Education News Roundup: Nov. 17 – 2016

03Today’s Top Picks:

 

Lawmaker: Rooftop solar tax credits taking $20 million from education budget http://gousoe.uen.org/8lQ (DNews)

http://gousoe.uen.org/8m8 (KUER)

 

Bill proposes reimbursing schools when students graduate early http://gousoe.uen.org/8lR (DNews)

 

Victims improving a day after Mountain View High stabbings http://gousoe.uen.org/8lS (DNews)

 

Betsy DeVos could be Trump nominee for secretary of education http://gousoe.uen.org/8mb (DFP)

 

 

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TODAY’S HEADLINES

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UTAH

Lawmaker: Rooftop solar tax credits taking $20 million from education budget

 

Lawmakers Move To Phase Out Rooftop Solar Tax Credit

 

Bill proposes reimbursing schools when students graduate early

 

Victims improving a day after Mountain View High stabbings

 

Granite early open enrollment begins Dec. 1

 

Syracuse athletics makes place for students with disabilities

 

Three new people elected to Davis School Board

 

Mountain View stabbing suspect booked on attempted murder charges

 

Teacher comes face to face with Mountain View student on rampage

 

Staff who responded to stabbing in Orem high school locker room share their story

 

Mountain View High holds parent-teacher conferences one day after student stabs 5 classmates

 

Logan teacher receives grant to help teenage mothers complete their education

 

10,000 Students attend Anti-Bullying Assembly at Vivint Smart Home Arena

 

The Canyon View High School Talon’s Drill Team to host their annual Craft Fair starting Friday November 18

 

Local Students Place in Radon Poster Contest

 

Utah budget: 10K more students next year to cost $115M

 


OPINION & COMMENTARY

 

STEM teachers may need a premium to stay in class

 

Parents must teach children civil discourse, not bullying

 

A U.S. Teacher’s Perspective on the Finnish Education System: What Can We Learn from Each Other?

 


 

NATION

 

Donald Trump has little power to scrap Common Core Must convince states to follow his vow

 

Betsy DeVos could be Trump nominee for secretary of education

 

L.A.’s education board sends a message to Trump: Schools will stay ‘safe zones’ for students here illegally

 

Former D.C. schools chancellor violated ethics rules when asking for donations

 

Superintendent Defends Staff Over Overcooked School Burger

 

High school program teaches job skills to disabled students

 

 

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UTAH NEWS

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Lawmaker: Rooftop solar tax credits taking $20 million from education budget

 

SALT LAKE CITY — A lawmaker said the 14-year-old state income tax credit for rooftop solar systems will zap the education budget of $20 million this year and cost another $60 million next year if the Legislature doesn’t act to prevent the hemorrhaging.

Rep. Jeremy Peterson, R-Ogden, told colleagues on the Legislature’s Revenue and Taxation Interim Committee that the proliferation of rooftop solar systems and the accompanying $2,000 tax credit to homeowners are creating a real budget problem for Utah schools.

Peterson is proposing to phase out the tax credit by 2021 and incrementally reduce it by $500 each year until then. His legislative proposal, which advanced Wednesday with a committee vote, would set a cap of $4 million in available credits in 2018, and then reduce it by $1 million each year afterward until it ends.

http://gousoe.uen.org/8lQ (DNews)

 


Lawmakers Move To Phase Out Rooftop Solar Tax Credit

 

Lawmakers took a first step Wednesday toward phasing out the state tax credit for rooftop solar panels.

Rep. Jeremy Peterson, R-Ogden, said the tax incentive reduces state funding for schools by around $20 million, and that impact is expected to balloon to more than $60 million in a few years as rooftop solar skyrockets in Utah.

“It’s time to pull those training wheels off and let the industry run under its own strength,” Peterson told the Interim Revenue and Taxation Committee.

Peterson said the price for rooftop solar is declining, so the incentive isn’t as important as it used to be. Since the state started offering the credit in 2002, homeowners have been able to claim a tax credit of up to $2,000 for installing rooftop panels.

http://gousoe.uen.org/8m8 (KUER)

 


 

Bill proposes reimbursing schools when students graduate early

 

SALT LAKE CITY — Utah legislators are considering “reimbursing” schools for students who graduate early through a program known as competency-based education.

Under a competency-based education model, a student who demonstrates mastery of a subject can advance rather than waiting to finish out the academic year or grade level.

