Education News Roundup: Feb. 7, 2017

The Utah State Capitol at sunset on the final day of the 2012 Legislative SessionToday’s Top Picks:

State revenue estimates aren’t looking too optimistic.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8Zw (DN)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/8Zx (UP)

The bill to keep Utah State Board of Education elections nonpartisan appears to be dead.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8Zy (UP)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/8ZS (SGN)

Sen. Fillmore’s bill on education equity advances.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8ZB (SLT)

Granite District takes a look at its aging schools.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8ZC (DN)

Betsy DeVos confirmed as Education Secretary in a 51-50 vote.
http://gousoe.uen.org/903 (Politico)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/90n (SLT)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/904 (WaPo)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/905 (WSJ)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/90g (NYT)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/906 (USAT)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/909 (Ed Week)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/907 (AP)
and http://gousoe.uen.org/908 (Reuters)

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TODAY’S HEADLINES
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UTAH

State revenue estimates may not go up, Senate budget chairman warns

Non-partisan school board election bill is finished for 2017

Bill to give poor school districts extra money passes first Senate vote

Utah sex ed needs attention, legislators say, but abstinence angle will continue
HB215 defeated » Some Republicans agree Utah children need better instruction and advice on the subject, but party-line vote all but kills proposal.

Survey finds support for Our Schools Now varies with presentation

Granite seeks long-term plan to replace, renovate district’s aging schools

Elementary school’s focus on gratitude brings police to Orem family’s door

Logan High educator awarded Utah biology teacher of the year

United Way of Salt Lake announces 2017 Changemakers

Education association honors managing director at GOED

Utah’s Top Youth Volunteers Of 2017 Selected By National Program
The Prudential Spirit of Community Awards honors Orem and Bountiful students with $1,000, medallions and trip to nation’s capital

Bail increased for Spanish Fork teacher charged with rape for reported sex with student

Logan School District adjusts make-up days

Deadline approaching for new STEAM school enrollment

Cottonwood High opens food pantry for students in need

Bear River Charter School and InTech Collegiate High School to host Student Safety Parent Seminar

How You Can Have Fun While Preparing for College and Beyond
Summer Camp is Aimed at High School Students

K-12 Districts Embrace Performance Matters’ Vision for Student and Educator Growth, Resulting in New Sales and Record Attendance at National Learners Conference

OPINION & COMMENTARY

Sutherland’s Education Vision

Utah high school wrestling needs to reduce classifications, not add another

Tithing for education

Heads in the sand

Differences by Design? Student Composition in Charter Schools with Different Academic Models

NATION

Senate confirms DeVos as secretary of education
The 51-50 vote to confirm DeVos comes after the billionaire philanthropist unexpectedly emerged as the most contentious of any of Trump’s nominees.

The Sensation Known as Betsy DeVos
Never before has an education secretary aroused so much controversy. Could her confirmation be a boon for schools?

DeVos foes now claiming her policies could ‘kill children,’ ruin public schools

States’ ESSA Plans Now Entering the Legislative Phase

Big Stakes for K-12 as Federal Budget Process Gears Up

New Autopsy of inBloom Re-ignites Old Debates About Sharing Student Data

‘Uber for Substitutes’ Promises to Enrich Learning When the Teacher Is Away

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UTAH NEWS
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State revenue estimates may not go up, Senate budget chairman warns

SALT LAKE CITY — New revenue estimates expected next week may be a wash, Senate Budget Chairman Jerry Stevenson warned Monday as lawmakers began passing base budget bills adding up to $15.1 billion.
“I’m not going to give anyone any encouragement the floodgates are opening,” Stevenson, R-Layton, told reporters when asked whether tax collections are likely to grow beyond the $287 million already forecast in new ongoing money.
What’s anticipated, the new budget boss said, is “maybe a little bit more” in income tax collections that go to pay for public education, while the sales tax collections that make up the bulk of the state’s general fund may “not do so well.”
Stevenson said that means lawmakers shouldn’t be counting on more money to spend, especially since the revenue growth already projected will likely all go toward boosting the funding mechanism for schools, pay increases and other needs.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8Zw (DN)

http://gousoe.uen.org/8Zx (UP)

