Education News Roundup: Jan. 26, 2017

Gov. Herbert delivers the State of the State address.

Today’s Top Picks:

Education takes a central role in Gov. Herbert’s State of the State address.
(See many the links below)

Sen. Dabakis wants to turn Utah’s flat tax into a two-tiered system to fund education.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8S2 (SLT)

NEA claims credit for 1 million e-mails urging a rejection of Education nominee Betsy DeVos.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8Sp (WaPo)

Wall Street Journal looks at people who buy homes specifically with a top-performing school in mind.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8Sw (WSJ)

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TODAY’S HEADLINES
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UTAH

Herbert launches drive to help more Utahns qualify for high-pay jobs
Governor calls for improvements in air quality, education and curbing homelessness; opposes an income-tax hike to help schools.

Senator Dabakis: Tax the rich to fund schools

Bills To Improve Special Ed Make Their Way Through Utah Senate

Day 4: The seat belts on the bus go click, click, click

It’s School Choice Week, but vouchers worry some local public educators

Gay rights group wants Utah’s anti-gay school laws halted

Too Many Teachers Get Zero Benefits From Retirement Plans, Report Says

Loophole in law allows teacher to avoid sex charges
Tooele County attorney claims student victim was of legal age

Ex-Utah teacher convicted of having sex with teen boys says she’s ‘extremely remorseful’

Study: Utah No. 2 for putting its money into programs that work

A teacher’s miraculous story

Riverton schools raise nearly $230,000 for local children fighting cancer

OPINION & COMMENTARY

ESSA Is an Opportunity for States
States must adapt to the shifting federal education landscape

NATION

National Education Association: More than 1 million emails sent to senators urging a vote against DeVos

DeVos says she will protect students with disabilities, but advocates aren’t convinced

Touting a federal grant for local students, L.A. mayor again vows to protect immigrant families

Cursive, classic literature and phonetics: AZ schools leader sounds out new curriculum

Education savings account proposal expanded to all students, not just those with special needs

A student was forced to urinate in a bucket during class. She sued – and won.

Bill: Make Schools Fly Mississippi’s Confederate-themed Flag

Homeowners’ Quest for the Best Schools
To get their children into top-performing schools, some parents buy homes in highly rated-and typically expensive-districts. After graduation, ‘there is a mass exodus.’

 

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UTAH NEWS
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Herbert launches drive to help more Utahns qualify for high-pay jobs
Governor calls for improvements in air quality, education and curbing homelessness; opposes an income-tax hike to help schools.

Gov. Gary Herbert first took office as Utah was climbing out of the Great Recession. He says its economy and high-tech businesses are now creating jobs so fast that the state doesn’t have enough qualified people to fill them.
So he announced during his State of the State speech Wednesday a new program called Talent Ready Utah to recruit businesses to partner with schools to guide students through proper training and education early, provide internships and invest in education.
“We anticipate that Talent Ready Utah will help fill 40,000 new high-skill, high-paying jobs over the next four years,” Herbert said.

Education . The governor spoke in support of more resources for education, but opposed the Our Schools Now initiative – without mentioning it by name – that seeks to put on the ballot a $750 million increase in state income tax for schools.
Raising income taxes could hurt the recovering economy and, in the end, hurt school funding.
“The very best way to ensure ongoing growth of education funding is to continue to grow our economy. Failure to take into account how tax rates affect business investment won’t help us make good policy decisions,” he said.
Herbert suggests instead other ways to raise revenue for education, including collecting the estimated $150 million to $200 million in tax on internet sales that is technically owed but rarely paid by residents if not collected at the time of the purchase.
Herbert also called for possibly removing many of the mushrooming sales tax exemptions. “In 1996 there were 48 sales tax exemptions; today, there are 89. In that same period income tax credits have more than tripled – from 12 to 38.”
http://gousoe.uen.org/8RY (SLT)

http://gousoe.uen.org/8RZ (DN)

http://gousoe.uen.org/8S0 (UP)

http://gousoe.uen.org/8Sf (UPC)

http://gousoe.uen.org/8Sa (OSE)

http://gousoe.uen.org/8Sc (PDH)

http://gousoe.uen.org/8Sb (LHJ)

http://gousoe.uen.org/8Sd (SGN)

http://gousoe.uen.org/8SB (Gephardt Daily)

http://gousoe.uen.org/8Sh (KUTV)

http://gousoe.uen.org/8Si (KTVX)

http://gousoe.uen.org/8Sj (KSL)

http://gousoe.uen.org/8Sl (KSTU)

http://gousoe.uen.org/8Sn (KUER)

http://gousoe.uen.org/8Sz (Governing)

