Education News Roundup: Oct. 31, 2016

Today’s Top Picks:

Utah Digital Teaching and Learning Grant Program

Utah Digital Teaching and Learning Grant Program

Standard-Examiner looks at Davis District’s Digital Teaching and Learning Grant application.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8f2 (OSE)

D-News looks at school breakfast in Utah.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8eU (DN)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/8fi (KSL)

Judge rules that plaintiffs in the lawsuit filed against the state’s statute against homosexuality advocacy in sex education will be allowed to remain anonymous.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8fl (KSTU)

State Treasurer Damschen writes in favor of Amendment B.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8eZ (DN)

U.S. Supreme Court will hear the transgender school case out of Virginia.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8eG (NYT)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/8eH (Fox)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/8eI (Politico)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/8eJ (WaPo)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/8eK (WSJ)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/8fp (AP)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/8fr (Ed Week)

Did ENR just hear a mad rush for resumes? Hawaii is looking for a new state superintendent.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8eN (Garden Island)

But then again, a lot of urban school districts are looking for new superintendents, too.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8fn (AP)

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TODAY’S HEADLINES
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UTAH

Davis School District aims to address digital learning gaps with grant money

More Utah students may get access to breakfast in the classroom

Utah adolescents with autism get own ‘high school,’ prevocational education

Judge allows LGBT students in lawsuit against Utah to be anonymous

Ogden School Board hears district successes

Utah surpasses nation in number of students passing AP exams

SUU bringing STEAM to local youth

Burch Creek Elementary students learn through hands-on STEM building projects

Whitesides Elementary students get into Halloween spirit with ‘Thriller’

Davis Applied Technology College approves fee increase for welding courses

Fired Utah teacher sues school district for alleged discrimination
Courts » He says his age, health problems led to his dismissal.

Award-winning author Anthony Doerr headlines Ogden School District fundraiser

Foreign exchange student, Utah host die in falls at Bridal Veil Falls

Sandy middle school trying to recover from school shooting

High School Band Brings State Championship Back Home
Bingham High School’s marching Band has been crowned State Champs for 2016

Preschoolers sing Halloween songs at Senior Citizens Center

OPINION & COMMENTARY

Amendment B will make a big difference in Utah classrooms

Utah education is falling behind nation, and we need commit more dollars

Without good sex ed, Utah’s youths head to porn sites for info

My son was sent home because of a drawing; should I be worried?

Tribune’s take on trust land sale was inaccurate

Show some respect for the UEA

We need Jennifer Graviet on the Utah State Board of Education

Blair changed a student’s life. Now he recommends her for the Ogden School Board

Nudges That Help Struggling Students Succeed

The Need to Validate Vocational Interests
Assuming college is always the best option turns career-minded students away from true learning.

3 TVs and No Food: Growing Up Poor in America
The presidential candidates should be talking about poverty. Here’s why.

NATION

Supreme Court to Rule in Transgender Access Case

Struggling new teachers pose dilemma for schools

Quitting School: Turnover Rises for Urban Superintendents

Search may begin for new schools boss
Superintendent Matayoshi’s contract expires June 30

DPI candidate signs pledge to eliminate Education Department

Map: Tracking the Common Core State Standards

When Can State Tax Dollars Go to Church-Run Programs?

High school on Oracle’s campus turns education on its head
Bay Area high school students will soon be able to attend school on a tech campus, with a curriculum that turns traditional education on its head.

Mom sues Iowa Park school district over son’s death

Justices Sympathetic to Girl Suing School Over Service Dog

Girl’s Football Hopes Sacked by Rules on Competing with Boys

When ‘Jeopardy!’ comes to school

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UTAH NEWS
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Davis School District aims to address digital learning gaps with grant money

FARMINGTON — The Davis School District has applied for a Digital Teaching and Learning Grant to address gaps in digital education.
The state grant would mean about $3 million over three years. Grant administrator Don Beatty said the district will find out if they get the money in early December, after receiving state feedback and making a few minor tweaks.
Beatty said the grant is qualifying, not competitive, so as long as their application meets every requirement they will receive the money.
“We want to show we can spend it responsibly but gather data to show it’s effective,” he said.
The goal is to address three specific areas district-wide: IT infrastructure, personalized learning for teachers and digital curriculum development. The ultimate goal is to build and enhance modern learning environments.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8f2 (OSE)


