Education News Roundup: Oct. 28, 2016

boardlogoToday’s Top Picks:

You’re going to need to get out your scorecards to keep track of Utah State Board of Education candidate endorsements.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8dM (SLT)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/8e6 (KUTV)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/8dO (SLT)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/8dZ (OSE)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/8dN (UP)

There is some follow up on Utah’s nation-leading performance in eighth grade science scores.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8dX (DN)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/8e7 (KSL)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/8e9 (KUER)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/8ea (MUR)
or a copy of the results
http://gousoe.uen.org/8dG (NAEP)

If you’re regular readers, you’ve already seen this story about Davis High’s Debbie Hall, but CBS did a nice job with it.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8er (CBS)

New study finds the gender gap in math begins in kindergarten.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8dP (NewsHour)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/8dR (HuffPo)
or a copy of the study
http://gousoe.uen.org/8dQ (American Educational Research Association)

Presuming the 108-year-old pent-up excitement and energy of 42,000 Cubs fans inside Wrigley Field and at least as many milling about on the corner of Addison and Clark (or waiting for homeruns out on Waveland Avenue) doesn’t actually tear a hole in the space-time continuum this weekend, ENR will be back on Monday.

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TODAY’S HEADLINES
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UTAH

Mormon apostle violates church policy by donating to Utah school board candidate, acknowledges ‘oversight’
Elections » General authority acknowledges “oversight” after giving a relatively small sum to a school board candidate.

Utah Technology Council flips its support in two school board races
Politics » Group pulls informal backing because that message had not been “fully vetted.”

Utah eighth-graders post top science scores on national test

Utah Trust Lands Auctioned Off For School Revenue

School raises money to send beloved, terminally-ill secretary to Hawaii

Portrait of influential Utah educator finds new home in Timpview halls

How Student Athletes Can Take an Active Role in Anti-Bullying

Fidelity Investments’ employees set to transform Geneva Elementary

Checking out Bryant Middle School’s newly remodeled library

STEAM Festival to Bring Hands-On Learning to Cedar City

Trunk-or-Treat at Mountain View High

Inside our schools

OPINION & COMMENTARY

Our endorsement for State Board of Ed, District 4: Jennifer Graviet

Be Sure to Vote, Especially on Education-Related Issues

Education versus UHSAA

Graviet will be a voice for children, teachers on Utah State Board of Ed

Davis voters need to defeat McCauley for using GOP logo on signs

Keep Connie Morgan on Logan school board

Why the Mountain West Is Still Holding Out on Pre-K
The region’s individualist ethos and unique demographic breakdown have resulted in a lack of early-education investment.

What It Takes to Teach Science in a Rural School
For rural science teachers, knowledge isn’t enough

NATION

Gender gap in math starts in kindergarten, study says

Hillary Clinton Campaign Releases $500 Million Anti-Bullying Plan

Teachers Union Head Brings Political Clout to Bear for Hillary Clinton
National Education Association chief Lily Eskelsen García takes campaign to defeat Republican nominee Donald Trump personally

Public Schools Turn to Marketing to Win Back Students From Charters
Districts educate about 95% of U.S. public-school students, but they are feeling the bite from charters

Where The Money Comes From In The Fight Over Charter Schools

Do Charter Schools Enroll More White Students?
Depends on the State

K-12 Digital Citizenship Initiative Targets States

On a classroom-based test for new teachers, black teachers score lower
A new report shows gap on the edTPA and researchers want to find out why

Microsoft Aims to Build on ‘Minecraft’ Success
A classroom-geared version of the popular construction game is set for widespread release.

Religious high schools not allowed to hold public prayer before playoff game due to IHSA rule

Satanic Leader: After-school Clubs Send Positive Message

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UTAH NEWS
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Mormon apostle violates church policy by donating to Utah school board candidate, acknowledges ‘oversight’
Elections » General authority acknowledges “oversight” after giving a relatively small sum to a school board candidate.