The concept was first introduced in Utah in 2013, when the Legislature passed a bill allowing school districts and charter schools to establish competency-based education programs and asked the State School Board to recommend a funding formula for such a program.

However, due to the way they’re funded, schools stand to lose money for each student who graduates early, according to associate general counsel Victoria Ashby.

http://gousoe.uen.org/8lR (DNews)

 


Victims improving a day after Mountain View High stabbings

 

OREM — Students stabbed at Mountain View High School in an apparent random attack continued to improve Wednesday.

The news came as students who were not physically injured returned to school to try to resume normal class activities.

And Orem police continued to search for a possible motive as to why a 16-year-old boy allegedly stabbed five of his classmates before injuring himself with the same knife.

Just before 8 a.m. Tuesday, the 16-year-old boy stabbed five boys in the locker room in the gymnasium area at the school, police said. The 16-year-old has been described by district officials as a straight-A student with no history of problems who had recently enrolled at Mountain View after being home-schooled.

Injuries included wounds to some of the boys’ upper torsos and necks, police said.

http://gousoe.uen.org/8lS (DNews)

 


Granite early open enrollment begins Dec. 1

 

SOUTH SALT LAKE — Granite School District’s early open enrollment period for the 2017-18 school year begins Thursday, Dec. 1, and ends Tuesday, Feb. 21, 2017.

Open enrollment applications are available at all schools, and are processed in the order received. Students residing within district boundaries are given priority. Enrollment depends on space available in the requested grade, class or program, and requests do not require a release from the student’s home school or district.

A one-time, nonrefundable $5 processing fee, payable to the requested school, may be charged at the time the application is submitted. That fee can be waived for qualified applicants.

http://gousoe.uen.org/8lT (Dnews)

 


Syracuse athletics makes place for students with disabilities

 

SYRACUSE — Craig Lawrence sits dutifully on the sidelines, watching the Syracuse High School football team run through tackling drills.

Craig is a team manager — a somewhat glorified title for what many would simply call a “water boy.” But make no mistake, it’s an important job. He helps make sure his fellow students remain hydrated during physical exertion.

The 16-year-old has autism and a learning disability, so he doesn’t say much while sitting on the sideline, and he makes only minimal eye contact. Ask him a direct question and he awkwardly looks away. Sometimes, if you’re lucky, you can coax out a one-word “yes” or “no” answer, or a subtle nod of the head. But more often than not, he simply averts his eyes, and you get the impression he’s convincing himself that when he looks back, you’ll be gone.

Believe it or not, that’s an improvement.

http://gousoe.uen.org/8lW (SE)

 


Three new people elected to Davis School Board

 

Three new members have been elected to the Davis School District Board of Education.

Liz Mumford was elected to Precinct 1 and Brigit Gerrard was elected to Precinct 4, replacing board members Barbara Smith and Kathie Bone who chose not to run. John Robison was elected, defeating board member Larry Smith in Precinct 2.

Mumford graduated from Brigham Young University with a degree in elementary and early childhood education and now has four children enrolled in Davis School District schools, according to her website. She has worked as an enrichment teacher, international language curriculum developer and teacher and youth counselor.

Mumford has four children attending Davis School District Schools and said she wants to be an advocate for parents.

“I’ve got my skin in the game with kids in school and I want to make sure I’m representing all parents,” she said.

http://gousoe.uen.org/8lX SE)

 


Mountain View stabbing suspect booked on attempted murder charges

 

A student who reportedly stabbed five classmates at Mountain View High School on Tuesday has been booked on five attempted murder charges.

Six students, including the reported suspect, were injured at about 8 a.m. Tuesday in a locker room while getting ready for a physical education class. Staff cornered the 16-year-old suspect in the bathroom area until a school resource officer arrived and took the boy into custody.

The entire incident took place in six minutes because of the on-site resource officer, according to David Stephenson, a spokesperson for Alpine School District.

http://gousoe.uen.org/8lY (DH)

 


Teacher comes face to face with Mountain View student on rampage

 

Orem, Utah — (KUTV) Coach Jordan Blanchard was in the hallway of Mountain View High School early Tuesday morning, when a student rushed up to him, covered in blood, looking for help.

“A young man who had been injured came to me and said, ‘coach there is something going on in the locker room,’ ” said Blanchard.