A copy of the address
http://gousoe.uen.org/8S1 (Governor’s Office)

Video of the Democrats response
http://gousoe.uen.org/8Se (Utah Senate Democrats)

 

Senator Dabakis: Tax the rich to fund schools

The Our Schools Now ballot initiative is working to lift Utah’s income tax rate from 5 percent to 5.875 percent, a shift that would raise $750 million for public education.
But one lawmaker says the problem isn’t that the tax rate is too low, the problem is that it is too flat.
Before asking all Utahns to pay a higher rate, Salt Lake City Democratic Sen. Jim Dabakis said, the state should turn to its wealthy citizens to fund schools.
“That great sucking sound you heard is money flying out of our schools and into the pockets of the Romneys and the Huntsmans,” Dabakis said.
Dabakis is preparing legislation that would change Utah’s flat tax to a two-tiered system, with individuals making more than $250,000 and couples making more than $500,000 taxed at a rate of 7 percent. The change would affect about 18,000 taxpayers, Dabakis said, and raise $287 million for the state’s Education Fund.
It would raise slightly more than one-third the amount Our Schools Now hopes to generate, but Dabakis says the initiative is “premature” until the flat tax is adjusted.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8S2 (SLT)

 

Bills To Improve Special Ed Make Their Way Through Utah Senate

Special education was the main topic of discussion on Utah’s Senate floor Wednesday. Three bills aimed to improve student services in the state are headed to a vote.
The bills’ sponsor, Democratic Senator Gene Davis, says it’s not easy unpacking special education law for his colleagues.
“I don’t think a lot of people understand,” Davis says.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8So (KUER)

 

Day 4: The seat belts on the bus go click, click, click

Legislature 2017 coverage
. Rep. Craig Hall, R-West Valley City, is sponsoring a bill that would require all new school buses purchased after June 30, 2017, to be equipped with seat belts for all passengers. Hall will be pitching the idea to the House Transportation Committee at 2 p.m.
. Roughly 300 students from the Madeleine Choir School will gather on the Capitol steps at 9 a.m. to use their singing voices to encourge state lawmakers to pass legislation that will improve Utah’s air. This is the third consecutive year students from the school have visited the Capitol to air their concerns about the excess smog in the Salt Lake Valley.
. It’s Charter School Day at the Legislature. More than 500 students from 50 charter schools will join Utah Lt. Gov. Spencer Cox at the Capitol to showcase charter school options available to parents from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. In addition, Junhao Wang, a 15-year-old pianist and 10th-grader at Utah Virtual Academy, will be performing.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8S8 (DN)

 

It’s School Choice Week, but vouchers worry some local public educators

Gov. Gary Herbert has declared that Utah will mark National School Choice Week, Jan. 22 to 28, to spread the word that parents have several options when it comes to their kids’ education.
This year, School Choice Week comes on the heels of confirmation hearings for President Donald Trump’s pick for Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos, a strong proponent of private school vouchers and public charter schools. And while most local educators agree that choice is a good thing, the incoming administration has renewed worries of school vouchers.
According to a press release, School Choice Week is a nonpartisan, nonpolitical effort intended to raise awareness about school choice options, including traditional public schools, public charter schools, public magnet schools, online learning, private schools and homeschooling.
There aren’t many private schools in Cache Valley, but the enrollment in and number of charter schools continues to grow.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8S3 (LHJ)

 

Gay rights group wants Utah’s anti-gay school laws halted

SALT LAKE CITY- A gay rights advocacy group wants a judge to halt Utah state laws it says discriminates against LGBT students by restricting talk about homosexuality in schools.
The National Center for Lesbian Rights argues in a request for preliminary injunction filed Wednesday that the laws serve no purpose other than expressing the state’s moral disapproval of homosexuality.
The state of Utah has denied it has anti-gay school laws, saying the case quotes selectively from state law and school rules.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8S9 (OSE)

http://gousoe.uen.org/8Sg (KUTV)

http://gousoe.uen.org/8Sk (KSTU)

http://gousoe.uen.org/8SC (NYT)

http://gousoe.uen.org/8St (AP)

