Education News Roundup: Nov. 22 – 2017

Graduation Cap Cupcake

Graduation Cap Cupcake/clevercupcakes/CC/flickr

Today’s Top Picks:

 

Utah’s High School Graduation Rate Rises to 85 Percent in 2016 http://gousoe.uen.org/8nH (UTPublicEd)

 

REL Study Challenges the Traditional Perception That When Students Drop Out They Leave School Permanently http://gousoe.uen.org/8nD (IES)

 

Commentary: What the Best School Districts Do Right

http://gousoe.uen.org/8o0 (EdWeek)

 

New study shows variety in teachers’ influences on kids’ futures, and how poorly we measure that http://gousoe.uen.org/8nV (THR)

 

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TODAY’S HEADLINES

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UTAH

 

Utah’s High School Graduation Rate Rises to 85 Percent in 2016

 

Education under Trump: Some Utahns hoping for less oversight, more state control

 

Two Corner Canyon High students killed in Draper rollover Teens remembered as kind, caring as hundreds attend vigil

 

Provo Rotary Club giving dictionaries to third-grade students

 

Canyons’ open enrollment begins Dec. 1

 

Nebo School District weighing grade reconfiguration

 

Westlake High School’s marching band heading to Rose Parade

 

REL Study Challenges the Traditional Perception That When Students Drop Out They Leave School Permanently

 

Teens in school shooting had been arguing over girl, police say

 

Former Coach Facing New Sex Related Charges

 

Dixie State University helps high schools celebrate Utah College Application Week

 


OPINION & COMMENTARY

 

Online school

 

Trump won. What’s next for education?

 

DeVos would bring innovation to schools

 

What the Best School Districts Do Right

 


NATIONAL NEWS

 

To help low-income kids, more schools try dual-language programs

 

Where Donald Trump Stands on School Choice, Student Debt and Common Core

 

School bus driver charged in deadly Chattanooga crash

 

New study shows variety in teachers’ influences on kids’ futures, and how poorly we measure that

 

Education Secretary calls on all states to abandon corporal punishment

 

Oakland Schools Chief to Take Over as DC Schools Chancellor

 

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UTAH NEWS

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Utah’s High School Graduation Rate Rises to 85 Percent in 2016

 

SALT LAKE CITY – A total of 38,326 students graduated from Utah’s public high schools in 2016 bringing the total high school graduation rate to 85 percent, an increase of 1 percentage point over 2014, according to data released today by the Utah State Board of Education (USBE). The Utah high school graduation rate has increased 6.4 percent over the past five years.

Year-to-year graduation rates increased for most demographic subgroups in Utah in 2016. The exceptions are for white students, Hispanic students, and English language learner students, where the rate held steady between 2015 and 2016, and economically disadvantaged students, where the rate declined from 76 to 75 percent.

http://gousoe.uen.org/8nH (UTPublicEd)

 


Education under Trump: Some Utahns hoping for less oversight, more state control School choice, vouchers and curbing the role of the Department of Education are among Trump’s immediate goals, but there are limits to what a president can do legally.

 

President-elect Donald Trump’s candidacy was most known for hard-line stances on immigration, trade and divisive rhetoric on race, religion and gender.

Less clear is what approach the nation’s 45th president will take toward schooling.

“Donald Trump barely mentioned public education on the campaign trail,” said Heidi Matthews, Utah Education Association president.

Like many Republicans, Trump is critical of Common Core State Standards — a “total disaster,” he said — while supporting free-market education approaches such as vouchers, charter schools and private schools.

Trump also has advocated dismantling or reducing the Department of Education, which oversees federal laws such as Title I and Title IX that require equal opportunity for students independent of income levels and gender, respectively http://gousoe.uen.org/8nv (SLTrib)

 


Two Corner Canyon High students killed in Draper rollover Teens remembered as kind, caring as hundreds attend vigil

 

DRAPER — Hundreds of teenagers gathered to comfort one another at Draper Park Sunday the mourn the deaths of two Corner Canyon High School students.

The teens were killed in a one-car rollover late Saturday when they were thrown from the vehicle that was carrying five 16 year olds.

Ethan Fraga and Lexie Fenton were remembered as popular students known for their happy personalities and kind attitudes Sunday as their friends and classmates met. Despite the rainy weather, a steady stream of people flowed in and out of the park throughout the evening, their cars filling surrounding neighborhoods when lots overflowed.

Some teens carried flowers or small lights. Many wrote messages on balloons before releasing them into the night air.

http://gousoe.uen.org/8nw (DNews)

http://gousoe.uen.org/8nK (KUTV)

http://gousoe.uen.org/8nN (Fox13)

 


Provo Rotary Club giving dictionaries to third-grade students

 

PROVO — Third-grade students at each elementary school in the Provo School District have been receiving an early Christmas gift this year — their own dictionaries.

