Education News Roundup: Nov. 09 – 2016

 

Alternative Language Services (ALS) Directors meeting at the USBE office.

Alternative Language Services (ALS) Directors meeting at the USBE office.

 

Today’s Top Picks:

Early results show voters approving Jordan, Alpine school bonds http://gousoe.uen.org/8iu (SLTrib)

 

Unofficial results: Alpine, Jordan district voters approve $630M in school bonds http://gousoe.uen.org/8ix (DNews)

 

Utah voters complete purge of state school board incumbents, early results show http://gousoe.uen.org/8iv (SLTrib)

 

Voters approve amendment to send more state land money to Utah schools http://gousoe.uen.org/8iw (SLTrib)

 

Mass. charters, Ga. school takeovers: Voters decide four education ballot questions http://gousoe.uen.org/8iS (WaPo)

 

Education Mattered in 2016

http://gousoe.uen.org/8iW (USN)

 

 

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TODAY’S HEADLINES

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UTAH

 

Early results show voters approving Jordan, Alpine school bonds

 

Unofficial results: Alpine, Jordan district voters approve $630M in school bonds

 

Utah voters complete purge of state school board incumbents, early results show

 

Voters approve amendment to send more state land money to Utah schools

 

More students attending Utah’s charter schools

 

Utah Valley Educator of the Week: Britney Manderino Utah Valley Student of the Week: Tate Gunther

 

Unofficial results in for candidates battling for state, Utah County school districts’ board of education seats

 

Alpine School District’s $387 million bond wins in unofficial election results

 

Provo City School District reviews school improvement plans

 

Johnson, Morgan win Logan School Board elections

 

USU researchers testing game to encourage healthy eating in schools

 

Washington County School Board races too close to call

 

Hurricane Middle School Students Learn Life Lessons in Reality Store

 

Boulter wins state school board race

 


OPINION & COMMENTARY

 

Show some civility — and common sense — in school carpool lanes

 

Sex education does not “taint the mind”

 

Investment in education raises student achievement

 

After shocking election, New York history teacher tries to alleviate ‘despair, anxiety or indignation’

 

Donald Trump Wins Presidency, Brings Uncertainty to Big Education Issues

 


NATION

 

Mass. charters, Ga. school takeovers: Voters decide four education ballot questions

 

Californians pass 3 education propositions

 

Republicans prevail in Texas State Board of Education races

 

Education Mattered in 2016

 

Could Donald Trump put Mike Pence in charge of education policy as VP? Here’s his Indiana education record

 

GOP’s McCormick elected Indiana schools superintendent

 

Oklahoma voters strike down ‘penny sales tax’ for education

 

 

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UTAH NEWS

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Early results show voters approving Jordan, Alpine school bonds

 

Voters in Salt Lake County and Utah County approved $630 million in school bonds on Tuesday for the Jordan and Alpine School Districts, according to preliminary election results.

At press time, vote totals showed the $245 million Jordan bond succeeding by 14 percentage points, with voters in Alpine voting 68 percent to 32 percent in favor of a $387 million bond.

Jordan School District plans to rebuild one school and build five new schools. Its 20-year bond is estimated to cost $16.80 each year in new property taxes for a home valued at $300,000.

Alpine’s bond is not expected to raise taxes for property owners, but will maintain current taxing levels as debt from a 2011 bond expires. Plans for the bond include the construction of nine new schools and the reconstruction of four existing schools, as well as renovation projects throughout the district.

http://gousoe.uen.org/8iu (SLTrib)

 


Unofficial results: Alpine, Jordan district voters approve $630M in school bonds

 

WEST JORDAN — Early election night results indicate voters in Jordan and Alpine school districts have approved more than $630 million in school funding.

In Jordan School District, 57 percent of voters had approved the proposed $245 million bond, meant to build five new schools and rebuild West Jordan Middle.

“The Jordan Board of Education is thrilled with the passage of this bond,” said Susan Pulsipher, president of the Jordan School Board. “Jordan District is committed to providing the best education possible. This bond will help us build schools to keep up with growth and enhance the quality of education for our students.”

