Education News Roundup: Oct. 21 – 2016

 

School and Institutional Trust Lands Administration /Education News Roundup

School and Institutional Trust Lands Administration /Education News Roundup

Today’s Top Picks:

 

NEA president tells Utah teachers to ‘proceed until apprehended,’ calls school board elections the most important in the state http://gousoe.uen.org/8aR (SLTrib)

 

Auction nets $5.5M for Utah schools, sells off part of land in Bears Ears struggle http://gousoe.uen.org/8aW (DNews)

 

New Website Aims to Keep Kids Alcohol Free

http://gousoe.uen.org/8b3 (ABC4UT)

 

School district requires $15 background checks for all visitors — including parents http://gousoe.uen.org/8bc (WaPo)

 

Texas May Be Denying Tens Of Thousands Of Children Special Education http://gousoe.uen.org/8ba (NPR)

 

 

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TODAY’S HEADLINES

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UTAH

 

NEA president tells Utah teachers to ‘proceed until apprehended,’ calls school board elections the most important in the state

 

Report: Salaries just ‘part of the solution’ for Utah’s teacher shortage

 

Auction nets $5.5M for Utah schools, sells off part of land in Bears Ears struggle

 

After secretary’s ALS diagnosis, Davis High raises money to send her to Hawaii

 

Two contested elections for Logan City School Board

 

Here’s why students across Utah are getting a four-day weekend

 

New Website Aims to Keep Kids Alcohol Free

 

Girl’s school photo becomes super-viral sensation

 

Proposed Bond Isn’t A Tough Sell For Growing Alpine School District

 

Utah’s School-To-Prison Pipeline, Part 1

 

Utah Valley University Partners with Utah Education Network to Bring Stained Glass Creation to K-12 Classrooms

 


OPINION & COMMENTARY

 

Esther J. Cepeda: Teacher-prep programs need tougher admissions standards

 

Letter: Worth the cost

 

Burton is a loyal advocate for teachers

 

Obama’s real education legacy: Common Core, testing, charter schools

 

School district requires $15 background checks for all visitors — including parents

 


NATION

 

More New York City Schools Join Diversity Admissions Program Low-income students and English language learners will be given priority in admissions at 19 schools

 

Texas May Be Denying Tens Of Thousands Of Children Special Education

 

The Gendered Past of Typing Education

 

Robert A. DeLeo backs 2 despite union opposition

 

Meet kid who got super-rare 100% in AP calculus

 

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UTAH NEWS

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NEA president tells Utah teachers to ‘proceed until apprehended,’ calls school board elections the most important in the state

 

Sandy • By passing the Every Student Succeeds Act last year, National Education Association (NEA) President Lily Eskelsen Garcia said Thursday, federal lawmakers removed the “handcuffs” from state education systems.

The law, which in December replaced the No Child Left Behind Act, allows states to develop their own performance measurements for public schools, rather than a mandated system of standardized testing and sanctions.

And those state-level conversations, Eskelsen Garcia said, provide educators with a chance to weigh in on how educational success and failure will be determined.

“We are right there in state after state, whether they invite us or not,” she said. “We’re not going to waste this opportunity — it’s more than an opportunity; it’s a responsibility to get this right.”

Her comments were part of the opening session of the UEA Convention at the South Towne Expo Center, an annual two-day gathering of the Utah Education Association.

http://gousoe.uen.org/8aR (SLTrib)

 


Report: Salaries just ‘part of the solution’ for Utah’s teacher shortage

 

SALT LAKE CITY — If Utahns want to ease the burden on teachers, they will have to take a hard look at how much they really value them, according to Andrea Rorrer, director of the Utah Education Policy Center.

In an election brief authored in partnership with the University of Utah’s Kem C. Gardner Policy Institute and Hinckley Institute of Politics, researchers called on lawmakers to address low teacher pay but also to invest in professional development and teacher recognition.

“It’s not as simple as just paying more,” Rorrer said. “It’s acknowledging the significance of the work that educators are doing that’s important to them. It’s recognizing the demand that they have (and) the expertise that’s necessary to do the job they do and do it well.”

