Education News Roundup: Nov. 02 – 2016

Reid P. Newey. Photo courtesy of Davis School District office.

Reid P. Newey. Photo courtesy of Davis School District office.

Today’s Top Picks:

 

Congratulations to Reid Newey on his new appointment as the superintendent of Davis School District.

http://gousoe.uen.org/8g9 (SLTrib)

http://gousoe.uen.org/8gd (SE)

 

Utah County residents to see 11 school district-level options on election ballot http://gousoe.uen.org/8gh (DH)

 

Utah mom creates toy to help kids learn how to code http://gousoe.uen.org/8go (KSL)

 

The PG-13 Reporters Covering an R-Rated Election http://gousoe.uen.org/8gt (NYT)

 

New standards contribute to academic improvement in many states, report asserts http://gousoe.uen.org/8gx (EdSource)

 

 

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TODAY’S HEADLINES

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UTAH

 

‘Children should be prepared to compete intellectually, creatively and technically’: Davis School District Board of Education chooses new superintendent

 

State school board considering new challenge to athlete transfer rule Amended plan » Governing body, state board working on compromise that could loosen restrictions.

 

Photos: Utah students cast vote in mock presidential election

 

Reid Newey named as Davis School District superintendent

 

How local school districts teach sex ed without breaking Utah school board rule

 

Utah Valley Student of the Week: Tyler Andrew

 

Utah Valley Educator of the Week: Nikki Carpenter

 

Utah County residents to see 11 school district-level options on election ballot

 

Utah mom creates toy to help kids learn how to code

 

Teen charged in school shooting remains in custody following hearing

 

Lockdown lifted at Timpview, Edgemont and Canyon Crest after neighborhood police situation

 


OPINION & COMMENTARY

 

Teen cheerleader blunder offers a teachable moment in world that’s forgetting hard-won lessons

 

Local bond requests are not reasonable

 

Johnson passionate about education

 

Rival School Helps Marching Band Deliver “Peak” Performance

 

6 reasons to study abroad at Wasatch Academy in Utah Wasatch Academy’s picture

 

How schools can teach kids to value food

 


NATION

 

Woman held against her will saved by daughter who took note to school

 

The PG-13 Reporters Covering an R-Rated Election

 

The Complicated History Behind California’s Vote on Bilingual Education

 

The U.S. Department of Education offers a new tool to help schools measure ed tech results

 

New standards contribute to academic improvement in many states, report asserts

 

Battle over charter school ballot question heating up

 

Enrollments in teacher prep programs rise for first time in 13 years

 

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UTAH NEWS

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‘Children should be prepared to compete intellectually, creatively and technically’: Davis School District Board of Education chooses new superintendent Education » Reid Newey’s experience began as a teacher at Clearfield High School.

 

Weber County educator and former Utah State basketball player Reid Newey will serve as the new Davis School District superintendent.

The district’s board of education appointed Newey on Tuesday night, replacing Bryan Bowles, who announced his retirement in July after 14 years in the post.

Newey is an assistant superintendent with Weber School District and was among 10 candidates who interviewed for the position. He is expected to begin his term as superintendent on Dec. 1, according to a news release from Davis School District.

“I believe in educating the ‘whole child’ by proving meaningful, positive experiences with people who are invested and caring,” Newey wrote in his application, according to the release. “Children should be prepared to compete intellectually, creatively and technically in a rapidly changing world.”

http://gousoe.uen.org/8g9 (SLTrib)

 


State school board considering new challenge to athlete transfer rule Amended plan » Governing body, state board working on compromise that could loosen restrictions.

 

Members of the Utah Board of Education are preparing for a rematch with the state’s governing body over high school athletics.

Public agendas for the board’s meetings later this week show a proposed policy amendment that would loosen athlete transfer rules by restricting school membership in the Utah High School Activities Association, or UHSAA.