 

Non-partisan school board election bill is finished for 2017

It appears the Utah House will not hear a bill that would make the State Board of Education elections non-partisan.
HB151 by Rep. Raymond Ward, R-Bountiful, would take the 2018 board elections back to nominees not representing a political party.
There is a long history – both legal and political – in this battle.
And last year the GOP majority, over objections of the Democrats, passed a law saying the 2016 State Board of Education elections would be non-partisan. But after that, starting in 2018, candidates would run under the banner of political parties, or as independents, if they wished.
Twice now, the House Rules Committee has refused to send Ward’s bill to a hearing for a committee. After the third such rejection, Rules members are not supposed to suggest again that a bill be sent out for a mandatory hearing – and the bill is basically dead.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8Zy (UP)

http://gousoe.uen.org/8ZS (SGN)

 

Bill to give poor school districts extra money passes first Senate vote

A proposal to set aside funding for Utah’s poorest school districts earned early Senate approval on Monday.
By a preliminary 20-8 vote, Senators advanced SB80, which would capture one-third of annual education spending increases in order to incrementally raise the funding floor for public schools.
Bill sponsor Sen. Lincoln Fillmore, R-South Jordan, said the bill is necessary to address the disparity in local property tax revenue, which is used by districts to supplement state dollars.
School district boundaries drawn by the Legislature, he said, have created a situation in which 70 percent of Utah students attend schools with below-average funding.
“Some school districts have ski resorts and lakes and others have vast desert that the federal government uses for target practice,” Fillmore said. “We created this problem and we need to solve that problem on a statewide basis.”
But critics say the proposal aims at equalization by eroding an already equalized funding source, the weighted pupil unit, or WPU.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8ZB (SLT)

 

Utah sex ed needs attention, legislators say, but abstinence angle will continue
HB215 defeated » Some Republicans agree Utah children need better instruction and advice on the subject, but party-line vote all but kills proposal.

Utah schools will continue to teach an abstinence-based sexual education curriculum after a bill to allow comprehensive instruction was defeated in committee.
Despite several Republican lawmakers saying sex education in Utah needs improvement, the House Education Committee voted 12-2 along party lines to reject HB215, sponsored by Rep. Brian King, D-Salt Lake City.
“I’m not ready to go here yet,” said Rep. Eric Hutchings, R-Kearns. “But I’m not ready to stop yet because things are broken.”
The committee also declined to vote on a bill by Rep. Keven Stratton, R-Orem, that would have allowed schools to determine whether prior consent of a parent should be required for children to participate in a new abuse prevention course.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8Zz (SLT)

http://gousoe.uen.org/8ZA (DN)

http://gousoe.uen.org/8ZJ (OSE)

http://gousoe.uen.org/8ZK (PDH)

http://gousoe.uen.org/8ZN (LHJ)

http://gousoe.uen.org/90l (SGN)

http://gousoe.uen.org/8ZT (UPC)

http://gousoe.uen.org/8ZV (KUTV)

http://gousoe.uen.org/8ZX (KTVX)

http://gousoe.uen.org/8ZZ (KSL)

http://gousoe.uen.org/900 (KSTU)

http://gousoe.uen.org/901 (KUER)

http://gousoe.uen.org/902 (MUR)

 

Survey finds support for Our Schools Now varies with presentation

A new study shows support for the Our Schools Now initiative to increase educational spending varies with how the idea is presented to voters.
The business-led initiative would increase the state’s income tax rate from 5 percent to 5.875 percent and generate about $750 million in public education funding in the first year.
Faced with the less than 1 percent increase, 50 percent of those surveyed supported the initiative and 45 percent were against it.
The study, conducted by the Trafalgar Group, was commissioned by the Libertas Institute and the Utah chapter of Americans for Prosperity, according to a news release.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8ZI (OSE)

 