The dictionaries are being distributed by members of the Provo Rotary Club as part of their community service efforts.

Before passing out the dictionaries, members of the club have been discussing the importance for students to develop their vocabulary and continue their education. Club members hope the students will be able to utilize the dictionaries throughout the rest of their elementary and middle school years.

Shorten

http://gousoe.uen.org/8nx (DNews)

 


Canyons’ open enrollment begins Dec. 1

 

SANDY — The Canyons School District’s early open enrollment period for the 2017-18 school year begins Thursday, Dec. 1, and ends Friday, Feb. 17, 2017.

School transfers are approved when space is available and on a first-come, first-served basis. Parents are responsible for providing transportation for transfer students.

Once a school administrator approves an open-enrollment permit, the permit will renew automatically every year as long as the student remains at the same school and the permit is not revoked. Permits must be renewed when a student advances from elementary to middle school or from middle school to high school.

http://gousoe.uen.org/8ny (DNews)

 


Nebo School District weighing grade reconfiguration

 

Middle schools could return to Nebo School District for the fall of 2020.

The district is considering changing its current grade reconfiguration as part of a bond that will potentially go before voters in 2018. The district can bond for $150 million without raising the current tax rate. Although projects for the bond haven’t been drafted yet, if passed, the money will likely go to build new schools and address other facility needs.

The district sent out a survey to parents last week asking for input on future grade configuration options. They have until Nov. 30 to answer the survey, which was sent out through the district’s messaging system.

http://gousoe.uen.org/8nA (DH)

 


Westlake High School’s marching band heading to Rose Parade

 

The Marching Thunder is heading to California in 2018.

Westlake High School’s marching band will perform in the 2018 Tournament of Roses Parade, on New Year’s Day in Pasadena, California.

Gary Twitchell, the principal of the Saratoga Springs school, said despite Westlake High School being a fairly new school, he isn’t surprised it was chosen. The Marching Thunder is one of the top marching bands in the state.

“It just goes to show a lot of hard work by the kids and of course the director to be recognized that way,” Twitchell said.

The band is fundraising to offset some of the costs of going to the parade. Anyone can donate to the band through the Alpine School District Foundation.

http://gousoe.uen.org/8nB (DH)

 


REL Study Challenges the Traditional Perception That When Students Drop Out They Leave School Permanently

 

About a quarter of Utah students who dropped out and re-enrolled graduated on time with their peers, while another 30 percent graduated within six years, according to a new report.

The new study from Regional Educational Laboratory West was conducted in partnership with the Utah State Office of Education and examined data on students who were expected to graduate from Utah public schools in 2011 (entered high school in 2007-08). The report describes the prevalence, characteristics, and high school outcomes of dropouts who re-enroll. Among the findings:

  • About one-fifth (19 percent) of students in Utah’s 2011 graduating cohort dropped out at some point during high school;
  • 22 percent of those who dropped out had re-enrolled by 2011; http://gousoe.uen.org/8nD (IES)

 


Teens in school shooting had been arguing over girl, police say

 

SALT LAKE CITY — A 14-year-old boy and a 16-year-old he is accused of shooting outside a middle school had reportedly been actively arguing on social media over a girl.

When the two finally met on the north end of the Union Middle School grounds, 615 E. 8000 South, just as class was letting out on Oct. 25, Joshua Cordova reportedly came up to the 14-year-old boy and dared him to shoot.

“Joshua approached (the boy) and stuck his arms out telling (the boy) to shoot him and reunite him with his deceased mother. (The boy) removed a firearm from his backpack and held it at his side as Josh continued to yell at him, telling him to shoot him,” according to a search warrant affidavit unsealed Monday.

http://gousoe.uen.org/8nE (KSL)

http://gousoe.uen.org/8nI (KUTV)

 


Former Coach Facing New Sex Related Charges

 

TOOELE COUNTY, Utah (ABC4 Utah) – Curtis Ware is facing 12 new sex related charges involving a 16 and 17 year old student. The former Grantsville High School Football Coach and teacher will be in court Tuesday to hear the new charges.

The felony charges include one count of forcible sodomy, three counts of sexual exploitation of a minor, and four counts of forcible sexual abuse. Another four counts of lewdness are misdemeanors.

Court documents claim these acts happened between May 23rd and August 23rd of this year.

Ware was arrested back in September after the two students came forward to the Grantsville High School principle. He was only charged by Grantsville City with sexual battery and lewdness which are both misdemeanors.