The coach, rather than gathering up a handful of students and running out of the school, ran past fleeing students, towards the locker room. Inside he saw one student on the ground bleeding, and a teen with a knife in the bathroom, Blanchard starting talking to the boy.

“I was able to approach him and talk to him a little bit and try to calm him,” said Blanchard.

http://gousoe.uen.org/8m2 (KUTV)

 


Staff who responded to stabbing in Orem high school locker room share their story

 

OREM, Utah – New details were released Wednesday surrounding the stabbing of six students, including the student suspect, at Mountain View High School.

Principal Taran Chun said the bell rang and then he heard what happened from a student witness.

“This young man runs up to me with all the urgency and says, ‘Principal, principal, principal! Someone is trying to kill people in the boy’s locker room.’ And I went running,” Chun said.

A victim who was holding his bloodied neck ran up to a health and weight training teacher named Jordan Blanchard.

“All the training and all the preparation in the world doesn’t prepare you for that,” Blanchard said.

He was one of the first to rush inside the locker room.

http://gousoe.uen.org/8m6 (Fox13)

 


Mountain View High holds parent-teacher conferences one day after student stabs 5 classmates

 

OREM, Utah – Three times a year, the Alpine School District holds parent-teacher conferences, and it just so happened one of those conferences was scheduled the day after a violent attack in the Mountain View High School boys’ locker room.

Five students were transported to the hospital with serious but not life-threatening injuries after a fellow classmate began stabbing them.

“That’s part of the reason I came, not because my kid is struggling in school, but mostly because I want to know that the school is a safe place to send him every day,” said parent Malia Alder.

Alder is grateful that Mountain View has been so open and honest.

http://gousoe.uen.org/8m7 (Fox13)

 


Logan teacher receives grant to help teenage mothers complete their education

 

Not only is Laura Santos a student at Utah State University, but she is also an educator at Kairos Academy, a charter school in West Valley City. Santos is helping others complete their education while continuing to work on her master’s degree.

A few weeks ago, Santos was awarded a 2016 Smart Women Grant for her dedication to her own education, as well as her commitment to helping teenage mothers complete their high school education at Kairos Academy.

The Logan student says she plans on using half of the $3,000 grant money to continue her education at USU, while donating the other half to Kairos Academy to help with their drop-out prevention program.

http://gousoe.uen.org/8m0 (CVD)

 


10,000 Students attend Anti-Bullying Assembly at Vivint Smart Home Arena

 

SALT LAKE CITY (ABC4 Utah) – A massive anti-bullying assembly was held at the Vivint Smart Home Arena Wednesday. Thousands of students from Northern Utah all the way to down St. George were in attendance thanks to the Utah Anti-Bullying Coalition.

The message was less about learning how not to be a bully, but rather how to be a someone’s champion; how to be kind and how that kindness can make a difference in someone’s life.

Close to ten-thousand students heard the message today. The organizer of the event called it a school assembly on steroids. That’s because there were several guest speakers including Rosalind Wiseman, the author of the best-selling book Queen Bees and Wannabees: Helping Your Daughter Survive Cliques, Gossip, Boyfriends and the New Realities of Girl World, which was the basis for the movie Mean Girls. The program also included music from Orem-based band Foreign Figures and Lukas Graham.

http://gousoe.uen.org/8m1 (ABC4UT)

 


The Canyon View High School Talon’s Drill Team to host their annual Craft Fair starting Friday November 18

 

CEDAR CITY, Utah – The Canyon View High School Talons drill team will host its annual fundraising craft fair at Canyon View High school on Friday November 18 from 5pm to 9pm and Saturday November 19 from 9am to 5pm. Admission is $1.00 per person.

Yes, a special guest will make an appearance. Santa will be there on Friday from 630pm-7pm and on Saturday from 11am-2pm.

The craft fair is a staple in Cedar City and Southern Utah and is very well known. Booths are sold out long before November to local crafters, and local vendors.

Not only will you be able to do some Christmas shopping but, local dance groups and choirs from area elementary schools will be on hand to show off their dancing and singing skills.

A bake sale will be available for those who need a little snack while shopping.

http://gousoe.uen.org/8m4 (KCSG)

 


Local Students Place in Radon Poster Contest

 

ST GEORGE, Utah – The Utah Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) has announced the five Utah student winners for the 2017 National Radon Poster Contest.

