Education News Roundup: Jan. 27, 2017

School Buses at Capitol

School Buses at Capitol

Today’s Top Picks:

House committee advances the school bus seat belt bill.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8SS (SLT)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/8SU (DN)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/8Tl (KSL)

Rep. King introduces a sex ed bill.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8T3 (DN)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/8Tt (KSTU)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/8Ts (MUR)

Daily Herald profiles new Utah State Board of Education Member Scott Neilson.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8Tb (PDH)

As another former member of the Skyline Horizon staff, ENR joins with Trib columnist Paul Rolly in paying tribute to the late, great English and journalism teacher Clarann Jacobs.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8SR (SLT)

Sen. Franken says Betsy DeVos will not get any Democratic votes for confirmation as Education Secretary.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8Ty (WaPo)

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TODAY’S HEADLINES
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UTAH

Seat belts could be required in new Utah school buses
Safety » Some lawmakers are worried about possible $10K extra cost per bus.

Utah lawmaker introduces ‘modified’ sex ed bill, hopes for more support

Affordable housing bill advances, despite concern it will cut school funds
HB38 » Proposal would boost tax credits for landlords, reduce education revenues.

Bill proposes run-off contests in some primary elections

Utah GOP Seeks Increased School Funding Without More Taxes

Shiozawa targets skyrocketing EpiPen prices

Catholic choir, other school groups rally at Utah Capitol for clean air

Students visit Capitol to tout importance of charter schools

Spanish Fork teacher, soldier, takes seat on Utah State Board of Education

Hillcrest parents defend dual language immersion program

Knowlton Elementary kids bond with Layton senior citizens through reading

Unusual class is helping West Jordan students change their attitudes

Equality Utah seeks injunction blocking state’s ‘anti-gay’ school curriculum laws

Teacher at Spanish Fork high school arrested over alleged sexual activity with student

Former Northern Utah Autism Program volunteer enters guilty plea to theft

Utah’s suicide epidemic: The ‘tip of the iceberg’

Elementary students raise trout in classrooms

What to do if your child’s grades drop

Jazz to host NBA Math Hoops Live event Monday

Inside our schools for Jan. 27

OPINION & COMMENTARY

Thumbs up, thumbs down for Jan. 27

A novel approach to boosting teacher pay

We can’t get used to saying ‘President Trump’

Thanks, Mrs. Jacobs, a journalism teacher who deserves her own headline

School financing should focus on struggling students

Monument and education

Abstinence-Only Sex Ed Must Go

A Look at Trump’s Supreme Court ‘Finalists’ and Education Cases

NATION

As Trump Weighs Fate of Immigrant Students, Schools Ponder Their Roles

Sen. Franken: No Democrat will vote for Betsy DeVos as education secretary – and we’re seeking Republicans to oppose her

New Trump Education hire vanishes

Why Young Girls Don’t Think They Are Smart Enough

Beyond ‘Just Say No’: schools teacher About Opioid Dangers

Educational Testing Service acquires assessments company for $127.5M

 

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UTAH NEWS
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Seat belts could be required in new Utah school buses
Safety » Some lawmakers are worried about possible $10K extra cost per bus.

Utah transportation officials always stress that the most important safety step motorists can take is to buckle up. But many school buses in the state lack seat belts.
So the House Transportation Committee voted 7-3 Thursday to advance HB132 to require seat belts in any new buses purchased for schools in the state. It now goes to the full House.
Lawmakers also say some fortunate timing might help school districts to afford the $10,000 or so in estimated higher costs for each such bus.
Rep. Craig Hall, R-West Valley City, sponsor of the bill, noted the state has $32 million coming through a settlement from Volkswagen for emissions violations – and the state is looking at spending $20 million or so of that settlement to replace older, dirty diesel school buses to improve air quality.
Hall said that could both reduce pollution and add seat belts – if his bill passes into law.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8SS (SLT)

http://gousoe.uen.org/8SU (DN)

http://gousoe.uen.org/8Tl (KSL)