The brief is part of Informed Decisions 2016, a series of political events and research papers meant to help voters make informed decisions this election year.

Education has consistently been rated a top priority by voters in Utah, which faces a growing gap between the number of students and available teachers.

http://gousoe.uen.org/8aV (DNews)

 


Auction nets $5.5M for Utah schools, sells off part of land in Bears Ears struggle

 

SALT LAKE CITY — The president of a Utah farming corporation outbid Mormon history buffs and conservation groups to snatch up nearly 400 acres of school trust lands in an area that could become enveloped in a Bears Ears national monument should it happen.

The Comb Ridge parcel sold for $500,000 — $200,000 above what defeated competitors offered — to Lyman Family Farm’s Joe Hunt, who responded, “What Bears Ears?” when asked.

Lyman Family Farm prevailed in a number of bidding wars at Wednesday’s Utah School and Institutional Trust Lands auction that garnered $5.5 million for the benefit of the permanent school trust fund, which distributes money to Utah schools.

The Hole in the Rock Foundation wanted the 391-acre parcel at Comb Ridge adjacent to federally managed lands to lead youth groups on historical and cultural tours of an area that was blazed by Mormon pioneers over the winter of 1879-80 in a treacherous journey.

Groups like Friends of Cedar Mesa prize the area for its abundance of cultural artifacts and stunning sandstone scenery.

http://gousoe.uen.org/8aW (DNews)

 

 


After secretary’s ALS diagnosis, Davis High raises money to send her to Hawaii

 

Davis High School counselor Robyn Lawson said she could tell something was different about Debbie Hall the minute she saw her back at school after summer break.

In mid-October, everything became clear when Hall was diagnosed with ALS, also known as Lou Gehrig’s Disease.

“She’s such a wonderful lady,” Lawson said. “We all knew something was wrong, but it’s a crushing thing to hear the diagnosis.”

Hall’s doctors have given her less than a year to live because the disease is in her lungs, so Lawson and the school’s six other counselors got to work to help their beloved secretary and registrar check off a big bucket list item: going to Hawaii.

“She‘s just one of those people who doesn’t know how much she’s loved,” Lawson said. “She’s the nicest person in the world. She never gets mad. She never loses her patience.”

http://gousoe.uen.org/8aZ (SE)

 


Two contested elections for Logan City School Board

 

Of the six seats up for election Nov. 8 in the Logan City and Cache County school boards, candidates for all but two seats in Logan will be running unopposed.

In interviews with each candidate, themes in this election included retaining teachers, adjusting to changing demographics in Logan City and allowing for more open communication between board members and parents.

http://gousoe.uen.org/8b1 (HJ)

 


Here’s why students across Utah are getting a four-day weekend

 

SANDY, Utah (ABC 4 Utah) – While students across Utah forget about school this UEA weekend, many teachers are just getting started.

About 2,000 educators are gathering at the Sandy South Towne Expo Center for the annual Utah Education Association convention.  This year’s hot topics include the upcoming election, the ongoing teacher shortage, and the constant struggle to really reach students.

“We thank you for your work and what you’re doing,” said Utah Governor Gary Herbert, who kicked off the two-day event by acknowledging the tough job Utah educators have.

“Our teachers are dedicated, they’re professional,” Herbert said.

They are also not without challenges.

That is why so many say they are giving up their long weekend to take part in workshops, training, and discussions with fellow UEA members.

http://gousoe.uen.org/8b2 (ABC4UT)

 


New Website Aims to Keep Kids Alcohol Free

 

Governor and First Lady Herbert announced a new online tool to help educate parents about underage drinking this week.

Doug Murakami, director of Alcohol Education at the Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control, talks more about this new resource.

Research shows that of kids who start drinking before age 15, 40 percent will become alcohol-dependent.

The goal of the website is to heighten parents’ awareness of the difficult challenges children face, including underage drinking. The site’s message reminds parents that through their influence and discussions with their children, they can prepare kids to say “no” to alcohol and remain alcohol-free.

