Education News Roundup: Jan. 19, 2017

Canyons School District

Today’s Top Picks:

School funding continues to be talked about ahead of the legislative session.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8ND (DN)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/8Oc (SGS)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/8NX (KSL)

Salt Lake Chamber will back education funding as part of its legislative priorities.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8Od (Utah Business)

Canyons District will seek waivers on middle school CTE courses.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8NO (DN)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/8NY (KSL)

Standard-Examiner looks at undocumented students in Utah schools.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8NQ (OSE)

Don’t forget: The Utah State Board of Education is holding a public hearing at 5:30 tonight on the Utah High School Activities Association Rule.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8NM (Athletic Business)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/8On (USBE)

ED backs down on spending rule in the new ESSA.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8O0 (NPR)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/8O4 (WaPo)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/8O9 (Ed Week)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/8Oa (Politico)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/8Ol (CNN)

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TODAY’S HEADLINES
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UTAH

Lawmakers discuss alternate solutions for Utah’s education budget

Canyons School Board votes to seek state waiver of two required courses

Undocumented: Impact of Trump’s Proposed Deportations Unclear for K-12 Students

UHSAA to Hold Hearing on Transfer Rule

Salt Lake Chamber Public Policy Guide Highlights Tax Reform, Education Funding

Davis School Board hires independent consultant for high school boundary study

New Air Guidelines Could Mean More Indoor Recess For Utah Students

Chasing buses – Nebo transportation maintenance keeps district moving

Utah State Director Martin Announces Impending Retirement

Jim Crosbie and Cache Valley Media Group honored by UHSAA

Snow days to be made up

In new book, Utah students send messages to President Trump
Books > Essays by six Utah teens included in book addressed to President Donald K. Trump.

“It’s like basketball for nerds”

Utah College Application Week helps seniors prepare for life after high school

Student’s Heart Revived by School Staff
Staff: He was purple & blue and looked lifeless

Former Elementary School To Become Dixie State Tech Center

Utah students head to DC to witness inauguration first hand

Nonprofit Helps Utah Students Find Free Dresses For Prom

No injuries after car collides with Jordan School District bus

Edith Bowen Laboratory School enrollment open

Open Houses for Catholic Schools Week

Poster contest for high school students intends to raise awareness of Gospel call for solidarity

Lt. Governor Cox to Speak at Charter Day on the Hill, A Showcase of Diverse School Choice Options

Spirits are high at Canyon View Elementary

Inside our schools

OPINION & COMMENTARY

Education tax hike initiative is creating the right kind of conversation

How to fund education and fight pollution

Betsy DeVos and Tom Price should make a huge difference for children

NATION

Education Department Drops Fight Over School Money

Ed Secretary John King tried to reform school discipline. He thinks we still have a long way to go.

Here are some of the protests planned for Trump’s inauguration

Teacher says he won’t show Trump inaugural address to students

Report: Need for Federal Investments in Early Learning Increasing

More Teachers Seek National Certification

With lightning speed, Betsy DeVos became a target of late-night comics

In Grizzly Country, DeVos’ Gun Remark Lands Differently

 

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UTAH NEWS
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Lawmakers discuss alternate solutions for Utah’s education budget

SALT LAKE CITY – A pair of lawmakers raised concerns Wednesday over appropriating funds for a potential education ballot initiative and suggested earmark budget reform as a way to find more funding for public schools.
Sen. Jerry Stevenson, R-Layton and chairman of the Executive Appropriations Committee, spoke at a panel hosted by the Salt Lake Chamber. He proposed changes to state budget earmarks as a means of freeing up money for increased spending on public education.
The panel addressed desires from a group of business leaders pushing for increased education spending as part of a potential 2018 ballot initiative. The group, Our Schools Now, want a state income tax increase of about 7/8 of 1 percent. The proposal would raise the tax rate from 5 percent to 5.875 percent and would generate about $750 million in new revenue for education.
“That translates into asking each Utah family to vote, if that’s where we do this, on the ballot to raise their taxes ($500) to $600 a year,” said Rep. Brad Wilson, R-Kaysville and Utah’s House majority leader. “That’s a pretty big ask.”
http://gousoe.uen.org/8ND (DN)

http://gousoe.uen.org/8Oc (SGS)

http://gousoe.uen.org/8NX (KSL)