Among the winners was Sofia Hancock, a seventh-grader from Fossil Ridge Intermediate School in St. George.

She will receive $100, along with $100 for her school, and will have the opportunity to meet Governor Herbert in January for Radon Awareness Month.

There were over 500 entries from around the state; illustrating the dangers of radon, where it comes from, how it gets into our homes, and how residents can test their homes for this invisible, radioactive gas.

http://gousoe.uen.org/8m5 (KCSG)

 


Utah budget: 10K more students next year to cost $115M

 

SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — State lawmakers will need to find $115 million next year to cover 10,000 more students that are expected to be in public schools next fall.

The Salt Lake Tribune reports (http://bit.ly/2fYRbEv ) that’s on top of $15 million Utah needs to cover higher-than-expected enrollment this year.

Despite the extra students, the growth in enrollment has slowed down, with the number of students growing about 1.5 percent next…

http://gousoe.uen.org/8m9 (EdWeek)

http://gousoe.uen.org/8ma (Fox13)

 

 

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OPINION & COMMENTARY

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STEM teachers may need a premium to stay in class Salt Lake Tribune editorial

 

The Utah State Auditor has joined the chorus of educators who say low pay is contributing to the teacher shortage in Utah, but he’s singing solo when he raises the possibility of paying math teachers more than others.

The auditor put out a brief, four-page comparison of starting salaries for education majors in Utah vs. other majors. The results largely confirm what is already known anecdotally: First-year teachers are among the lowest paid college graduates.

John Dougall, a Republican and former Utah legislator, is largely in agreement with teacher advocates and the Utah Education Association in promoting the idea that higher pay in other fields is drawing potential teachers away from the teaching profession, particularly in the “STEM” fields.

While an education graduate can expect an entry-level salary of around $36,000, those who major in computer science or engineering can expect $20,000 more, or higher. “The public education system should reconsider its compensation practices, particularly in regards to this information and the competing opportunities graduates have,” the report said.

http://gousoe.uen.org/8lO

 


Parents must teach children civil discourse, not bullying Deseret News editorial commentary

 

Reports that school children of Hispanic and Muslim backgrounds have been harassed by fellow students in the wake of last week’s election should be troubling to everyone and acceptable to no one. The state’s governor and superintendent of schools have strongly condemned such behavior, and to that condemnation we add our voice.

There is no justification for allowing attitudes of intolerance and prejudice to seep into society. We don’t know how common such acts of taunting or bullying have been, but not a single incident should ever be abided by any responsible person, and that goes for the parents of those children who may be influencing such behavior. Such actions are nothing less than an extenuation of bigotry.

http://gousoe.uen.org/8lU

 


A U.S. Teacher’s Perspective on the Finnish Education System: What Can We Learn from Each Other?

Huffington Post blog by Leticia Guzman Ingram, 2016 Colorado State Teacher of the Year.

 

Teachers constantly hear how American’s education system is broken and not performing at the same level as other countries in the world. I recently returned from a trip to Finland so I could better understand why its students are performing at such a high level and what we could learn from them to improve our own schools. This trip was organized through a collaboration between the Council of Chief State School Officers (CCSSO), which runs the National Teacher of the Year Program, and EF Education First. While in Finland, I had opportunities to visit schools and converse with many educators. I experienced different aspects of the Finnish culture and learned about the supports that exist for educators in their country. Here are a few key takeaways from Finland that inspired me while also making me feel proud about the things we’re doing right here in the U.S.

http://gousoe.uen.org/8md

 

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NATIONAL NEWS

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Donald Trump has little power to scrap Common Core Must convince states to follow his vow

 

Donald Trump vowed to scrap Common Core if elected to the White House, but supporters and critics alike agree the incoming president has little, if any, power over the education standards that already are in place across the vast majority of states.

Making good on his campaign promise to get rid of the standards — which he repeated throughout the GOP primary and general-election campaign — would depend almost entirely on Mr. Trump using his bully pulpit to convince states to dump Common Core, scholars say. The nature of the system gives virtually all authority to the states, and a Trump administration will face an uphill climb in convincing many of those states to abandon the standards.

