Education News Roundup: Nov. 07 – 2016

 

 

"Your Vote Counts" by Renee Silverman/CC/flickr

“Your Vote Counts” by Renee Silverman/CC/flickr

Today’s Top Picks:

 

Conference gives girls hands-on learning experience in STEM fields http://gousoe.uen.org/8hH (DNews)

 

$630 million in school funding hinges on Jordan, Alpine district voters http://gousoe.uen.org/8hI (DNews)

 

Utah State Board of Education November Meeting Summary http://gousoe.uen.org/8hW (UPE)

 

Why Most Parents Home School: Safety, Drugs, and Peer Pressure, Study Finds http://gousoe.uen.org/8hD (EdWeek)

 

Trump-Clinton? Charter Schools Are the Big Issue on Massachusetts’ Ballot http://gousoe.uen.org/8hX (NYT)

————————————————————

TODAY’S HEADLINES

————————————————————

 

UTAH

 

Utah school board loosens athlete transfer rules Some high school athletes would find transferring easier under proposed rule changes

 

Conference gives girls hands-on learning experience in STEM fields

 

$630 million in school funding hinges on Jordan, Alpine district voters

 

New Davis School District superintendent named

 

New Davis School District superintendent’s salary tops $196,000

 

Feeling the split: High school experience has changed for many on south-end

 

Meet Utah’s D.A.R.E and School Resource Officer of the Year Jeremy Brown

 

LGBT groups petition against Utah A.G. over transgender bathroom issue

 

New License Law Spells Trouble for Teachers

 

Utah State Board of Education Meeting Summary

 


OPINION & COMMENTARY

 

Letter: Sex ed is a moral issue

 

It’s OK to be gay, and Utah teachers need to be able to say it is

 

Fund Utah schools by ending corporate incentives

 

Measure schools’ success with both high and low achievers

 

Burton will be a voice for our children on the Ogden School Board

 

Blair would be an outstanding choice for Ogden School Board Blair will bring dedication, insight to the Ogden School Board Nancy Blair has more than 29 years of proven educational leadership

 

Utah GOP has no business meddling in State Board of Ed election

 


NATION

 

Why Most Parents Home School: Safety, Drugs, and Peer Pressure, Study Finds

 

Trump-Clinton? Charter Schools Are the Big Issue on Massachusetts’ Ballot

 

Civil rights group makes legal case for controversial Education Dept. regulation

 

After saying education system ‘sucks,’ gov lauds schools

 

KC Public Schools hit the full accreditation mark for first time in decades

 

California voters poised to gut English-only instruction law

 

 

————————————————————

UTAH NEWS

————————————————————

 

Utah school board loosens athlete transfer rules

 

High school athletes at the sub-varsity level could switch teams at will, with varsity athletes able to transfer only in defined circumstances, under a policy that earned preliminary approval from the Utah Board of Education on Friday.

The proposal was first introduced in September and went through several revisions this week before earning measured support from the Utah High School Activities Association, or UHSAA, the primary governing body over high school sports in the state.

“I think this is as close as we’ve been the whole way through,” said Rob Cuff, UHSAA’s executive director.

But guests at Friday’s school board meeting were unanimous in their opposition to the policy, which would force UHSAA to loosen transfer rules for student-athletes or lose roughly 90 percent of its member schools.

UHSAA rules currently prohibit transfers once a student has established eligibility at a school, unless that student obtains a waiver due to hardship, bullying, family relocation or other circumstances.

http://gousoe.uen.org/8hB (SLTrib)

 


Some high school athletes would find transferring easier under proposed rule changes

 

SALT LAKE CITY — The Utah State Board of Education on Friday passed a fourth version of new rules governing the athletic eligibility of high school transfer students.

Currently, high school students who want to transfer from one school to another and take their athletic eligibility with them must provide proof of a hardship or a family move into the boundary of the new school.

If all parties support the latest proposed revision of the rules, transferring schools as an athlete — in certain situations — would be easier than under current UHSAA rules.

The Utah High School Activities Association will take the proposal to its board of trustees for approval, and then it would need a final OK from the State School Board’s Standards and Assessments Committee in December.

http://gousoe.uen.org/8hJ (DNews)

 

 


Conference gives girls hands-on learning experience in STEM fields

 

CLEARFIELD — Jessie and Maddy Turner have big dreams for their futures, but both include doing well in school.

“The more I learn and the better I get at it, the more opportunities I’ll have,” said Maddy, a sixth-grader from Clearfield who attended the Northern Utah Expanding Your Horizons conference for young women on Saturday. She said she wants to be a pilot and a veterinarian “to be able to help animals all over the state when they need it.”