A high-ranking LDS Church leader has run afoul of his faith’s policies on political neutrality by contributing to a candidate for state school board.
Campaign-disclosure records for candidate Richard Nelson show a $250 contribution on Oct. 17 from Elder D. Todd Christofferson, a member of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles, the second-highest governing body of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.
The relatively small donation does not violate any state election laws, and Christofferson is free as an individual to support and contribute to political campaigns.
But an internal church policy, updated in 2011, instructs full-time ecclesiastical leaders to avoid political involvement, including campaign donations.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8dM (SLT)

http://gousoe.uen.org/8e6 (KUTV)


Utah Technology Council flips its support in two school board races
Politics » Group pulls informal backing because that message had not been “fully vetted.”

In a campaign season of endorsements, unendorsements and re-endorsements, a Utah business association is experiencing its own political reconsiderations.
In a letter to its members Wednesday night, the Utah Technology Council expressed formal support for six Utah Board of Education candidates, reversing informal endorsements for two races made earlier this month.
The council said the original endorsements — which were based solely in opposition to candidates who received contributions from the Utah Education Association — did not represent the views of the organization.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8dO (SLT)


Utah eighth-graders post top science scores on national test

SALT LAKE CITY — Utah’s eighth-graders posted the highest scores in the U.S. on a standardized science test, according to results released Thursday.
Utah’s eighth-graders raised their average science score by five points last year on the National Assessment of Educational Progress exam to 166 on a 300-point scale, according to the results.
They beat the national average by 13 points.
Fourth-graders in Utah, who raised their average score by six points, ranked eighth in the nation, according to the data.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8dX (DN)

http://gousoe.uen.org/8e7 (KSL)

http://gousoe.uen.org/8e9 (KUER)

http://gousoe.uen.org/8ea (MUR)

A copy of the results
http://gousoe.uen.org/8dG (NAEP)


Utah Trust Lands Auctioned Off For School Revenue

The State of Utah School and Institutional Trust Lands Administration, or SITLA, currently manages over three million acres of land. Although not technically public, these trust lands are generally open for biking, hunting, fishing, and other outdoor activities. On October 19th, over 3,500 acres of trust lands across the state were sold at auction, generating over $6 million for Utah schools. Areas that were formerly open for outdoor recreation are now closed.
“My concern, though, is that those lands can now not be accessed,” said Dr. Joshua Lenert, who works in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of Utah. “Forget whether you’re a hunter or an angler, even if you ride bicycles or you ride ATVs, you’re now barred from those lands. From my perspective, the loss of access is significant.”
These trust lands were set aside by Congress when Utah became a state in 1896. The purpose is to generate revenue for public institutions like reservoirs, hospitals and schools.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8en (UPR)


School raises money to send beloved, terminally-ill secretary to Hawaii

A little more than a year ago, Debra “Debbie” Hall, went to the doctor for a scratchy throat she thought was caused by allergies. After a few trips to the ear, nose and throat doctor, she was sent to a neurologist who quickly diagnosed the problem.
“When I finally got into a neurologist, they were able to quickly diagnose the situation and concluded that I have had this for years,” said Hall.
By “this” she means amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease.
Hall has worked at Davis High School in Kaysville, Utah, as the secretary for the counseling department and the registrar for 19 years.
Talking to her colleagues, it’s clear that her impact on the school has been immeasurable.
“In all the years I’ve worked with her I’ve never seen her lose her patience or get upset with anybody,” said Robyn Lawson, a counselor who has worked with Hall for six years. “She’s just loved cause she’s so patient and kind.”
Lawson said Hall and her husband came to the school to let the department know about her diagnosis.
“The doctor said if she had a bucket list to get started on it quickly,” her husband explained.
“We all knew she wanted to go to Hawaii,” said Lawson. “When she regained her composure she joked ‘better start looking at Hawaii!’”
The staff knew immediately that they wanted to make this trip happen for Hall, her husband and her kids and grand-kids.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8er (CBS)


Portrait of influential Utah educator finds new home in Timpview halls

Timpview High School has a new face in the halls these days. It’s that of Karl G. Maeser, one of the most influential educators in Utah.
A painting of Maeser, which had previously hung in the old Maeser School in Provo, was recently moved from the district offices to a more permanent home at Timpview High School where more people will be able to see it.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8em (PDH)