The amendments come roughly two months after the school board dropped a challenge to the UHSAA’s transfer rule, which prohibits team-switching unless specifically approved through a waiver due to issues like hardship, bullying or a family relocation.

In place of waivers, the latest proposal would establish criteria for an approved transfer, allowing students to maintain eligibility after switching teams due to a death in the family or divorce, or to participate in an academic program at their new school.

http://gousoe.uen.org/8ga (SLTrib)

 


Photos: Utah students cast vote in mock presidential election

 

Fifth-grader Alyse Coon looks at images of the 2016 presidential candidates before voting as part of EveryKidVotes! — the largest student mock election in history — at Ascent Academy in West Jordan on Tuesday. Hundreds of thousands of students across the United States were expected to participate in Tuesday’s event, sponsored by Studies Weekly. Results of the mock election showed Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton with a little more than 68 percent of the vote and 367 electoral votes, compared with GOP candidate Donald Trump’s 31 percent and 171 electoral votes. In the three prior presidential elections, the students have correctly predicted the winning candidate.

http://gousoe.uen.org/8gb (DNews)

 


Reid Newey named as Davis School District superintendent

 

FARMINGTON — Reid P. Newey has been selected to be the Davis School District superintendent of schools.

The announcement was made at a Board of Education meeting Tuesday evening, Nov. 1.

“I can’t tell you how much I appreciate the opportunity to serve Davis School District,” Newey said.

Newey is the assistant superintendent for the Weber School District. His new position is effective Dec. 1.

“After a nationwide search, it’s interesting to me we found someone in our own backyard,” board member Julie Tanner said.

Newey has 28 years of experience in education, starting as teacher at Clearfield High School and going on to serve in administrative positions at Weber High, North Ogden Junior High and Fremont High. He has also worked as the career and technical education director and executive director of secondary education for the Weber School District.

http://gousoe.uen.org/8gd (SE)

 


How local school districts teach sex ed without breaking Utah school board rule

 

About 15 years ago when she was new to the job, Woods Cross High School teacher Judy Allen brought a guest speaker to her sociology class at the request of some of her students to talk about his life as a homosexual man.

During the presentation, the speaker mentioned he had been treated poorly in the public school system, and after a complaint from parents, Allen was reprimanded for breaking a Utah State Board of Education policy which bars advocating for homosexuality.

Earlier this month, the LGBTQ advocacy group Equality Utah filed a lawsuit against the state’s education office in federal court over that very policy.

The incident was removed from Allen’s record and she teaches both sociology and health education classes. This and several other board rules “do more harm than good,” she said.

“I’m afraid, as the lawsuit says, we’re potentially preventing people, teachers, from advocating for young people for fear they’re violating a school board policy,” she said.

http://gousoe.uen.org/8ge (SE)

 


Utah Valley Student of the Week: Tyler Andrew

 

Tyler Andrew began his formal academic journey at Odyssey Charter School in kindergarten. He is now a confident and outgoing sixth-grader, and was chosen by Odyssey Charter School as the Daily Herald’s Utah Valley Student of the Week.

Each year, Tyler has impressed his teachers with his knowledge and desire to learn. Tyler loves school! His learning does not stop when school gets out each day. At home, he continues to read about what they are learning in class and loves to make connections between his learning at school and outside of school. He is a voracious reader and if his mother doesn’t know where he is, he can usually be found reading somewhere.

Tyler is also a very skilled musician. He has played the piano for four years and spends a lot of time playing and improvising songs. He loves to figure out songs he has heard and is skilled at playing by ear.

http://gousoe.uen.org/8gf (DH)

 


Utah Valley Educator of the Week: Nikki Carpenter

 

Nikki Carpenter has been at Odyssey Charter School in various capacities as a parent, volunteer, instructor, and currently as a teacher. She was chosen by Odyssey Charter School as the Daily Herald’s Utah Valley Educator of the Week.