 

Too Many Teachers Get Zero Benefits From Retirement Plans, Report Says

The days when new teachers could expect to take low pay in exchange for a respectable retirement package are long gone, according to a new report. Today, many new teachers can expect low pay with lousy benefits.
What’s more, new teachers nowadays contribute a portion of their low pay to pension plans that will probably be worth less upon retirement than what the teachers contributed while they were in the classroom, according to the report.

Only six of the districts studied had 401(k)-style plans, where a teacher’s contribution grows through earned interest and employer contributions from the very beginning. The six districts offering 401(k)-style plans are Anchorage, Alaska; Miami-Dade County, Fla.; Detroit, Mich.; Columbus, Ohio; Greenville County, S.C.; and Alpine, Utah.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8SD (Ed Week)

A copy of the report
http://gousoe.uen.org/8SE (Fordham Institute)

 

Loophole in law allows teacher to avoid sex charges
Tooele County attorney claims student victim was of legal age

TOOELE Utah – A high school teacher avoided criminal charges because of a loophole in the law.
“This shouldn’t be going on in schools at all,” said Scott Broadhead, the Tooele County attorney.
But it happened in December at Tooele High School. A resource officer learned nude pictures of a teacher were being passed around.
Those nude pictures were posted on social network according a police report obtained by Good 4 Utah.
The teacher, who also coaches at the high school was brought in for police questioning in December. Good 4 Utah is not publishing his name because no criminal charges were filed.
According to the police report he confessed claiming “he touched her (private parts)” … and they sent about “20 nude photographs to each other.”
Despite the confession, the Tooele County attorney couldn’t file charges.
“Because she is an adult,” said Broadhead. “She’s 18 years of age. She claims there was no coercion.”
http://gousoe.uen.org/8SA (KTVX)

 

Ex-Utah teacher convicted of having sex with teen boys says she’s ‘extremely remorseful’

A former Utah teacher convicted of having sexual relationships with three high-school students told a parole board Tuesday her low self-esteem was the reason for her inappropriate behavior.
The tearful Brianne Altice said she hopes her victims realize she’s “extremely remorseful” and that they can continue with their lives after her “poor decisions,” according to the Salt Lake Tribune.
A district court convicted the 37-year-old in 2015 with three counts of sex abuse and sentenced her to at least two years and up to 30 years in prison after pleading guilty.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8SF (New York Daily News)

http://gousoe.uen.org/8SG ([London] The Sun)

http://gousoe.uen.org/8SH (Christian Post)

 

Study: Utah No. 2 for putting its money into programs that work

Utah’s state government is the second-best in the nation for using “evidence-based policy making,” or basically focusing its limited resources on programs that are proven to produce positive results.
That’s according to a study released Thursday by the Pew Charitable Trusts and the MacArthur Foundation.
It said Utah is a leader among the states in putting money where research shows it will actually do good “by developing processes and tools that use evidence to inform policy and budget decisions.”
http://gousoe.uen.org/8S6 (SLT)

A copy of the report
http://gousoe.uen.org/8S7 (Pew Charitable Trusts)

 

A teacher’s miraculous story

Those who know North Park Elementary prep aide, Shelli Jensen, can see how much she enjoys her job and working with students. An outsider can easily see the care and attention she gives in her classroom, but most would never guess she suffered an aneurysm that nearly claimed her life in 2010.
The only real side effect she has is that she often forgets things, including names. While this can be difficult for a teacher with hundreds of students, she’s grateful that’s all.
Jensen has been teaching for 22 years with the Box Elder School District-a career she actually stumbled into. While living in Honeyville she was asked to sub for someone and two weeks later they decided to quit. With three of her four children attending the school, it was a great opportunity.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8Sy (Tremonton Leader)

 