More Utah students may get access to breakfast in the classroom

SALT LAKE CITY — More than half of the kids getting free or reduced-price lunch at Utah schools are forgoing breakfast — at least the one their schools are offering at no extra charge.
Low participation rates in breakfast served at schools is something the state has struggled with for a while, ranking dead last among other states in recent years.
And it isn’t because the kids aren’t hungry.
“The expectation to get kids to school early when parents are trying to fit that into an already hectic schedule is hard to overcome,” said Marti Woolford, with Utahns Against Hunger.
The group has been advocating for serving breakfast in the classroom, where all kids have access to it without the stigma of “being poor,” she said, or having to get to school early to partake.
Six of 21 elementary schools in the Salt Lake City School District are already serving breakfast in the classroom. It makes a visible difference in the attitudes of students.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8eU (DN)

http://gousoe.uen.org/8fi (KSL)


Utah adolescents with autism get own ‘high school,’ prevocational education

SALT LAKE CITY — Graduating from high school can be momentous for any teenager, but for many with special needs, specifically autism, the milestone is called “the cliff” for a reason.
“It’s what parents call that time when their special-needs kids age out of school, leaving all the supportive services families have come to rely on,” said Julia Hood, director at the Carmen B. Pingree Autism Center of Learning.
The uprooting used to happen at the end of elementary school, Hood said, but available services and resources have come a long way.
“And there’s still a long way to go,” she said, adding that the long-term plan is to provide services for people with autism “from birth to death.”
Pingree soon will open an expansion to assist more adolescents with autism — tripling enrollment to serve up to 30 students ages 13 to 18.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8eT (DN)

http://gousoe.uen.org/8fj (KSL)


Judge allows LGBT students in lawsuit against Utah to be anonymous

SALT LAKE CITY — A federal judge has allowed three students who are part of a lawsuit against the state of Utah over its so-called “No Promo Homo” law to remain anonymous.
U.S. Magistrate Judge Brooke Wells issued a protective order on Friday, allowing the students to proceed in the lawsuit using the pseudonyms “John Doe,” “James Doe” and “Jane Doe.” The judge also allowed their parents to be referred to under pseudonyms in court filings and arguments.
Their identities will be disclosed to the Utah Attorney General’s Office, which is representing the state in the lawsuit, which may disclose them to members of the school districts or Utah State School Board, “but only if and when such disclosure is necessary to litigate this action,” Judge Wells wrote.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8fl (KSTU)


Ogden School Board hears district successes

Several schools in the Ogden School District celebrated achievements and successes at a Board of Education meeting this week.
In purple shirts to show their school pride, the students and teachers of Polk Elementary School went before the board to celebrate receiving some of the highest scores in the district last year on the state’s Student Assessment of Growth and Excellence test, also known as SAGE.
SAGE tests cover English, math and science and students are graded as either below proficient, approaching proficient, proficient or highly proficient. The results for the previous year are released every fall by the Utah State Board of Education.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8f4 (OSE)


Utah surpasses nation in number of students passing AP exams

SALT LAKE CITY — The College Board, a nonprofit organization that connects students to college success, reports a total of 25,142 Utah public school students took a total of 38,685 advanced placement exams in 2016, a 6 percent overall increase from 2015.
In addition, 66 percent of students who took the tests earned scores of 3, 4 or 5, good enough to earn college credit, according to the board. Nationally, just 55.9 percent of public school students scored a 3, 4 or 5 on AP exams in 2016, the College Board noted.
Because of recent changes in demographic reporting by the College Board, it is difficult to gauge the change in Utah’s ethnic and racial participation in AP exams. There was, however, a 10 percent increase in students eligible for free and reduced-price lunch participating in AP exams over 2015 totals. Students who are economically disadvantaged now account for nearly 8 percent of AP test takers in Utah public schools, College Board data shows.
The Alpine, Canyons, Davis, Duchesne, and Ogden school districts were all recognized by the board for simultaneously increasing access to AP courses to more students while increasing passing rates. This marks the fifth year in a row Davis has been recognized and the fourth time for Alpine. Canyons and Duchesne were both on the list last year as well as this year.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8eV (DN)


SUU bringing STEAM to local youth

Elementary students overran Cedar City this weekend as Southern Utah University was host to the second annual STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts and mathematics) Festival.
The festival provided students of all ages an opportunity to work with professionals and college students in several fields to learn about possible job opportunities for their future.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8fc (SGS)

http://gousoe.uen.org/8fy (Iron County Today)


Burch Creek Elementary students learn through hands-on STEM building projects

The first group of sixth-grade students at Burch Creek Elementary School wasn’t having much luck Thursday morning as they tried to build sturdy towers using only straws, pins and paper clips.
Even though Jack Hale’s square contraption continued to topple, he kept trying
“Is it OK to fail?” Darin Vincent, a classroom volunteer, asked.
“Yeah, so you learn from your mistakes,” Jack said.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8f5 (OSE)