Both girls tend to enjoy staying after school some days to help with or participate in extracurricular science, technology, engineering and math programs.

“I like the hands-on stuff best,” said Jessie, while twirling the propeller of her homemade airplane that she made and learned to fly at the conference. “A lot of it is stuff you don’t get to do in class.”

http://gousoe.uen.org/8hH (DNews)

 


$630 million in school funding hinges on Jordan, Alpine district voters

 

WEST JORDAN — Fourteen brand new schools. Five rebuilds. At least 10 renovation projects.

That’s what’s at stake for two Wasatch Front school district heading into Tuesday’s election, all resting on a pair of bond proposals together totaling more than $630 million in property taxes.

In Jordan School District, voters will consider a $245 million bond to help pay for five new schools and a rebuild of West Jordan Middle School.

Alpine School District voters will weigh a $386 million bond to build nine new schools, rebuild four and renovate 10.

While district officials are restricted by law from campaigning for or against the bonds, they’re urging voters who haven’t already cast their ballots to make educated decisions and know what the districts may face if the bonds aren’t approved.

http://gousoe.uen.org/8hI (DNews)

 


New Davis School District superintendent named

 

FARMINGTON — The Davis Board of Education has appointed Reid P. Newey as superintendent of the Davis School District.

Newey, the district’s 18th superintendent, succeeds W. Bryan Bowles, who retired in July after 14 years as superintendent. Newey currently serves as an assistant superintendent in the Weber School District.

With 28 years of experience in education, Newey began as a teacher at Clearfield High School. Early in his career he worked as an assistant basketball coach at Utah State University, and a teacher and basketball coach at Weber and Fremont high schools.

http://gousoe.uen.org/8hK (DNews)

 


New Davis School District superintendent’s salary tops $196,000

 

FARMINGTON — The newly appointed superintendent of schools for the Davis School District will make $196,600 annually.

Reid Newey was appointed to the position by the Davis School District Board of Education, effective Dec. 1. Newey currently works as the an assistant superintendent for the Weber School District.

According to his contract, obtained by the Standard-Examiner through an open records request, Newey’s annual base salary excluding benefits will be $193,000 until July 1, 2017, at which time he will receive the same cost of living increase other administrators receive.

Newey will also receive a $3,600 administrative allowance annually as part of his taxable income, to be used for “miscellaneous business expenses” such as “automobile expenses, cellular telephone plan, and home Internet connection,” according to the contract.

In addition, the district will also pay for expenses Reid incurs while performing his duties, such as airline tickets and other travel expenses.

http://gousoe.uen.org/8hL (SE)

 


Feeling the split: High school experience has changed for many on south-end

 

Juniors at Mountain Crest last year were faced with a tough situation.

If they lived in the boundaries of Ridgeline, they had the choice to spend their final year at a brand new school, leaving behind old traditions. If they didn’t live in the Ridgeline boundaries, they had to watch half of their friends leave and see their hallways grow a bit more empty. Either way, a unique set of challenges has descended upon two high schools this year.

Caleb Newman, a senior in the drama department at Mountain Crest, said this year doesn’t feel the same. He had several friends move to Ridgeline.

“I miss them a lot,” Newman said. “In a drama department, you get really close,”

Although Mountain Crest added a freshman class, the population has still been greatly reduced with the split.

“The first day of this year I went out in the hall after the bell rang and I’m like, ‘Wait, am I late to class?’” Jakob Dimick, a junior, said. “There were so few people in there.”

http://gousoe.uen.org/8hR

 


Meet Utah’s D.A.R.E and School Resource Officer of the Year Jeremy Brown

 

CENTERVILLE, UT (ABC4 UTAH) A Centerville Police Officer was just named Utah’s D.A.R.E. officer of the year and And Utah’s School Resource Officer of the year. No one has ever won both awards at the same time.

In this week’s Behind the Badge police profile we meet Officer Jeremy Brown.

Welcome to DARE class at Reading Elementary School. It’s one of four Centerville elementary schools where 6th graders learn about Drug Abuse Resistance Education. “Thinking first. Which is hard to do when we are stressed.” And the man behind the messages – is Centerville Police Officer Jeremy Brown. “I have the opportunity to talk to kids and let them know police officers are not scary. We don’t want to hurt you. The things you see on the news are isolated incidents – there not what we do everyday. I get to teach them that we love you guys and want to serve you and were not somebody to be afraid of.”