How Student Athletes Can Take an Active Role in Anti-Bullying

Dustin Smith, Founder of Especially for Athletes, explains the program and how it’s changing the lives of high school students and athletes everywhere.
Especially for athletes is asking athletes from young kids to professional levels who are under the “ SPORT LIGHT” to take more of a role in anti-bullying and suicide prevention as well as efforts to show better sportsmanship, stop cheating and drug abuse prevention.
They ask student athletes to use their popularity to give back and help the lonely and the less popular.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8es (KTVX)


Fidelity Investments’ employees set to transform Geneva Elementary

More than 100 Fidelity Investments employees will be take part in “Transformation Day” Saturday at Geneva Elementary. The volunteers, coming from Fidelity’s regional center in American Fork, an investment center in Orem, and an additional regional center in Salt Lake City, will reinvigorate Geneva Elementary, the oldest elementary in the Alpine School District.
Volunteers will be painting inspirational quotes and murals around the school, complete playground landscaping and build benches.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8ep (PDH)


Checking out Bryant Middle School’s newly remodeled library

Seventh-graders Diego Miranda and Oscar Magallon look at some new books at a ribbon-cutting ceremony for the newly remodeled library at Bryant Middle School in Salt Lake City on Thursday. In connection with Thursday’s ribbon-cutting, the school issued a challenge to its students to read 100 pages a month to meet a goal of the student body reading more than 200,000 pages before the end of the school year. Bryant, a Title I school in the Salt Lake City School District, received $8,000 in funding from the Utah Legends Golf Tournament to purchase texts for the library. This contribution provides students who may have limited print resources at home with opportunities to check out new, up-to-date and relevant texts for their academic and personal reading. The new books are a mix of informational text and high-interest fictional text chosen to reflect areas of student interest in grades 7-8. The donation resulted in more than 480 books being added to the library’s shelves.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8dY (DN)


STEAM Festival to Bring Hands-On Learning to Cedar City

The second annual southern Utah STEAM Festival will be held October 28 – 29 on the Southern Utah University campus. The two-day festival presents hands-on science, technology, engineering, art and math learning for children of all ages.
On Friday, October 28, grade school students from across southern Utah will convene by invitation at the Hunter Conference Center at SUU. Then, on Friday evening and again on Saturday, the event will open to the general public at no charge. Sponsored by Southern Utah University, the STEM Action Center, the Governor’s office of Economic Development, and Cedar City Library in the Park, the festival incorporates experiential learning and interdisciplinary projects to help make STEAM education exciting for students from elementary up to university levels.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8eq (Broadway World)


Trunk-or-Treat at Mountain View High

Harris Havens, 1, dressed as Clark Kent, cheers with excitement after receiving candy from Utah Highway Patrol officer David Wurtz during Trunk-or-Treat on Thursday Oct. 27, 2016, at Mountain View High School in Orem. Target donated 150 pounds of candy, each of the approximately 10 students in the Mountain View honor society donated a bag, and the Orem police department bought $1,500 worth of treats for the event.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8e2 (PDH)


Inside our schools

Snow Canyon High
Valley Academy Charter
Pine View Middle
Utah Online High
http://gousoe.uen.org/8e4 (SGS)


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OPINION & COMMENTARY
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Our endorsement for State Board of Ed, District 4: Jennifer Graviet
(Ogden) Standard-Examiner editorial

We endorse candidates for one simple reason — we can’t ask anything of you we wouldn’t demand of ourselves.
So if we expect you to follow the news, listen to the candidates, test their ideas and make a decision, we should be willing to put ourselves through the same process.
We could not sit down with every candidate on the Nov. 8 ballot, so we focused on three races of vital concern to Northern Utah: The 1st Congressional District, governor, and the Utah State Board of Education, District 4.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8dZ


Be Sure to Vote, Especially on Education-Related Issues
Utah Policy op-ed by Kim Burningham, former chairman of the Utah State Board of Education

Like me, I suspect a number of you have already voted.
Many others will do so shortly. I hope by election day all of you will have participated. Because of the unusually contentious race at the top of the ticket, many people I talk to are almost apathetic. Some have even said, “I think I’ll skip it this time.” Please don’t. No matter how you may feel about the presidential race, I strongly urge you to move “down-ballot” and make your will known on lesser-publicized issues. A number of these votes relate directly to education. Go clear to the bottom and make sure you speak up on matters that will have major impact upon our schools.
I make the following recommendations:
http://gousoe.uen.org/8dN