Riverton schools raise nearly $230,000 for local children fighting cancer

Riverton High School and its surrounding feeder schools raised $228,097.68 for local children battling cancer during a three-week charity drive in December. The high school alone raised $191,274.17.
Riverton’s charity fundraiser, known as Silver Rush, is one of the school’s longest-standing traditions, but this is the first year that the high school invited other Riverton schools, including South Hills and Oquirrh Hills middle schools and Rose Creek Elementary, to join their efforts.
And while Riverton High’s student body officers were thrilled about their record-breaking Silver Rush total, up from last year’s $144,446.16, they continued to repeat what’s become the Silver Rush motto: “It’s not about the money-it’s about the change.”
http://gousoe.uen.org/8Sx (South Valley Journal)

 

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OPINION & COMMENTARY
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ESSA Is an Opportunity for States
States must adapt to the shifting federal education landscape
Education Week op-ed by Jack Markell, former chair of the National Governors Association and was a co-chair of the initiative that established the Common Core State Standards

After 14 years of No Child Left Behind-a federal education law that brought needed attention to underserved students across the country, but became increasingly out of touch with classroom realities-states are ready for changes under the Every Student Succeeds Act, which goes into full effect in the 2017-18 school year.
Under ESSA, states can choose their own measures of progress for student learning aligned to their visions of what education should look like. In the wake of final federal regulations for accountability released in November, deadlines are approaching for states to submit their proposals to the U.S. Department of Education for how they will hold schools accountable under the law. These accountability plans must show how states will implement academic standards aligned to help students stay on track for success in college and the workplace; ensure students from all backgrounds have an equal footing; track progress of schools across a variety of measures not limited to test scores; and identify ways to offer additional support where students are struggling.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8SI

 

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NATIONAL NEWS
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National Education Association: More than 1 million emails sent to senators urging a vote against DeVos
Washington Post

The National Education Association, the nation’s largest labor union, says that more than 1 million people have used an online form during the past three weeks to email their senators to urge opposition to Betsy DeVos, President Trump’s nominee for education secretary. More than 40,000 people have called senators using a hotline the union set up to access the switchboard at the U.S. Capitol, NEA officials said.
NEA President Lily Eskelsen Garcia said the union did not pay for advertisements, instead using its ordinary advocacy channels – such as emails to members and social media posts – to encourage people to contact their senators. She said the response surprised and gratified her.
“It’s just amazing,” Eskelsen Garcia said. “We couldn’t generate this if it weren’t authentic, if it weren’t something legitimately and authentically viral.”
The pace of calls and emails about DeVos surpasses any previous NEA campaign, union officials said: In all of 2015, efforts to get teachers to contact Congress about the Every Student Succeeds Act – a sweeping new federal education law that affects every public school in the nation – generated a total of 284,000 emails, they said.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8Sp

 

DeVos says she will protect students with disabilities, but advocates aren’t convinced
Washington Post

Betsy DeVos, President Trump’s nominee for education secretary, has promised that she would enforce federal laws meant to protect students with disabilities, a move meant to reassure senators, advocates and parents who were unsettled by positions she seemed to stake out at her recent confirmation hearing.
“Thank you for the opportunity to more fully explain my position on the importance of protecting the rights of students with disabilities and ensuring that they receive the quality education they deserve,” she wrote Tuesday in a letter to Sen. Johnny Isakson (R-Ga.), a member of the Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor and Pensions (HELP). DeVos went on to write that she is “eager to bring a sense of urgency” to enforcing the federal law, as well as to providing students with disabilities more school choices.
During her Jan. 17 confirmation hearing, DeVos at one point suggested that states should be able to decide whether to enforce the federal law known as the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, which guarantees students with disabilities access to a free and appropriate education. Later, she said she had been “confused” about IDEA, a four-decade-old federal law that protects civil rights.
Disability-rights advocates were upset by what was either DeVos’s lack of understanding of the federal education law or her belief that states’ rights should take precedence over a federal civil rights law.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8Ss

 

Touting a federal grant for local students, L.A. mayor again vows to protect immigrant families
Los Angeles Times