 

Utah lawmaker introduces ‘modified’ sex ed bill, hopes for more support

SALT LAKE CITY – Utah lawmakers will rehash sexual education in public schools, but the bill’s proponents hope a different approach gains more favor this time around.
HB215, introduced Thursday, “is a bill about ensuring our kids are more likely to know about and have the components of what makes a healthy relationship,” said House Minority Leader Brian King, D-Salt Lake City, who is tackling the issue for a second time.
Eagle Forum director Gayle Ruzicka said Utah’s laws are already good at keeping Utah kids from having sex, as shown in low teen pregnancy, sexually transmitted disease and abortion rates across the state.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8T3 (DN)

http://gousoe.uen.org/8Tt (KSTU)

http://gousoe.uen.org/8Ts (MUR)

 

Affordable housing bill advances, despite concern it will cut school funds
HB38 » Proposal would boost tax credits for landlords, reduce education revenues.

The Utah House passed a bill Thursday designed to increase affordable housing and fight homelessness, despite concerns that it would reduce education funds to do so.
Representatives voted 50-22 to pass HB36, and sent it to the Senate for consideration.
Its sponsor, Rep. Becky Edwards, R-North Salt Lake, said it would encourage more affordable housing by doing such things as increasing state income-tax credits for landlords.
Fiscal analysts figure that may cut income tax – which in Utah goes entirely for education ­- by $1.4 million a year.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8TC (SLT)

 

Bill proposes run-off contests in some primary elections

Sen. Curt Bramble, R-Provo, may have found an elegant solution to a thorny problem with Utah election law.
Bramble’s SB114 addresses the issue plurality in primary elections. Since Utah started allowing candidates to get on the primary election ballot by gathering signatures, many politicos (okay, Republicans) have worried having multiple candidates on the primary ballot could lead to someone winning a party nomination with less than a majority of the vote. That happens a lot in general elections, but many of the party faithful (again, Republicans) were clutching their pearls and fanning themselves at the possibility.
Bramble’s bill creates a process for having a runoff election in certain cases. Obviously, just two candidates in a race mean someone will get more than 50%. Three candidates mean one would win with approximately 35%. But, if there are four or more candidates in a primary race, Bramble’s bill would send the top-two into a primary election, unless one of them crosses that 35% threshold.
The runoff election would be by mail only.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8SM (UP)

http://gousoe.uen.org/8SP (SLT)

 

Utah GOP Seeks Increased School Funding Without More Taxes

As Utah faces large increases in its public school enrollment over the next few years, legislators and other elected representatives are hoping to find sources of education funding that don’t require a raise in taxes.
Gov. Gary Herbert, in his State of the State address Wednesday, acknowledged the funding needs facing Utah’s public schools but cautioned against raising taxes to address them.
“Because Utah has had the fastest-growing student population in the nation, we have significant funding needs just to accommodate the growth. In order to push our way to the top, we need to invest more money into education,” Herbert said. “At the same time I am very concerned about altering our tax policies in any way that could damage our robust economic engine. In fact, the very best way to ensure ongoing growth of education funding is to continue to grow the economy.”
State Senate President Wayne Niederhauser said that the Legislature has already raised taxes for education in recent years and that doing so again would be a tall order for elected officials.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8TB (UPR)

 

Shiozawa targets skyrocketing EpiPen prices

Brian Shiozawa, R-Salt Lake City, is taking steps to combat the skyrocketing price of EpiPens, which are used in emergencies to save the lives of people who have severe allergic reactions.
EpiPens deliver a dose of epinephrine, which can save the lives of those who have allergies to shellfish or peanuts.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8SN (UP)

 