 

Canyons School Board votes to seek state waiver of two required courses

SANDY – In a Tuesday night meeting that spilled over into the early hours of Wednesday, the Canyons Board of Education voted shortly before midnight to seek a waiver of two state-required courses for middle schoolers.
After hours of public comment from patrons who packed a standing room-only board chamber and an overflow room, the board also voted to change school day configurations at three middle schools – Eastmont, Indian Hills and Mount Jordan – moving to seven-period days from six periods in the next academic year.
The waiver would effectively press the pause button on implementing a state-required Digital Literacy course for eighth-graders and a full-year Career and College Awareness to be taken by sixth-graders.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8NO (DN)

http://gousoe.uen.org/8NY (KSL)

 

Undocumented: Impact of Trump’s Proposed Deportations Unclear for K-12 Students

OGDEN – Most local school districts don’t track immigration status, so although some educators are worried about the impacts of Donald Trump’s election on these students, no one knows exactly how many children will be affected.
In Utah, 7.4 percent of kindergarten through 12th grade students in public and private schools were children of unauthorized immigrants in 2014, according to Pew Research Center.
That’s in line with the national level – where 3.9 million students, or about 7.3 percent, were the children of illegal immigrants – but dramatically lower than neighboring states, which have some of the highest levels in the nation. In Nevada, 17.6 percent of students are the children of undocumented immigrants; in Arizona it’s 12.2 percent, and Colorado is at 10.2 percent.
Although Davis, Ogden and Weber school districts don’t track the immigration status of students or their parents, they do require proof of residency, such as a utility bill, lease, driver’s license or pay stub, to enroll.
“If they show documentation they’re currently a resident within our district boundaries, we welcome any parent who is willing to bring their kid to our schools,” Ogden School District spokesman Jer Bates said.
These districts offer English as a Second Language classes, but immigration status doesn’t play a role in enrollment for that class.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8NQ (OSE)

 

UHSAA to Hold Hearing on Transfer Rule

MIDVALE – The Utah High School Activities Association is hoping to convince the State Board of Education to reconsider a recently passed board rule governing transfers of high school athletes.
The board notified the UHSAA on Tuesday that it will hold a hearing on the rule Thursday at 5:30 p.m. The association plans to invite school officials from local school board members to principals to coaches to make their concerns known to the state board during that hearing.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8NM (Athletic Business)

http://gousoe.uen.org/8On (USBE)

 

Salt Lake Chamber Public Policy Guide Highlights Tax Reform, Education Funding

Salt Lake City-Education and tax reform were at the forefront of both the Salt Lake Chamber’s 2017 Public Policy Guide and the minds of legislators at a panel discussing the guide Wednesday.
Moderated by KSL’s Doug Wright, Salt Lake Chamber President and CEO Lane Beattie, Senator Jerry Stevenson and House Majority Leader Rep. Brad Wilson discussed lawmakers’ and the chamber’s top issues for this year’s session.
Each year, the Salt Lake Chamber releases a report informed by the concerns of the business community at large for perusal and consideration by lawmakers in the upcoming legislative session.
“It’s something that’s become very, very important to us as the voice of Salt Lake City’s businesses,” Beatty said. “The chamber utilizes this guide on a regular basis to promote policy.”
On the list is greater investment in education to help grow a skilled workforce; modernizing Utah’s tax code as part of solving future funding challenges-particularly for education; protecting non-compete agreements; supporting public-private partnerships; regulation reform; improving air quality; balancing alcohol laws; and creating a strategy to protect Utah’s water in the future. When Beatty was joined by Stevenson and Wilson to discuss the list, each item garnered discussion, but the first two items dominated the conversation.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8Od (Utah Business)