“I don’t think there’s a federal lever there, and many of us made this point throughout the campaign that we’re not sure why Donald Trump thinks he can [eliminate Common Core]. This is not a promise he’s going to be able to keep,” said Michael Petrilli, president of the Thomas B. Fordham Institute, a leading education think tank, adding that Mr. Trump also would run into philosophical problems in telling states what to do with education policy.

http://gousoe.uen.org/8m3 (WaPo)

 


Betsy DeVos could be Trump nominee for secretary of education

 

Republican activist Betsy DeVos, a strong supporter of charter schools and school choice, is being cited by national publications as being among the candidates president-elect Donald Trump is considering for U.S. Secretary of Education.

DeVos, the wife of Dick DeVos, joins several other Michiganders, including former U.S. Rep. Pete Hoekstra of Holland and Ronna Romney McDaniel, the chairwoman of the Michigan Republican Party, who have been mentioned as potentially securing key roles in the Trump administration.

DeVos’ background would be a fit for Trump’s plans to boost school choice in the U.S., particularly for high-poverty students. She is on the board of directors for the Great Lakes Education Project, which advocates for school choice and charter schools. She also chairs the board of directors of the American Federation for Children, another choice advocacy group.

http://gousoe.uen.org/8mb (DFP)

 


L.A.’s education board sends a message to Trump: Schools will stay ‘safe zones’ for students here illegally

 

The nation’s second-largest school system on Tuesday sent a message to President-elect Donald Trump: Los Angeles’ public schools will continue to be “safe zones” for students in the U.S. illegally.

The Los Angeles Board of Education voted to approve a resolution reaffirming L.A. Unified’s current policy, which directs school staff members not to allow federal Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents onto school campuses unless their visit has been approved by the superintendent and the district’s lawyers. Board members also seconded a policy that protects the immigration information and identities of students, family members and school staff.

Board members also agreed to write a joint letter to Trump “affirming the American ideals that are celebrated in Los Angeles.”

http://gousoe.uen.org/8mc (LAT)

 


Former D.C. schools chancellor violated ethics rules when asking for donations

 

Former D.C. Public Schools Chancellor Kaya Henderson violated the city’s ethics rules when she solicited a donation from a major food service contractor shortly after a whistleblower lawsuit accused the company of swindling millions of dollars from the school system, according to a ruling from the D.C.’s Board of Ethics and Government Accountability.

The ethics board decided to censure the former chancellor — issuing a formal statement of disapproval — but did not fine Henderson for the missteps. Henderson left her job in October.

Henderson said she was unaware that she was breaking any rules at the time, noting that her predecessor also solicited donations from contractors, according to case documents the ethics board released.

http://gousoe.uen.org/8me (WaPo)

 


Superintendent Defends Staff Over Overcooked School Burger

 

DUBOIS, Pa. (AP) — A Pennsylvania school district superintendent is defending his food service staff over a photo of an overcooked school cafeteria hamburger that was posted online.

A student at DuBois Area High School posted the picture on the town’s regional Facebook page to show people what a friend was served at school on Monday.

Superintendent Luke Lansberry says cafeteria workers are required to cook burgers to at least 155 degrees but were cooking burgers to 170 degrees. He says the burger depicted is the only one of 300 served that drew a complaint and wishes the student would have just returned it for a new one.

Lansberry says the burger was provided in a “government commodity” program through a vendor.

http://gousoe.uen.org/8mf (AP)

 


High school program teaches job skills to disabled students

 

CHEYENNE, Wyo. (AP) — Cheyenne’s South High is furthering its focus on preparing its students for careers after high school.

Riccardo Castle and Katie Rhoads recently received a $996 grant from the Cheyenne Schools Foundation to help students with severe disabilities learn job skills at the school and in the community, reported the Wyoming Tribune Eagle (http://bit.ly/2fag8LR).

“We’re trying to teach our students some work skills and habits,” Rhoads said. She is an occupational therapist at South High.

Castle, a teacher in South High’s Program for Adaptive Living Skills (PALS), added, “We want to make them more independent and…

http://gousoe.uen.org/8mg (EdWeek)

 

 

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CALENDAR

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USBE Calendar

http://www.schools.utah.gov/main/CALENDAR.aspx

 

 

UEN News

http://www.uen.org

 

December 8:

Utah State Charter School Board meeting; Board Room

http://www.schools.utah.gov/charterschools/State-Board.aspx

 

December 8:

Utah State Board of Education Committee meetings; Board Room

http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspx

 

December 9:

Utah State Board of Education meeting; Board Room

http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspx

 

 

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