Education versus UHSAA
Utah PoliticoHub commentary by Paul Mero, president and CEO of Next Generation Freedom Fund

For a good five or six years over the past decade I have encouraged the state Legislature to reign in the power of the Utah High School Activities Association (UHSAA). Recently, and surprisingly, the State Board of Education had the same thought. The State Board proposed to end the control UHSAA has over school athletics by controlling the transfer process.
UHSAA has purview over all extracurricular activities in Utah schools – music, science, vocational programs and, of course, high school sports. For every other extracurricular activity a student is free to transfer to any other school to pursue those activities. But not if the student is an athlete. In fact, state law rules that any student can transfer to any school for no reason if the transfer school has space. But not if the student is an athlete.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8e5


Graviet will be a voice for children, teachers on Utah State Board of Ed
(Ogden) Standard-Examiner letter from Kalisha Williams

To all District 4 voters! There is a nonpartisan race on your ballot. I am asking you to trust a teacher and vote Jennifer Graviet for the Utah State Board of Education.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8e0


Davis voters need to defeat McCauley for using GOP logo on signs
(Ogden) Standard-Examiner letter from Vance Pace

I was pleased to read Richard Heath’s letter in the Oct. 17 StandardExaminer regarding the political logo on the lawn signs of Mike McCauley (”By using GOP logo, is Davis School Board candidate trying to discredit opponent?”). I also noticed McCauley’s lawn signs scattered all over central Davis County. I have to conclude that McCauley isn’t smart enough to know school board elections are nonpartisan, in which case he should not be elected. Or else he unethically flaunts his political affiliation with the knowledge that it is a nonpartisan election, in which case he should be defeated.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8e1


Keep Connie Morgan on Logan school board
(Logan) Herald Journal letter from Fred Duersch, Jr.

I am writing in support of Connie Morgan as a candidate for reelection to the Logan City School District Board of Education. I have noticed Connie’s efforts in promoting student achievement in the district. Connie is the only member of the current board with classroom teaching experience having taught at Logan Senior High School for many years. She will also volunteer at Adams Elementary, listening to students read. Education has been her life’s work. She has a vision of excellence in education for all children. Connie understands instruction, assessment, hiring protocols, training issues, the needed resources, communication, accountability, and safety issues.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8e3


Why the Mountain West Is Still Holding Out on Pre-K
The region’s individualist ethos and unique demographic breakdown have resulted in a lack of early-education investment.
Atlantic commentary by DAVID LOEWENBERG, an education-policy intern at New America

When you think of America’s western mountain states, what comes to mind? Wide, open spaces? Majestic peaks? Infinite blue skies? Pervasive lack of investment in pre-k?
This sparsely populated region, unique in both its striking landscape and rugged individualist ethos, is not exactly the center of attention when it comes to matters of public policy. So perhaps it is not surprising that while almost all states across the country have moved toward greater investment in pre-k, this region’s resistance to do so has, to a certain degree, escaped scrutiny.
As the body of research confirming the critical importance of a child’s earliest learning experiences has grown, so has political momentum behind investment in publicly funded pre-k. In states both conservative and liberal, rural and urban, pre-k is receiving more attention, more support, and more funding. Indeed, though funding remains severely inadequate on the whole, nearly every state now dedicates at least some state funding to pre-k initiatives—a trend that has been researched, analyzed, and discussed considerably in recent years.
But far less discussed are those states that have bucked this national trend toward investment in pre-k—“those last holdouts,” in the words of President Obama just this week. Five states—Idaho, Montana, New Hampshire, South Dakota, and Wyoming—still do not provide any state funding for pre-k, meaning parents must either pay full tuition out of pocket, rely on a scarce supply of federal subsidies, or forego pre-k altogether. And all but one of those five states are clustered in the mountainous west.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8eh


What It Takes to Teach Science in a Rural School
For rural science teachers, knowledge isn’t enough
Education Week op-ed by Jessica Weller, coaching coordinator for the STEM Goes Rural program at Purdue University, & Lynn A. Bryan, director of the Center for the Teaching and Learning of STEM