 

Davis School Board hires independent consultant for high school boundary study

FARMINGTON – The Davis School District has hired a consultant to work on a boundary study slated to start this fall.
The Board of Education unanimously voted to hire Darrell White, one of the district’s former superintendents. White worked on a 2006 boundary study involving Syracuse High School.
The new boundary study is needed for a new high school being built in Farmington as part of a $298 million bond passed in 2015.
Board member Tamara Lowe encouraged board members not to get involved or meet with small community groups because any positive feedback could be interpreted as a promise to approve certain boundaries.
“It’s really important for board members to stay the hell out of the game,” Lowe said.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8NR (OSE)

New Air Guidelines Could Mean More Indoor Recess For Utah Students

Elementary School administrators are keeping a close eye on Salt Lake County’s air quality this week. New and slightly stricter guidelines from the Utah Department of Health could mean a little less recess time this winter.
The Utah recess guidelines state clearly when students should stay indoors during recess because of bad air. It all comes down to particulate matter levels or PM 2.5.
Brittany Guerra of the Utah Asthma Program says schools used to let kids play outside with levels up to 90. “It’s now lowered to 55.4 which is right when the red starts,” she says.
If the air quality is red or purple, all students stay inside.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8O1 (KUER)

 

Chasing buses – Nebo transportation maintenance keeps district moving

Many people go about doing good deeds in their families, neighborhoods, organizations and church congregations. “Utah Valley’s Everyday Heroes” celebrates these unsung community members and brings to light their quiet contributions.
The Tuesday morning after Martin Luther King Jr. Day, Nebo School District’s transportation department has just a few buses in their Payson shop to work on.
With one of the big yellow buses on a hoist and elevated a few feet off the ground, the workers stand underneath it, focused on fixing its electrical issue.
While things were a little bit slower this week after several sunny days, just a few weeks ago the 10-person team was busy clearing parking lots and pulling out buses that were stuck all across the county.
Chris Wright, shop foreman, said during that four-day week, each employee worked roughly 80 hours and came in at all times of day and night to make sure that school could continue safely and in a timely fashion.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8NS (PDH)

 

Utah State Director Martin Announces Impending Retirement

After more than a decade overseeing the pupil transportation program for the Utah State Department of Education, Murrell Martin is retiring from this role, effective Feb. 1.
Martin has devoted a total of 34 years to the industry, starting in 1982 as a substitute school bus driver while attending Utah State University. He graduated in 1985 with a business and psychology degree.
“At the time, I did not envision it being a career,” he told STN. “In a short period, I grew to enjoy the challenges and rewards of school bus driving.”
He logged nine years behind the wheel, after which he was promoted to transportation supervisor for the Cache County School District. During his tenure at this northern Utah district, he said he focused on driver training and route coordination.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8NL (School Transportation News)

Jim Crosbie and Cache Valley Media Group honored by UHSAA

High school coaches, administrators and officials gathered at the Sleepy Ridge Country Club in Orem Wednesday to participated in the Utah High School Activities Association’s Distinguished Service Awards. Fifteen individuals were honored for their dedication to high school sports and activities.
The UHSAA Distinguished Service Award was initiated in 1987 to honor individuals for their service and contributions to high school activities. According to the UHSAA, each recipient was chosen because of the standards of excellence they exemplify through their service, professional responsibilities, leadership and sportsmanship.
Among those recognized Wednesday was Ridgeline Athletic Director Jim Crosbie. Crosbie was recognized as the Athletic Director of the year among the 149 member schools. Crosbie was nominated and introduced by Ridgeline High School Principal Bob Henke. Henke detailed the long history he and Crosbie have shared together. Not only are they working together at Ridgeline, but they also worked together for over a decade at Mountain Crest High School.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8NU (CVD)