Parents can access the information at www.parentsempowered.org.

http://gousoe.uen.org/8b3 (ABC4UT)

 


Girl’s school photo becomes super-viral sensation

 

ROCKLIN, Ca. – A single school picture can make a big impact.

A 3-year-old from California decided to wear a Superman costume for her picture instead of an outfit her dad picked for her.

Kaylieann’s picture with her Superman doll has now gone viral, but there’s more to this little girl than just her love for superheroes.

“Pooterman,” as Kaylieann calls him, better know as Superman, is her sidekick. He’s also her wardrobe inspiration for school picture day.

“I’ve always wanted her to be as independent as possible,” Kaylieann’s dad, Austin Steinbach told Fox 40.

That’s why Austin wasn’t offended when she chose the costume over the three outfits he picked for her. He’s also not surprised. He said she dresses up in costume for school all the time.

http://gousoe.uen.org/8b4 (Fox13)

 


Proposed Bond Isn’t A Tough Sell For Growing Alpine School District

 

Leaders of the Alpine School District are asking for support from Utah Valley residents on November 8th. Voters will decide on a proposed $387 million dollar bond for district expansion and renovation.

District officials released an animated video to explain the proposed bond. In the video we’re introduced to the “Lewis family” and they have some concerns.

“The kids are worried about their schools being too crowded,” the video says. “Mom and dad Lewis are worried about their kids not getting the right attention with so many students.”

That worry is legitimate. In the next four years the district will increase by over 5,000 students. But here’s the real question on the minds of the Lewis’:

“How will this bond impact the Lewis family’s property taxes?” the video asks. “The bond will do a number of things but the one thing it won’t do is raise property taxes.”

http://gousoe.uen.org/8b5 (KUER)

 


Utah’s School-To-Prison Pipeline, Part 1 The first in a two-part series.

 

Students with disciplinary problems often find themselves sooner or later in trouble with the law. According to Nubia Peña, J.D., Program Coordinator at Racially Just Utah, the Beehive State is not immune to the school-to-prison pipeline.

“Most people think it only occurs in urban cities but based on the demographics of children of color, children with disabilities, homeless youth, and children that exist in vulnerable intersections—these are the children that are being pushed out schools disproportionately through harsh discipline practices,” she said. “Children with disabilities are some of our most vulnerable populations because they highly depend, not only on the individuals in the classroom, but on people to advocate for their rights in ways that they cannot advocate for themselves.”

African-American students are three times more likely to face disciplinary action at school in Utah than their white classmates. Latino students are more likely to receive disciplinary action as well.

http://gousoe.uen.org/8b6 (UPR)

 


Utah Valley University Partners with Utah Education Network to Bring Stained Glass Creation to K-12 Classrooms

 

SALT LAKE CITY and OREM, Utah, Oct. 21, 2016 /PRNewswire/ — Utah Valley University (UVU), Utah’s largest institution of higher learning and Utah Education Network (UEN), a nationally recognized innovator in broadband and broadcast delivery of educational services for educators and students, today announced plans to create companion curriculum and field trips to accompany the Roots of Knowledge stained glass undertaking soon to be a fixture on the UVU campus. The bold and large-scale permanent public art installation will debut Nov. 18 and mark the culminating moment of UVU’s 75th anniversary celebration. Tapping the ancient storytelling art form of stained glass, while uniquely adapting it for a modern, secular setting, UVU is creating both a singular artistic landmark on campus and a powerful engaged learning model for the state.

http://gousoe.uen.org/8b7 (PRN)

 

 

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OPINION & COMMENTARY

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Esther J. Cepeda: Teacher-prep programs need tougher admissions standards Washington Post commentary by Esther J. Cepeda

 

CHICAGO • After years of negotiations and input from education interest groups, teachers and their unions, the U.S. Department of Education recently released its revised Teacher Preparation Regulations, designed to help ensure that students get the best new teachers possible.