In our home state of Indiana, more than a quarter of K-12 students attend rural schools. With the 2015 passage of the Every Student Succeeds Act, Indiana is in the process of determining how the new requirements will translate into state education practice. As educators of future STEM teachers, we have an acute interest in the changes to teacher-certification requirements prompted by the new federal law, known as ESSA, and the implications that these changes will have on the quality of preparation of future teachers, particularly those who will be teaching STEM subjects in our rural schools.
There is a growing misperception among policymakers that knowledge of subject matter is all that is needed to become an effective science teacher, minimizing the value and necessity of pedagogical preparation. This misperception is seen in proposed teacher-certification requirements, for example, that would allow teachers with no preparation in pedagogy or child and adolescent development to teach in classrooms for up to two years while they acquire the necessary pedagogical training. While research supports the intuitive notion that a deep, flexible, and coherent understanding of subject-matter knowledge is a prerequisite for good teaching, such knowledge must be married with robust pedagogical training.
But is a command of subject-matter and pedagogical knowledge enough to prepare a teacher for teaching in a rural school?
http://gousoe.uen.org/8ef


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NATIONAL NEWS
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Gender gap in math starts in kindergarten, study says
NewsHour

Gender gaps in math achievement and teacher expectations that boys are stronger at math than girls start to form by kindergarten, according to a study released Thursday by the American Educational Research Association.
The study also found that teachers consistently underrated girls’ math skills, even when boys and girls behaved and performed in similar ways academically.
While the gender gap starts early among high-achieving math students, it spreads quickly to all students throughout elementary school. And both high- and low-achieving schools are impacted, according to the report.
“If schools are addressing biases, it’s not happening effectively,” said Joseph Cimpian, lead author of the study and associate professor of economics and education policy at New York University’s Steinhardt School.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8dP

http://gousoe.uen.org/8dR (HuffPo)

A copy of the study
http://gousoe.uen.org/8dQ (American Educational Research Association)


Hillary Clinton Campaign Releases $500 Million Anti-Bullying Plan
Education Week

Hillary Clinton, the Democratic presidential nominee, is pitching a $500 million program to help states and schools combat bullying. At the same time, her campaign has a new ad framing her opponent, Republican nominee Donald Trump, as a schoolyard bully.
Funding for the “Better Than Bullying” initiative would go to states to develop plans to combat bullying. Under the plan, states would be eligible for $4 in federal matching funds for every $1 of their own money they put into anti-bullying efforts.
The money could be used for everything from hiring social workers, school psychologists, nurses, and school counselors, to supporting programs to improve mental health or prevent suicide. States could also use the money to help train teachers on how to deal with bullies, or figure out how to handle cyberbullying, including parent education.
The funds could also help states make school climate a priority under the Every Student Succeeds Act, and to develop legislation that explicitly prohibits bullying on the basis of race, gender, national origin, religion, gender identity, and more.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8dU

http://gousoe.uen.org/8dV (Politico)

http://gousoe.uen.org/8dW (WaPo)

http://gousoe.uen.org/8e8 (NPR)


Teachers Union Head Brings Political Clout to Bear for Hillary Clinton
National Education Association chief Lily Eskelsen García takes campaign to defeat Republican nominee Donald Trump personally
Wall Street Journal

PHILADELPHIA—Lily Eskelsen García, the president of the National Education Association, is using her union’s vast campaign machine to wage a personal fight against Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump.
As a Hispanic married to a Mexican citizen, she was insulted by his derogatory comments about Mexican immigrants. As the daughter of a U.S. Army veteran, she was upset by Mr. Trump’s criticism of the parents of a Muslim veteran killed in Afghanistan. And, as a woman, she was offended by Mr. Trump’s comments about how his status as a celebrity allowed him to grope women.
“This has hit me in every place I live,” Ms. García, 61 years old, said in an interview.
Under Ms. García’s watch, the teachers union is waging its most extensive election effort ever. She pushed the union to endorse Democrat Hillary Clinton last fall, months before the primaries had started, and to start campaigning for her much earlier than the union has in prior elections.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8eo