Catholic choir, other school groups rally at Utah Capitol for clean air

SALT LAKE CITY – Several hundred students gathered on the front steps of the Capitol building Thursday to call attention to the issue of smog.
Barely through its first full week in session, the Utah Legislature has seen a number of groups trying to grab their attention over such issues as women’s rights, the horrors of opioid addiction and the annual entreaty to fix the state’s pollution problems.
On Thursday, the Madeleine Choir School in Salt Lake City led a rally over clean air issues along the Wasatch Front.
The rally, according to spokesman Matt Kitterer, tackles one of the global environmental issues Pope Francis talked about in his encyclical – Laudato Si – addressed to “every person living on this planet.”
http://gousoe.uen.org/8ST (DN)

http://gousoe.uen.org/8T2 (SLT)

http://gousoe.uen.org/8Tk (KTVX)

http://gousoe.uen.org/8Tm (KSL)

http://gousoe.uen.org/8To (KSTU)

http://gousoe.uen.org/8Tr (KUER)

 

Students visit Capitol to tout importance of charter schools

Members of the show choir at the American Leadership Academy in Spanish Fork perform during Thursday’s Charter Day on the Hill at the Capitol in Salt Lake City. During the event, which is designed to celebrate National School Choice Week, more than 500 students from 50 charter schools showcased the school options available to parents in Utah. In addition, the students hosted booths to educate lawmakers on the programs and curricula provided at various charter schools, and on the importance of charter school funding.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8T4 (DN)

 

Spanish Fork teacher, soldier, takes seat on Utah State Board of Education

Scott Neilson spent only $250 on his campaign for the Utah State Board of Education, which included hiring a student to make his website. Running against incumbent Stan Lockhart, husband of the late Becky Lockhart, the first female speaker of the Utah House of Representatives, Neilson, a teacher at Maple Mountain High School in Spanish Fork, was a relative unknown.
“Nobody expected me to win,” Neilson said. “I don’t know how many people see me up there and tell me, ‘You were the dark horse of the dark horses.'”
But Neilson, who got his name out on social media and met with teachers and parents, won. He’s spent about a month on the board and has received about 10 phone calls or emails a day from voters. His seat represents the state’s 13th District, which covers Provo, Springville, Mapleton and Spanish Fork.
His spot on the state board and role as a history and government teacher aren’t the only hats he wears. Neilson, a father of four who lives in Spanish Fork, is also an intelligence officer for the Utah National Guard and officiates wrestling.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8Tb (PDH)

 

Hillcrest parents defend dual language immersion program

Parents and students packed the Logan City School District Board of Education meeting Tuesday night to defend the Portuguese dual language immersion program at Hillcrest Elementary after hearing that it may be cut due to expected budget decreases.
At the Tuesday night meeting, LCSD Board President Kristie Cooley said they are at the very beginning steps and have not made a decision on whether or not to continue supporting dual language immersion, or DLI, at Hillcrest Elementary. The other DLI program in Logan – Spanish at Bridger Elementary – is not at risk of being cut due to different teacher ratios. She said it has to do with financial difficulties.
“We are in a budget shortage just because of our transient nature of our district,” Cooley said.
The program is still young. Current fifth-graders at Hillcrest Elementary will be the first to graduate from the DLI program and move on to Mount Logan Middle School.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8Td (LHJ)

Knowlton Elementary kids bond with Layton senior citizens through reading

LAYTON – Jackson Barton was reading through the book “I Am Six” easily Tuesday morning until he turned the page and came to the word “count.”
Diana Baldwin, a 68-year-old former teacher and resident at Apple Village Assisted Living, didn’t hesitate to help him sound it out.
Jackson’s entire first-grade class was at Apple Village as part of the Reading Buddies program, which partners school children with the elderly.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8T7 (OSE)

 

Unusual class is helping West Jordan students change their attitudes

Sometimes life can be very difficult, especially for a junior high student.
But the school psychologist at West Jordan Middle School has come up with an idea to help relieve some of the stress students are experiencing.
“They need a lot of help right now,” said Dr. Olin Levitt.
Monday through Thursday, Dr. Levitt turns his office into a yoga studio for 30 minutes.
The “studio” comes complete with music, battery-operated candles and mood lighting.
And according to the students, it works.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8Ti (KUTV)