Whitesides Elementary students get into Halloween spirit with ‘Thriller’

LAYTON — Even though it was supposed to be a flash mob, the students of Whitesides Elementary School were lined up and ready to dance well before the first chords of “Thriller” began to play.
As the music boomed across the playground, a large group of students followed the direction of physical education teacher Samantha Bradd, moving and shaking to Michael Jackson’s iconic dance moves from the “Thriller” music video.
Bradd, a first-year teacher, said she wanted to show her students there are other ways to get exercise besides playing sports.
“I can’t decide if I want to make this an annual tradition or if I want to change it up every year, but the kids really love it and I think exposing them to different kinds of exercise is really good for them,” she said. “They find what works for them because not all kids love soccer or basketball.”
http://gousoe.uen.org/8f0 (OSE)


Davis Applied Technology College approves fee increase for welding courses

The Davis Applied Technical College is increasing student fees for welding courses, effective Jan. 1.
At a board of directors meeting Thursday, board member Will Pierce said the community partner the college works with, Lincoln Electric, has decreased the amount of materials it provides to students for free to $20,000.
Historically, the business has given between $50,000 and $60,000, so because of the decrease, students will have to pay for more for the materials and equipment they learn with.
Fee increases vary widely by class, but will increase overall by an average of 5 percent as of Jan. 1. The school offers about 40 different welding classes, according to its website.

The DATC Clery Report, an annual mandatory security report, shows there were two liquor law violations and one drug arrest on campus property.
Security and Risk Management Coordinator Andy Fresh said the alcohol incident involved two high school students in the college’s auto shop program, and the drug-related incident didn’t involve students, but was included in the report because it happened on DATC property.

The new director of Career Path High School, Stacey Hutchings, was also introduced to the board. Since she took the job, the percentage of students there enrolling at DATC has risen to 63 percent; it had historically never been higher than 43 percent.
Career Path High School is located on the DATC campus.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8f3 (OSE)


Fired Utah teacher sues school district for alleged discrimination
Courts » He says his age, health problems led to his dismissal.

A former teacher filed a lawsuit this week against the Carbon School District asking for $1.1 million after he says he was discriminated against and fired due to health problems and age.
Joseph Jamison, who started working for the school district in 1999, was diagnosed with liver disease in 2007, according to the lawsuit filed in U.S. District Court.
Over the next few years, “a rift began to slowly develop between” the teacher and his middle school principal, Tom Montoya, as Jamison “declined to take on additional after-school extracurricular duties … after contract teaching hours.”
After one particular instance of this, someone informed the teacher that Montoya had “openly stated that he intended to find a way to fire Jamison,” the suit states. Jamison filed a civil rights complaint through the teachers union.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8fx (SLT)


Award-winning author Anthony Doerr headlines Ogden School District fundraiser

OGDEN — Award-winning author Anthony Doerr is adding his name to a long list of writers who have attended the Ogden School District Foundation’s annual Fall Author Event.
The event is the foundation’s largest fundraiser every year, drawing about 1,000 people in recent years and filling the Ogden Eccles Conference Center. Other authors who have attended include Ray Bradbury, Amy Tan, Neil Gaiman and Ken Burns.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8f1 (OSE)


Foreign exchange student, Utah host die in falls at Bridal Veil Falls

PROVO CANYON — A Chinese foreign exchange student and a member of his host family died in separate falls at Bridal Veil Falls on Saturday, police said.
Kedi Chen, 14, was found dead after officers arrived at the scene Saturday evening. Hikers found Chen and called police at approximately 6:45 p.m., according to Utah County Sheriff’s Sgt. Spencer Cannon.
Police at that time also reported that 28-year-old Brandon Reas, of Springville, was missing. Reas’ body was found about 7:45 a.m. Sunday, police said.
Chen was a foreign exchange student from China and had been living in Nara, Japan. He arrived in Utah on Saturday and planned to be in Springville just a few days as part of the short-term exchange program, police said.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8eX (DN)

http://gousoe.uen.org/8eY (SLT)

http://gousoe.uen.org/8f6 (OSE)

http://gousoe.uen.org/8f9 (PDH)

http://gousoe.uen.org/8fd (KUTV)

http://gousoe.uen.org/8fg (KTVX)

http://gousoe.uen.org/8fh (KSL)

http://gousoe.uen.org/8fk (KSTU)

http://gousoe.uen.org/8fz (Gephardt Daily)