As President Trump signed executive orders to strengthen immigration enforcement and deny funding to “sanctuary cities,” L.A.’s mayor and school officials gathered to celebrate a $30-million federal grant to help students in eight schools with large Latino populations and reaffirmed their commitment to protecting immigrant students and their families.
The nonprofit Youth Policy Institute was awarded a $30-million “Promise Neighborhood” grant from the U.S. Department of Education under the Obama administration to provide academic, health and legal services to about 4,000 students attending eight public and charter schools in Pico-Union and Hollywood. The money is supposed to be parceled out over five years, starting in 2017. The organization received a similar grant in 2013 for 18 schools in Hollywood and Pacoima.
The funding is expected to pay for resources such as college advisors, mental health counselors and AmeriCorps tutors, and to keep schools open early in the mornings, after school and on weekends to serve as community centers where families can seek health, housing and other services, said Dixon Slingerland, Youth Policy Institute’s president and chief executive. The organization plans to guarantee two years of community college tuition to students within the Promise Neighborhood, he said.
Slingerland said he expects to see the funding come through even though a different administration is running the Department of Education, in part because the Promise Neighborhood initiative has strong Republican backing in Congress and serves rural communities in addition to liberal, urban cities like Los Angeles. The $30 million is supplemented by private donations, he said, which help fund many of the programs.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8S4

 

Cursive, classic literature and phonetics: AZ schools leader sounds out new curriculum
(Phoenix) Cronkite News

PHOENIX – Arizona’s top education leader is heralding new state curriculum standards that would replace modern works with classic literature, retool math education with an emphasis on memorization, and focus reading education on phonetics. She also proposed a five percent raise for teachers.
Superintendent of Public Instruction Diane Douglas, said changes to Common Core standards focus on what is “developmentally” appropriate for K-12 students. She compared introducing challenging concepts too early to trying to teach a newborn to walk.
“They need to take things in certain steps along the way or they just won’t learn them appropriately,” Douglas said in an annual State of Education speech earlier this week at the Arizona State Capitol.
Douglas attacked Common Core standards as resulting in “obscene literature literally being put into the classroom into the hands of our children.” Instead, “our children will once again be reading the great literature of our society,” she said.
The State Board of Education voted in December to adopt the revised standards 8-1, which has been Douglas’ goal since she took office two years ago. The new standards will go into effect in the fall of 2018.
Along with requiring students to learn to write and read cursive, the new standards will refine math teachings such as adding elements of fact memorization for all grade levels.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8S5

Education savings account proposal expanded to all students, not just those with special needs
St. Louis Post-Dispatch

JEFFERSON CITY . All students in Missouri could apply for an education savings account under an updated proposal a Senate panel considered Wednesday.
Funded by tax credits from private donations, the accounts, or ESAs, could be used by parents to pay for certain approved expenses, including private school tuition and textbooks.
Lamar Republican Sen. Ed Emery’s plan was initially open only to wards of the state and students with disabilities, but he offered a more far-reaching version in committee.
Critics contend that ESAs are just a new generation of school vouchers, which have failed to make it through the Legislature in years past.
But backers said Wednesday that the accounts would return control to parents who want to keep their children out of struggling schools.
The Missouri proposal is similar to an Arizona law that Gov. Eric Greitens referenced in recent his state of the state speech, where he endorsed the idea and stressed the need to put power back in the hands of parents and teachers.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8Sv

A student was forced to urinate in a bucket during class. She sued – and won.
Washington Post

A Southern California classroom was filled with high school freshmen when one of them realized that she needed to run to the restroom.
Patrick Henry High School in San Diego, however, had a policy at the time stipulating that students were not permitted to take bathroom breaks during class – and the teacher took a strict interpretation of it.
The teacher, Gonja Wolf, forbid the 14-year-old girl from leaving the classroom that Wednesday in February 2012. Instead, she let the girl pee in a bucket, then empty it in a classroom sink, according to a lawsuit.
The gossip reportedly spread through the school, then hit the news media, leading to the girl’s anxiety, depression and an attempted suicide.
Now five years later, the San Diego Unified School District was ordered Wednesday to pay the student, who is now 19, more than $1.25 million in damages and $41,000 to cover medical bills, according to the San Diego Union-Tribune.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8Sq

http://gousoe.uen.org/8Sr (San Diego Union-Tribune)

 