 

Equality Utah seeks injunction blocking state’s ‘anti-gay’ school curriculum laws

Equality Utah has asked the federal court to block the enforcement of state curriculum laws and policies that bar classrooms and student clubs from positive discussions of homosexuality in public schools.
Utah’s lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender advocacy group sued the state school board and the Cache County, Jordan and Weber school districts over the so-called “no-promo homo” laws in October.
A petition seeking an immediate injunction against enforcing the statutes and Utah Board of Education administrative policies was filed late Wednesday in Salt Lake City’s District Court, by the San Francisco-based National Center for Lesbian Rights (NCLR).
http://gousoe.uen.org/8SQ (SLT)

http://gousoe.uen.org/8SV (DN)

http://gousoe.uen.org/8Te (LHJ)

http://gousoe.uen.org/8Tn (KSL)

http://gousoe.uen.org/8Tu (MUR)

http://gousoe.uen.org/8TA (Fox)

http://gousoe.uen.org/8TE (Rainbow Times)

Teacher at Spanish Fork high school arrested over alleged sexual activity with student

A Spanish Fork school teacher has been arrested after an alleged sexual encounter with a 17-year-old male student.
Sarah Lewis, a 27-year-old social studies and dance teacher at Landmark High School in Spanish Fork, was arrested on Jan. 24.
Payson police Lt. Bill Wright expects Lewis to be charged for unlawful sexual activity with a minor, a third degree felony, and providing alcohol to a minor, a class A misdemeanor.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8T1 (SLT)

http://gousoe.uen.org/8Ta (PDH)

http://gousoe.uen.org/8Tj (KUTV)

http://gousoe.uen.org/8Tp (KSTU)

 

Former Northern Utah Autism Program volunteer enters guilty plea to theft

OGDEN – A former Northern Utah Autism Program volunteer accused of stealing more than $5,000 from a parents’ program entered a guilty plea to a reduced charge.
Rebecca Irene Campos, 31, appeared in 2nd District Court on Thursday, Jan. 26, with her attorney Branson West.
West said attorneys had agreed to a plea deal. Campos entered a guilty plea to one count of third-degree felony theft. She faces a possible sentence of up to five years at the Utah State Prison.
A sentencing hearing is scheduled for March 23 before Judge Michael DiReda.
As part of the plea agreement, Campos has agreed to pay the entire restitution. That amount was not specified in court on Thursday.
Campos was originally charged with one count of second-degree felony theft. That charge carried a possible sentence of one to 15 years at the prison.
Campos is accused of stealing money that was privately donated to the Northern Utah Autism Program at Canyon View Elementary School, court records say.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8T8 (OSE)

 

Utah’s suicide epidemic: The ‘tip of the iceberg’

Health officials are still trying to fight the suicide and depression epidemic in Utah, and new measures – including limiting access to lethal means, such as firearms – are part of that plan.
According to a new report from the Utah Division of Substance Abuse and Mental Health, over 550 Utahns die of suicide each year, and it’s the seventh leading cause of deaths in Utah. Additionally, Utah ranks seventh in the nation for suicide deaths.
The report claims 154,288 adults and youth are in need of, but not receiving, mental health services.
“These statistics are just the tip of the iceberg,” the report alleges.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8Tg (SGS)

 

Elementary students raise trout in classrooms

LOGAN, Utah – Tiffany Kinder is one of several teachers throughout Cache Valley who are raising trout in their classrooms from egg to fingerling to teach kids about water quality, life cycles and the scientific method.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8T9 (OSE)

http://gousoe.uen.org/8TD (Washington Times)

What to do if your child’s grades drop

Dawn Ramsey of the Jordan School District PTA shares ideas for what you can do when you see a sudden drop in your child’s school performance.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8Tq (KSTU)