In Alpine School District, 67 percent of voters gave a thumbs up to the $386 million bond proposal for nine new schools, four rebuilds and 10 renovation projects.

http://gousoe.uen.org/8ix (DNews)

 


Utah voters complete purge of state school board incumbents, early results show

3 challengers win seats on state school board, early results indicate.

 

State school board incumbents faced an unfriendly electorate in 2016, with preliminary election results showing challengers succeeding in three races.

If the numbers hold, 14 of the board’s 15 seats will have turned over in the past two elections. The exception would be board member Terryl Warner, who was appointed to fill a vacancy in 2014 and retained her seat in the election later that year.

At press time, board vice-chairman David Thomas lagged behind Jennifer Graviet by 13 percentage points, while board member Stan Lockhart trailed Scott Neilson by 13 percentage points.

And Alisa Ellis, an organizer within the Utahns Against Common Core community, appeared to defeat her opponent, incumbent Dixie Allen, 52 percent to 48 percent.

http://gousoe.uen.org/8iv (SLTrib)

 


Voters approve amendment to send more state land money to Utah schools

 

Utah’s public schools will receive a bump in land trust funding after voters approved a constitutional amendment Tuesday night, early elections results show.

At press time, preliminary vote totals showed a vote of 64 percent to 36 percent for Amendment B, which allows managers of Utah’s $2.1 billion permanent state School Fund to award earnings — up to 4 percent of the endowment’s value — to schools throughout the state.

The prior language of the state’s constitution allowed only interest and dividends from the fund to be distributed.

The change in the distribution model, which will take effect in July 2017, is estimated to produce $79 million for Utah schools, compared to $57 million without the amendment.

Utah State Treasurer David Damschen said the amendment will provide for sustained long-term growth of the State School Fund while benefiting Utah schools and students.

http://gousoe.uen.org/8iw (SLTrib)

 


More students attending Utah’s charter schools

 

SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — New state enrollment figures show Utah’s charter schools gained an additional 4,000 students this year.

The Salt Lake Tribune reports that according to the Utah Board of Education, charter school enrollment increased by nearly 6 percent from 2015.        The state has seen growth among the state’s charter schools for several years, but that growth has slowed.

In 2014, charter enrollment rose 12 percent, followed by 9.8 percent in 2015.

State Charter School Board spokesman Mark Peterson says enrollment “may be levelling off” because the board has been approving fewer new charter schools than it has in the past.

The alternative schools enroll 11 percent of all Utah students.

Utah’s public schools saw more than 644,000 new students this year, an increase of less than 2 percent from 2015.

http://gousoe.uen.org/8iy (SE)

 


Centerville Elementary students cast ballots in mock election

 

CENTERVILLE — Whether it was because they had a favorite candidate or simply didn’t want to pick Donald Trump or Hillary Clinton, the students of Centerville Elementary School all cast their votes in a mock election Tuesday morning.

The event was put together by second-grade teacher Aleasa Anderson who did it because it was something she remembered from her own time in elementary school.

“I just thought it would be a neat thing to do with the kids at the school, so I told my principal I had this idea, and he let me run with it,” she said.

Anderson said the students looked forward to voting, and some discussed the pros and cons of each candidate in class.

“They get so fired up, it’s ‘Trump this! Clinton that!’” Anderson said, laughing.

As of about 2 p.m., the results of the mock election were provided to the Standard-Examiner by Principal Dan Hansen.

http://gousoe.uen.org/8iz (SE)

 


Utah Valley Educator of the Week: Britney Manderino

 

Ever need to explain why something in science happens but can’t figure it out yourself?

Britney Manderino, a Barratt Elementary sixth-grade teacher, loves to explain science. That is why Alpine School District has chosen Manderino as the Daily Herald’s Utah Valley Educator of the Week.

Her love for science took her from Illinois, where she grew up, to Brigham Young University where she received her Bachelor of Science degree. Realizing she could help others gain her love of science, she went on to get her master’s in education at Southern Utah University.

Upon graduation, Manderino taught third and fourth grade in St. George for four years. Having the opportunity to return to Utah County, she chose Barratt Elementary where she has taught for the last five years.

http://gousoe.uen.org/8iB (DH)

 


Utah Valley Student of the Week: Tate Gunther

 

In ancient times, David prepared for battle against the strong, ginormous Goliath. David went armed with determination, self-confidence and a slingshot.