Granite seeks long-term plan to replace, renovate district’s aging schools

SOUTH SALT LAKE — If the walls of many of Granite School District’s schools could talk, the topics would likely resonate with baby boomers: the specter of the Cold War, the civil rights movement, the growing popularity of rock ‘n’ roll and the wonder of space travel.
That’s because 44 of the district’s schools are more than 50 years old. A couple even date back to the 1930s.
Not only are the buildings showing their age, ongoing facility reports by engineers indicate they require costly repairs and renovations, which can include replacing heating, cooling and lighting systems to major structural upgrades.
Sixteen of Granite District’s elementary schools, four of its junior highs and the Brockbank campus of Cyprus High School each meet a threshold that 85 percent of the building needs repairs or renovation, according to the reports.
Beyond systems overhauls, many schools need significant security and seismic upgrades.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8ZC (DN)

Elementary school’s focus on gratitude brings police to Orem family’s door

When Gina Rex, a 9-year-old from Orem, wrote a letter expressing her gratitude to the Orem Police Department she likely didn’t expect several officers to show up at her door.
But they did and wanted to thank her for her sweet note, which was one of several suggestions on how to express gratitude that came from teachers at Gina’s school.
“It wasn’t something required,” Gina’s mother, Grace Rex, said. “It was something that gave her an opportunity to show gratitude, but it wasn’t forced. That’s what made it genuine.”
Gina attends Scera Park Elementary in Orem, where the school has sorted each student into one of five different houses based around important character traits they hope to help their students develop.
Principal Lori Bellitti said they decided to do this to ensure that each student leaves the school not just smarter, but as a more well-rounded individual.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8ZM (PDH)

 

Logan High educator awarded Utah biology teacher of the year

The Utah Science Teachers Association has recognized Logan High School educator Shaunda Wenger as the Outstanding Biology Teacher of the Year.
Wenger said she credits the award to both her day-to-day teaching style and her collaboration with the USU STARS! Gear Up program, which connects students with projects that aren’t part of the regular curriculum. Gear Up has allowed some of her students to collect data on monarch butterflies and experiment on radish seeds that were sent in space.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8ZO (LHJ)

 

United Way of Salt Lake announces 2017 Changemakers

SALT LAKE CITY — The United Way of Salt Lake announced it will honor three individuals and one organization with its United for Change Changemaker award.
The honorees, who will be recognized during a breakfast on March 16, are Kurt Micka, executive director of Utah Partners for Health; state Sen. Ann Millner, R-Odgen; Kearns High School Principal Maile Loo; and Silicon Slopes’ Startup Santa program.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8ZG (DN)

 

Education association honors managing director at GOED

SALT LAKE CITY — Benjamin Hart, managing director of Urban and Rural Business Services at the Governor’s Office of Economic of Development, has been named the Utah Association for Career and Technical Education Champion of the Year.
Education leaders recognized Hart at a recent awards ceremony at Orem High School.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8ZH (DN)

 

Utah’s Top Youth Volunteers Of 2017 Selected By National Program
The Prudential Spirit of Community Awards honors Orem and Bountiful students with $1,000, medallions and trip to nation’s capital

SALT LAKE CITY — Rebekah Reno, 16, of Orem and Kara Hughes, 13, of Bountiful today were named Utah’s top two youth volunteers of 2017 by The Prudential Spirit of Community Awards, a nationwide program honoring young people for outstanding acts of volunteerism. As State Honorees, Rebekah and Kara each will receive $1,000, an engraved silver medallion and an all-expense-paid trip in early May to Washington, D.C., where they will join the top two honorees from each of the other states and the District of Columbia for four days of national recognition events. During the trip, 10 students will be named America’s top youth volunteers of 2017.
The Prudential Spirit of Community Awards, now in its 22nd year, is conducted by Prudential Financial in partnership with the National Association of Secondary School Principals (NASSP).
http://gousoe.uen.org/90j (PR Newswire)

Bail increased for Spanish Fork teacher charged with rape for reported sex with student

