Education News Roundup: Oct. 13 – 2016

 

 

Edith Bowen Laboratory School website image.

Edith Bowen Laboratory School website

Today’s Top Picks:

 

Edith Bowen Laboratory School recognized as one of the top in the country

http://gousoe.uen.org/87Q (CVD)

 

Utah House Democrats plan to roll out education policies in 2017

http://gousoe.uen.org/87V (Fox13)

 

Ensuring Equity Across Rural Schools (commentary)

http://gousoe.uen.org/880 (U.S.ED Blog)

 

What U.S. public education might look like with a Clinton or Trump presidency http://gousoe.uen.org/88a (WAPo)

 

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TODAY’S HEADLINES

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UTAH

 

Photo: Expo sets Utah students on path to finding a career

 

Murray taking applications for gifted student program

 

Edith Bowen Laboratory School recognized as one of the top in the country

 

App to help Utah kids in crisis

 

Park City HS considers student drug testing after suspected fatal overdoses

 

Utah teen suspended, facing charges after assault in high school hallway

 

Utah House Democrats plan to roll out education policies in 2017

 


OPINION & COMMENTARY

 

My view: Legislature and public education

 

Losing Our Trust, School Lunch, and land management.

 

What we’re buying with school levy

 

Ensuring Equity Across Rural Schools

 

A Misguided Attack on Charter Schools

 


NATION

 

Cleveland schools move slowly on year-round classes goal of 2012 Cleveland Plan and levy

 

Schools ban Halloween clown costumes, Pokémon cards

 

Facebook education software spurs privacy fears

 

There’s No Erasing the Chalkboard

 

Barbershop Cuts Prices For Kids Who Read Aloud During Appointment Kids are bookin’ it to this shop, which houses only titles with black role models.

 

What U.S. public education might look like with a Clinton or Trump presidency

 

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UTAH NEWS

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Photo: Expo sets Utah students on path to finding a career

 

West High School’s Jasmine Munoz touches a cow’s heart Wednesday at the Pathways to Professions Career and Technical Education Showcase at the South Towne Expo Center in Sandy. The event, the first of its kind in Utah, provided hands-on learning experiences and access to industry professionals as high school students, college students, their families and community members explored routes that can lead to high-paying, high-demand careers. The event, which is free and open to the public, continues from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. Thursday.

http://gousoe.uen.org/87O (DNews)

 


Murray taking applications for gifted student program

 

MURRAY — Testing applications are now being accepted for the Murray School District’s Perspectives Gifted/Talented Program.

Students who consistently demonstrate above average academic ability, have uniformly high test scores and are motivated to do challenging work at a faster pace are typically successful in the program. Students eligible for consideration should currently be in kindergarten through fifth grade.

Interested parents are invited to attend an information meeting on Wednesday, Nov. 16, from 6:30-7:30 p.m. in the district office, 5002 Commerce Drive.

Testing applications and additional parent information are available in at local school offices or at the district’s website, murrayschools.org.

Applications are due Friday, Dec. 9.

http://gousoe.uen.org/87P (DNews)

 


Edith Bowen Laboratory School recognized as one of the top in the country

 

According to the National Center for Education Statistics, there are over 100,000 schools in the United States. Of those schools only a select few are recognized as a Blue Ribbon School each year. And one of those is the Edith Bowen Laboratory School in Logan.

A school can be awarded a Blue Ribbon recognition for one of two reasons: as an Exemplary High Performing School (recognized as among the top schools in the state) or an Exemplary Achievement Gap Closing School (making the fastest progress in the state in closing the achievement gap among student subgroups over the past five years).

Edith Bowen was recently recognized as one among 279 public and 50 private schools that received the prestigious honor from the U.S. Department of Education. Discovery Elementary School in Brigham City was also recognized as a high performing school.

http://gousoe.uen.org/87Q (CVD)

 


App to help Utah kids in crisis

 

An announcement was made a few weeks ago that certain schools in the Weber and Davis County area would be using a new app. It is the Safe Utah Crisis & Safety Tip Line. It was unveiled this year and is now implemented in more than a handful of schools in Utah.