Snow days to be made up

Weather related items were the topic of lengthy discussion at the recent school board meeting.
The two “snow days” forcing cancellation of schools the early part of January have to be made up as per state mandate. Severe monetary consequences for the district would occur if this mandate were not followed, said Superintendent Ron Tolman.
Several alternatives for attendance were suggested during the discussion including extending school through the end of May. Keeping in mind plans already made by teachers and parents for the school year and the current calendar, and guided by Superintendent Tolman, the board voted that students would attend school Feb. 20, Presidents’ Day, and March 3, a teacher preparation day, as make up days.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8Oj (Tremonton Leader)

 

In new book, Utah students send messages to President Trump
Books > Essays by six Utah teens included in book addressed to President Donald K. Trump.

If Brea Fournier, a 16-year-old from Cottonwood Heights, could talk to soon-to-be President Donald J. Trump, she would tell him she is very passionate about human rights.
She would convey her concerns “in a respectful way,” she says, while asking Trump to “remember that blacks, whites, Latinos, Muslims, Jews, Christians, atheists, men, women, and LGBTQ” are all Americans. “Please defend their rights as much as you would defend your own,” the Utah teen would say respectfully. “I’m asking you to remember that on the inside, we all look the same. And we all want a nation of peace.”
Despite the ugliness of the recent election, Fournier, who attends the Salt Lake School for the Performing Arts, expresses great hope for the future. “The divide is actually mobilizing my generation more,” she said in a phone interview Thursday. “Our generation is really going to have to work to get back to the middle, and back to listening to one another.”
Another Utah teen, Emma Fryer, 17, of West Jordan, would also call on the president to remember that diversity is what makes our country great. “I hope that he listens to everyone in America,” she said in a phone interview.
Brea and Emma’s letters to Trump are among the six essays by Utah teens included in a just-released anthology, “Dear Mr. President: Teen Voices From Across the Country.” “I am hopeful, I am scared, I am proud, I am hurt, I am invigorated,” Emma wrote in her essay.
The book was the brainchild of writer Ingrid Ricks, a Logan native and University of Utah graduate now transplanted to Seattle. Ricks, the author of the bestselling young adult memoir “Hippie Boy,” is launching “Dear Mr. President” in concert with Friday’s Inauguration ceremonies.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8Om (SLT)

 

“It’s like basketball for nerds”

Bear River High was the scene of robots, young scientists, and competition Saturday as the Bears hosted the VEX robotics competition for eager engineering, math and science students from several schools across Utah and Idaho, 22 teams total. This STEM based program is fairly new to the school but strong roots are set to make the club stronger in the years to come.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8Og (Tremonton Leader)

Utah College Application Week helps seniors prepare for life after high school

This year, 32 additional high schools participated in Utah College Application Week (UCAW). The dates varied for schools, but most were held near the end of October or beginning of November. Total participating schools grew to 116, approximately 77% of the 149 public high schools in Utah, as noted by the Utah State Office of Education.
The Utah System of Higher Education issued a press release on this year’s effort for high school seniors to apply for college. The release noted that UCAW now supports over 20,000 students. College and university presidents and local officials, including Utah’s Lt. Gov. Spencer Cox, visited high schools to speak to students,.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8Ob (Cottonwood-Holladay Journal)

 

Student’s Heart Revived by School Staff
Staff: He was purple & blue and looked lifeless

DRAPER, Utah – Staff members who saved a Corner Canyon High School student’s life are speaking out about the ordeal.
“This was a team effort,” said Nancy Purcell, District Nurse, Canyons School District.
Nancy Purcell is one of four staff members at Corner Canyon High that rushed into the school’s gym after receiving word that a student had slumped against the wall and collapsed to the floor.
Purcell, along with the school’s hall monitor, principal and assistant principal started to perform CPR on the student and then realized his heart stopped beating.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8NW (KTVX)

 