Rather than reducing bail for a teacher charged with raping one of her students, a Fourth District Court judge increased her bail Monday, citing her as a “danger to society.”
Sarah Lewis, 27, a former teacher at Landmark High School, stood before Judge Samuel McVey as her attorney, Mark Woodbury, argued for a reduction from her $5,000 cash-only bail.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8ZL (PDH)

 

Logan School District adjusts make-up days

Just days after the Cache County School District announced how it will be making up lost school days because of January’s weather, the Logan City School District has also announced its changes.
According to Superintendent Frank Schofield, deciding how to make the schedules work has been a challenge his district has not seen before.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8ZQ (CVD)

 

Deadline approaching for new STEAM school enrollment

CEDAR CITY — Anyone who regularly drives down 200 North in Cedar City has witnessed the progress of the new Cedar North Elementary School building. As construction of this state-of-the-art science, technology, engineering, arts and math – or STEAM – school nears completion, open enrollment is being held for the 2017-18 school year, with a deadline of Feb. 20.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8ZR (SGN)

 

Cottonwood High opens food pantry for students in need

Salt Lake City — Cottonwood High School students held Souper Bowl of Caring events, raising $11,300 in cash and collecting 4,500 cans to open a new food pantry inside the school. Poverty numbers at Cottonwood continue to climb. The students and administrators heard about the success of a similar pantry at Granger HS and they decided to act.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8ZW (KUTV)

 

Bear River Charter School and InTech Collegiate High School to host Student Safety Parent Seminar

Partnering for the third year, Bear River Charter School and InTech Collegiate High School will hold an annual Student Safety Parent Seminar on Thursday, Feb. 9, at 6:00 p.m. to discuss a sensitive but important topic—suicide prevention. Presenters will include prevention specialists Becky Austad and Shauna Morgan, with the Northern Utah Hope task force (NUHOPE), and Cathy Davis, representing the Utah State Board of Education. The meeting will take place at Bear River Charter School, located at 75 S. 400 W. in Logan. Parents of students attending both schools are encouraged to participate.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8ZP (CVD)

How You Can Have Fun While Preparing for College and Beyond
Summer Camp is Aimed at High School Students

Young American Innovators is hosting The Innovation Challenge on June 21-23. It’s a summer camp in Salt Lake County where students explore their strengths, compete with other students in a category of their choice, win scholarships and prizes, and have a lot of fun!
Todd Davis, president of Young American Innovators, Kimberly Davis and Brittany Mangum talk more about the program.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8ZY (KTVX)

 

K-12 Districts Embrace Performance Matters’ Vision for Student and Educator Growth, Resulting in New Sales and Record Attendance at National Learners Conference

SANDY, Utah–Since Truenorthlogic and Performance Matters merged last year, the combined company has been leading the charge to connect student and educator growth to support a cycle of continuous improvement. The new company has clearly struck a chord with K-12 educators.
In 2016, Performance Matters’ client roster grew by more than 33 percent as school districts across the United States have embraced its forward-thinking, data-driven approach to student and professional learning. Today, more than 400 educators from schools and school districts are coming together in Buena Vista, Fla. to discover and share best practices for harnessing the power of data at the Performance Matters National Learners Conference.
http://gousoe.uen.org/90k (Business Wire)

 

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OPINION & COMMENTARY
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Sutherland’s Education Vision
Sutherland Institute commentary by Christine Cooke, education policy analyst

Reform requires vision. Leaders who want to transform education must know where they want to go and why they want to go there. They spread their vision by elevating public dialogue to the level of values, principles and ideals – the “attainment of the highest things.” They avoid the temptation to only oppose bad ideas without offering bold new ones, recognizing that without the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia, the Boston Tea Party would not have been even a footnote in history. To this end, Sutherland Institute offers its vision for education: how we view human learning, what we believe to be the purpose of education, and what education should look like once it is transformed.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8ZU

 

Utah high school wrestling needs to reduce classifications, not add another
Deseret News op-ed by Brian Preece, head wrestling coach at Provo High School from 1994-2006