Sandy middle school trying to recover from school shooting

A Sandy middle school still reeling from a tragic shooting get’s a message of hope today, from a man who knows something about being bullied.
Lance Allred, who was born deaf, became the very first deaf player to make it to the NBA. He retired last year and now speaks to kids as a motivational speaker.
“We are going to take one very long breath and hold it for ten seconds,” he told the group of sixth through eighth graders gathered for the special assembly. “You got a lot of emotions in here and we are going to work through them.”
http://gousoe.uen.org/8fe (KUTV)


High School Band Brings State Championship Back Home
Bingham High School’s marching Band has been crowned State Champs for 2016

SOUTH JORDAN, Utah – The conquering heroes returned home late Sunday to Bingham High School.
The Bingham High Marching Band were crowned State Champs over the weekend in St. George.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8ff (KTVX)


Preschoolers sing Halloween songs at Senior Citizens Center

Every October, the preschoolers and kindergartners of Morningside School dress up in their Halloween costumes and march next door to the Cache County Senior Citizens Center to sing spooky songs.
This year, the children held hands as they paraded into the cafeteria on Thursday morning, where senior citizens were drinking their morning tea and having breakfast.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8fa (LHJ)


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OPINION & COMMENTARY
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Amendment B will make a big difference in Utah classrooms
Deseret News op-ed by David Damschen, Utah’s state treasurer

In Utah, simple solutions for funding public education are hard to find. Robust enrollment growth in our schools presents a constant challenge to policymakers and taxpayers. This is where Constitutional Amendment B comes in — it is a small and prudent change to how certain non-tax education funds are distributed and invested that will make a big difference in Utah classrooms, and it is available for voters to approve on this year’s ballot.
Key to Amendment B’s impact is that it improves funding for the School LAND Trust program — a strictly controlled (and monitored) program administered at the local level by school community councils. The money goes straight to local public and charter schools, bypassing any form of bureaucracy, and is applied directly to each school’s most critical academic needs. This is why these are the most effectively and efficiently applied resources in Utah’s public education system.
These distributions to schools come from the $2 billion permanent State School Fund, purposed solely for funding public education in Utah and invested for growth and stability by a team of seasoned institutional investment professionals.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8eZ


Utah education is falling behind nation, and we need commit more dollars
Salt Lake Tribune op-ed by Matthew Weinstein, State Priorities Partnership Director at Voices for Utah Children

This month saw the publication of new state and federal data on high school graduation rates for the 2014-15 school year. “Utah high school graduation rate above average: 84.8 percent” crowed the headline of the Associated Press coverage carried in many Utah newspapers. But a closer look at the data reveals a more troubling picture.
For the nation as a whole, high school graduation rates have been rising steadily in recent years. When broken out by race and ethnicity, the data show progress across the board, but also substantial disparities.
Here are the data for U.S. high school graduation rates in 2015: U.S. overall, 83.2 percent; whites, 87.6 percent; Latinos, 77.8 percent; Asian Americans/Pacific Islanders, 90.2 percent; African Americans, 74.6 percent; American Indians, 71.6 percent.
And here are the equivalent data for Utah in 2015: Utah overall, 84.8 percent; whites, 87.4 percent; Latinos 74.4 percent, Asian Americans/Pacific Islanders, 86.0 percent; African Americans, 70.0 percent; American Indians, 70.0 percent.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8eE


Without good sex ed, Utah’s youths head to porn sites for info
Salt Lake Tribune op-ed by Alisha Worthington, sex educator, author and graduate student at the USC Suzanne Dwvorak-Peck School of Social Work

Utah teens and their families are living in another desert of sorts — an information desert about human sexuality. Kids thirsting for information about this most basic topic will keep looking until they find it, even if it means going to an internet porn site.
When Gov. Gary Herbert signed resolution S.C.R.9 declaring pornography a “health crisis” on the heels of defeated legislation that would have enhanced sex education in Utah, the state effectively wiped out the ability for teens and families to get access to quality information locally.
With the alarming rise of sexually transmitted infections, as reported by the CDC, it’s more crucial than ever to provide quality sex education. Instead, Utah has unintentionally created a scenario in which the very thing the Legislature is hoping to avoid — internet porn use among kids and teens — is almost the only option available for information. And, we all know most pornography isn’t even close to reality, especially the reality parents would like their kids to know.
Moreover, by stating that pornography is something “the individual cannot overcome without assistance” (S.C.R. 9) we further damage a teen’s ability to seek education and help by labeling him or her an “addict” from the beginning. Even the American Psychiatric Association has declined to include “sex addict” as an official diagnosis in the DSM-5 due to inconclusive research.
The fact that the Utah Legislature decided to base a resolution lacking crucial evidence is irresponsible and diverts attention from the real issue ­— delivering quality information to an underserved population.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8eQ