Fast forward to a modern-day David: Tate Gunther, a third grader at Barratt Elementary. Tate prepares daily to battle his Goliath — anxiety — and that is one reason why he has been chosen by Alpine School District for the Daily Herald’s Utah Valley Student of the Week.

Armed with loving parents, helpful siblings, friends, and school personnel, Tate starts each day armed with determination, self-confidence and his backpack. Anxiety strikes unannounced and without warning, but Tate is strong and brave. He applies the tools he’s been taught and succeeds daily with a smile. During the rest of his day, Tate enjoys playing soccer, skateboarding and being with his friends. Tate enjoys making others happy by showing compassion and acceptance for everyone.

http://gousoe.uen.org/8iC (DH)

 


Unofficial results in for candidates battling for state, Utah County school districts’ board of education seats

 

In local school board races, many candidates were winning handily over challengers, according to unofficial results reported Tuesday evening. The contest was much tighter for candidates competing in state-level board of education races.

All Utah County precincts were reporting at 11:32 p.m.

In Alpine School District, Mark Clement won the race for the fourth seat on the board of education, a seat that represents the Pleasant Grove High School cluster, beating out opponent Rachel Thacker, with 56.34 percent of the vote.

Incumbent Scott Carlson will be re-elected, beating Miriam Ellis for a seat that represents the Lehi High School cluster, receiving 59.98 percent of the votes.

http://gousoe.uen.org/8iD (DH)

 


Alpine School District’s $387 million bond wins in unofficial election results

 

Voters are backing Alpine School District’s $387 million bond, according to unofficial election results.

Support for the bond was about 68 percent, according to results posted at 11:32 p.m. Tuesday night, at which point all precincts were reporting.

“We are grateful for the trust and support shown by so many citizens with this bond election,” a statement from the Alpine School District Board of Education reads. “This speaks to the value we place on education which is one of our greatest rights and privileges to ensure our children’s future. Our stewardship of this bond will continue to be held in the greatest care and focused on the need to provide a safe and quality education for all students across the district.”

http://gousoe.uen.org/8iE (DH)

 


Provo City School District reviews school improvement plans

 

Provo City School District is urging its schools to increase parent engagement, increase communication with communities and use data to target improvements.

The goals came with the review of school improvement plans for Title I schools at the district’s Board of Education meeting Tuesday evening.

Principals shared examples of holding grade-level parent nights and discovering whether there were higher turnouts at meetings held before, during or after school.

Karen Brown, principal of Provo High School, shared the school’s mindset on community involvement.

“We have what we call an all-hands-on-deck approach, which means everyone in the community is involved in every student’s graduation,” Brown said.

http://gousoe.uen.org/8iF (DH)

 


Johnson, Morgan win Logan School Board elections

 

Jenny Johnson has been voted into the Logan City School District Board of Education to take the 2nd District seat left vacant by the outgoing Lynn Hobbs. Connie Morgan has been voted into a second term in the 4th District.

Ann Geary, current Logan City School District Board of Education president, ran with no opponent in the 3rd District.

In the Cache County School District, there were no contested elections this year. Larry Jeppesen in the 1st Precinct, D. Jeffrey Nielsen in the 3rd Precinct and Kathy Christiansen in the 6th Precinct all ran without opposition.

Johnson, an alumna of Logan High and parent of current Logan students, said she wants to give back to the community.

http://gousoe.uen.org/8iG (HJ)

 


USU researchers testing game to encourage healthy eating in schools

 

A group of researchers at Utah State University are conducting research at local elementary schools to test the effectiveness of a lunchtime game to encourage a healthy diet.

The “Fit Game” rewards schools that eat healthily with daily slideshow installments in an ongoing story about a group of heroes fighting to save the universe from the evil Vegetable Annihilation Team.

In the story, the heroes educate students on the benefits of healthy eating — sweet potatoes make you strong, broccoli makes you smart and beans give you endurance — while at the same time setting goals that are reached by more vegetable and fruit consumption.

“It’s sort of like a comic book,” said Frank Sosa, a psychology graduate student at USU.

http://gousoe.uen.org/8iH (HJ)

 


Washington County School Board races too close to call Voters in Washington County weighed in Tuesday on three races for the Washington County School District School Board.