Jazz to host NBA Math Hoops Live event Monday

SALT LAKE CITY – The Utah Jazz will teach math to local students through basketball during an NBA Math Hoops Live event on Monday, Jan. 30, at the Zions Bank Basketball Center, 1414 S. 500 West, beginning at 4 p.m.
NBA Math Hoops is a fast-paced board game that teaches students fundamental math skills through basketball stats of their favorite Jazz and NBA players. A full-size, live version of the game will be played on the Jazz practice court with help from guards Shelvin Mack and Raul Neto.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8T5 (DN)

Inside our schools for Jan. 27

Vista School
Valley Academy Charter
Snow Canyon High
Arrowhead
Millcreek High
Canyon View Middle
Three Peaks Elementary
North Elementary
Parowan Elementary
Fiddlers Elementary
Enoch Elementary
http://gousoe.uen.org/8Th (SGS)

 

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OPINION & COMMENTARY
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Thumbs up, thumbs down for Jan. 27
(Provo) Daily Herald editorial

THUMBS UP: Alpine School District deserves credit for its willingness to engage with residents. Not everyone agrees on how long winter break should be, but by taking a petition signed by more than 8,000 people asking for a longer one and discussing what can be done, the Alpine School District Board of Education is showing it listens to its community.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8Tc

 

A novel approach to boosting teacher pay
Utah Policy analysis by Bob Bernick

How would you like to earn $10,000 a year more?
Sounds kind of like those hand-lettered signs you see at stop lights, right?
But freshman Rep. Mike Winder, R-West Valley, has such a plan for Utah public school teachers who have two rare qualifications:
They are among the best teachers in the state.
And they’re willing to teach in the poorest, most challenged schools, K-12.
Winder’s HB212, introduced Thursday, is an incentive program aimed at getting the best teachers into the places they are needed most – poor and troubled schools with struggling students.
The bill is complicated.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8SL

We can’t get used to saying ‘President Trump’
Utah Policy commentary by columnists Bryan Schott and Bob Bernick

We’re back in the House Gallery at the Utah State Capitol for the annual Utah legislative session.
Gov. Gary Herbert delivers his State of the State address. He’s getting better at giving these speeches, and this time he talked about job creation, air quality and liquor laws among other things.
Will Utah get rid of the Zion Curtain? Bob’s not so sure that’s going to happen, even though the law is quite silly.
Utah Republicans are asking President Trump to overturn or reduce the size of the Bears Ears Monument. Plus, we still can’t get used to saying or typing “President Trump.”
Legislators are tackling the budget, but it’s not clear where they are going to find extra money for Utah’s schools.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8SO (video)

Thanks, Mrs. Jacobs, a journalism teacher who deserves her own headline
Salt Lake Tribune commentary by columnist PAUL ROLLY

I never worked on the student newspaper at Skyline High when I attended the school some 50 years ago.
For starters, I didn’t have the grades to be accepted on the Skyline Horizon staff. I also didn’t have the interest. I was just limping toward graduation, daydreaming through lessons or skipping classes altogether.
But I did take an introductory journalism class my senior year. It was a one-semester course that looked like an easy credit.
As I was vegetating at my desk one day, the journalism teacher, Clarann Jacobs, asked me to stay after class for a few minutes. I thought I must be in some sort of trouble, which was usually the case. But she surprised me.
“You have a gift,” she told me. “You have a natural talent for writing. You should think about pursuing that further.”
It may have been the first time a teacher told me I was good at something. I took it to heart and began churning out writing assignments for Mrs. Jacobs.
In hindsight, I’m not sure she really believed I had a gift for writing. I suspect she told me that to make me believe it.
And I did.
That encounter – and her class – inspired me to go into journalism when I was in college and finally get serious about school. That led to a 40-plus-year career at The Salt Lake Tribune.
Mrs. Jacobs, who later became Clarann Larsen through a second marriage, died Monday. The news created an outpouring on social media, with former students gushing about the impact she had on them.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8SR