Former Elementary School To Become Dixie State Tech Center

St. George, UT – A former elementary school in St. George will soon house a Dixie State University work force training center. Dixie State plans to launch its “Innovation Plaza” at the location of the former East Elementary School. Dixie State Provost Dr. Michael Lacourse says the center’s academic menu will be polytechnical in character with public and private sector internships offered to students for on the job experience. Lacourse says over the next few months work crews will convert East Elementary into the new Dixie State sponsored community educational resource center.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8O3 (MUR)

Utah students head to DC to witness inauguration first hand

Salt Lake City, Utah – The transition of power from President Obama to Donald Trump will be complete in a matter of days.
The inauguration is drawing a lot of attention from those ready to celebrate and those ready to protest the controversial new president.
Hundreds of thousands are expected in the Nation’s Capital when Trump is sworn in as the 45th President of the United States.
Utahns are eager to be there.

Mr. Arnold’s American History class from Fremont High School will be there too.
“We came out to tour the city, and see the historical sights and gain a better understanding. And then the inauguration just happened to be a talking point for us all year,” said Arnold.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8NV (KTVX)

 

Nonprofit Helps Utah Students Find Free Dresses For Prom

Salt Lake City, UT – A nonprofit group is working to make sure girls throughout Utah have a chance to go to prom in a nice dress. The group Celebrate Everyday loans donated dresses for use at dances and formal occasions. It also accepted wedding gowns and loans them to brides who can’t afford to buy their own dresses. Information about the program and a catalog of dresses available can be seen online at celebrateeveryday.info.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8O2 (MUR)

 

No injuries after car collides with Jordan School District bus

BLUFFDALE, Utah – No one was seriously injured in a multi-car accident involving a Jordan School District bus Thursday morning.
Snow has made the roadways slick.
That caused one car to hit another car and then the school bus near Bangerter and 2700 W., according to Bluffdale Fire.
A few students were on the bus at the time of the accident, none were injured.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8NZ (KSTU)

Edith Bowen Laboratory School enrollment open

Edith Bowen Laboratory School is holding open enrollment and accepting applications for the coming school year.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8NT (LHJ)

 

Open Houses for Catholic Schools Week

In honor of the national Catholic Schools Week, the Catholic schools in Utah have scheduled the following open houses.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8Oe (IC)

 

Poster contest for high school students intends to raise awareness of Gospel call for solidarity

SALT LAKE CITY – A new poster contest is offering high school students a chance to have their graphic design skills recognized diocesan-wide.
The contest, offered through the Diocese of Salt Lake City, seeks entries that “creatively and vibrantly illustrate our common Gospel call to join in solidarity with our brothers and sisters locally, nationally and globally through acts of charity and justice,” according to the contest handout.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8Ok (IC)

 

Lt. Governor Cox to Speak at Charter Day on the Hill, A Showcase of Diverse School Choice Options

SALT LAKE CITY–More than 500 students from 50 charter schools will join Utah Lt. Governor Spencer Cox at the Utah Capitol building to showcase the great charter school options available to parents in Utah.
The event, which is designed to celebrate National School Choice Week, will take place in Salt Lake City Thursday, Jan. 26 from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8Of (Business Wire)

 

Spirits are high at Canyon View Elementary

Students at Canyon View Elementary get to celebrate school spirit on a designated day each month throughout the school year. Classes compete against each other for the roving Bengal Tiger trophy. On Jan. 6, students in Charilyn Gustafson’s fourth grade class garnered the prize. Gustafson hopes her class will maintain their school spirit for the rest of this year.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8Oi (Cottonwood-Holladay Journal)

 

Inside our schools

Canyon View Middle
Three Peaks Elementary
North Elementary
East Elementary
Arrowhead
Tuacahn High
Pine View Middle
http://gousoe.uen.org/8Oh (SGS)

 

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OPINION & COMMENTARY
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Education tax hike initiative is creating the right kind of conversation
Deseret News editorial