Public Schools Turn to Marketing to Win Back Students From Charters
Districts educate about 95% of U.S. public-school students, but they are feeling the bite from charters
Wall Street Journal

GRAND PRAIRIE, Texas—Billboards, glossy mailers and ads at movie theaters here promote the offerings available at public schools. In Los Angeles, dozens of 8-foot-high banners with photos of college-bound students line a busy road, targeting families with school-age children.
Westonka Public Schools in Minnesota sends parents a baby bag filled with a district-logoed bib, a welcome letter from the superintendent and a course catalog.
In an era of school choice, with charter schools and even other districts threatening to cut into their enrollments and funding, traditional public schools are fighting back with expensive marketing campaigns and retooled offerings to appeal to students. Some schools are even adopting the fancy uniforms associated with charters.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8eg

Sidebar story on school uniforms
http://gousoe.uen.org/8el (WSJ)


Where The Money Comes From In The Fight Over Charter Schools
(Boston) WBUR

Both sides in the ballot fight over the charter cap are out knocking on doors in the run-up to Election Day. The public faces of each campaign are students, parents and teachers, pleading for fairness and excellence in every child’s education.
Behind the scenes, though, an unprecedented clash of titans is taking place.
Supporters of Question 2 — the ballot measure that would raise the cap on the number of charter schools allowed to operate in Massachusetts — have contributed $19.5 million to the campaign; opponents have kicked in $13.4 million, according to filing data kept by the state Office of Campaign & Political Finance.
Together that makes almost $33 million — more than twice the $15 million spent, mostly by gaming interests, in the 2014 casino debate, which had been the state’s most expensive campaign on a ballot question.
And very little of that money comes from small, Bernie Sanders-sized donations. Though hundreds of people have contributed modest amounts of money this past year, the average contribution on both sides is about $40,000.
The opposition to Question 2 — organized under the name “Save Our Public Schools” — is almost entirely funded by national and local teachers’ unions; less than 1 percent came from other sources.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8dT


Do Charter Schools Enroll More White Students?
Depends on the State
Education Week

Wealthy or poor, black or white, native speaker or English-language learner—the types of students that enroll in charter schools vary greatly from state-to-state.
That’s the conclusion of a new analysis by the American Enterprise Institute that compares charter schools to their neighboring traditional district schools in 22 states.
Whether charter schools are expanding or shrinking the achievement gap between advantaged and disadvantaged students is an argument that powers some of the most contentious debates over whether policymakers should be expanding these schools.
Among the most recent examples are the NAACP’s decision to officially call for a ban on new charter schools, and a ballot question in Massachusetts on whether to lift a state cap on the number of charters allowed in the state.
Nat Malkus, who authored the report for the conservative think tank, writes that arguments for and against charters tend to fall into two buckets. While charter opponents say the schools select and retain only the most advantaged students in their schools, proponents argue that charter schools give poor and minority students a path out of failing district schools and, eventually, into college.
Malkus examined federal data and found there’s truth to both characterizations, and that the makeup of charter students in many states doesn’t neatly fit into either bucket.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8ed

A copy of the report
http://gousoe.uen.org/8ee (AEI)


K-12 Digital Citizenship Initiative Targets States
Education Week

A coalition of groups focused on children and media launched a new campaign today to encourage state lawmakers to promote digital citizenship in schools.
The aim is to spur adoption of new legislation requiring the formation of state-level advisory committees charged with finding ways to help ensure students use classroom technology safely and ethically while becoming savvy consumers and creators of online media and information.
“Our kids are now living in a digital world, and we need to teach them how to make smart choices so they can take advantage of all that tech has to offer while avoiding the dangers,” said James P. Steyer, in prepared remarks he was expected to deliver Oct. 28 to the Twitter Digital Citizenship Summit in San Francisco. “We believe that good online behavior mimics good offline behavior.”
Steyer is the founder and CEO of the nonprofit Common Sense Media, whose advocacy wing, Common Sense Kids Action, will lead the new campaign. The group is joined by Media Literacy Now, the Digital Citizenship Institute, and the National Association for Media Literacy Education. Together, they hope to initially persuade 20 states to pass new digital-citizenship legislation in 2017.
Their model is Washington state, where Gov. Jay Inslee, a Democrat, earlier this year signed into law a measure requiring the office of the state superintendent of public instruction to convene a statewide advisory committee that will devise best practices and recommendations for “instruction in digital citizenship, internet safety, and media literacy.”
http://gousoe.uen.org/8ec