My son was sent home because of a drawing; should I be worried?
(St. George) Spectrum commentary by columnist Scott Jakubowski

Question: My son was recently sent home for drawing a picture of a guy shooting another guy. He’s only in 2nd grade and the picture was not that detailed or anything. It seemed pretty harmless to me. In fact, I think both of the figures in the drawing were smiling. Call me old-fashioned, but his picture doesn’t seem like a problem. His teacher said that their policy is one of no-tolerance when it comes to violence. I’ve seen some of the horrible things that happen in the world today, but come on. Don’t we still need to use a little common sense in judging these things? Or am I wrong? My son seems very well adjusted to me. He is kind, he loves his older sister and little brother. He listens well (well, for a 7-year-old). I think it’s really ridiculous. With that said, I don’t want to be naïve. Should I be worried about this? I doubt parents of kids who go shooting up schools ever expected their kids to do that kind of thing. Is there something I’m missing? I don’t think there’s a problem here, but I would hate to be wrong. What do you think?
http://gousoe.uen.org/8fb


Tribune’s take on trust land sale was inaccurate
Salt Lake Tribune letter from Aaron C. Garrett

I recently read an article in The Salt Lake Tribune entitled “Hunters, conservation groups decry privatization of beloved Utah lands as SITLA sale nets $5.5M.” One of the pictures associated with the article showed Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell viewing some petroglyphs. These petroglyphs are on BLM land, not land that was sold in the auction. Another of the photographs stated in the caption that the “sale has drawn criticism from sportsmen and conservationists who say these lands should remain public,” and the title of the article itself insinuated the lands were public lands by referencing privatization.
In fact, school trust lands are private lands which are held in trust by the state to be used to generate revenue for Utah’s schools.
Whether these lands should be sold or continue to be held in trust is a legitimate question, and so is the types of uses to which these lands should be put to accomplish that goal. However, when The Tribune places inaccurate information about school trust lands into the public forum it makes an already contentious issue even more so and precludes the constructive dialogue that should take place around how we use these lands.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8eR


Show some respect for the UEA
Salt Lake Tribune letter from Connie Anderson

It seems the Utah Technology Council wants voters to believe that Utah Education Association is full of villains when in reality it is full of, well, teachers. They want you to believe that UEA doesn’t have a right to support and endorse state school board candidates that actually know the important issues of public education.
What baloney!
I am a retired teacher (28 years) and chose to be a lifetime member of UEA. My daughter is a first-year teacher and she joined UEA. We’re just regular people who want to make a difference in the lives of children. Show some respect, would you?
http://gousoe.uen.org/8eS


We need Jennifer Graviet on the Utah State Board of Education
(Ogden) Standard-Examiner letter from Marlene Barnett

Your official ballot has a pleasant surprise — a nonpartisan section. Don’t miss it! It is perhaps the one place where your vote can make a big difference. One of the candidates is extraordinarily well qualified and needed on the Utah State Board of Education.
If the names are unfamiliar and you don’t know which to choose, prepare to be amazed. Jennifer Graviet was Weber School District’s 2012 Teacher of the Year, and runner-up for Utah’s State Teacher of the Year. Her list of awards for teaching excellence is a long one, including an educational trip to schools in China to represent Utah.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8f8


Blair changed a student’s life. Now he recommends her for the Ogden School Board
(Ogden) Standard-Examiner letter from Jackson Trotter

I want to encourage people to vote for Nancy Blair for the Ogden School Board. When I was in second grade, I had Mrs. Blair as a teacher. That year sticks out in my life. She had a way of teaching things that just made me remember them. I had a great year that year and I really started to get things that I hadn’t gotten quite yet. A lot of people felt the same way.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8f7


Nudges That Help Struggling Students Succeed
New York Times op-ed by David L. Kirp, professor at the University of California, Berkeley

When I was in high school, I earned A’s in all my math classes — until I took calculus. In algebra and geometry, I could coast on memorizing formulas, but now I had to think for myself.
It was disastrous, culminating in my getting a charity “C,” and I barely passed my college calculus class.
The reason, I was convinced, was that I didn’t have a math mind. I have avoided the subject ever since.
It turns out that I got it wrong. While it’s unlikely that I could have become a math whiz, it wasn’t my aptitude for math that was an impediment; it was my belief that I had the impediment to begin with.
I’m not the only person convinced that he can’t like math. Millions of college freshmen flunk those courses and, because algebra is often required, many drop out of school altogether. A report from the Mathematical Association of America flagged math as “the most significant barrier” to graduation.
This fatalistic equation can be altered.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8eL