Serious ballot initiatives have a way of grabbing the attention of state lawmakers in Utah. It’s no surprise, then, that a potential tax increase for additional education funding has dominated pre-legislative session chatter.
A powerful group of former lawmakers, business leaders and educators, called “Our Schools Now,” is proposing a ballot initiative calling for a 17.5 percent increase in the income tax, from 5 percent to 5 7/8 percent. This would raise about $750 million, most of which would go toward public education. Leaders of the group have promised to tie the extra money to performance so that schools would receive it only if they could demonstrate how it improves performance.
It’s a discussion that’s long overdue in a state where funding for public education has demonstrably suffered due to public policy changes over the past 20 years. But legislative leaders, reacting to the threat of an initiative, appear to be scrabbling for ways other than the income tax to find money, examining exactly what the needs are and what extra money would accomplish.
With the legislative session set to begin Monday, some leaders already have said they don’t like the idea of raising the income tax, particularly through a ballot initiative.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8NE

 

How to fund education and fight pollution
Deseret News commentary by columnist Jay Evensen

Barring some unforeseen crisis or development, education funding is going to be the No. 1 issue this legislative session. Why not find a solution that stimulates the economy, makes the air cleaner and helps schools all at once?
If Utah lawmakers are creative enough in the session that begins Monday, they might be able to tackle two vexing problems at once – education funding and air pollution.
The only downside is that you, the taxpayer, would have to pay a bit more of your hard-earned money to the state; but let’s face it, just about every reliable political barometer is pointing in that direction anyway, so why not make your money work as effectively as possible?
The idea is to apply variable tolls to major roadways, but with a twist.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8NN

 

Betsy DeVos and Tom Price should make a huge difference for children
(Washington, DC) The Hill op-ed by STEVEN BARNETT, Board of Governors Professor and Director of the National Institute for Early Education Research (NIEER) at Rutgers University

As Betsy DeVos and Tom Price prepare to enter the new administration both would do well to give special consideration to the education of children prior to kindergarten.
At first blush this seems like odd advice. Early education was barely mentioned in their confirmation hearings, and it was hardly a hot topic during the campaign. Besides that, some may wonder why the Secretary of Health and Human Services should give any thought to education at all.
Yet a few early, coordinated steps between their two departments could produce big–dare I say huge – wins for America’s young children and for the new administration.
The right moves now could generate much-needed bipartisan goodwill while expanding the kinds of private sector solutions to public problems they both champion.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8NJ

 

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NATIONAL NEWS
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Education Department Drops Fight Over School Money
NPR

The U.S. Department of Education has withdrawn a proposal that could have fundamentally changed the flow of federal dollars to schools that serve low-income students.
“The law is clear that it is unacceptable to systematically underfund low-income schools and fill the hole with federal resources,” explained Dorie Turner Nolt, a spokeswoman for the education department. “While we worked tirelessly to put forward a regulation that implements that simple requirement and to incorporate the extensive feedback we received, we ultimately did not have time to publish a strong final regulation that lives up to the promise of the law.”
This brings to an end a long and bitter fight between the Education Department, led by Secretary John B. King, Jr., and Sen. Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn, himself a former education secretary and current chairman of the Senate committee that handles education.
“This is an intolerable situation,” Alexander said of the Department’s so-called “supplement-not-supplant” proposal back in May, in a heated speech on the Senate floor. “If the regulations are not consistent with the law, I don’t believe [states] should follow them,” he said. “If the department persists, then the state should go to court to sue the department.”
Why was Alexander so angry?
The easy answer: Title I. That’s the $15 billion the federal government sends to districts to help schools that serve lots of low-income students.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8O0

http://gousoe.uen.org/8O4 (WaPo)

http://gousoe.uen.org/8O9 (Ed Week)

http://gousoe.uen.org/8Oa (Politico)

http://gousoe.uen.org/8Ol (CNN)

 

Ed Secretary John King tried to reform school discipline. He thinks we still have a long way to go.
Vox