 

Results of these races will not be final until all mail-in, provisional and paper ballots submitted at the polls are received, counted and certified. As of 11:30 p.m. Tuesday, these were the results.

Two Santa Clara residents are vying for a seat on the school board in District 1. Richelle Nelson had 1,500 votes, compared to Becky Dunn’s 2,231. The Spectrum & Daily News was unable to reach either candidate for comment Tuesday night.

In District 2, incumbent Craig Seegmiller of St. George faced a challenge from Rick Nelson, also of St. George. Seegmiller had 1,497 votes to Nelson’s 863.

Seegmiller said he was grateful for those who believe he has done a good job during his four previous terms on the school board. He spoke with The Spectrum & Daily News while helping his son with math homework.

http://gousoe.uen.org/8iJ (TS)

 


Hurricane Middle School Students Learn Life Lessons in Reality Store http://gousoe.uen.org/8iM (TS)

 


Boulter wins state school board race

 

  1. GEORGE – Michelle Boulter has won the race for a seat on the Utah State Board of Education, District 15.

Early Wednesday morning, county votes were still being tallied in the wake of Tuesday morning’s voting machine snafu that had poll workers relying on paper ballots.

Boulter won with 52.2 percent of the vote; opponent Wesley Christiansen had 47.80 percent; according to the Utah election results webpage.

Both candidates ran independently. Boulter received 35.85 percent of votes in the June primary election while Christiansen received 24.56 percent.

Both candidates favored more local control over education but differed in their opinions on rejecting federal money outright.

Boulter believes Utah should forgo accepting federal funds for education in favor of more local control, saying Utah receives less than 10 percent of total funding from the federal government.

http://gousoe.uen.org/8iQ (SGN)

 

 

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OPINION & COMMENTARY

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Show some civility — and common sense — in school carpool lanes Standard Examiner letter by Tiffany Shapiro

 

As a mother of five, a long-time resident of Davis County and a parent of children in public school, there is an issue that has become a serious concern. It speaks to the very civility of our discourse with our neighbors, even, I daresay, our fellow man. It is an issue regarding civility, respect, a common sense of goodwill and a symbol of humanity. It is a gauge we can use to determine how willing we are to help each other, work together for a common goal, lift each other and reach for the better of society. This issue is school carpool lane manners.

While I’m being somewhat tongue-in-cheek with my comments, I’m actually quite serious about the implications. There is an “every-man-for-herself” attitude when Utah drivers get behind the wheel.

http://gousoe.uen.org/8iA

 


Sex education does not “taint the mind”

Salt Lake Tribune letter by Donald Thomas

 

If Teresa Mull (“Sex ed is a moral issue,” Forum, Nov. 7) believes that sex education is “alarming and dangerous,” it is even more frightening to believe, as she does, that sex education taints the mind “with impure thoughts.”

Further, in 45 years as an educator I have never seen “government” teaching in any classroom. Sex education is taught by highly respected and dedicated teachers of high moral character.

Let us be clear: 1. Sex education is voluntary and Teresa need not have her children participate. 2. Having sex education in schools does not prevent any parent from instructing their own children. 3. Sex education is, as Teresa states, “intrinsically tied up in ethics” which requires knowledge and not ignorance.

Alisha Worthington wrote a measured and thoughtful op-ed (“Without good sex ed, Utah’s youths head to porn sites for info,” Oct. 30). Unfortunately Mull’s letter is neither http://gousoe.uen.org/8iY

 


Investment in education raises student achievement Sun Herald commentary by Rosemary G. Aultman

 

The Mississippi State Board of Education and the Mississippi Department of Education have been working strategically during the past three years to improve student outcomes.

Our work has been targeted, deliberate and focused to make the maximum impact with the resources and flexibility we have been afforded.

Mississippians are now seeing a significant return on investment as a result these efforts. This means potentially less money will be diverted for remediation costs and more money will be directed to classrooms. The long-term return will produce ongoing savings for the state because students are being prepared to be successful in college and the workforce, and to flourish as parents and citizens.

http://gousoe.uen.org/8j3

 


After shocking election, New York history teacher tries to alleviate ‘despair, anxiety or indignation’

Dealing with the fact that there are a lot of people in the world who think differently than you do is an important part of the work of becoming an adult Hechinger Report commentary by Jim Cullen

 

NEW YORK – When I threw the floor open to my class this morning, the main thing my charges seemed to want was information: Would he be allowed to do this? What will happen in the event of that? Growth begins with curiosity.