The Need to Validate Vocational Interests
Assuming college is always the best option turns career-minded students away from true learning.
Atlantic commentary by ASHLEY LAMB-SINCLAIR, 2016 Kentucky Teacher of the Year

At a recent conference, I listened to a university president boast about a program she had developed in partnership with several local high schools. She told the story of one teenager who lived in a rural area and worked full time on his family’s farm in addition to attending high school. The university president explained that the young man had little promise for attending college because of his circumstances. But through the dual-credit program, he was able to gain college credit while still in high school, which gave him the confidence to seek an associate’s degree in agriculture and return home to work on his family farm. I listened as she proudly told this young man’s story and the audience cheered for both of them, and all I could think was: What an extraordinary waste of time.
It may be shocking for a veteran high-school teacher to feel that a student gaining any kind of degree is a waste of time, but considering that 44 percent of recent college graduates are underemployed, and many employers such as Deloitte are now completely ditching college degrees as a requirement altogether, it is becoming increasingly difficult to sell the same old story—working hard to make good grades to go to college to get a good job—to millennials. When I think of the young agriculture student in the aforementioned anecdote, my heart hurts for him because I believe the system misled him. I wonder if he acquired any college debt during this journey, why he didn’t feel the need to continue on to attain a bachelor’s degree, and why it was necessary for a young man who grew up on a family farm to learn about agriculture miles away in a community-college classroom. I would feel a bit better if he wanted to be a teacher, or photographer, or engineer, and that’s why he went to college, but he didn’t. He went to learn something he probably already knew, but chances are no one had ever validated his expertise, and no one had ever found a way for his secondary education to be integrated into the work he loved.
Obviously, the counterargument here is the largely touted maxim that people with college degrees make more money than those without them, which is statistically true. But this idea is misleading: Crushing student-loan debt increases yearly and ethnicity, class, and gender factor into salary levels, regardless of education. And low-income kids can become “targets for diploma mills that load them up with debt, but not a lot of prospects.”
http://gousoe.uen.org/8fv


3 TVs and No Food: Growing Up Poor in America
The presidential candidates should be talking about poverty. Here’s why.
New York Times commentary by columnist Nicholas Kristof

PINE BLUFF, Ark. — Here’s the kind of person whom America’s presidential candidates just don’t talk about: a sweet, grinning, endangered 13­year­old boy named Emanuel Laster.
Emanuel has three televisions in his room, two of them gargantuan large­screen models. But there is no food in the house. As for the TVs, at least one doesn’t work, and the electricity was supposed to be cut off for nonpayment on the day I visited his house here in Pine Bluff: Emanuel’s mother deployed her pit bull terrier in the yard in hopes of deterring the utility man. (This seemed to work.)
The home, filthy and chaotic with a broken front door, reeks of marijuana. The televisions and Emanuel’s bed add an aspirational middle­class touch, but they were bought on credit and are at risk of being repossessed. The kitchen is stacked with dirty dishes, and not much else.
“I just go hungry,” Emanuel explained.
If Emanuel were in Aleppo, Syria, maybe we would — briefly, ineffectually — fret about his plight or discuss it in a presidential debate. But he inhabits the rubble of our domestic no man’s land of poverty, narcotics and hopelessness, and so he is invisible.
“I’d like to go to college,” said Emanuel, who earns A’s and B’s in school. “I’d be the first in my family. I want to be a police officer, or a fireman or a judge.” But, he acknowledged, there isn’t a single book in the house.
Emanuel’s ambition is commendable, but children of poverty face treacherous obstacles to success.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8eF


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NATIONAL NEWS
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Supreme Court to Rule in Transgender Access Case
New York Times

WASHINGTON — The Supreme Court on Friday entered the national debate over transgender rights, announcing that it would decide whether a transgender boy may use the boys’ bathroom in a Virginia high school.
The court is acting just a year after it established a constitutional right to same-sex marriage, as state laws and federal actions on transgender rights have prompted a welter of lawsuits. In taking the case, the court signaled that it may move more quickly in the area of transgender rights than it has in expanding gay rights.
The public debate has been ignited, in part, by a North Carolina law that requires transgender people to use bathrooms in government buildings that correspond with the gender listed on their birth certificates, a statute that has drawn protests, boycotts and lawsuits.
The case revolves around how the Obama administration is entitled to interpret a federal regulation under a 1972 law that bans discrimination “on the basis of sex” in schools that receive federal money. The legal question is whether it can also ban discrimination based on gender identity.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8eG

http://gousoe.uen.org/8eH (Fox)

http://gousoe.uen.org/8eI (Politico)

http://gousoe.uen.org/8eJ (WaPo)

http://gousoe.uen.org/8eK (WSJ)

http://gousoe.uen.org/8fp (AP)

http://gousoe.uen.org/8fr (Ed Week)