It’s an attempt to use smartphones and mobile apps to tackle a very serious issue. Missy Larson, Chief of Staff for the Utah Attorney General’s office said today’s kids talk through texting.

“And so we looked at these issues and looked at how we are going to get to the kids and how the kids can get to us in the way that they can find support. The most logical way is start talking their language and that is through technology,” she explained.

http://gousoe.uen.org/87R (CVD)

 


Park City HS considers student drug testing after suspected fatal overdoses

 

Salt Lake City — (KUTV) The Park City Board of Education is considering drug testing for high school students involved in extra-curricular activities like sports, band or even debate team.

After two 13 year-old male students died of suspected drug overdoses last month, school board members felt they needed to take action to keep other kids safe from deadly drugs that are in schools all over Utah.

“It was like having a bucket of cold water poured on us. It was a wake-up call,” said Tania Knauer, board of education president.

The school board is still having discussions about how a new drug-testing policy would work. Testing could be random, involve only some students or all students in activities. How to pay for the testing is also a question.

http://gousoe.uen.org/87S (KUTV)

http://gousoe.uen.org/87U (Fox13)

 


Utah teen suspended, facing charges after assault in high school hallway

 

CACHE COUNTY, Utah — The tension was thick in the halls of Sky View High School last Friday as two students, one towering over the other, appeared to be arguing. But after only 13 seconds the verbal brawl turned physical, and the altercation was recorded.

One blow to the student’s face sent him to the ground. The video continues to show the student convulsing on the hallway floor. The Cache County Sheriff’s Office said his injuries were serious enough to require surgery.

“The students involved have been suspended,” said Tim Smith, a spokesperson Cache County School District

The student who threw the punch was arrested that same day. The sheriff’s office says he will be charged with aggravated assault. In the meantime, the video captured in the hallway is making its rounds online.

http://gousoe.uen.org/87T (Fox13)

 


Utah House Democrats plan to roll out education policies in 2017

 

SALT LAKE CITY – Some Democratic lawmakers are already eyeing 2017’s legislative session. On the top of their to-do list is creating education bills aimed at supporting teachers.

House Democrats surveyed nearly 1,500 teachers in Utah to find out what challenges they face in the classroom so lawmakers can come up with some real solutions.

Some of the frustrations Utah teachers shared with lawmakers were a lack of support in the classroom and respect for their profession.

As a result, Utah is facing a major teacher shortage, along with the rest of the country. According to Learning Policy Institute, between 19% and 30% of new teachers leave the profession within five years.

“Students in Utah today and across the United States are voting with their diplomas,” said Rep. Joel Briscoe, D-Salt Lake City. “They are not going into public education as a profession.”

http://gousoe.uen.org/87V (Fox13)

 

 

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OPINION & COMMENTARY

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My view: Legislature and public education Deseret News commentary by Shauna Robertson

 

When it comes to our state Legislature and its adversarial relationship with public education, there are many things I don’t understand. I don’t understand why people entrusted with safeguarding public education seem to do everything they can to undermine it. Why, faced with a very real and immediate shortage of qualified teachers, they treat teachers like the enemy rather than an essential component of student success. But their latest stunt will cause ripples far outside the walls of the schools.

About a month ago, school grades were released to the public. Without context, it looks like most schools got worse instead of better. If the situation were real, it would be cause for outrage. But it isn’t real. Just like the antiquated bell curve from the “old school” way of assessing performance, there is a clause in the accountability legislation that says that if too many schools achieve grades of A or B, the formula must be adjusted to limit those numbers and also ensure that there are always some schools rated D or F.

http://gousoe.uen.org/87N

 


Losing Our Trust, School Lunch, and land management.