 

School financing should focus on struggling students
Cache Valley Daily op-ed by Paul Mero, President/CEO of Next Generation Freedom Fund

Should we raise taxes to provide more money for our public school system? Utah has one of the lowest per pupil spending rates in the nation, if not the lowest at times, and yet we seem to do pretty well with what we have. In fact, we seem to do rather exceptionally with what resources we invest. Our per-pupil spending might be low but the overall investment in education is the largest part of our state budget, by far.
But would more money make a difference? The backers of the new funding initiative, Our Schools Now, say more money would make a huge difference and have proposed an increase to the state income tax – in Utah, all income tax goes to education. The Our Schools Now plan “calls for a 7/8 of 1 percent (.008) increase to the personal income tax, which [they predict] would total $750 million; [it would] provide each Utah school with roughly $1000 [more] per enrolled student; and, [it would] require all funding to be spent in ways that increase student learning.”
http://gousoe.uen.org/8Tf

 

Monument and education
Deseret News letter from Paul Mortensen

Utah and the article “Bears Ears designation’s false promises”: How can Utah politicians even want more responsibility for Utah? Even if came with someone else funding it, (which it won’t), Utah’s politicians would treat it the way they have treated the children of Utah. They have said that Utah kids don’t deserve what every other state in the union is providing their children.
A number of years ago, Utah was paying more per child than Mississippi. It didn’t take our Utah politicians long to change that, and our local politicians have provided our children with the least amount of funding of all states. Our local politicians don’t even have a plan to pay as much as Mississippi.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8T6

 

Abstinence-Only Sex Ed Must Go
Daily Utah Chronicle letter from ALISA PATIENCE

During my move to my new apartment, I stumbled across something interesting: my abstinence pledge from junior high. Yes, you read that right. In my junior high health class, everyone was encouraged to sign an abstinence pledge. Abstinence is the practice of restraining from something, with connotation often associated with sex. Abstinence-only sex education, like that put forward in my own health class, is meant to prevent teens in high school from having sex until marriage. The only problem: it doesn’t work.
STD rates in 2016 were up 40 percent in Utah from 2015, according to Deseret News. While this is alarming, it’s not surprising. Abstinence-only sex education fails to educate students about healthy sexual practices and, as a result causes the spread of STIs and teen pregnancy. If you stick a bunch of emotional and hormonally-changing teenagers in a box for four years, it appears sex is inevitable, no matter the religion or current education policy. This doesn’t mean everyone is going out and having sex, but nothing seriously stops those who do.
When you teach abstinence only, you know what you get? Either a bunch of teenagers who are getting married as fast as possible so they can have sex or a great number of uneducated teens having unprotected or risky sexual encounters. Sound familiar, Utah?
http://gousoe.uen.org/8TF

A Look at Trump’s Supreme Court ‘Finalists’ and Education Cases
Education Week analysis by columnist Mark Walsh

President Trump says he will announce his pick for the vacancy on the U.S. Supreme Court on Thursday, Feb. 2. After winnowing his list of 21 possibilities, the president says he is ready to nominate a replacement for the late Justice Antonin Scalia, who died on Feb. 13 last year.
The finalists are now down to three. Or two, or four or five, depending on which account you want to put stock in. So I thought it would be a good time to provide an initial discussion of some of the education-related jurisprudence of those most likely to be named to the high court.
This is not an exhaustive review of education cases, which I will seek to provide for the eventual nominee. But it is meant as an introduction.
The “finalists” are Neil M. Gorsuch, 49, a judge on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 10th Circuit, in Denver; Thomas M. Hardiman, 51, a judge on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 3rd Circuit, in Philadelphia; and William H. Pryor Jr., 54, of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 11th Circuit, in Atlanta.
Two other judges have been mentioned even in recent days as still in the mix. They are Diane S. Sykes, 59, of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 7th Circuit, in Chicago; and Raymond M. Kethledge, 50, of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 6th Circuit, in Cincinnati. Sykes and Pryor were names specifically mentioned by Trump during the presidential campaign.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8T0