And that teaching continues just down the road at Centerville Jr. High School.

http://gousoe.uen.org/8hT (ABC4UT)

 


LGBT groups petition against Utah A.G. over transgender bathroom issue

 

SALT LAKE CITY — National and local LGBT rights organizations called out Utah Attorney General Sean Reyes on Thursday over his support of a lawsuit that it says harms transgender people.

Equality Utah and Freedom for All Americans, based in Washington, D.C., launched an online petition to tell the Republican attorney general to “stop attacking transgender people.”

“A.G. Reyes is giving Utah a bad name — and we need to send the message that our state is stronger when everyone is included and protected from discrimination,” the petition states.

Utah is among a dozen states that sued the Obama administration over a memo that threatened federal education funding if schools don’t allow transgender students to use the restroom that matches their gender identity.

http://gousoe.uen.org/8hU (KSL)

 


New License Law Spells Trouble for Teachers

 

In Utah, the lack of budgetary support for teachers K-12 is sadly nothing new. Historically, teachers in the state are paid roughly 30 percent lower than professionals with comparable degrees, and the establishment of numerous standardized tests has taken away from authentic learning statewide. Yet, just as Utah’s imprudent system of education seemingly couldn’t get worse, the enlightened members of the State Board of Education intervened in June of this year.

In response to a severe shortage of teachers in Utah, the Board passed a resolution termed the “Academic Pathway To Teaching,” that allows individuals to be hired without a traditional teaching license. There are stipulations, of course, including a bachelors degree and entry level subject tests. However, these regulations only mask the damage that has been done to teachers in Utah. Let’s begin with the state’s budget for education.

http://gousoe.uen.org/8hV (TDUC)

 


Utah State Board of Education Meeting Summary

In its November 4, 2016 meeting, the Utah State Board of Education:

Gave preliminary approval to an amended rule dealing with public school participation in organizations like the Utah High School Activities Association. Approved Digital Teaching and Learning grants for four school districts and two charter schools. Reviewed student enrollment numbers from the October 1 head count conducted in Utah public schools.

http://gousoe.uen.org/8hW (UPE)

 

 

————————————————————

OPINION & COMMENTARY

————————————————————

 

 

Sex ed is a moral issue

Salt Lake Tribune letter Teresa Mull

 

The presumptive arrogance and flawed logic expressed in Alisha Worthington’s recent op-ed (“Without good sex ed, Utah’s youths head to porn sites for info”) is alarming and dangerous.

Worthington writes that by not bringing more sex education to schools, “the state effectively wiped out the ability for teens and families to get access to quality information locally.”

Does Worthington really think school and pornography are the only places teens and families can learn about sex?

Does she really think the schools are the be-all and end-all of information? How egotistical! And how insulting to parents!

Worthington says some teens “lack parents willing to supply comprehensive sex education.”

http://gousoe.uen.org/8hC

 


It’s OK to be gay, and Utah teachers need to be able to say it is Salt Lake Tribune Op-ed by Paul C. Burke, Brett L. Tolman and John Mackay

 

No teacher in Utah should have to choose between their job and offering encouragement or potentially life-saving support to a gay student.

Unfortunately, state law incoherently prohibits the “advocacy of homosexuality” in public school curriculum. Another statute targets Gay Straight Alliances to discourage both their existence and the participation of the closeted teens. Together, these laws target LGBT teenagers and aim to deprive them of critical information and social support as they are coming out and navigating adolescence–a foundational time when self-esteem and personal dignity can benefit from support at school and affirmation by a caring teacher.

Utah’s ill-fated laws form the last vestiges of our state’s system of legal discrimination against LGBT citizens. Utah’s anti-gay educational laws have been particularly pernicious and harmful because they target vulnerable teenagers.

http://gousoe.uen.org/8hE

 


Fund Utah schools by ending corporate incentives Salt Lake Tribune commentary by Evelyn Everton

 

Utah’s state legislators may not convene until January, but key members are already setting the agenda for the packed 45-day session. Groups like Education First are laying the foundation for a concerted effort to push a personal income tax hike, allegedly needed to boost the state’s education funding.

But if lawmakers are really concerned about funding schools, there are better paths to take. The best would be to start gutting corporate welfare handouts that enrich a lucky few at the expense of the rest of us — and our schools.

Utah has a host of corporate welfare programs at both the county and state level. At the county level, many local governments grant property tax exemptions to corporations, which subtract money that would have otherwise gone to school districts.

http://gousoe.uen.org/8hF

 


Measure schools’ success with both high and low achievers Salt Lake Tribune commentary by Michael J. Petrilli and Brandon L. Wright

 

Utah needs to improve its accountability system for K–12 education. A relic of the No Child Left Behind era, it has a critical flaw: It encourages schools to narrowly focus on the progress of their lowest-performing students. That’s a worthy and important objective, but it shouldn’t be the only outcome schools are held responsible for.