The idea is that if teacher-preparation programs transparently report on a variety of performance metrics — such as placement and retention rates of teachers in their first three years in the classroom (including in high-needs schools) as well as feedback from new teachers and their employers on the effectiveness of their training — the data will help improve the efficacy of these programs.

And there’s no question that they need improvement.

In 2013, the National Council on Teacher Quality (NCTQ) put out a seminal report that found only 10 percent of 1,200 teacher-preparation programs nationwide were adequately training people to succeed in the classroom. More recently, a 2015 NCTQ report found that standards for training new teachers are inconsistent — even within the same prep programs.

http://gousoe.uen.org/8aS

 


Letter: Worth the cost

Deseret News letter by Ray Stillwell

 

Your editorial entitled “Education Survey Results” (Oct. 14) made for interesting reading, especially the last sentence of the editorial wherein it is stated that, “Proponents of increased funding for education will not only have to build a winning coalition among policymakers, they must also do a better job of educating an uninformed citizenry. …” I doubt anyone could argue against that point. However, I would reword that line to read “uninformed and unwilling citizenry.”

Our family moved to Utah 31 years ago. We have lived in the same home for all of those years. Over the years my wife and I supported every bond issue and tax increase proposed for education even though our child attended private school. Most of the proposals went down in defeat. What amazed me about the defeat of the proposals were the adamant objections expressed by parents whose children would benefit the most from the increased funding.

http://gousoe.uen.org/8aX

 


Burton is a loyal advocate for teachers

Standard Examiner letter by Edward and Cheri Walker

 

This is a letter of endorsement on behalf of Sue Ann Burton, who is running for the District 5 position on the Ogden School Board. As educators ourselves, we are impressed with the qualifications she has for this position. Having been an educator, she is well aware of the educational system and how to serve within it.

Beyond her educational experience, Sue Ann has a vested interest in the success of the Ogden School District. She has children in each level, from elementary through high school. She has been actively engaged in all aspects of our schools and the community, which supports our children and their opportunities that combine to create success for both. Having served with her on community committees, we know how hard she works to make a project successful.

http://gousoe.uen.org/8b0

 


Obama’s real education legacy: Common Core, testing, charter schools The Washington Post Answer Sheet by Valerie Strauss

 

President Obama went to a high-performing D.C. high school this week to tout the “progress” his administration has made in public education, America’s most important civic institution. To mark the legacy moment, he brought along the two men who have served as his education secretaries — Arne Duncan and John King Jr., along with D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser, D.C. Rep. Eleanor Holmes Norton, and Gen. Colin Powell and his wife Alma.

It’s what he didn’t say that was most revealing. A fuller evaluation of the Obama education legacy would look somewhat different from the one he offered.

Obama charmed the student audience at Benjamin Banneker Academic High School, joking with them and telling them he remembers some of the awkward social moments of being a high school student. As the White House text shows:

http://gousoe.uen.org/8b9

 


School district requires $15 background checks for all visitors — including parents Washington Post Answer Sheet blog by Valerie Strauss

 

Is this smart — or overzealous?

A school district in Alabama is requiring that all visitors who come to school during the day — including parents and grandparents — must pass a background check and pay $15 to get it.

The Pelham City School District had decided over the summer to require background checks for school lunch visitors — but recently extended it to include visitors for “all school day activities.”

A recent post on the district website said:

http://gousoe.uen.org/8bc

 

 

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NATIONAL NEWS

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More New York City Schools Join Diversity Admissions Program Low-income students and English language learners will be given priority in admissions at 19 schools

 

Amid calls for more integration in New York City’s public schools, 19 schools will give priority in admissions for next fall to low-income students or English language learners.

The city Department of Education said Thursday that 12 schools will join seven already in a “diversity in admissions” pilot project. They represent a modest number among some 1,800 public schools.

East Village Community School, a popular pick in Manhattan, will give priority for half of its seats in prekindergarten and kindergarten to English language learners and children who qualify for subsidized lunches.