High school wrestling: State championships are here at last
Next school year, the Utah High School Athletic Association will increase to six classifications. Many see this as necessary, while others look at six classifications as unnecessary for a state the size of Utah. It seems especially ridiculous for wrestling, and the data shows it.
Utah has quality wrestling programs and wrestlers. For example, Wasatch is nationally ranked and placed high in two prestigious out-of-state tournaments. Box Elder’s Brock Hardy, a junior two-time state champion, is arguably the best wrestler in the country for his weight class, with a national title in Greco-Roman this past summer.
Unfortunately, having five classifications has diluted the competition and, for the best wrestlers, creates an easy road to divisional and state championships.
http://gousoe.uen.org/90m

 

Tithing for education
Salt Lake Tribune letter from Lynn Jensen

I was born here, educated at the University of Utah and pay my boatload of taxes. I’m not LDS, which brings me to my specific issue: education in Utah. We have about 633,900 students in Utah. It is a published fact that Utah is dead last on the amount it spends per student. The national average is $11,000. We spend $6,500. And it shows. We’re ranked 32nd in the nation with a grade of C-.
Now, if we use some light statistics, all from published sources, the median household income in Utah is $62,912. The average size of a Utah household is four people. Utah’s population is 3,100,000, of whom approximately 55 percent are LDS. Of those 55 percent, approximately 45 percent have temple recommends, which means they’ve paid 10 percent of their income to the LDS Church, pre any Utah taxes. If we do the math, we come to see that over $1,443,956,381 goes straight to the church. Utah gets none of it.
If we were to take those tithing dollars and apply them to education, (do the math) we’d add $2,277 additional dollars per student, bringing us up to to at least mid-level in spending.
http://gousoe.uen.org/8ZE

 

Heads in the sand
Salt Lake Tribune letter from Fred Ash

In a Jan. 8 Tribune op-ed (“DeVos is a smart choice for education”), Mitt Romney wrote that “more teachers and more pay … is demonstrably not the answer” to the public education problem.
Then, in the same article, he wrote, “the qualities and educational attainment of the teachers were most important.”
Then in a Feb. 1 editorial in the Deseret News on Utah education reform, we read that “class size is not as important in changing per-pupil performance as the quality of the teacher at the head of the classroom.”
Do these writers have their heads in the sand? Can’t they see even in their own words the self-contradiction?
http://gousoe.uen.org/8ZF

 

Differences by Design? Student Composition in Charter Schools with Different Academic Models
American Enterprise Institute analysis by Nat Malkus and Jenn Hatfield

The charter school movement is premised on the idea that, if independent operators create differentiated and innovative schooling options, families will benefit from making meaningful choices among those options that reflect their preferences. Charters are freed from many of the constraints traditional public schools face, allowing them to implement distinct academic models, school cultures, or curricular focuses that appeal to a subset of families. The consistent growth of charter schools, which now constitute one in 14 public schools nationwide, provides some evidence of the popularity of these options. However, it has been difficult to gauge how much differentiation there is in charter school models nationwide and how substantive it is.
This paper attempts to shed light on these questions. Looking at charter schools across the nation, we use the content on charter schools’ websites to identify their academic models. Nearly half of charter schools had a specialized academic model, and these were further divided into a dozen specific categories. These nonexclusive categories included no-excuses schools, schools focused on arts or STEM education, and schools focused on vocational education.
http://gousoe.uen.org/90i

 

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NATIONAL NEWS
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Senate confirms DeVos as secretary of education
The 51-50 vote to confirm DeVos comes after the billionaire philanthropist unexpectedly emerged as the most contentious of any of Trump’s nominees.
Politico