Salt Lake City Weekly commentary by Katharine Biele

 

School Lunch Programs

So much for the “Don’t eat at your desk” admonition. At Wilson Elementary, it’s encouraged. Utah has long had a school lunch program, and some breakfasts, but the state ranks last in participation in the breakfast programs. Maybe it’s due to the hassle of getting to school so early, or the hassle of signing up. Besides the added physical activity and anti-obesity elements, a 2015 study by Cardiff University showed that kids are twice as likely to have grades that are higher than average if they eat a good breakfast. Now, Deseret News reports, Granite School District and about 70 schools statewide are starting to offer breakfast to classrooms after school has started. It takes the stigma out of sitting alone in the cafeteria and gives everyone a chance to chow down in class. Grants are available, but the Legislature might want to throw in some money for the future brains of the state.

http://gousoe.uen.org/87X

 


What we’re buying with school levy

Moab Sun News column by Mary O’Brian

 

In the early 2000s, my husband Bob (O’B) O’Brien and fellow University of Oregon sociologist Jean Stockard undertook research to understand what accounts for times in the U.S. when rates of youth homicide and suicide have gone up versus times they have gone down. (The two devastating youth rates generally go up and down together.)

Using standard statistical methods, they were able to account for a large portion of the opposing trends by measures related to the absence or presence of adults in the children’s lives. For instance, during times when the proportion of single-parent families is higher in the U.S., youth homicide and suicide trends go up. Youth homicide and suicide rates went up during the Baby Boom of the 1950s when classrooms suddenly had too many students per teacher, and the rates went down when the number of teachers better matched the number of children in their classes.

http://gousoe.uen.org/87Z

 


Ensuring Equity Across Rural Schools

Homeroom, U.S. ED official blog post

 

During my 11 years as a classroom teacher, I have learned that many things shape the learning opportunities available to a child. These factors can range from the abilities of the classroom teacher, to the climate of the school, to the leadership and vision of administration. We rightfully spend a lot of time discussing how to ensure our children receive the very best in all of these areas. However, last week I encountered one factor we don’t talk about nearly enough, something that can make a more profound difference for children than all others. What is this difference? 23 miles.

Last week, I had the privilege to visit two rural school districts in central Pennsylvania that are separated by only 23 miles. At first glance, these districts have a lot in common. In both instances, the schools are being led by innovative and talented leaders that are maximizing district resources to create well-rounded learning environments for all students.

http://gousoe.uen.org/880

 

 

A Misguided Attack on Charter Schools

New York Times editorial

 

The N.A.A.C.P., the nation’s oldest civil rights organization, has struggled in recent years to win over younger African-Americans, who often see the group as out of touch. The N.A.A.C.P.’s board will reinforce that impression if it ratifies an ill-advised resolution — scheduled for a vote this weekend — that calls for a moratorium on expansion of public charter schools, which receive public money but are subject to fewer state regulations than traditional public schools.

These schools, which educate only about 7 percent of the nation’s students, are far from universally perfect, and those that are failing should be shut down. But sound research has shown that, when properly managed and overseen, well-run charter schools give families a desperately needed alternative to inadequate traditional schools in poor urban neighborhoods.

http://gousoe.uen.org/881

 

 

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NATIONAL NEWS

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Cleveland schools move slowly on year-round classes goal of 2012 Cleveland Plan and levy

 

CLEVELAND, Ohio – Cleveland has made only slow progress toward placing students in year-round classes to boost learning – a major goal of the Cleveland Plan for Transforming Schools and the campaign for 2012’s giant school tax.

Though district CEO Eric Gordon and the district made no specific promises of how many students would shift to year-round classes or how fast, Gordon said at the start of the tax campaign that his personal goal would be to have “most, if not all” make that change.

The Cleveland Plan also listed having a “year-round calendar” as a “fundamental building block” of improving learning.

And it was a regular part of Gordon’s campaign speeches and a goal that was regularly reported and presented to voters as a significant change families could see if the levy passed.

http://gousoe.uen.org/882  (C)

 


Schools ban Halloween clown costumes, Pokémon cards

 

Two schools in Birmingham have banned Halloween clown outfits and Pokémon cards.

Beverly Elementary School Principal Jamii Hitchcock sent out an email blast Friday, informing families that Halloween clown costumes will not be allowed during this year’s festivities. In the letter, Hitchcock said the decision was based on the flurry of media reports over the so-called creepy clowns that are stirring up trouble around the country.

