, vividly maps out just how difficult it is for students who live in shelters to get an education.

It is a crisis that has grown: Roughly one out of every 13 children in the New York City public school system is now homeless. That figure includes those in the shelter system as well as in other temporary living situations, such as students whose families are staying with relatives because they do not have a home of their own. The report, called “Not Reaching the Door: Homeless Students Face Many Hurdles on the Way to School,” focuses on students in shelters, who tend to face the tallest educational obstacles.

http://gousoe.uen.org/875 (NYT)

 


Here’s How Schools Can Soften The Blow Of Sixth Grade

 

Middle school is tough. Bodies change. Hormones rage. Algebra becomes a reality. But there are things schools can do to make life easier for students — like this big study we wrote about showing that K-8 schools may be better for kids than traditional middle schools.

But aside from re-configuring an entire school system, are there other ways to make the sixth-grade experience better?

To answer that question, I called up Dru Tomlin, a director at the Association for Middle Level Education — an organization that’s been researching best practices for middle grade students for decades. Tomlin knows middle school: He’s been a middle school teacher, an administrator, and he’s the parent of a seventh-grade student.

http://gousoe.uen.org/87p (NPR)

 

 

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CALENDAR

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USOE Calendar

http://www.schools.utah.gov/main/CALENDAR.aspx

 

 

UEN News

http://www.uen.org

 

 

October 13:

Utah State Charter School Board meeting

250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://go.uen.org/62M

 

 

October 18:

Executive Appropriations Committee meeting

2 p.m., 445 State Capitol

http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2016&com=APPEXE

 

 

October 19:

Education Interim Committee meeting

1:15 p.m., 30 House Building

http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2016&com=INTEDU

 

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