The school has been fortunate to have her as a teacher in kindergarten and now first grade. She always has a smile on her face. She is so patient and kind with her students, and her students love her.

She is always coming up with new projects and ideas to help her first-graders. As you watch her teach, the amount of energy she exudes and the fun she adds to her teaching helps her students succeed at hard things. Carpenter loves teaching and seeing the students learning and understanding new concepts.

http://gousoe.uen.org/8gg (DH)

 


Utah County residents to see 11 school district-level options on election ballot

 

Utah County voters will have their hand in shaping 14 education-based election outcomes Nov. 8, 11 of which are school district-level races.

The educational items on the ballot include three Utah State Board of Education races, nine school district board of education races and a proposed bond in Alpine School District.

School district races are listed below alphabetically by district, with board of education candidates listed in alphabetical order by last name.

http://gousoe.uen.org/8gh (DH)

 


Utah mom creates toy to help kids learn how to code

 

SALT LAKE CITY — About a year ago, Kristy Sevy’s now 9-year-old daughter Kenzie became a little more tech-minded.

“She has always had a strong interest in all things STEM (science, technology, engineering, mathematics),” Sevy said. “She’s always been precocious, asked lots of questions.”

She would ask her mom such questions as, ‘How does cancer spread? How does an egg split in half? How do you code hot lava in ‘Minecraft’? She was asking for things like coding and robotics and things that were just way over my head.”

Sevy had to turn to her phone for answers.

“You should see my Google searches,” she said.

Sevy looked for educational toys which would help satisfy her daughter’s curiosity. She found a Raspberry Pi — not something her grandmother baked — but rather a small computer her daughter could code with.

http://gousoe.uen.org/8go (KSL)

 


Teen charged in school shooting remains in custody following hearing

 

An initial court appearance for a 14-year-old boy accused of shooting another teenager twice in the head was cut short Tuesday, after his attorney requested he not be in the courtroom due to the presence of a TV news camera. The boy’s attorney, Tasha Williams, claimed she had never been informed that there would be a camera and requested the judge issue an order that the defense be informed of media photo requests in the future. Prosecutors did not object to the notion and it was ultimately granted.

According to the prosecution the 14-year-old suspect and Joshua Cordova met for a fight on the grounds of Union Middle School. The teen shot Cordova in the head, then shot him again after he went down to the ground. A teacher who was outside the school at the time of the shooting told detectives that at least three shots were fired, and the gun jammed when attempting to fire a fourth.

http://gousoe.uen.org/8gq (KNRS)

 


Lockdown lifted at Timpview, Edgemont and Canyon Crest after neighborhood police situation

 

A soft lockdown has been lifted at three Provo schools after police responded to a reported hostage situation in the nearby neighborhood.

Just before 11 a.m., the Provo Police Department received a call of a possible hostage situation near 700 East and 3750 North, just one block north of Timpview High and Edgemont Elementary schools and about 10 blocks south of Canyon Crest Elementary.

Police established a perimeter around the house, and received reports of hostages being taken and threats of gun violence. Officers noted there was no indication of gunfire or forced entry in the house.

The house occupants were called out of the house without incident, though several people were taken into custody.

http://gousoe.uen.org/8gr (DH)

 

 

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OPINION & COMMENTARY

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Teen cheerleader blunder offers a teachable moment in world that’s forgetting hard-won lessons Deseret News commentary by Lois M. Collins

 

A lot of things are said in jest when you’re meeting a rival for a football game. But good-natured in intent or not, sometimes things go too far. That happened last week in Hillsboro, Ohio, where cheerleaders reduced a tragic and hateful moment in American history to a one-liner on the football field.

Thanks to social media and the ease with which we circulate each other’s clever or awful communications, most of America knows about the “Trail of Tears” banner some cheerleaders revealed at a football game. The cheer squad at Greenfield-McClain High School held up a banner that read, “Hey, Indians, Get Ready for a Trail of Tears Part 2.” They were referring to the Hillsboro High mascot.