After further investigation Tooele County Attorney’s Office decided to file new charges over the weekend. Even though the forcible sodomy is alleged to have happened in Iron county the case will be handled in the Tooele County Courts.

http://gousoe.uen.org/8nL (ABC4UT)

 


Dixie State University helps high schools celebrate Utah College Application Week

 

ST GEORGE, Utah – Dixie State University is celebrating Utah College Application Week by hosting assemblies complete with presentations from recent graduates and Dixie State President Richard “Biff” Williams, giveaways, and appearances by mascot Brooks the Bison.

Under the direction of the Utah System of Higher Education Outreach and Access Department, Utah College Application Week provides high school seniors at partner schools the opportunity to complete at least one college or university application during the school day. Particular focus is placed on students who would be the first in their families to attend college, low-income students and students who may not have otherwise considered applying.

http://gousoe.uen.org/8nP (KCSG)

 

 

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OPINION & COMMENTARY

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Online school

Deseret News letter by Sophia Perkins

 

I attend online school at Utah Connections Academy. There are many reasons as to why I am thankful for this school option: I am able to move at my own pace, I have done so much better than I did in traditional school, and it helps with my schedule. When I attended traditional high school, I wasn’t able to move at my own pace; sometimes I needed to go slower and other times I wanted to go faster. In online school I can take my time, and even if I fall behind I don’t feel pressured to constantly get caught up — this helps especially in math.

Online school, honestly, helped me become more successful in my academic career. I have a very time-dependent schedule. I am a teen parent, which I am proud of, and I am also working on getting a part-time job. Attending UCA helps me because I can work around my own schedule and at my own pace. The main reason I am thankful for UCA is the teachers and all their help. They always respond to every webmail I send, call me when I need them to, and help in live lessons. No matter how many times I ask, they are always very helpful.

http://gousoe.uen.org/8nz

 


Trump won. What’s next for education?

Sutherland Institute commentary by Christine Cooke

 

Trump won. What does this mean for education? The answer is – we’re not quite sure yet. At Sutherland Institute, we hope Trump respects the uniqueness of each individual’s God-given ability to learn and accomplish great things by re-empowering states with power to make education policy decisions; championing educational choice; and emphasizing parental involvement.

Education was not a top issue for either candidate this election cycle, so we’re left to make predictions based on a handful of statements. During his campaign, Trump suggested closing the U.S. Department of Education; spending $20 billion on expanding vouchers so students could use federal money to attend the school of their choice; and getting rid of Common Core (which would have to be done by the states, not the federal government).

http://gousoe.uen.org/8nQ

 


DeVos would bring innovation to schools

Detroit News editorial

 

President-elect Donald Trump interviewed Michigan’s Betsy DeVos over the weekend for possible appointment as education secretary. She would be an inspired choice.

DeVos is a powerful advocate for education innovation, and is committed to the principle that every student should have the opportunity to learn in a quality school.

She and her husband, Dick DeVos, the billionaire former chairman of Grand Rapids-based Amway Corp., have turned most of their recent attention and philanthropy towards improving education choices for parents.

Her philosophy is that there is no single answer to the education puzzle, but rather different options are required for different children and circumstances. She also advocates for modernizing how children are taught, and being open to new methods of learning.

http://gousoe.uen.org/8nZ

 


What the Best School Districts Do Right

Four lessons for better district-school coherence

Education Week commentary by Susan Moore Johnson

 

Education reformers in the United States have long debated whether school districts should centralize decision-making authority in the district office or decentralize it to let schools take the reins. At the start of the 21st century, new state and federal accountability policies—with their widely publicized results on standardized tests and penalties for schools that failed to meet improvement targets—led central-office administrators to closely manage schools. Now, with the growth of charter schools, the policy pendulum has started to swing back toward decentralization of districts, giving both traditional public schools as well as public charters more autonomy.

http://gousoe.uen.org/8o0

 

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NATIONAL NEWS

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To help low-income kids, more schools try dual-language programs

With eye toward equity, schools in low-income, black neighborhoods try controversial approach. Part 1 of 2.

WASHINGTON—In Ivonne Kendrick’s classroom at Houston Elementary School, 3-year-olds sit cross-legged in a circle, listening to their teacher sing about the fall season.

“Llega el otoño tras el verano,” (Autumn comes after summer), they repeat after her in Spanish. One month into the school’s new dual-language program, their accents are unmistakably American. But they know how to ask for a manzana, or apple, at snack time and recognize that when Ms. Kendrick says “fila,” that’s their cue to form a line. The next day, the students will continue their lessons in English, alternating between the two languages throughout the week.