Bill: Make Schools Fly Mississippi’s Confederate-themed Flag
Associated Press

JACKSON, Miss. — A bill advancing in the Mississippi House of Representatives would require all K-12 schools to fly the state flag or lose their state accreditation.
House Bill 280, passed 13-8 Wednesday in the House Education Committee, is a broader mandate that schools must follow the state Constitution and all state laws.
But one of Mississippi’s laws is an oft-flouted mandate that schools fly the banner, which includes the Confederate battle emblem in its upper left-hand corner. Districts, especially those with majority African-American student bodies, sometimes object to the flag as racist. One example of a district that doesn’t display the flag is the city of Jackson, Mississippi’s second-largest school system.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8Su

 

Homeowners’ Quest for the Best Schools
To get their children into top-performing schools, some parents buy homes in highly rated-and typically expensive-districts. After graduation, ‘there is a mass exodus.’
Wall Street Journal

Houston lawyer Anne Ferazzi Hammett spent about three months last spring looking for a great high school for her teenage daughters, Anna and Nora. Then she discovered Westlake, a high school that gets top marks in academic rankings and draws strong reviews from parents.
The only drawback: The school is located in Austin, Texas, about 165 miles northwest of the Hammetts’ home. Nonetheless, Ms. Ferazzi Hammett and her husband, Rick Hammett, bought a $2.25 million house in Westlake’s school district, and they and their daughters will move in June.
“We will start a new life in a new place,” said Ms. Ferazzi Hammett, 56, who will telecommute. Mr. Hammett, 63, will commute back to Houston for his work as an attorney. It’s all worth it for “a great academic experience for the girls,” she said.
For some home buyers, there is no factor more important than the public schools their children will attend. They analyze student-body performance on standardized tests, school rankings, what percentage of alumni go on to four-year colleges and which schools send students to Ivy League or top-tier state universities. They then uproot their lives to move within these districts’ boundaries, where homes can cost hundreds of thousands of dollars more than nearby homes zoned to different schools.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8Sw

 

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CALENDAR
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USBE Calendar
http://www.schools.utah.gov/main/CALENDAR.aspx

USBE Legislative Tracking Sheet
http://www.schools.utah.gov/law/Legislative-Session.aspx

UEN News
http://www.uen.org

January 26:
Public Education Appropriations Subcommittee meeting
8 a.m., 445 State Capitol
http://le.utah.gov/Interim/2017/html/00000422.htm

Utah State Board of Education legislative meeting
Noon; 210 Senate Building
http://www.boarddocs.com/ut/usbe/Board.nsf/Public

House Transportation Committee meeting
2 p.m., 30 House Building
http://le.utah.gov/~2017/agenda/HTRA0126.ag.htm

Senate Economic Development and Workforce Services Committee meeting
2 p.m., 215 Senate Building
http://le.utah.gov/~2017/agenda/SEDW0126.ag.htm

Executive Appropriations Committee meeting
5 p.m., 445 State Capitol
http://le.utah.gov/Interim/2017/html/00000118.htm

January 27:
Retirement and Independent Entities Appropriations Subcommittee meeting
12:15 p.m., 20 House Building
http://le.utah.gov/Interim/2017/html/00000401.htm

Senate Education Committee meeting
2 p.m., 210 Senate Building
http://le.utah.gov/~2017/agenda/SEDU0127.ag.htm

House Political Subdivisions Committee meeting
2 p.m., 450 State Capitol
http://le.utah.gov/~2017/agenda/HPOL0127.ag.htm

House Revenue and Taxation Committee meeting
2 p.m., 445 State Capitol
http://le.utah.gov/~2017/agenda/HREV0127.ag.htm

January 30:
Public Education Appropriations Subcommittee meeting
8 a.m., 445 State Capitol
http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2017&com=APPPED

February 1:
Public Education Appropriations Subcommittee meeting
8 a.m., 445 State Capitol
http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2017&com=APPPED

February 3:
Public Education Appropriations Subcommittee meeting
8 a.m., 445 State Capitol
http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2017&com=APPPED

February 9:
Utah State Charter School Board meeting
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.schools.utah.gov/charterschools/State-Board.aspx

Utah State Board of Education study session, USDB and committee meetings
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.boarddocs.com/ut/usbe/Board.nsf/Public

February 10:
Utah State Board of Education meeting
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.boarddocs.com/ut/usbe/Board.nsf/Public

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