This shortcoming is particularly pernicious for high-achieving poor and minority children, students who deserve better and are critical to Utah’s — and our nation’s — competitiveness. They’re the most dependent on the school system to cultivate their potential and accelerate their achievement, yet that system is failing them.

This is a tragedy, particularly at a time when Utah is struggling to help these students complete college and rise to positions of leadership. For instance, only 16 percent of Black students attending the state’s four-year public universities graduate on time. For Latinos, it’s just 15 percent.

http://gousoe.uen.org/8hG

 


Burton will be a voice for our children on the Ogden School Board Standard Examiner letter by Timothy J. Eck

 

Where today in the race to the White House can we find an ordinary person whose life we can learn honesty, integrity and a sense of purpose? Obviously, no one like that is running for president. But they are out there. We have two extraordinary individuals in our hometown who provide a calm, reasonable approach to issues and who are unifiers — not dividers. They are Sue Ann Burton and Nancy Blair.

Although they are opposing each other for a seat on the Ogden School Board, we couldn’t ask for two better candidates to represent us. The struggle then becomes, whom do we vote for? It is amazing how difficult that decision can be when we have good choices. This should be a lesson for the two political parties.

That said, here’s why I am endorsing Sue Ann Burton: She still has children in the system — a lot of them. She’s invested.

http://gousoe.uen.org/8hM

 


Blair would be an outstanding choice for Ogden School Board Standard Examiner letter by Kyra Hudson

 

On Tuesday, Nov. 8th, District 5 voters have a much-needed, long-overdue opportunity to vote for a replacement member of the Ogden School Board. Nancy Blair — or Mrs. Blair, as she was known to generations of students from Polk School — would be an outstanding choice for this important position. I say this because both my children had the good fortune to have her as a second grade teacher, where her creativity, compassion, and standards benefitted my and all children of all levels of learning and abilities.

Not only does the Blair family have a long history of service to Ogden, Nancy Blair will bring her expertise and experience as an educator to the table. The Ogden School District needs teachers and experienced professionals in the field of education to bring a renewed understanding and support for students, teachers and parents.

http://gousoe.uen.org/8hN

 


Blair will bring dedication, insight to the Ogden School Board Standard Examiner letter by Laura Wagsgard

 

Our daughters have had wonderful teachers at Polk Elementary in Ogden. One of those teachers is Nancy Blair. I always felt good knowing they would be in her care. Mrs. Blair took the time to make learning fun, interesting and hands-on. My children have a love for nature, history and national parks in large part because of the time they spent in Mrs. Blair’s class.

She went above and beyond her teaching responsibilities and loved and cared for each child in her class. If I ever had a worry or concern, Msr. Blair would listen and take action to help with the problem. I know she would dedicate herself, as she has to teaching, to being an informed, interested member of the Ogden School Board. I know she would give the board the same undivided attention, dedication and insight, just as she has given her students, fellow teachers and parents for the past 29 years.

http://gousoe.uen.org/8hO

 


Nancy Blair has more than 29 years of proven educational leadership Standard Examiner letter by Kelly Howard

 

We have two wonderful candidates running for an Ogden City School Board position. Both candidates are devoted to their families, to the community and to education.

Letters of support for Sue Ann Burton state repeatedly that she has attended all school board meetings in the past year (but one). To be able to say that seems to me like an advanced planning strategy and a resume filler.

I wonder why attending a meeting is more relevant than 29 years of proven educational leadership? I guarantee that Nancy Blair will attend the school board meetings, work sessions, and will be devoted to her position when she is elected. I have never seen anything less than 100 percent from Nancy Blair.

http://gousoe.uen.org/8hP

 


Utah GOP has no business meddling in State Board of Ed election Standard Examiner letter by JoAnn Hanson

 

I received an email from the Utah State Republican Party endorsing a certain candidate for the State School Board, but this is a nonpartisan race.

As a nation, we are angry with Hillary Clinton for lying and not following the rules. But now the Utah GOP is not following the rules.

In the school board races, we should vote for candidates who truly care about our students and who will strengthen our public schools. Period.

http://gousoe.uen.org/8hQ

 

 

 

————————————————————-

NATIONAL NEWS

————————————————————-

 

Why Most Parents Home School: Safety, Drugs, and Peer Pressure, Study Finds

 

A new federal report aims to shed some light on one of the hardest groups in education to pin down data on: home schoolers.