For President Obama’s education secretary, school discipline is a personal issue.
John King says he loved school as a young child. It was a safe space in his otherwise complicated childhood. King’s mother died when he was 8, and his father, who had Alzheimer’s disease, died four years later.
In his teens, though, King says he became angrier. He was kicked out of high school for acting out and skipping class.
Back then, family members and teachers gave him a second chance and helped him complete his education. Now he’s defending the need for school discipline reform nationwide: a system with more second chances, and fewer suspensions and expulsions.
“You would never say to a student, ‘You got that math problem wrong. You must be the kind of student who gets math problems wrong. No more math for you,'” King told Vox. “But that is how we’re approaching discipline: ‘You’ve made a bad choice. You’re the kind of person who makes bad choices. You leave the school community.'”
In his final weeks as education secretary, King spoke with Vox about the role that race and income play in school discipline and about what discipline might look like going forward.
What follows is that conversation, edited for length and clarity.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8NK

 

Here are some of the protests planned for Trump’s inauguration
Boston Globe

If you’re not in the mood to celebrate President-elect Donald Trump’s inauguration, you’re not alone.
For inauguration weekend, officials in Washington are preparing for the arrival of an unprecedented number of protesters in the nation’s capital, with about 200,000 people alone expected to participate Saturday in the Women’s March on Washington in the city. In addition to the main event, over 600 “Sister Marches” organized in solidarity with the march on Washington are set to take place around the world.
Here’s a look at some of demonstrations set to take place this weekend:
Thursday, January 19
National
Reclaim Our Schools Day of Action: Teachers unions and education organizations have banded together to form the Alliance to Reclaim Our Schools, which is calling for a national day of action on January 19 to send a “single message” to Trump and his pick for secretary of education, Betsy DeVos.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8NF

http://gousoe.uen.org/8NG (Washington Examiner)

 

Teacher says he won’t show Trump inaugural address to students
Lansing (MI) State Journal

WILLIAMSTON – A Williamston teacher’s decision not to show President-elect Donald Trump’s inauguration speech to his students prompted strong reactions on social media after a letter to parents was shared by Williamston graduate and current syndicated radio host Steve Gruber..
On his website, Gruber, who also has two children in the school district, posted an email sent to parents Monday by Brett Meteyer, a fourth-grade teacher at Williamston’s Explorer Elementary School. Gruber said he received a copy of the email from another parent in the district.
In the email, Meteyer explained that the President-elect’s comments during the election about women, minorities and the disabled, comments Meteyer characterized as inflammatory and derogatory, left him worried Trump might make similar statements following his inauguration.
“Because I am concerned about my students and your children being exposed to language and behavior that is not in concert with the most conservative social and family values, I have decided to show the inauguration of Donald Trump this Friday, but we will not view Mr. Trump’s inauguration speech,” Meteyer wrote in the email.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8O6

 

Report: Need for Federal Investments in Early Learning Increasing
THE Journal

While many have argued that the federal government sponsors too many childhood and early learning programs, a recent analysis of federal programs by the Departments of Education (ED) and Health and Human Services (HHS) indicates otherwise.
The new report says investments in early learning are not meeting the needs of families across the nation, and many eligible families are not receiving services.
The report, “The Department of Health and Human Services and the Department of Education Joint Interdepartmental Review of All Early Learning Programs for Children Less Than 6 Years of Age,” reviewed all federal programs identified by the Government Accountability Office and concluded that only eight programs have the primary purpose of promoting early learning for children from birth to age 6:
http://gousoe.uen.org/8NH

A copy of the report
http://gousoe.uen.org/8NI (HHS)

 

More Teachers Seek National Certification
Education Week

There’s been an uptick in teachers pursuing advanced certification through a leaner, simpler process.
In 2013, the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards announced a series of changes to make the certification process cheaper and more streamlined. The board decreased the application fee for teachers to $1,900, from $2,500, and condensed the assessment process into four modules, which can be completed in any order within three years. Previously, teachers had to complete all the work in a single year. The standards themselves have not changed.
Now, more than 20,000 teachers are undergoing NBPTS certification-a significant increase from previous years, spokesman Richard Klein said, although historical data on candidate numbers weren’t readily available.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8O8