Struggling new teachers pose dilemma for schools
San Francisco Chronicle

Principal Susan Ritter agonized over the decision she had to make: Should she keep four struggling new teachers on staff at San Francisco’s Balboa High School, or get rid of them at the end of the school year?
The choice was difficult.
If she let the probationary teachers remain, it would mean leaving the four floundering in classrooms while they headed for tenure, making it harder to remove them later if they didn’t improve. If she let them go, she would have to search for replacements amid a broad teacher shortage and probably end up with equally inexperienced educators when school started in the fall.
Principals face this dilemma across the state every year, with hundreds of new teachers — often those working with the neediest students — losing their jobs less than two years after starting their careers.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8eM


Quitting School: Turnover Rises for Urban Superintendents
Associated Press

NEW HAVEN, Conn. — As the architect of school reform in New Haven, Superintendent Garth Harries appeared to be making progress. Test scores were up, dropout rates were down, and a new teacher evaluation system became a national model.
But after only slightly more than three years, and clashes with members of the city’s Board of Education, Harries is stepping down Monday.
He lasted about as long as the average for superintendents in urban American school districts, a turnover rate that has been on the rise. While the churn reflects growing strains on leaders in the largest and neediest school systems, it also adds to the challenges by disrupting improvement plans that are measured over years, not months.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8fn


Search may begin for new schools boss
Superintendent Matayoshi’s contract expires June 30
(Lihue, HI) The Garden Island

Hawaii’s Board of Education announced it plans to start discussions to search for a new superintendent during its general business meeting Tuesday.
This action has left some in the department shocked by the decision to conduct a search instead of offering Superintendent Kathryn Matayoshi a contract extension.
“This is the first time that the board has not indicated an extension,” said Donalyn Dela Cruz, Hawaii Department of Education spokeswoman. “We’re all mystified by what’s happening.”
Matayoshi’s contract expires on June 30. She has served as the state’s superintendent since 2010.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8eN


DPI candidate signs pledge to eliminate Education Department
Minot (ND) Daily News

MINOT — A candidate for North Dakota’s superintendent of public instruction said he signed a pledge distributed by a group that wants to put an end to the U.S. Department of Education.
Joe Chiang, a math teacher for the Four Winds School District, is opposing incumbent Kirsten Baesler for a four-year term in office.
The U.S. Parents Involved in Education group has asked candidates at every level of government to sign the pledge “to reject all federal mandates tied to federal funding,” and “fight against federally mandated curriculum, standardized tests, and all illegal and unconstitutional mandates from the federal Department of Education.”
Chiang said last week that he did sign the pledge. It was “more a matter of the spirit of what they’re trying to do than what I would be able to do in the office,” he said.
The state superintendent of public instruction has no direct ability to end the U.S. Department of Education.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8eO


Map: Tracking the Common Core State Standards
Education Week

Confused about the status of the Common Core State Standards? You’re not alone.
Since we published an update last year about the status of the English/language arts and math standards across 50 states and the District of Columbia, there’s been a fair bit of activity regarding the standards. Although the national backlash to the common core seems to have cooled a little bit in recent months, several states have announced some kind of change to the standards due to state legislation, governors’ directives, or other reasons.
The map below represents our best judgment about the nominal status of the common core across the country. In addition to the map, see our drop-down menu below for information about how different states are handling the common core.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8fq


When Can State Tax Dollars Go to Church-Run Programs?
Stateline

Do state laws that prevent taxpayer dollars from aiding churches automatically exclude religious institutions from all state programs — even if it’s one to resurface a playground at a day care center?
In answering that question, the U.S. Supreme Court could put states in the position of spending public money for services provided by churches or other religious organizations despite their own constitutional bans on the practice. Or, many states fear, it could jeopardize a multitude of programs, in which state and local governments provide tax dollars to religious groups via school vouchers or through payments for social services.
“If money goes to religion in some capacity, when is that OK and when is it not OK? This is a sort of ‘Where’s the line?’ case,” said Lisa Soronen with the State and Local Legal Center, which represents organizations like the National Conference of State Legislatures (NCSL) and the National Governors Association.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8fs


High school on Oracle’s campus turns education on its head
Bay Area high school students will soon be able to attend school on a tech campus, with a curriculum that turns traditional education on its head.
CNN/Money