As a high school history teacher, I have two intersecting sources of solace as I go about my job the day after a historic—and to a great many people, upsetting—election. The first is that necessity requires me to put aside my own unease and confusion as I try to help adolescents process an event that is necessarily unprecedented for them, though I have resources (ranging from professional expertise in managing a conversation to having been around the block a time or two) that I bring to the classroom to assist with that.

My role is to help them feel better as a matter of trying to alleviate despair, anxiety or indignation, but also to feel better in the sense of thinking more clearly, to bring their hearts and their heads into greater alignment (or, at least, greater consciousness of each other).

 


Donald Trump Wins Presidency, Brings Uncertainty to Big Education Issues Education Week blog post by Andrew Ujifusa

 

Republican nominee Donald Trump has been elected president, according to the Associated Press. The real estate executive has largely ignored education during his successful presidential bid, except for a $20 billion federal investment in school choice he announced in September. And there are a lot of unanswered questions about what his administration will mean for public schools.

Having never held elected office, Trump’s K-12 record was already relatively thin compared to some of his opponents when he began running last year. He’s mostly discussed public schools in sound bites, claiming that he would get rid of the Common Core State Standards…

http://gousoe.uen.org/8j4

 

 

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NATIONAL NEWS

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Mass. charters, Ga. school takeovers: Voters decide four education ballot questions

 

Though the presidential race cliffhanger was taking up most of the political oxygen Tuesday night, there were also important education policy developments in the states. Here’s how four high-profile ballot initiatives fared:

Massachusetts

Voters rejected one of the most fiercely contested and expensive ballot initiatives in the nation, which would have allowed for the opening of up to 12 charter schools per year and for the expansion of existing charter schools.

Opponents — including state and national teachers’ unions, Boston Mayor Martin Walsh (D) and Democratic Sens. Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren — had argued that the rapid expansion of charter schools would drain traditional public schools of essential resources. The defeat is the latest in a string of rebukes of the charter school movement, including a recent resolution by the national NAACP calling for a moratorium on new charter schools until there is an assurance of greater accountability and transparency of charters’ fiscal and academic performance.

http://gousoe.uen.org/8iS (WaPo)

 


Californians pass 3 education propositions

 

Californians passed three education-related propositions, sending more money to schools and bringing back bilingual education.

Income Tax Extension Benefits K-12 Education:

Proposition 55 extends the income tax rates under Prop. 30 for individuals who earn more than $250,000 a year and couples who earn more than $500,000 a year for 12 years.

It passed easily and is expected to raise between $4 billion and $9 billion a year from 2019 to 2030, with most of the money going to K-12 education. Some money would be set aside for state community colleges and low-income health care programs.

If it didn’t pass, $5.5 billion in state funding of K-12 education programs would have been cut.

http://gousoe.uen.org/8iT (LASR)

 


Republicans prevail in Texas State Board of Education races

 

Republicans seeking re-election to the State Board of Education managed to hang onto their seats Tuesday despite speculation that Republican Donald Trump at the top of the ballot might flip some races.

 

Republicans seeking re-election to the State Board of Education managed to hang onto their seats Tuesday despite speculation that the unpopularity of the candidate headlining the GOP ticket, Donald Trump, may flip certain races. And one newcomer seeking an open seat in a deeply conservative East Texas district easily bested his Democratic rival.

The GOP’s margin of victory in three contested races may have been smaller than it would have been without Trump at the top of the ticket, but they still handily beat their Democratic challengers. (Trump also secured a smaller percentage of the vote than Republicans normally enjoy in deep red Texas but still beat Hillary Clinton.) http://gousoe.uen.org/8iV (TTT)

 


Education Mattered in 2016

Education played a role in both Clinton’s and Trump’s campaigns.

 

With 2016 voting fully upon us today, the education world can now stop complaining about how education really didn’t matter to the presidential race. It’s finally time for education advocates to begin gearing up to complain about how it isn’t really a big issue in the 2020 race for the White House.