 

With lightning speed, Betsy DeVos became a target of late-night comics
Washington Post

Before her Senate confirmation hearing Tuesday evening, Betsy DeVos was just a polarizing nominee for education secretary. But before the hearing was even over – thanks largely to her insistence that schools might need guns to defend against “potential grizzlies” – she had become a viral meme.
And by Wednesday night, barely 24 hours after DeVos’s testimony, she had become a target for multiple late-night television comics.
Jimmy Kimmel suggested President-elect Donald Trump should have walked into DeVos’s hearing, after her grizzly remark, and told her “you’re fired.” On the Colbert Show, school surveillance cameras captured a grizzly – well, a man in a bear suit – acting as the class bully, offering one kid a cigarette in the bathroom and giving another a wedgie on the playground.
Trevor Noah also poked fun about DeVos’s “potential grizzlies,” on The Daily Show, saying that what schools really need are bears to protect kids from guns. But Noah also went long, devoting eight minutes to some of the more cringe-worthy moments of DeVos’s hearing performance – and to wonky education debates that don’t usually get a lot of popular attention.
“Of all Donald Trump’s picks, none seemed to be less prepared than the one we saw yesterday,” Noah said.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8O5

 

In Grizzly Country, DeVos’ Gun Remark Lands Differently
Associated Press

CHEYENNE, Wyo. — In grizzly country, comments by President-elect Donald Trump’s nominee for education secretary that schools should have guns on campus to protect against the bears aren’t a punch line.
Betsy DeVos’ remark Tuesday to a Senate committee that state and local officials should decide whether guns might have a place at schools caused a big stir in some parts of the country after mass shootings have claimed scores of young lives.
But in places such as Wyoming, the issue is more about safety than politics. Grizzlies attack hunters, tourists and others while they are deep in the backcountry and sometimes even on a quick hike near home. The bears have killed six people in the Yellowstone National Park area since 2010.
Grizzlies in growing numbers roam a wide area around a tiny elementary school in Wapiti, Wyoming, 30 miles east of the park, which has a tall fence to keep the carnivores off the playground.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8O7

 

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CALENDAR
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USBE Calendar
http://www.schools.utah.gov/main/CALENDAR.aspx

UEN News
http://www.uen.org

January 19:
Utah State Board of Education public hearing
5:30 p.m., 250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://gousoe.uen.org/8MD

January 23:
First day of the Utah Legislature
State Capitol
http://le.utah.gov/

January 24:
Public Education Appropriations Subcommittee meeting
8 a.m., 445 State Capitol
http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2017&com=APPPED

January 26:
Public Education Appropriations Subcommittee meeting
8 a.m., 445 State Capitol
http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2017&com=APPPED

Utah State Board of Education legislative meeting
Noon; 210 Senate Building
http://www.boarddocs.com/ut/usbe/Board.nsf/Public

Executive Appropriations Committee meeting
5 p.m., 445 State Capitol
http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2017&com=APPEXE

January 30:
Public Education Appropriations Subcommittee meeting
8 a.m., 445 State Capitol
http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2017&com=APPPED

February 1:
Public Education Appropriations Subcommittee meeting
8 a.m., 445 State Capitol
http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2017&com=APPPED

February 3:
Public Education Appropriations Subcommittee meeting
8 a.m., 445 State Capitol
http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2017&com=APPPED

February 9:
Utah State Charter School Board meeting
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.schools.utah.gov/charterschools/State-Board.aspx

Utah State Board of Education study session, USDB and committee meetings
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.boarddocs.com/ut/usbe/Board.nsf/Public

February 10:
Utah State Board of Education meeting
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.boarddocs.com/ut/usbe/Board.nsf/Public

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