It raises two questions: How could a group of high school students know so little about the Trail of Tears that they failed to see how despicable the sign’s content and context was? And how can it be turned into a teachable moment that’s helpful in a bigger sense?

http://gousoe.uen.org/8gc

 


Local bond requests are not reasonable

Daily Herald letter by Mike Nelson

 

We recently received information about bond issues facing Lehi voters.

The city wants a parks bond of $50 million passed. For our home that amounts to about $240 yearly.

We are also in the Alpine School District, which wants a school bond of $387 million passed, which amounts to about $280 yearly.

If passed they will cost us about $520 yearly, a 21 percent increase in our property taxes.

Increase in area population is behind the bond requests and additional money needs to be raised for our parks and schools. But it brings to mind the recent attempt by Jordan School District to pass a bond issue, which the voters defeated citing the extravagance of the buildings. This year Jordan is proposing a bond issue which is more in line with economy and functionality.

http://gousoe.uen.org/8gk

 


Johnson passionate about education

Herald Journal letter by Dan and Holly Johns

 

Jenny Johnson is running for Logan City School Board, and she has our vote for a few important reasons. She is involved, invested and passionate about our children’s education. There are very few people who have attended as many board meetings as Jenny, and her participation has been significant and needed. Often, we rely on her to convey information from the board meetings to parents and she always delivers a fair assessment with keen insight into the issues that face the Logan schools. She will be a strong, positive force on the board and provide a much needed balance. It is without hesitation that we endorse Jenny Johnson, and encourage you to vote for her as well.

http://gousoe.uen.org/8gm

 


Rival School Helps Marching Band Deliver “Peak” Performance American Fork drum majors give Lone Peak the uniforms off their backs

 

HIGHLAND (ABC4 Utah News) – High school marching bands from all over the state competed at the 2016 Red Rocks Invitational and one band needed some last minute help to deliver a “peak” performance.

Lone Peak High School Band Director Curt McKendrick said his band practiced for 6 months to prepare for the contest.

“It’s just the culmination of all the hard work the kids have put in all year,” McKendrick told ABC4 Utah News.

But last Friday in St. George, disaster stuck.

“As the kids were taking their uniforms off the cart, the drum majors realized they couldn’t find their uniforms,” McKendrick said.

That’s because the two uniforms had been left behind in Highland 275 miles away.

With no uniforms for either of their on-field leaders and the performance just one hour away, the Lone Peak Band was in a major predicament….until members of a rival band gave them the shirts off their backs. And their pants.

http://gousoe.uen.org/8gn (ABC4)

 


6 reasons to study abroad at Wasatch Academy in Utah Wasatch Academy’s picture SI News article

 

Throughout its 141-year history, Mt. Pleasant’s Wasatch Academy in Utah has been far more than just a college preparatory boarding school. Awarded “Best of State” in education for seven years running, Wasatch Academy has, and always will be, an institution that changes lives.           Education shouldn’t just involve classes, tests, and numbers; education is meant to develop students into intelligent, caring citizens with the power to change the world. That’s the core idea behind Wasatch Academy’s educational approach, and it’s one that resonates both in and outside of the classroom.

Let’s take an in-depth look at how Wasatch Academy fosters this approach, especially for international students:

http://gousoe.uen.org/8gs

 


How schools can teach kids to value food It’s well past time we reverse the status quo on food waste. If children really are our future, it’s going to be a wasteful one if we don’t change our ways.

The Christian Science Monitor commentary by Jonathan Bloom

 

There’s much ado about food waste these days. The Obama Administration set an aggressive food waste reduction goal by 2030, five states and a few cities have banned it from landfills, Congress held hearings on the matter, the Ad Council created a suite of “Save the Food” public service ads, and the National Science Foundation just donated US$1 million to tackle the issue.