Design Tech High School’s (d.tech) official home is still just a skeleton nestled up to Oracle’s headquarters in Redwood City, California, but come next year, it will open its doors to students. It will be the first U.S. high school on a technology company’s campus.
Oracle is funding the construction of d.tech, and has been involved with the school since its inception.
Founded in 2014, the public high school takes a unique approach to education — letting students learn and create projects at their own pace. Teachings are centered on “design thinking,” which finds solutions through empathy, experimentation and evidence-based problem solving, similar to what’s taught at Stanford’s Hasso Plattner Institute of Design (d.school).
http://gousoe.uen.org/8fw


Mom sues Iowa Park school district over son’s death
Wichita Falls (TX) Times Record News

An Iowa Park woman whose son committed suicide has sued the Iowa Park Consolidated Independent School District, claiming the district did nothing to prevent the bullying and discrimination she says led to her son’s death.
Roxanne Jones filed the suit Tuesday in federal court in Wichita Falls, claiming the school district violated T.G. Garcia’s constitutional rights.
The suit alleges that because T.G., 14, was of mixed ethnic origin, “was extremely slender and had a very exuberant personality that many perceived as being ‘feminine’ or ‘girly’,” he was subjected to bullying on almost a daily basis.
T.G. died of a self-inflicted gunshot wound at the family’s home on Oct. 26, 2014.
“T.G.’s nuclear family and his stepfather made sure the school knew about the bullying and were advised by the Vice Principal that ‘boys will be boys.’ As a result, no actions or resolutions were taken by the school,” the suit claims.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8eP


Justices Sympathetic to Girl Suing School Over Service Dog
Associated Press

WASHINGTON — The Supreme Court appears sympathetic to a 12-year-old Michigan girl with cerebral palsy who wants to sue school officials for refusing to let her bring a service dog to class.
Most of the justices hearing arguments in the case Monday seemed to agree that federal disability laws allow Ehlena Fry to pursue the case in court.
Lower courts ruled against her, saying the dispute over the fluffy white goldendoodle named Wonder first had to go through a lengthy administrative process.
The issue is important to disability groups that want to remove cumbersome hurdles that they say discourage people from pursuing their legal rights.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8fm


Girl’s Football Hopes Sacked by Rules on Competing with Boys
Associated Press

NEW YORK — Alison Rogers raced across the field, a touchdown-saving tackle in her line of sight.
It was her favorite moment of the season she spent playing middle school football. Rogers, a cornerback from Ethical Culture Fieldston School in New York, brought a boy to the ground and a crowd to its feet.
“All of the parents went insane,” she said.
Now Alison can’t get on the field at all.
The issue isn’t her ability to compete with boys. It’s whether she should be allowed.
New York state rules governing mixed gender competition require an extra physical fitness performance test for girls, clear in their intent but not in their application. Alison, 13, declined to repeat it this year and has been prevented from rejoining her teammates.
The dispute has highlighted an unusual tension between bureaucratic rules designed to protect students while giving girls the chance to play traditionally male-dominated sports.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8fo


When ‘Jeopardy!’ comes to school
Los Angeles Times

It was a cloudy weekday evening at Van Nuys Middle School in the San Fernando Valley. Fallen leaves dotted the campus, and a brief drizzle speckled windshields.
After school ended, over 100 students crowded into the auditorium, faces painted blue, pom-poms in hand, to cheer on their friends in a simulated version of the game show “Jeopardy!”
The tradition started last year, when a parent with a connection to the show proposed the idea to the school’s magnet coordinator, Joshua Rosenthal.
This year, over 1,000 students at the school took a qualifying test. On Thursday, finalists from each grade faced off. When school ended, it was time for the final battle: the sixth-, seventh- and eighth-grade champions played against one another.
That’s how sixth-grader Juan Muldong, seventh-grader Andrew Espinoza, and eighth-grader Anka Trendafilova wound up wearing matching blue T-shirts, standing side by side, heads nervously bobbing.
At stake: a seat in a Long Beach schools version of the game show’s Tournament of Champions, two tickets to anywhere JetBlue travels, and pride.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8fu


————————————————————
CALENDAR
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USOE Calendar
http://www.schools.utah.gov/main/CALENDAR.aspx

UEN News
http://www.uen.org

November 3:
Utah State Board of Education study session, USDB and committee meetings
2:15 p.m., 250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspx

November 4:
Utah State Board of Education meeting
8 a.m., 250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspx

November 10:
Utah State Charter School Board meeting
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://go.uen.org/62M

November 15:
Executive Appropriations Committee meeting
2 p.m., 445 State Capitol
http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2016&com=APPEXE

November 16:
Education Interim Committee meeting
1:15 p.m., 30 House Building
http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2016&com=INTEDU

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