On a classroom-based test for new teachers, black teachers score lower
A new report shows gap on the edTPA and researchers want to find out why
Hechinger Report

African-American teachers scored lower on a controversial new teaching exam states are adopting to make becoming a teacher a more rigorous process.
Advocates of the Stanford University-owned exam, known as edTPA, say its focus on performance in the classroom – including videos and essays based on candidates’ student teaching – will better prepare new teachers and increase teaching quality in schools that badly need it. But critics have worried the test could create another stumbling block for minority teachers, who are underrepresented in the profession.
About 70 percent of candidates scored a 42, the cut score recommended by the group that administers edTPA, according to an analysis released by the group Tuesday. But no states use that bar. In Washington and New York, the only two states using it in teaching licensing, the cut scores were 35 and 41, respectively. (89 percent of all teachers scored 35 or better.)
Overall, the Stanford report said “differences by racial /ethnic group were small, women generally scored more highly than men, and suburban teachers on average scored more highly than teachers in other teaching contexts.” The average score for black teacher candidates was 41 (below the recommended pass rate), compared to roughly 45 for white, Hispanic and Asians.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8dS


Microsoft Aims to Build on ‘Minecraft’ Success
A classroom-geared version of the popular construction game is set for widespread release.
U.S. News & World Report

The Nov. 1 launch of a “Minecraft” version tailored for the classroom is exciting educators and parents alike.
“Phenomenal” is how Mark Minghella describes the test version of “Minecraft: Education Edition,” the new iteration of the popular building game.
“I’ve got an overwhelmingly … positive attitude toward ‘Minecraft’ in the classroom,” says Minghella, a technology teacher in the nation’s capital at the British International School of Washington. He says he was familiar with “Minecraft” thanks to his two kids. “It’s actually being used for education purposes and not just for students to play games.”
Minghella says the game can help students understand the concepts involved with building a sustainable community, as well as how to work collaboratively, overcome obstacles and prioritize tasks.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8ej

Religious high schools not allowed to hold public prayer before playoff game due to IHSA rule
Chicago Tribune

Arora Central Catholic High School home games typically begin with a prayer over the public address system: to protect the athletes from injury; for good sportsmanship; for safe travel to and from contests.
But at a high-stakes home football game Friday against Wheaton Academy, a Christian school in West Chicago, public prayer will not be allowed.
Friday marks the first round of the Illinois High School Association Class 4A playoffs. And, under the IHSA rules that govern playoffs, prayer over a public address system is prohibited.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8ek


Satanic Leader: After-school Clubs Send Positive Message
Associated Press

SALEM, Mass. — The Satanic Temple is waging religious battles along a variety of fronts nationwide, and its co-founder says it’s just getting started.
The 3-year-old organization is fighting to get a nearly 9-foot, 1.5-ton statue of the goat-headed idol Baphomet placed on the Arkansas Capitol grounds as a counterpoint to a planned Ten Commandments monument.
Members have also proposed “After School Satan Clubs” in elementary schools from Oregon to Georgia where evangelical Christian “Good News Clubs” are operating.
And they’ve been pushing city councils from Alaska to Massachusetts to allow Satanists to give the opening prayer at public meetings – just as Christian, Jewish and other religious clerics have long done.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8eb


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CALENDAR
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USOE Calendar
http://www.schools.utah.gov/main/CALENDAR.aspx

UEN News
http://www.uen.org

November 3:
Utah State Board of Education study session, USDB and committee meetings
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspx

November 4:
Utah State Board of Education meeting
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspx

November 10:
Utah State Charter School Board meeting
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://go.uen.org/62M

November 15:
Executive Appropriations Committee meeting
2 p.m., 445 State Capitol
http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2016&com=APPEXE

November 16:
Education Interim Committee meeting
1:15 p.m., 30 House Building
http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2016&com=INTEDU

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