Houston is a low-performing school in the Deanwood neighborhood of Washington. Its dual-language program is the first to be offered in the area east of the Anacostia River, home to the city’s two poorest wards. The school’s student body is almost entirely African-American.

http://gousoe.uen.org/8nt (TCM)

 


Where Donald Trump Stands on

School Choice, Student Debt and

Common Core

 

When it comes to predicting how President­elect Donald J. Trump’s administration

will affect America’s schools and universities, education experts say they are

struggling to read the tea leaves.

“The fundamental issue is that nobody really knows what the Trump

administration is about” on education, said Frederick M. Hess, a conservative

education policy expert. At a panel discussion in Washington last week, he joked that

Mr. Trump’s trademark educational achievement thus far, creating the controversial

Trump University, placed him in history alongside another president, Thomas

Jefferson, the founder of the University of Virginia.

http://gousoe.uen.org/8nu (NYT)

 


School bus driver charged in deadly Chattanooga crash

 

CHATTANOOGA, Tenn. (AP) — A school bus driver who authorities say was speeding along a narrow, winding Tennessee road when he wrapped his vehicle around a tree was arrested and charged with vehicular homicide in the deaths of five children.

Calling the Monday afternoon crash “every public safety professional’s worst nightmare,” Chattanooga Police Chief Fred Fletcher told an overnight news conference that 24-year-old bus driver Johnthony Walker was also charged with reckless driving and reckless endangerment.

Investigators were looking at speed “very, very strongly” as a factor in the crash, Fletcher said earlier. An arrest affidavit posted online by Chattanooga station WTVC says Walker was driving well above the posted 30 mph speed limit on a narrow, winding road when he lost control of the bus. His bond was set at $107,500, according to the affidavit.

http://gousoe.uen.org/8nC (KSL)

http://gousoe.uen.org/8nM (Fox13)

http://gousoe.uen.org/8nR (UPR)

 


New study shows variety in teachers’ influences on kids’ futures, and how poorly we measure that

 

On the first day of school, Taylor Delhagen directs his ninth-grade students to write “tweets” about Michael Brown’s killing in Ferguson based on different depictions of events he posted around the room.

When children in Classroom A and Classroom B show the same improvement on their math tests, Teachers A and B get the same evaluation score, and the assumption is that both teachers excel at the same things.

But that assumption may be entirely wrong. Teacher A is a rock star when it comes to imparting math content while Teacher B is not, but Teacher B excels at getting students to persevere when they hit obstacles. So the Classroom A students did well on their tests because they knew the content, while the Classroom B kids did well because they didn’t give up easily and reviewed their answers.

http://gousoe.uen.org/8nV (THR)

 


Education Secretary calls on all states to abandon corporal punishment

The Obama administration Tuesday called for an end to corporal punishment in states and school districts that continue to

allow the practice.

In a letter to governors and state school leaders, U.S. Education Secretary John B. King, Jr., called corporal punishment

“harmful, ineffective, and often disproportionately applied to students of color and students with disabilities.”

He urged states that had not yet ended corporal punishment — generally defined as paddling, caning or otherwise using

physical force to inflict pain as punishment — to “eliminate this practice from your schools, and instead promote supportive,

effective disciplinary measures.”

While corporal punishment is banned in 28 states and the District of Columbia, there are 15 states that permit the practice and

seven more that do not expressly prohibit it.

http://gousoe.uen.org/8nX (WaPo)

 


Oakland Schools Chief to Take Over as DC Schools Chancellor

 

The superintendent of public schools in Oakland, California, is heading east to take over public schools in the District of Columbia.

Mayor Muriel Bowser announced at a news conference Tuesday that she is naming Antwan Wilson as the city’s schools chancellor.

Wilson replaces Kaya Henderson, who led District schools for 5 ? years and built a reputation as a national leader in urban education reform. Test scores and graduation rates increased under Henderson, but the huge achievement gap between white students and non-Asian minorities held steady.

Henderson’s predecessor, Michelle Rhee, recently met with President-elect Donald Trump as he works to fill his Cabinet.

Wilson was Oakland’s superintendent for two years. In a letter to staff, he said improving schools in the nation’s capital “is more important now than ever.”

http://gousoe.uen.org/8nY (ABCNews)

 

 

 

 

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CALENDAR

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USBE Calendar

http://www.schools.utah.gov/main/CALENDAR.aspx

 

 

UEN News

http://www.uen.org

 

December 8:

Utah State Charter School Board meeting; Board Room

http://www.schools.utah.gov/charterschools/State-Board.aspx

 

December 8:

Utah State Board of Education Committee meetings; Board Room

http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspx

 

December 9:

Utah State Board of Education meeting; Board Room

http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspx

 

 

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