Vice President Mike Pence on Tuesday cast a historic tie-breaking vote in the Senate to seal Betsy DeVos’ confirmation as the next Education secretary, ending an unusually contentious fight over a Cabinet post that has traditionally enjoyed bipartisan support.
The 51-50 vote to confirm DeVos comes after the billionaire philanthropist and GOP megadonor unexpectedly emerged as the most contentious of any of President Donald Trump’s Cabinet nominees.
http://gousoe.uen.org/903

http://gousoe.uen.org/90n (SLT)

http://gousoe.uen.org/904 (WaPo)

http://gousoe.uen.org/905 (WSJ)

http://gousoe.uen.org/90g (NYT)

http://gousoe.uen.org/906 (USAT)

http://gousoe.uen.org/909 (Ed Week)

http://gousoe.uen.org/907 (AP)

http://gousoe.uen.org/908 (Reuters)

 

The Sensation Known as Betsy DeVos
Never before has an education secretary aroused so much controversy. Could her confirmation be a boon for schools?
Atlantic

A 40-second scene on Saturday Night Live this past weekend featuring Kate McKinnon as the beleaguered Betsy DeVos, now the nation’s education secretary, blew up almost instantly on social media. The scene could’ve easily been just a blip, buried within the remarkable skit that had the affable Melissa McCarthy playing the role of Sean Spicer, the White House’s pugnacious press secretary. But McKinnon’s cameo as DeVos made its own headlines.
Perhaps it was because the SNL comedian so flawlessly, and efficiently, embodied the most glaring criticisms of the Michigan billionaire-turned-Cabinet member. McKinnon’s DeVos failed to answer a reporter’s question about growth versus proficiency, as DeVos did during her confirmation hearing; McKinnon responded that she doesn’t “know anything about school.” She alluded to her desire to funnel public-education money into private schools, namely Christian ones. And she finished off with DeVos’s now-infamous comment about the need for guns on campus to protect students from grizzly bears.
But perhaps another reason the skit was so noteworthy was because it highlighted issues—and, indeed, a Cabinet position—that typically only garner the interest of those deeply embedded in the education world.
“All us education nerds were on Twitter saying, ‘Whoa, there was an education secretary being spoofed on SNL!’ That says it all, right?” said Joshua Starr, the CEO of PDK International, a professional educators’ association, and the former superintendent of Montgomery County Schools in Maryland.
http://gousoe.uen.org/90f

 

DeVos foes now claiming her policies could ‘kill children,’ ruin public schools
Fox

‏ If her critics are to be believed, Education Secretary nominee Betsy DeVos is a danger to special education, could end public schooling and has plans that “will kill children.”
Think that’s hyperbole?
“That is not an exaggeration in any sense,” tweeted Vanity Fair film critic Richard Lawson, who fired off a series of tweets early Tuesday arguing that DeVos’ confirmation would be deadly for “queer and other at-risk kids” – because of DeVos’ support for voucher programs.
http://gousoe.uen.org/90h

 

States’ ESSA Plans Now Entering the Legislative Phase
Education Week

As state legislative sessions forge ahead, you’ll start to see states’ Every Student Succeeds Act accountability plans vetted by lawmakers as the new law requires.
Unlike for waivers from ESSA’s predecessor, the No Child Left Behind Act, or applications for the Race to the Top program, the federal government requires state boards of education to show that state education agencies have conducted “meaningful” consultation with state legislatures over their ESSA plans. In addition, governors have 30 days to review a plan before it’s submitted to the federal Department of Education.
The meaningful consultation clause is one both the National Conference of State Legislatures and the National Governors Association pushed for after the battles over the Common Core State Standards led to many state politicians complaining that the standards were implemented without their knowledge.
Other than giving ESSA plans widespread political support, there are some more-technical benefits to having ESSA plans vetted by legislators, Michelle Exstrom, NCSL’s education program director told me on the phone Monday.
http://gousoe.uen.org/90a

 