The U.S. Department of Education’s National Center for Education Statistics released a report this month with estimates on the number of home schoolers in the U.S. as well as other key characteristics about the group.

The report bases the estimates on a sample from survey data collected between 1999 and 2012.

It estimates there are about 1.8 million students home schooling in the U.S., which is only a sliver—about 3.4 percent—of…

http://gousoe.uen.org/8hD (EdWeek)

 


Trump-Clinton? Charter Schools Are the Big Issue on Massachusetts’ Ballot

 

BOSTON — The television ads are relentless, fueled by a historic surge of campaign spending. Fliers are clogging mailboxes. Both sides are knocking on doors across the state.

But in deep blue Massachusetts, the contentious campaigning is not for president but for a ballot question on whether to expand charter schools.

The pitched battle in this state, known as a bellwether on education policy, reflects the passions that charter schools arouse nationwide, particularly regarding a central part of the debate: If they offer children in lagging traditional public schools an alternative path to a quality education, do they also undermine those schools and the children in them?

Because Massachusetts’s charter schools rank among the nation’s best, advocates say a yes vote to allow more of them would send a strong signal that they have a crucial role to play in improving student learning and closing the achievement gap between white and black students.

http://gousoe.uen.org/8hX (NYT)

 


Civil rights group makes legal case for controversial Education Dept. regulation

 

A chorus of opponents has accused the Obama administration of overstepping its legal authority with a proposal to regulate the spending of billions of dollars meant to help educate children from poor families.

The nonpartisan Congressional Research Service bolstered that criticism, finding in May that the proposed regulation appeared to “go beyond what would be required by a plain reading of the statute.”

But a new analysis — conducted by attorneys at WilmerHale at the request of the Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights and provided to The Washington Post — comes to a different conclusion, finding that the Education Department has “ample” legal authority to move forward with its proposal.

http://gousoe.uen.org/8hZ (WaPo)

 


After saying education system ‘sucks,’ gov lauds schools

 

MONTGOMERY, Ala. (AP) — A day after causing an uproar by saying Alabama’s education system “sucks,” Gov. Robert Bentley released a video message saying he knows there are “amazing things going on inside our classrooms every day.”

The governor released the three-minute video Thursday night on social media. Bentley did not directly apologize for, or mention, his controversial remarks that unleashed a fury of criticism from teachers. However, the governor appeared to try to offer an olive branch to offended educators.

“There are a lot of amazing things going on inside our classrooms every day,” Bentley said. Bentley said he knows many…

http://gousoe.uen.org/8i0 (EdWeek)

 


KC Public Schools hit the full accreditation mark for first time in decades

 

For the first time in about 30 years, Kansas City Public Schools have scored at full accreditation level on the state-issued Annual Progress Report.

But the Kansas City district may have to wait another year before the state grants them that status.

The Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education on Monday released the annual performance scores for every district and charter school in the state. Only seven districts in the state scored below full accreditation level.

In the Kansas City area, Hickman Mills was among those that missed the mark.

“We are especially pleased to see significant improvement in APR scores in unaccredited districts,” said Margie Vandeven, Missouri commissioner of education. The Missouri School Improvement Program is the state’s school accountability system for reviewing and accrediting public school districts.

http://gousoe.uen.org/8i1 (KCS)

 


California voters poised to gut English-only instruction law In a near complete reversal of precedent, polling shows a ‘yes’ vote is likely on California’s Multilingual Education Act

 

SAN DIEGO, Calif. — Last spring, Derrick Fields, 9, sat in his social studies classroom at Sherman Elementary School, learning about the creation of the telegraph. The machine was invented so that “someone can connect to someone who is far away,” he said.

This was pretty normal stuff for a fourth grade history lesson, except for one thing: The entire lesson — from the textbooks to the teacher’s instructions to the students’ short essays — was in Spanish.

In fact, half of Derrick’s time is spent learning in Spanish and the other half in English in what’s known as a dual language immersion program.

Teaching academic subjects in Spanish, or any foreign language, has been widely understood to be illegal in California since 1998.

http://gousoe.uen.org/8i2 (THR)

 

 

————————————————————

CALENDAR

————————————————————

 

USOE Calendar

http://www.schools.utah.gov/main/CALENDAR.aspx

 

 

UEN News

http://www.uen.org

 

 

November 10:

Utah State Charter School Board meeting

250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://go.uen.org/62M

 

 

November 15:

Executive Appropriations Committee meeting

2 p.m., 445 State Capitol

http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2016&com=APPEXE

 

 

November 16:

Education Interim Committee meeting

1:15 p.m., 30 House Building

http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2016&com=INTEDU

Related posts:

Comments are closed.