 

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NATIONAL NEWS
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As Trump Weighs Fate of Immigrant Students, Schools Ponder Their Roles
Education Week

As President Donald Trump weighs the fate of undocumented youth brought to the United States as children, hundreds of thousands, if not millions, of K-12 children and the educators who serve them are bracing for upheaval.
This week, Trump has already signed executive orders that order construction of a wall on the U.S.-Mexico border, called for stripping federal funding from so-called “sanctuary cities” that shield immigrants, and announced new criteria that could make more undocumented immigrants priorities for deportation. He is also expected to sign an executive order that would suspend legal immigration from majority-Muslim nations such as Syria and Iran.
Denver schools Superintendent Tom Boasberg issued a joint statement on Thursday with officials from the Denver teachers’ union, Padres & Jóvenes Unidos, a children’s advocacy group, and the Colorado Education Association to denounce the moves.
“Immigrant and refugee students, families, educators, and staff are precious members of our Denver school communities and we greatly value them for the contributions they make to our schools and communities. We will do everything in our individual and collective power to protect them from deportation, criminalization, intimidation and harassment,” the statement read in part.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8Tx

 

Sen. Franken: No Democrat will vote for Betsy DeVos as education secretary – and we’re seeking Republicans to oppose her
Washington Post

Sen. Al Franken (D-Minn.) told Rachel Maddow on her MSNBC show Thursday night that no Democrat will vote to confirm Betsy DeVos, the Michigan billionaire tapped by President Trump to be his education secretary. He also said Democrats were actively looking for Republicans to vote against her.
Her supporters praise her for being a longtime advocate of school choice, but her critics say her education advocacy is aimed at privatizing the country’s public education system.
DeVos appeared before the Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor and Pensions last week and fumbled badly, displaying a lack of understanding of key education issues under tough questioning from Democrats.
Since then, opposition to her nomination has been growing. Tens of thousands of people have called or written to senators urging them to vote against her, more than 1 million people have signed petitions, and hundreds of alumni and students from her alma mater, Calvin College, wrote a letter to the legislators saying she was unqualified to be education secretary.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8Ty

 

New Trump Education hire vanishes
Politico

A controversial field organizer for Donald Trump’s campaign appears to have abruptly left her new Education Department job – three days after her hire was announced. Teresa UnRue of Myrtle Beach, S.C., was named in an investigation by The Associated Press last year for sharing racially charged content on social media. POLITICO reported earlier this week that she was on a list of 17 new individuals joining the Trump administration’s Education Department. But updated transition information obtained by POLITICO Thursday shows that UnRue’s name has abruptly vanished from that list of new hires.
It’s unclear what position UnRue, who once said that she would “take a bullet” for Trump, had at the agency. When reached by phone Thursday, UnRue directed questions to the Education Department’s press office. An Education Department spokesman said “the department doesn’t comment on personnel matters.”
http://gousoe.uen.org/8Tz

 

Why Young Girls Don’t Think They Are Smart Enough
New York Times

By the age of 6, young girls are less likely than boys to view their own gender as brilliant.
In our research, published today in the journal Science, we’ve found that girls as young as 6 start to believe that specific activities are “not for them” simply because they think they’re not smart enough. Our research suggests that American children are picking up on cultural stereotypes about brilliance at an early age. Unfortunately, these stereotypes suggest that girls aren’t as smart as boys.
If you try to think of a character in a book or show who is brilliant, you may come up with someone like Sherlock Holmes, Mr. Spock, Sheldon Cooper from “The Big Bang Theory” – or some other man. Of course, there are exceptions, such as Hermione Granger in the Harry Potter series and Lisa Simpson in “The Simpsons.” Most often, though, our cultural stereotypes promote the idea that beingintellectually gifted is a male quality.
Even if parents do not explicitly endorse this stereotype, evidence suggests that it affects their hopes for their children. A 2014 report found that American parents Googled “Is my son a genius?” more than twice as often as they Googled “Is my daughter a genius?”
http://gousoe.uen.org/8SW

http://gousoe.uen.org/8SX (Teen Vogue)

http://gousoe.uen.org/8SZ (CSM)