Yet this activism ignores two key players in the long-term fight against food waste: children and their schools. And if it doesn’t reach kids, today’s “much ado” about food waste might lead to nothing—nothing lasting, at least.

It’s easy to see why school food waste goes unnoticed—America squanders just US$1.2 billion via school lunch annually, a tiny slice of the estimated US$218 billion in food wasted in America each year.

http://gousoe.uen.org/8gw (CSM)

 

 

 

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NATIONAL NEWS

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Woman held against her will saved by daughter who took note to school

 

(CNN) — A piece of torn notebook paper helped free a Louisiana woman who was held against her will in a trailer, police said.

The woman was confined to a trailer that belonged to a family acquaintance “for at least a couple of weeks,” East Feliciana Parish Sheriff Jeff Travis said. Her 11-year-old daughter was with her.

On Tuesday, the mother slipped a note to her daughter that she was scared and being held against her will. The girl brought it to East Feliciana Middle School and gave it to officials, Travis said.

“It’s very alarming when a student shows up with a note asking for help,” Travis said.

The note implied the mother needed help, he added, without providing specifics. “She couldn’t leave. She needed someone to get her out of the situation and she couldn’t talk on the phone.”

http://gousoe.uen.org/8gp (Fox13)

 


The PG-13 Reporters Covering an R-Rated Election

 

A few weeks ago, Erik Weibel was at a Bernie Sanders rally for Hillary Clinton in Pennsylvania when he was accosted by a group of young supporters of Donald J. Trump. The boys surrounded him, jeering and chanting, “Trump! Trump! Trump!” One made a crude comment about Mrs. Clinton.

“They were being really obnoxious, getting right up in my face and shouting things, and I didn’t know how to react,” he said. “My mom stepped in and helped.”

It was just one of the potential pitfalls of being a young campaign reporter during one of the most contentious, polarizing and occasionally perilous elections in history.

Erik is 14, a ninth grader from Benton, Pa. He has been closely tracking the presidential race as a reporter for the children’s book publisher Scholastic, which has dispatched 35 children, ages 10 to 14, to the campaign trail.

http://gousoe.uen.org/8gt (NYT)

 


The Complicated History Behind California’s Vote on Bilingual Education The question of whether immigrants to the U.S. should speak English is an old one

 

As California voters head to the polls this Election Day, one of the propositions on their ballot will be a question with decades of history and conflict behind it: Should the state make it easier for schools to offer bilingual education for students?

The question is a relatively narrow one, but bilingual education has long been an indication of a larger conversation about immigration and language in the United States. Though the subject has not provoked much conflict during the general election season, it was a major point of conflict during the Republican primaries. Donald Trump blasted Jeb Bush for speaking Spanish on the campaign trail, Marco Rubio responded that campaigning in Spanish can be the best way to reach Spanish-speaking voters and Carly Fiorina mistakenly said that English was the official language of the United States.

http://gousoe.uen.org/8gu (TIME)

 


The U.S. Department of Education offers a new tool to help schools measure ed tech results

 

A new tool from the U.S. Department of Education will help school districts rapidly measure the results of education technology.

The Ed Tech Rapid Cycle Evaluation Coach was announced last week at the Blended and Online Learning Symposium in San Antonio, Texas. It’s still in the early stages, so those interested in using the tool must apply to be part of the inaugural group.

Technology vendors tend to make grandiose claims about the usefulness of their programs. But there’s precious little research, aside from marketing materials and vendors’ “studies” of their own programs. Independent, high-quality methods commonly used to study educational programs tend to move slowly. In technology that can be a problem, because technology changes so rapidly – by the time the study is complete the program has likely reinvented itself.

http://gousoe.uen.org/8gv (HR)

 


New standards contribute to academic improvement in many states, report asserts

 

More rigorous standards in math and English language arts have contributed to improved academic achievement for students in many states including in California, a new report asserts.