Big Stakes for K-12 as Federal Budget Process Gears Up
Education Week

Congressional Republicans and President Donald Trump, aiming to break years of fiscal gridlock, could make significant changes to the U.S. Department of Education’s budget—changes that might include major cuts. There are conflicting signals about whether they’ll impose big cuts that hit students in special education, educators in teacher training, and other beneficiaries of federal education programs.
Budget sequestration, the mandated caps on spending that have defined the fiscal environment in Washington in recent years, may not make the headlines it used to. But lawmakers still have to decide if they want to end that constraint for education and other domestic programs—and if so, how those budgets will look for what’s left of fiscal 2017 and for fiscal 2018, which begins Oct. 1.
Dramatic reductions in spending appear possible. A recent report from The Hill newspaper indicated that a 2017 budget blueprint from the Heritage Foundation, a leading policy voice on the political right, could form the basis for the Trump administration’s fiscal 2018 budget.
http://gousoe.uen.org/90b

 

New Autopsy of inBloom Re-ignites Old Debates About Sharing Student Data
Education Week

Three years after its demise, inBloom is still exposing the wildly different ways that proponents and skeptics view education technology and educational data use.
Last week, the New York City-based research center Data & Society released a new report examining the quick rise and stunning fall of the nonprofit student-data-management effort. Launched in 2013 with $100 million from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and the Carnegie Corporation of New York, the initiative shut down its operations a year later, in April 2014.
Based on interviews with 18 key actors, “The Legacy of inBloom” is a must-read for those interested in a detailed, insider account of what went wrong—and why ambitious ed-tech initiatives often fail to take root.
Perhaps unintentionally, the report— and the early reaction it has stirred—also reveal how data-sharing believers still struggle to make sense of the vocal opposition their efforts provoke.
http://gousoe.uen.org/90c

The Legacy of inBloom
http://gousoe.uen.org/90d (Data & Society)

 

‘Uber for Substitutes’ Promises to Enrich Learning When the Teacher Is Away
Education Week

Do students receive the same quality of learning when their teacher is out?
One veteran teacher, frustrated with the amount of movies and busy work she saw in classes with substitute teachers, has come up with a solution that Harvard Ed. magazine refers to as “Uber for substitute teachers.” Her startup, Parachute Teachers, is a way to support high-quality substitutes to do more than pass out worksheets or struggle to implement a hastily prepared lesson plan.
Her concept: Have professionals in the community—a computer scientist, a chef, a musician, a graduate student, and so on—”parachute” into the classroom and teach something they’re passionate about. The idea, founder Sarah Cherry Rice says, is to promote authentic learning in classrooms, even when the teacher is away.
http://gousoe.uen.org/90e

 

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CALENDAR
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USBE Calendar
http://www.schools.utah.gov/main/CALENDAR.aspx

USBE Legislative Tracking Sheet
http://www.schools.utah.gov/law/Legislative-Session.aspx

UEN News
http://www.uen.org

February 7:

Public Education Appropriations Subcommittee meeting
8 a.m., 445 State Capitol
http://le.utah.gov/Interim/2017/html/00001108.htm

Senate Economic Development and Workforce Services Committee meeting
3 p.m., 215 Senate Building
http://le.utah.gov/~2017/agenda/SEDW0207.ag.htm

Senate Revenue and Taxation Committee meeting
3 p.m., 250 Senate Building
http://le.utah.gov/~2017/agenda/SREV0207.ag.htm

House Judiciary Committee meeting
3:40 p.m., 20 House Building
http://le.utah.gov/~2017/agenda/HJUD0207.ag.htm

House Transportation Committee meeting
3:40 p.m., 450 State Capitol
http://le.utah.gov/~2017/agenda/HTRA0207.ag.htm

February 8:
Senate Retirement and Independent Entities Committee meeting
1 p.m., 250 Senate Building
http://le.utah.gov/~2017/agenda/SRIE0208.ag.htm

House Political Subdivisions Committee meeting
3 p.m., 450 State Capitol
http://le.utah.gov/~2017/agenda/HPOL0208.ag.htm

February 9:

Utah State Charter School Board meeting
9 a.m., 250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.schools.utah.gov/charterschools/State-Board.aspx

Utah State Board of Education study session, USDB and committee meetings
1 p.m., 250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.boarddocs.com/ut/usbe/Board.nsf/Public

February 10:

tah State Board of Education meeting
8 a.m., 250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.boarddocs.com/ut/usbe/Board.nsf/Public

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