A copy of the study
http://gousoe.uen.org/8SY (Science)

 

Beyond ‘Just Say No’: schools teacher About Opioid Dangers
Associated Press

TRENTON, N.J. — Schools are going beyond “Just Say No” as they teach students as young as kindergartners about the dangers of opioids in the hope that they don’t later become part of the growing crisis.
Some states have begun requiring instruction about prescription drugs and heroin, and districts are updating their anti-drug teachings to move toward interactive and engaging science-based lessons they hope will save lives.
States including Ohio and New York have passed laws requiring that schools include opioid abuse prevention in health education, and Republican New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie pledged to do the same this month.
“The message will be simple and direct and start in kindergarten,” Christie said, “the medicine in Mom and Dad’s medicine cabinet is not safe for you to use just because a doctor gave it to them.”
http://gousoe.uen.org/8Tv

 

Educational Testing Service acquires assessments company for $127.5M
(Somerset, NJ) NJBIZ

Ewing-based Educational Testing Service announced that it has signed a definitive agreement to acquire Questar Assessment, a leading K-12 assessment solutions provider focused on building a bridge between learning and accountability.
ETS will acquire Questar for approximately $127.5 million, subject to certain adjustments as set forth in the transaction agreement. Holders of Questar common stock are expected to receive approximately $2.80 per share in the transaction.
If the deal is completed, Questar would become a separate, for-profit subsidiary of ETS.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8Tw

 

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CALENDAR
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USBE Calendar
http://www.schools.utah.gov/main/CALENDAR.aspx

USBE Legislative Tracking Sheet
http://www.schools.utah.gov/law/Legislative-Session.aspx

UEN News
http://www.uen.org

January 27:

Retirement and Independent Entities Appropriations Subcommittee meeting
12:15 p.m., 20 House Building
http://le.utah.gov/Interim/2017/html/00000401.htm

Senate Education Committee meeting
2 p.m., 210 Senate Building
http://le.utah.gov/~2017/agenda/SEDU0127.ag.htm

House Political Subdivisions Committee meeting
2 p.m., 450 State Capitol
http://le.utah.gov/~2017/agenda/HPOL0127.ag.htm

House Revenue and Taxation Committee meeting
2 p.m., 445 State Capitol
http://le.utah.gov/~2017/agenda/HREV0127.ag.htm

January 30:

Public Education Appropriations Subcommittee meeting
8 a.m., 445 State Capitol
http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2017&com=APPPED

House Education Committee meeting
2 p.m., 30 House Building
http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?Year=2017&Com=HSTEDU

Executive Appropriations Committee meeting
5:15 p.m., 445 State Capitol
http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?Year=2017&Com=APPEXE

January 31:

Senate Education Committee meeting
4 pm., 210 Senate Building
http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?Year=2017&Com=SSTEDU

February 1:
Public Education Appropriations Subcommittee meeting
8 a.m., 445 State Capitol
http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2017&com=APPPED

February 2:

Utah State Board of Education legislative meeting
Noon; 210 Senate Building
http://www.boarddocs.com/ut/usbe/Board.nsf/Public

February 3:
Public Education Appropriations Subcommittee meeting
8 a.m., 445 State Capitol
http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2017&com=APPPED

February 9:

Utah State Charter School Board meeting
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.schools.utah.gov/charterschools/State-Board.aspx

Utah State Board of Education study session, USDB and committee meetings
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.boarddocs.com/ut/usbe/Board.nsf/Public

February 10:

Utah State Board of Education meeting
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.boarddocs.com/ut/usbe/Board.nsf/Public

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