“Yesterday, it was brought to our attention that some third-grade students were discussing creepy clowns,” Hitchcock wrote. “Apparently, there was a discussion that occurred with a few students on the playground during third-grade lunch recess yesterday and today during fifth-grade recess. As a result, many students returned from recess afraid of the potential for clowns to come to Beverly to do harm.”

http://gousoe.uen.org/883 (DFP)

 


Facebook education software spurs privacy fears

 

Caroline Pollock Bilicki felt uneasy about the new education program introduced this year at her children’s Chicago school.

Summit Basecamp, built with the help of Facebook engineers, was billed as a powerful tool that could reshape how students learn. Dozens of schools nationwide have signed up to use the program, which tailors lessons to individual students using software that tracks their progress.

But it also captures a stream of data, and Bilicki had to sign a consent form for her children to participate, allowing their personal data to be shared with companies such as Facebook and Google. That data, the form said, could include names, email addresses, schoolwork, grades and Internet activity. Summit Basecamp promised to limit its use of the information – barring it from being used, for example, to deliver targeted ads – but Bilicki agonized over whether to sign the form.

http://gousoe.uen.org/884 (TTP)

 


There’s No Erasing the Chalkboard

Blackboards will endure as symbols of learning long after they’ve disappeared from schools. An Object Lesson.

 

In 2015, the construction crew renovating an Oklahoma high school uncovered an unusual time capsule. Beneath newer wall coverings, the workers discovered slate blackboards marked with schoolwork and colorful chalk drawings from 1917. Multiplication problems appeared beside a treble staff denoting an A-major scale. A spelling list, written in cursive, included the words “whoa” and “notion.” Drawings of Thanksgiving turkeys and a girl blowing bubbles adorned the spaces between the lessons.

Reports of the discovery spotlighted the chalk, acknowledging the blackboards merely as surfaces for the drawings. But slate blackboards, and the green chalkboards that replaced them, are themselves relics of a bygone era.

Even small schools in rural communities, like the elementary school I attended in Nebraska in the 1980s, have exchanged chalkboards for whiteboards and interactive Smart Boards.

http://gousoe.uen.org/885 (TA)

 


Barbershop Cuts Prices For Kids Who Read Aloud During Appointment Kids are bookin’ it to this shop, which houses only titles with black role models.

 

A barbershop in Michigan is getting a lot of buzz.

The Fuller Cut barbershop in Ypsilanti, Michigan gives $2 discounts to kids who read books aloud to their barbers while they’re getting their hair done.

And a lot of the time those two bucks go directly into the kids’ pockets.

“Parents love it and the kids … well, they like getting the two dollars back,” Ryan Griffin, the barber at the Fuller Cut who brought the discount program to the shop, told The Huffington Post with a laugh. “We get compliments from teachers all the time, too.”

The kids at the Fuller Cut don’t read any ol’ books, either. Because the shop caters to diverse communities, Griffin’s literary selection — which includes 75 to 100 rotating titles — has a very specific theme.

http://gousoe.uen.org/886 (HuffPo)

 


What U.S. public education might look like with a Clinton or Trump presidency

 

Education policy has received little attention in a 2016 White House race that has been dominated by debate about immigration, terrorism, foreign policy and presidential temperament. And yet in their public statements, and now in responses to questions from The Washington Post, the two major-party candidates have offered vastly different visions for the nation’s public schools.

Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton has sidestepped some of the polarizing Obama-era policies that drew backlash from teachers, emphasizing that she wants to improve education by offering universal preschool nationwide, reforming school discipline and investing in expanded computer science offerings. Republican nominee Donald Trump, on the other hand, has repeatedly criticized the nation’s education system as failing, saying that U.S. students demonstrate poor achievement given how much the nation spends on schools.

http://gousoe.uen.org/88a (WaPo)

 

 

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CALENDAR

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USOE Calendar

http://www.schools.utah.gov/main/CALENDAR.aspx

 

 

UEN News

http://www.uen.org

 

 

October 13:

Utah State Charter School Board meeting

250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://go.uen.org/62M

 

 

October 18:

Executive Appropriations Committee meeting

2 p.m., 445 State Capitol

http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2016&com=APPEXE

 

 

October 19:

Education Interim Committee meeting

1:15 p.m., 30 House Building

http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2016&com=INTEDU

 

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