The analysis looked at improvements in test scores from the 2014-15 school year to the 2015-16 school year. In 2014-15, most states took Common Core-aligned tests for the first time.

“More than 40 states have maintained high standards, and now that we have multiple years of results with high quality assessments, we can see that higher standards are leading to improved outcomes,” said Jim Cowen, executive director of the nonprofit Collaborative for Student Success, which released its report Tuesday.

In California, students took the Smarter Balanced tests, while in other states they took the PARCC and other tests.

Still, the report’s positive conclusions were tempered by noting that despite improvements over the past two years, in most states, including California, less than half of students were meeting standards in both math and English language arts. “There is more work to be done,” Cowen said. “Most kids are not on track and college- and career-ready. But there is upward movement.”

http://gousoe.uen.org/8gx (EdSource)

 


Battle over charter school ballot question heating up

 

BOSTON — The battle over a charter school ballot question is heating up in the sprint to Election Day.

On Tuesday, opponents of the question , about expanding the number of charter schools in the state, released a statement from independent Vermont U.S. Sen. Bernie Sanders calling for the measure’s defeat.

Sanders, a former Democratic presidential candidate, faulted the question for relying on money from New York backers. He said the question would drain resources from traditional public schools.

“Wall Street must not be allowed to hijack public education in Massachusetts,” Sanders said in a statement. “This is Wall Street’s attempt to line their own pockets while draining resources away from public education at the expense of low-income, special education students and English language learners.”

More than half of the nearly $22 million raised by backers of the question has come from the New York City-based Families For Excellent Schools Advocacy.

Republican Gov. Charlie Baker, who said charter schools offer important educational options for minority students, spent Tuesday morning going door to door in Springfield drumming up support for the question. He was joined by Henry Thomas III, president of Urban League of Springfield, which says it serves the black community and advocates for services that enhance the academic and social development of young people and families.

http://gousoe.uen.org/8gy (BH)

 


Enrollments in teacher prep programs rise for first time in 13 years

 

At a time when districts across California are reporting shortages of teachers in a number of subject areas, enrollments in teacher preparation programs in California have increased for the first time in 13 years.

The increase could be the result of a number of factors, including greater interest among prospective teachers in entering the profession, the success of more aggressive recruitment efforts and an abundance of job openings for teachers, especially in high-needs areas such as special education, bilingual education, and math and science.

According to a new California Commission on Teacher Credentialing report, enrollments statewide increased from 18,984 in 2013-14 to 20,881 in 2014-15, a nearly 10 percent increase. Because there is a one-year lag time in publishing data, the commission does not have figures for the 2015-16 school year.

“After years of news being about teacher layoffs, the story has changed,” said Mary Vixie Sandy, executive director of the state’s Commission on Teacher Credentialing. “There is greater interest in hiring teachers. So you’re seeing more students enrolling in credentialing programs.”

She said these figures are similar to previous trends when news of teacher shortages were followed by jumps in enrollment in credentialing programs.

One difference is the ethnic and racial makeup of teaching candidates, which is more diverse now than at any previous time, she said. More than half of students in teacher preparation programs in 2014-15 were nonwhite or white plus another race.

http://gousoe.uen.org/8gz (EdSource)

 

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CALENDAR

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USOE Calendar

http://www.schools.utah.gov/main/CALENDAR.aspx

 

 

UEN News

http://www.uen.org

 

 

November 3:

Utah State Board of Education study session, USDB and committee meetings

2:15 p.m., 250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspx

 

 

November 4:

Utah State Board of Education meeting

8 a.m., 250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspx

 

 

November 10:

Utah State Charter School Board meeting

250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://go.uen.org/62M

 

 

November 15:

Executive Appropriations Committee meeting

2 p.m., 445 State Capitol

http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2016&com=APPEXE

 

 

November 16:

Education Interim Committee meeting

1:15 p.m., 30 House Building

http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2016&com=INTEDU

 

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