But although it was hardly a centerpiece of this year’s campaign, education did actually matter in a few key ways in the 2016 race that have implications going forward.

Here are three:

Voter education level. Donald Trump’s campaign tried to energize down market voters with less education who are increasingly dislocated and left behind in today’s economy. He may have succeeded, but much of his rhetoric (and behavior) turned off college-educated white voters, especially women. Pre-election polls consistently pointed to these voters as a huge problem for Trump rather than the lift to Republicans they usually are. Polls consistently showed Trump not only trailing Clinton among these voters but also underperforming 2012 Republican nominee Mitt Romney. We’ll see how much Trump was able to stanch that bleeding in the end, but 2016 was definitely a year when education levels exerted even more leverage than usual in voting behavior.

http://gousoe.uen.org/8iW (USN)

 


Could Donald Trump put Mike Pence in charge of education policy as VP? Here’s his Indiana education record

 

With Donald Trump’s stunning victory Tuesday, Indiana Gov. Mike Pence will become vice president of the United States in January.

One of the big storylines of Pence’s time as Indiana’s governor was his role in the state’s contentious fights over education. A story pubished this morning by Education Week magazine quotes one expert predicting Pence’s expertise in education reform would mean Trump would tap him to lead his administration’s education policy initiatives. In August, Trump picked a staffer from Indiana Republican congressman Luke Messer’s office to formulate his education policies, which led to an agenda that placed a heavy emphasis on school choice.

In contrast with Trump’s brashness, Pence is known as a polite, measured politician who speaks with deliberation. Nonetheless, the one-term governor was far from the center on policy issues. A darling of social conservatives mostly for his support of religious rights and anti-abortion policies, Pence was in a close re-election fight for governor before he withdrew to join Trump’s ticket.

http://gousoe.uen.org/8iZ (Chalkbeat)

 


GOP’s McCormick elected Indiana schools superintendent

 

INDIANAPOLIS (AP) – Republican Jennifer McCormick has been elected Indiana’s state schools superintendent, defeating Democratic incumbent Glenda Ritz.

McCormick is now superintendent of the Yorktown Community Schools near Muncie. She ran a campaign critical of Ritz’s management of the Education Department and maintained she could work better with the Republican-dominated Legislature.

Ritz was the only Democrat among Indiana’s elected state officeholders for the past four years. She clashed frequently with Republican Gov. Mike Pence and GOP lawmakers over issues such as administration of the A-F school ratings system and expansion of the state’s private school voucher and charter school programs.

McCormick will be involved in upcoming debates over the state’s selection of a new standardized exam to replace the much-maligned ISTEP and the push for expansion of state-funded preschool programs.

http://gousoe.uen.org/8j1 (AP)

 


Oklahoma voters strike down ‘penny sales tax’ for education

 

OKLAHOMA CITY – A state question dealing with a tax increase was a highly debated issue leading up to the polls.

State Question 779 would implement a one percent sales tax to fund teacher pay raises and other educational causes. Supporters say the bill would generate more than $600 million for teacher pay raises and education.

“Education is hurting. Our kids are hurting. They are the ones who are feeling the effects of this,” said OEA President Alicia Priest.

Critics opposed raising taxes in the midst of a budget crisis, and also took issue with the bill’s nickname.

“The ballot calls it a one cent tax; that’s why it’s called the penny tax. But let’s be clear, this is a lot more than a penny that you find in your couch cushions or under your mats in your car. This is a one percent tax increase on all purchases Oklahomans make until the end of time,” said OCPA Impact’s David Bond.

http://gousoe.uen.org/8j2 (KFOR)

 

 

 

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CALENDAR

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USBE Calendar

http://www.schools.utah.gov/main/CALENDAR.aspx

 

 

UEN News

http://www.uen.org

 

 

November 10:

Utah State Charter School Board meeting

250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

https://uvc.uen.net/videos/channel/112/

 

 

November 15:

Executive Appropriations Committee meeting

2 p.m., 445 State Capitol

http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2016&com=APPEXE

 

 

November 16:

Education Interim Committee meeting

1:15 p.m., 30 House Building

http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2016&com=INTEDU

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