Some schools will give low-income children priority after admitting all students from the neighborhood zone who want to attend. At Brooklyn School of Inquiry, low-income students will have priority for 40% of the seats in its gifted and talented program, as long as they get high enough scores on the gifted exam.

http://gousoe.uen.org/8b8 (WSJ)

 


Texas May Be Denying Tens Of Thousands Of Children Special Education

 

When Rosley Espinoza’s daughter was very young, in preschool, she started acting differently. She seemed distracted and would get in trouble at school.

“Lack of interest, teachers’ notes coming home with behavior notes,” Espinoza says, speaking in Spanish.

She says she asked school officials to evaluate her daughter, Citlali, for special education, but they didn’t.

Every year, Espinoza says, Citlali’s behavior got worse. Last year, in second grade, “she stopped paying attention in class … [she was] harassing other children. On some occasions she would scream, yell.”

Espinoza says all of that caused her daughter, who’s now 8, to show signs of stress and depression, but her school still denied Citlali an evaluation. Espinoza may now know why.

A recent Houston Chronicle investigation revealed that Texas, the state with the lowest percentage of children in special education, 8.5 in 2015, may arbitrarily be capping services, which are entitled by federal law to students with autism, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, mental illness and other special needs.

http://gousoe.uen.org/8ba (NPR)

 


The Gendered Past of Typing Education

A quirky QWERTY history

 

The man who taught me to type was at least 100 years old at the time of my instruction. He wore thick, purple sunglasses that completely hid his eyes at all times. His long, white beard rippled as he traveled in a pink convertible through both time and space. This man was also, of course, animated.

Like the characters in Oregon Trail, Freddy the Fish, and other popular games of the early aughts, the time-traveling typing guru of Type to Learn was an inescapable fixture of my elementary-school computer classes. I attribute my ability to touch type—to use a keyboard without actually watching my fingers move—almost entirely to this computer game, which is a far cry from the typing courses high-school students took in previous decades and the typewriters they used.

http://gousoe.uen.org/8bb (TA)

 


Robert A. DeLeo backs 2 despite union opposition

 

House Speaker Robert A. DeLeo is defying the powerful Massachusetts Teachers Union by saying he will be voting yes on Question 2 — a ballot measure that would lift the cap on charter schools statewide.

“I decided to do what I feel is best for students,” DeLeo said yesterday during an appearance on WCVB-TV. “Whatever the political ramifications may be, I think it’s the right thing to do.”

The Democratic leader joins Gov. Charlie Baker in supporting the question that has divided political leaders between charter advocates and the teachers’ union.

http://gousoe.uen.org/8bd (BH)

 


Meet kid who got super-rare 100% in AP calculus

 

INDIANAPOLIS — Truman Bennet has always been good at math.

His parents, he said, placed an emphasis on math when he was young. And now, as an 18-year-old Marion High School senior, his math skills have paid off.

Bennet is one of just 18 students in the world to achieve a perfect score — earning every point possible — on the Advanced Placement Calculus AB exam, putting him among  0.006% of students who took the exam, according to the College Board.

“It’s just amazing,” he said. “Just to be part of an elite group of people like that.”

The AP Calculus AB is equivalent to a first semester college calculus course, according to the College Board, the organization that administers the exam. Topics covered include concepts and skills of limits, derivatives, definite integrals and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. AP exams are graded on a scale of 1 to 5, with 5 being the highest score possible.

http://gousoe.uen.org/8be (USAToday)

 

 

 

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CALENDAR

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USOE Calendar

http://www.schools.utah.gov/main/CALENDAR.aspx

 

 

UEN News

http://www.uen.org

 

 

November 3:

Utah State Board of Education study session, USDB and committee meetings

250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspx

 

 

November 4:

Utah State Board of Education meeting

250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspx

 

 

November 10:

Utah State Charter School Board meeting

250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://go.uen.org/62M

 

 

November 15:

Executive Appropriations Committee meeting

2 p.m., 445 State Capitol

http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2016&com=APPEXE

 

 

November 16:

Education Interim Committee meeting

1:15 p.m., 30 House Building

http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2016&com=INTEDU

 

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